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Hope College Anchor Official Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland, Michigan

Dr. J. R. Mulder will Speak Sarospatak Drive Initiated Today At Baccalaureate Service On Sunday, J u n e 6, a t 7:30 P. M.. the Class of '48 will assemble f o r the Baccalaureate service in t h e Hope Memorial Chapel. Dr. J o h n R. Mulder, President of Western Theological Seminary, will present t h e central address, entitled "Liberty Through Discipline." Dr. Mulder was g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope College with an A.B. degree in 1917. He was a w a r d e d the Regent Fellowship to t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan and continued his studies to receive his M a s t e r ' s degree in Philosophy in 1918. In 1921 he was g r a d u a t e d f r o m W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y with the B.D. degree.

By s t u d e n t request, a c a m p u s clothing drive f o r S a r o s p a t a k will s t a r t t o d a y a t noon and continue t h r o u g h next week. All articles of clothing and shoes a r e needed. The s a l a r y of a H u n g a r i a n is t w o hundred dollars a month. A suit of clothes is priced a t sixteen hundred d o l l a r s and a pair of shoes a t six hundred dollars. A c o m m u n i t y clothing drive was held on T u e s d a y and Wednesday of this week. A g r o u p of Hope s t u d e n t s c a n v a s s e d the town. C a r t o n s to receive clothing will be placed in each of the dormitories and in Van R a a l t e Hall.

Office Locations ^Vill Change Soon

Upon leaving his s e m i n a r y Dr. Mulder accepted a position as Prof e s s o r of Bible and Philosophy a t Central College, Pella, Iowa, and he served t h e r e until 1924. In the s p r i n g of t h a t y e a r Dr. Mulder assumed the p a s t o r a t e of t h e Bethany R e f o r m e d Church in Chicago, Illinois. In 1928 the s e m i n a r y f r o m which he had g r a d u a t e d called him back to become p r o f e s s o r of Practical Theology.

P r e s i d e n t L u b b e r s recently announced t h a t t h e r e will be several c h a n g e s made in the office location of college personnel. Dean of Men Hinga and Dean of College Hollenbach will move f r o m t h e i r p r e s e n t locations to occupy t h e f o r m e r V e t e r a n s ' Administration office. Dr. Raymond, Business M a n a g e r , will establish his office at the site of Dean Hollenbach's f o r m e r office. Several o t h e r r e a r r a n g e m e n t s will be made.

Since 1928 he has also served the W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y in Dr. John K. Mulder the C h a i r of S y s t e m a t i c Theology and in his present executive capacity. F r o m 1932 until 1936 Dr. Mulder served as editor of the denomination's periodical, T H E INAt the Honors Assembly this TELLIGENCER-LEADER, w h o s e morning, the Publications commitname was later c h a n g e d to T H E tee made the Anchor a w a r d s . CHURCH HERALD. A gold key w a s given to Renze The chapel choir will present the Members of P a l e t t e and Masque, L. Hoeksema a s Editor-in-Chief and musical background f o r the service Hope's D r a m a t i c Club, last night silver keys w e r e given to H e r m a n under t h e direction of Miss Hazel Ridder, Carolyn I n g h a m , Robert presented Miss M e t t a Ross of the Paalman. Wildman, J o s e p h Palmer, Virginia faculty with a lovely c o r s a g e and a life-time pass to its productions, Hemmes, Helen Wagner and Matthew Otte. Howard Koop w a s as a token of t h e i r special esteem awarded a dictionary. for the f o u n d e r of the society. The College E v e r s h a r p pencils were occasion w a s the annual S p r i n g awarded to Richard Hoebeke, Ma- Banquet honoring m e m b e r s for rie B u t t l a r , Marion H a n n a , Don their o u t s t a n d i n g contributions to At a recent m o r n i n g assembly, Vanden Berg, Betty Boelkins, Lois P&M. senior honors were a w a r d e d to ten DeKleine, Dorothy Davis, and Ruth Those receiving J u n i o r a w a r d s of the g r a d u a t i n g seniors. These Ruys. were A n n e t t e Cousins, William s t u d e n t s were selected by t h e Hope Richard Brown, Roger Kempers, Giles, S a n d r a Lanning, Richard f a c u l t y because they felt they had and Ted F l a h e r t y received Anchor Leonard, Connie McConnell, Suzelgiven g r e a t e s t promise of achievpins. len Roest, Marilyn Wolbrink, and ing signal success in t h e i r chosen O t h e r s on the staff were given J a c k Boeskool. professions. Anchor lapel buttons. Those receivThose who received A w a r d s and Those receiving the h o n o r s were ing b u t t o n s w e r e J a n e t Pfeiffer, Degrees were Marie B u t t l a r , DougDonald Buteyn, A l f r e d Pennings, Alice Moolenaar, Alida Hibma, las Cameron, Dorothy Davis, Roger Willard Curtis, Allan D y k s t r a , Betty De Ryke, Claire Leffingwell, Gunn, Marion H a n n a , Irene HeemJ o h n Ligtvoet, M a r j o r i e Lucking, Hazel V a n d e r Woude, Ruth Quant, s t r a , Russell Horton, Olga Kilian, Helen W a g n e r , Donald Mulder, Al- W a l t e r S t u d d i f o r d , Ruth De G r a a f , Raymond Martin, Man-in Mepyans, ma V a n d e r Hill and Renze L. Janice V a n d e r Borgh, Nancy Vy- Andrew T j e p k e m a , E d w a r d DunHoeksema. verberg, J o a n Ten Hoeve, Dolores ning, and Mary Voskuil. Those selected were invited as Thomas, W a l t e r Boerman, Richard Special g u e s t s at the dinner were g u e s t s of the f a c u l t y at a luncheon Leonard, Bob Hill, Richard John- President and Mrs, Lubbers, Dean held at the W a r m F r i e n d hotel. son, Roderick Kerr, Beverly Bame, and Mrs. Hollenbach, Dr. and Mrs. Alicia Van Zoeren, Mary Van Loo, William S c h r i e r , P r o f e s s o r and Toni Fredricks, Sally Schrier, Eve- Mrs. Clyde Geerlings and Mrs. E. lyn Van Dam, Dona S l u y t e r , Mary S. Avison. Lou Hepp, Pierce Maassen, and Charles Previte.

De Graaf Makes Anchor Awards

Miss Ross Honored As P o M ' s Founder

Faculty Picks Ten For Senior Honors

Dr. Blocker Names Pastoral Charges

Dr. Simon Blocker, p r o f e s s o r of Homiletics at W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y r e c e n t l y released the n a m e s of the Hope s t u d e n t s who have been given s u m m e r pastoral appointments. Those being named by Dr. Blocke r were J o h n Smith who will do work in Macy, N e b r a s k a , Donald Buteyn who will t a k e up duties at Antelope Valley, M a r i e t t a , Minnesota, and William Bennett who will do m i g r a n t work. O t h e r s t u d e n t s f r o m the college will do occasional p r e a c h i n g during the s u m m e r but no o t h e r full-time a p p o i n t m e n t s have been made.

Bible Department Releases Winners Rev. E u g e n e O s t e r h a v e n , head of the Bible D e p a r t m e n t , presented t h e w i n n e r s of the Bible contest a t t h i s m o r n i n g ' s assembly. Roger G. S h a f e r won t h e f i r s t price in the F r e s h m a n Bible cont e s t . Second prize w a s given to R i c h a r d C. Downs. In the Sophomore Bible contest, H e r m a n J . Ridder placed f i r s t and Carolyn R. Heckeler second. P a u l E . Hinkamp, J r . w a s a w a r d e d f i r s t prize in the J u n i o r contest and J a m e s H . S t e g e m a n received second. In each contest, the f i r s t p r i z e a m o u n t s to f i f t e e n dollars and the second prize was w o r t h ten dollars. T h e Senior prize will be a w a r d e d a t commencement. The F o r e i g n Missions prize was also a w a r d e d by Rev. O s t e r h a v e n . T h e prize, which consists of t w e n t y f i v e dollars, w e n t to H e r m a n J . Ridder.

EX A MIN A T I O N SCH EI) I L E .May 28 — J u n e 4 May 2* ( F r i d a y ) 1 'IT and I TTS - T T und 2 I T S

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.May 29 ( S a t u r d a y ) 10:00 J u n e I (Turtiday) i»:00 1:10 Mod. 3:30 June 2 y:00

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3 MWF F o r . Lan«uuj{i-» EK-m. & 2 n d y r . 5 TT

( Wrdiusday)

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June 3 (Thursday) 9:00 3 T T und 3 T T S 1 : 0 0 ... 1 MWF 3:30 T M W F and 6 TT June 4 (Friday) 9:00 B i b l e 11 a n d B i b l e 31 1:00 2 MWF 3:30 6 MWF A l l e x a m i n a t i o n H will be g i v e n o n t h e d a t e w h e d u l e d a n d at n o o t h e r t i m e . S t u d e n t * a r e not permitted to m a k e i|>eciul a r r a n g e m e n t * w i t h i n s t r u c t o r s . A n y i r r e g u l a r i t i e * m u s t be a p p r o v e d by t h e d e a n of t h e c o l l e g e .

Alpha Chi Chooses De Loot President

G e r a r d De Loof, a m e m b e r of the J u n i o r class hailing f r o m Richland, Michigan, was elected president of A l p h a Chi f o r the coming school t e r m a t an election held recently. The new vice-president is W a l t e r Kline, while H o w a r d Newton was elected t r e a s u r e r . Next fall, a F r e s h m a n will be chosen to act as S e c r e t a r y . On T h u r s d a y evening, May 20th, a d i n n e r meeting w a s held in the Temple building a t which Dr. J o h n Kuizenga, retired Princeton Semi n a r y P r o f e s s o r and E x - P r e s i d e n t of W e s t e r n S e m i n a r y , was the main s p e a k e r . Special music was f u r n i s h e d by a q u a r t e t composed of W a l t e r Kline, A r t V a n Eck, Don Boss and E a r l E c k e r so n .

May 27, 1948

Commencement Exercises Feature Kuizenga Address Alumni Proclaim Dr. Steggerda As Banquet Speaker

Milestone Distribution Slated For Next Week Owen Koeppe, editor of this y e a r ' s Milestone, announced today t h a t in all probability the Milestones would be r e a d y f o r distribution a b o u t the middle of next week. E d i t o r Koeppe s t a t e d t h a for some t i m e t h e r e has been diificulty in a c q u i r i n g m a t e r i a l s but t h a t he was hopeful f o r a distribution before Hopeites l e f t f o r home.

Scholarships Won By Music Majors P r o f e s s o r Robert C a v a n a u g h to-" day announced the w i n n e r s of the music scholarships. These a w a r d s a r e made only to m e m b e r s of the junior and senior class. The Browning Scholarship in Voice was a w a r d e d t o M a r j e r y Angus, a sophomore f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. The scholarship is f o r one lesson per week t h r o u g h out the y e a r or two lessons per week f o r one s e m e s t e r . H e r b e r t R i t s e m a , a sophomore f r o m Momence, Illinois, received the scholarship in piano. This a w a r d is given on t h e s a m e basis as t h e B r o w n i n g Scholarship in t h a t the s t u d e n t m u s t have been in residence a t Hope f o r two years and m u s t have m a i n t a i n e d a good general academic record. The scholarship in o r g a n was given to Miss F r a n c e s Rose, a sophomore hailing f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. This scholarship, also, is given on the s a m e basis as the B r o w n i n g Scholarship.

Four Students Join Pi Kappa Delta Ranks F o u r new m e m b e r s w e r e initiated into Pi K a p p a Delta, national hono r a r y forensic f r a t e r n i t y , a t ceremonies T u e s d a y a f t e r n o o n . May 18, in Van R a a l t e 104. The meeting was conducted by P e t e r J . Breen, r e t i r i n g p r e s i d e n t , and J e a n Watson, vice-president. The initiates w e r e : Nelson S t e g e m a n , Kenneth Weller, Floyd Goulooze, and Dennis S h o e m a k e r . Election of officers f o r next y e a r resulted as follows: Henry S h a w , p r e s i d e n t ; Harvey Moes, vice-president; Dennis Shoem a k e r , secretary-treasurer, and Floyd Goulooze, M a n a g e r of Forensics. Dr. William Schrier, faculty sponsor, addressed the group briefly following the ceremonies, and outlined plans for next year's activities.

Speech Dept. Releases Winners At the H o n o r s Assembly this morning, t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Speech made its a n n u a l a w a r d s . A w a r d s were presented by Dr. Schrier. The Adelaide Prize in O r a t o r y , consisting of twenty-five dollars, was a w a r d e d to Miss Dona Sluyter. The A.A. Raven Prize in O r a t o r y was a w a r d e d to Donald Buteyn who won first prize and t h i r t y dollars. The second prize of t w e n t y dollars was given to William D y k s t r a . Those receiving t h e J . A c k e r m a n Coles D e b a t i n g prize, ( P i Kappa Delta K e y ) , w e r e Henry Shaw, L a m b e r t Ponstein, and A r t h u r Ponstein.

You Can Learn While Sleeping! College life s t a n d s on the brink the word list and r e p e a t it ver- been d e m o n s t r a t e d t h a t s t u d e n t s of a revolution! Noted in a recent batim. This phenomenon is t e r m e d a r e in a m o r e receptive s t a t e f o r periodical was news t h a t we d r e a m " H y p n o p a e d i a , " or sleep-learning. knowledge w h e n in a dozing condiabout — literally. Consider how t h i s can effect col- tion t h a n w h e n wide a w a k e with A psychologist has succeeded in lege life. Vocabularies, g r a m m a r extraneous thought passing through d e m o n s t r a t i n g t h a t it is possible rules, l o g a r i t h m tables, f o r m u l a e , t h e i r c r a n i u m s . However, f o r them to learn while sleeping! E x p e r i - S h a k e s p e a r e a s s i g n m e n t s , etc., to " r e c e i v e " while in t h i s dozing m e n t s w e r e carried on w h e r e b y stu- m a y now be cudgeled into t h e brain s t a t e , it is required t h a t the a t t e n dents w e r e s t r e w n a b o u t his lab- while you sleep. A m o r e painless tion be riveted upon t h e m a t e r i a l o r a t o r y on couches. When enceph- process can scarcely be envisioned. being p r e s e n t e d . T h u s , t h e glassylographic m e a s u r e m e n t s indicated The phenomenon seems t o be a eyed coma i n t o which s t u d e n t s them soundly snoozing, t h e scien- first cousin to hypnosis w h e r e b y a a r e prone to p a s s will not do the tist introduced a small loudspeaker person e n t e r s sleep with t h e voice trick. under t h e i r pillows. These w e r e at- of a n o t h e r p a s s i n g f r o m t h e "conW i t h final e x a m s c o m i n g up, tached to a record c h a n g e r p l a y i n g scious" level to t h e " s u b c o n s c i o u s " t h i s s t i m u l a t i n g piece of i n f o r m a discs on which a voice r e p e a t e d level of t h e brain. T h e b r a i n still tion m a y be a boon t o m a n y a h a r non-related word lists, such a s : is active and receptive even t h o u g h ried s t u d e n t . W h e r e did you say dog, sir, knock, box, duel, top, etc. t h e bodily processes a r e in repose. I could g e t a s m a l l loudspeaker ? Upon a w a k e n i n g , t h e s t u d e n t s R i s k i n g w h a t t h i s revelation m a y — R e v i l e d f r o m the S i o u x Falls were able t o t a k e a quick g l a n c e a t cause in classrooms, it h a s also CoUete Paper.

Dr. John

K. Kuisenpa

Dr. Morri$ Steggprda

Carolyn Ingham Elected A.D.D. Prexy A t Dinner A.D.D. officers who w e r e recently elected at a dinner m e e t i n g are Carolyn I n g h a m , p r e s i d e n t ; Betty Boelkins, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; Shirley Knol, s e c r e t a r y ; and Hazel Vander Woulde, t r e a s u r e r . Mr. Albert L a m p e n , f a c u l t y advisor, was present at the meeting. T h i s service organization will r e s u m e its work next fall by selling r e f r e s h m e n t s at the football g a m e s .

Milestone Staff Receives Awards Dr. De G r a a f , as head of the Publications committee, made the following Milestone a w a r d s at the Honors Assembly this morning, rison all received silver keys. Owen Koeppe as Editor of the Milestone received a gold key. Mary Vande Wege, Phil Meengs, Dorothy Davis, and T i m o t h y HarE r n e s t Meeusen, Roger Kempers, W a l t e r Boerman, George Zuidema, Don Lam, Ted F l a h e r t y , Chester Schemper all received pins. Those receiving lapel buttons were Marie B u t t l a r , Betty Boelkins, Harold Fisher, B a r b a r a Van Dyke, Harold Grissen, P e g g y Prins, Mary Van Loo, J a n e t P f e i f f e r , B a r b a r a Van Dyke, J o - A n n Moessner, Shirley Willbrandt, B e t t y De Ryke, and Leona Dornebos.

Dr. J o h n E. K u i z e n g a will be the g u e s t of honor a n d main s p e a k e r a t the c o m m e n c e m e n t exercises of the Class of '48. These s e n ices will be held f o r 14.'} g r a d u a t i n g seniors a t 7:30 P. M. on J u n e 9, 1948 a t Hope Memorial Chapel. Morris S t e g g e r d a , Ph.D., P r o f e s s o r a t H a r t f o r d S e m i n a r y , Connecticut, will be t h e g u e s t - s p e a k e r a t the annual A l u m n a e b a n q u e t . The banquet will be held a t the T e m p l e building, 6:30 P. M., on J u n e 8. Dr. Kuizenga, a f o r m e r Hope teacher, received his education at Hope College, W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y , and t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan. He s e r v e d as p a s t o r of w h a t is ntfW the C e n t r a l Park Ref o r m e d Church and was called to Hope College as a professor in the d e p a r t m e n t s of psychology and religion. Then g o i n g to W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y , he held chairs in both S y s t e m a t i c and Practical Theology. He also served a s President of t h e S e m i n a r y until 1930, when he took a position as P r o f e s s o r of Apologetics and E t h ics at Princeton U n i v e r s i t y . In 1939 Dr. K u i z e n g a was appointed Charles Hodge P r o f e s s o r of Systematic Theology. While at Princeton he also served a s C h a i r m a n of the Committee on G r a d u a t e Study. Dr. S t e g g e r d a , a g r a d u a t e of Hope with the C l a s s of 1922, is a professor of a n t h r o p o l o g y a t H a r t ford S e m i n a r y . He spoke at the New \ o r k C h a p t e r A l u m n a e meeting held in April. F o u r hundred alumnae a r e expected to a t t e n d the banquet. Several prizes a n d a w a r d s will be presented, including the Senior Biblical Prizes, t h e G o d f r e y A w a r d '.n C h e m i s t r y , the Dr. Otto V a n d e r Velde A l l - C a m p u s A w a r d , the Board of Education Prize, and the English Prize. Added this y e a r will be an H. J . P r e t e n p o l A w a r d f o r the senior giving the promise of g r e a t e s t success in t h e gospel ministry. The following c o m m i t t e e s have been named by Dr. Lubbers: General C h a i r m a n , P r o f e s s o r Kleis; Music, P r o f e s s o r C a v a n a u g h ; Alumni, Mr. W i c h e r s ; P r o g r a m s , P r o f e s s o r O s t e r h a v e n ; Decorations, P r o f e s s o r Avison; P r i n t i n g , Mr. Geerlings; Processionals, P r o f e s s o r S t e k e t e e ; and Commencement Awards, Professor Hinkamp. Special music will be rendered by Phyllis D a r r o w , who will sing " J e s u s Only," by B o t a h and A l m a Vander Hill, who will play " T h o u A r t the Rock," by Mullet.

Elementary Teachers Inspect Kazoo System On T u e s d a y , May 25, t h e Elem e n t a r y T e a c h e r ' s Club went to K a l a m a z o o to inspect the school system t h e r e . O t h e r interested education s t u d e n t s w e r e invited to a t tend upon p r e s e n t a t i o n of $1.50 f o r t h e round trip. In t h e evening, t h e g r o u p w e n t to t h e home of Mrs. Schoon f o r a picnic supper.

Annual Honors Assembly Takes Place This Morning At t h i s m o r n i n g ' s assembly, v a r ious c a m p u s a w a r d s w e r e given. A n u m b e r of a w a r d s and prizes were made to s t u d e n t s , who, by t h e i r accomplishments and service, won them. The r e g u l a r chapel service a t 8 : 0 0 w a s conducted by t h e seniors. Immediately following t h e chapel service the j u n i o r s moved into the senior section of t h e chapel seats. A t this t i m e t h e senior class will w a s read by Gordon B r e w e r . Alida Kloosterman a n d Leon S p a r l i n g collaborated in t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n of t h e class prophecy. J e a n W a t s o n read t h e class h i s t o r y . T h e service w a s closed with t h e s i n g i n g of the Alma Mater. Upon t h e conclusion of the Senior Class exercises, a w a r d s were m a d e by several d e p a r t m e n t s and

committees. The Music D e p a r t m e n t announced t h e s c h o l a r s h i p s t h a t were a w a r d e d . The Speech D e p a r t m e n t made presented t h e prizes won t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r . T h e Bible and F o r e i g n Missions prizes w e r e also given a t t h i s m o r n i n g ' s assembly. A t h l e t i c , Publications and W.A.A. a w a r d s w e r e included in the schedule of t h e m o r n i n g . These a w a r d s will be f o u n d in s e p a r a t e a r t i c l e s else-

where in the Anchor. Milestone dedication was p e r f o r m e d by t h e editor Owen Koeppe. M r . Albert L a m p e n w a s the f a c u l t y m e m b e r receiving t h e honor. T h e Blue Key H o n o r F r a t e r n i t y also announced t h a t it had increased its g i f t t o t h e college f r o m t w o t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s t o t h r e e thous a n d s dollars.


Page Two

Hope College Anchor

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Hope College Anchor

Life Lies Behind

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Within another two weeks 143 Hopeites will don their caps and gowns, symbols of their academic success, and pass another milestone on t h e road of life. We congratulate t h e m upon their achievement and wish them continuing prosperity as t h e y pursue their diverse callings. No g u a r a n t e e of success goes with t h e i r diploma. But t h e seeds of success have been planted during f o u r years of moral, social, and intellectual training h e r e ; the harvest will depend upon f u ture cultivation. Thomas H. Huxley, in Science and Education, compares t h e world with a chessboard, the phenomena of the universe to t h e pieces, and t h e laws of N a t u r e to the rules of the game . . . "Education is learning t h e rules of t h i s mighty game." The g r a d u a t i n g seniors have had an opportunity to observe how others have played t h e great game of life and have learned some of the rules of living. Now they are going to t a k e part in this great adventure. The vast and various prospect of life lies before them, with all its uncertainties and dangers, its hopes and promises. For some of the g r a d u a t i n g students for-

F^ssociated C o l e e i a t e P r e s s EDITORIAL STAFF Herman J . Ridder Editor-in-Chief Dona B. Sluyter 1 Associate E d i t o r s Walter B. Studdiford j Richard L. Hoebeke Business Manager John H. Hoekstra Asst. Business M a n a g e r Dorothy M. Davis News E d i t o r Ruth C. De Graaf Feature Editor Mary E . VanLoo Society E d i t o r Owen J . Koeppe Sports E d i t o r Hazel M. Vander Woude Exchange E d i t o r Pierce E. Maassen Circulation M a n a g e r Ted E. F l a h e r t y Photographer J a n e t Pfeiffer, Alice M o o l e n a a r | Typists Alida Hibma, Betty De Ryke \ REPORTERS Alida K l o o s t e r m a n , Claire Leffingwell, R u t h Quant, J a n i c e Vander Borgh, Nancy Vyverberg, Joan Ten Hoeve, Dolores Thomas, Richard Leonard, Bob Hill, Richard Johnson, Roderick Kerr, Beverly Bame, Alicia Van Zoeren, Toni Fredricks, Sally Schrier, Evie Van Dam, Mary Lou Hepp, Charles Previte. BUSINESS STAFF Walter Boerman, Marie Buttlar, Marian H a n n a , Rodger Kempers, Don Vander Berg, Betty Boelkins, Lois De Kleine, Charles Link, Bill Geiger.

mal studies may be over, but f o r all of them

Entered as second class m a t t e r at the post office education in the deeper sense as defined by of Holland, Michigan, at special r a t e of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, Huxley is j u s t beginning. "Life lies behind October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. us as t h e quarry from whence we get tiles Subscription Rate: $2.00 per year.

and cope-stones for the masonry of today"

Published every two weeks during the school year by the students of Hope College. P R I N T E D AT OLD N E W S P R I N T E R Y

( E m e r s o n ) . Armed with a pride and an understanding of our intellectual, social, and moral heritage, and secured by a f a i t h in the

essssssssssesssssssssssssssssss&sssz

f u t u r e , the graduates of '18 will soon find

Editoriais

their places in a world looking f o r leadership.

This is the year's last Anchor and summer vacation follows very closely on its heels. But what are we to do with all this t i m e ? Somebody yells "Sleep!" But we weren't made of the same stuff Rip Van Winkle was. We will do a good deal of resting (it's a nicer word than loafing) and it seems a s though summer vacation was a t least designed f o r rest. It may have been designed for a good deal more t h a n that but it is a t least designed for t h a t . Vacation might also conceivably be designed to create a break in an otherwise monotonous schedule. Schedules are fine because t h e y make for organized living, but at times one becomes tired of a set way of doing things and a rebellion occurs. There is a certain factory smell to attending chapel at 8:00, eating lunch at 12:15 and dinner at 6:00. Three months of independence from a rigid schedule will restore some of tlie soul's individuality. But besides being a time of rest and independence, vacation could also be a chance to meet Life as it really is. It's commendable to study factory conditions out of a sociology book but the way to really understand a factory worker is to be one!

Don't call

anyone a "dumb f a r m e r " until you've worked with one a n d

have discovered

what a

world of accumulated information he has a t his finger tips. We have a fine Psychology department but the way to understand t h e workings of a young mind is to spend a summer as a camp counsellor.

There one

meets Life as it is. America's educational system has put a premium on textbook knowledge. As a result we have turned out Business Administration m a j o r s who can't identify a time clock!

Employment m a n a g e r s

who never

had an employer! Preachers who have never dirtied their hands with the work in which their parishioners are engaged! A sheepskin is tucked into their hand and they're shoved into the world — a world they have never met!

W h a t we need is more "on-the-job-

training" of some sort and the summer vacation is your chance. Don't f o r g e t it!

— W. B. S.

The Soul's Language We're pleased with t h e recent accomplishments of the Music Department. In recent issues of the Anchor t h e r e have been lead articles on concerts being given f o r the benefit of t h e student body. Some real progressive steps have been taken by the Administration in building up a d e p a r t m e n t t h a t is so essential to a truly Liberal A r t s College. What, a f t e r all, is a Liberal A r t s College, if it doesn't have a well-balanced emphasis on the fine a r t s ? Music is t h e language of the soul and it is in a Liberal Arts College t h a t the soul is elevated to a position above t h a t of the body. The blight of American education with all its specialization is t h a t it has failed to reckon with the fact t h a t the soul, even more than the body, needs to be educated. In many places of American education t h e body has seemingly outgrown the soul. Orchids to both t h e Administration and t h e Music Department f o r some of the year's best e n t e r t a i n m e n t ! At several of the chapel services recently we have heard the choir and the Glee clubs. We enjoyed them immensely. The t h o u g h t struck us t h a t perhaps more of our morning chapel services could be enhanced with some choral selections. The choir assumes its place each morning, sings the opening sentence and the " A m e n " following t h e prayer and t h a t ' s it — until the next morning when the process is repeated. Couldn't we hear from the Music department more o f t e n ? In the chapel building we a r e engulfed by some beautiful a r t but we fail to add to it often in our chapel services. We know it would cause e x t r a work but if we could realize t h a t some people can understand only the language of music, it might be worth it. Personally, a song has often prepared us f o r a day's work as well as some Scripture and prayer. Music Department, we're proud of your accomplishments. But in all your achieving, don't f o r g e t t h a t you have a service to render as well. We're t h a n k f u l f o r t h e concerts but our vote of t h a n k s would be a lot bigger if you'd make yourself available f o r more chapel services. You've got w h a t it t a k e s — don't be a miser!

An experiment is under way in extent of their knowledge, in de- t h a t is better or at least as good. the department of physics at Texas vising a first-class examination as "This method may be unusual, Christian University which could in taking one. T h i s led to t h e ex- but it requires a comprehensive result in a revolution against t r a - periment. knowledge of the subject plus inditional college examination pro"Most of my tests a r e coded genuity and application on the p a r t multiple choice," says Dr. Gaines. of the student. Newton "When a student doesn't know the " T h e good students like the new Gaines discovered t h a t physics stu- answer to one of the questions, I system but t h e poor students like dents do just as much thinking, give him the privilege of omitting nothing about examinations, no and disclose just about the same it if, in its stead, he can write one m a t t e r w h a t the system." Some

time

ago

Dr.

Dear Editor: This answer is passed out hundreds of time each day. Everybody is always too busy; too busy making money; too busy s t u d y i n g ; too busy j u s t t r y i n g to be busy. If we paused f o r a moment, we would, no doubt, find t h a t all this business of being busy is p r e t t y superficial and, as a m a t t e r of f a c t , just our way of pretending we're really covering ground. When somebody s t a r t s talking about democracy and America, almost immediately, a f t e r making a few choice r e m a r k s about these things being trite and f a r f e t c h e d , we usually launch into the old excuses, "besides, I can't bother about this s t u f f , I'm too busy." Many students whitewash themselves. They e x a g g e r a t e their own goodness and drape their brothers in black. They judge people and thus usurp the place of God. A sin of the good man is t h a t he may worship ends. When he t akes pride t h a t he has fasted and tithed, he may deceive himself by thinking t h a t religion is entirely a m a t t e r of good deeds, and t h a t one becomes an ethical person by a process of arithmetic. Add together your good deeds and as a result, Q.E.D., you get a religious personality. As a result of such thinking, the Church has not grown as it should have. Consequently, America faces the dilemma at this hour, that she faces. Few people realize the crucial urgency that faces mankind, if the race is to survive.

like a coat.

Christianity is not

merely a set of ideas: it is primarily such a M O V E M E N T ! One knows a good man by w h a t is known only by w h a t it D O E S !

There has never been a time of g r e a t e r need for a spiritual awakening in America. Christian solutions in personal and social problems are absolutely imperative. Our Country will become more and more pagan or progressively Christian, and the Churches cannot a f ford to stand idly by. To be true to Christ, we must share Him with others, or we will lose Him f o r ourselves. It was Jesus who said, "I am the light of the world, he t h a t followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life." (John 8:12) Christ may be thought of as a lighthouse whose beam of light

Only a few more notes l e f t in the shall know them, by their f r u i t s " (Matt. 7:16), said Christ, music box. These will be played in this last issue of the Anchor and in His Sermon on t h e Mount. then it's "So Long f o r a While." F o r God so loved t h e world t h a t Tulip Time in Holland a l w a y s He gave His only begotten Son brings with it m a n y concerts. Last t h a t whosoever believeth on Him week Wednesday night found many should not perish but have ever- tourists and f r i e n d s a t t h e joint Glee Club concert given in the lasting life. You see, when God Chapel. This w a s the last big loves, God loves the whole wide event of the y e a r f o r both Glee world, and when God gives, God Clubs. Of course, both have been gives His Son. How do we love? giving p r o g r a m s in the surrounding churches, however, these, too, How do we give? have already been written in the J. David Menchhofer record album, and now the pages of singing activities can be closed on a very successful year . CommenlM im Stay at Hope Musical A r t s Club held a brief Dear Editor, This is to be a rambling letter, but I wish to express a few comments, which have been suggested to me by my two year s t a y on the campus. One thing which has impressed me in contrast to other schools I have attended, is the personal interest the instructors t a k e toward their students.

I do not know of

any teacher here who is not willing to take time out from their routine in order to engage in a friendly conversation with a stuFor me, this a t t i t u d e has

But

it has been encouraging to

note that the chapel committee is very diligent

in their

efforts to

maintain worthwhile services. It is my sincere pr ayer t h a t the Hope students will recognize the chapel services not as a formality, but as a blessing. I'd

like to offer a bouquet, a

brickbat, and a suggestion to the Student Council. They have done a grand job in giving the student body

worthwhile

assembly

pro-

g r a m s and deserve much thanks. The criticism is not meant to be a reflection on any individual person, but the All-College parties and the F r e s h m a n I n i t i a t i o n were handled r a t h e r unenthusiastically. If these traditions a r e to be maintained and enjoyed, it is best to do a good job or not do it at all. The suggestion is this. Among the many gripes on the campus, there are a few legitimate ones. Why doesn't the Student Council serve as a clearing house or as a go between? It w o u l d undoubtedly create a healthy atmosphere. P e r h a p s there are some things wrong with Hope, but I am very t h a n k f u l for the things which are right with it. There are lots of extra courses at Hope which a r e not listed in the catalog. Yet so few students take a d v a n t a g e of the concerts, lectures, and activities on the campus. The r i g h t amount of these can do a lot f o r an individual's education. I sincerely hope t h a t our college will continue to uphold the f u n d a m e n t a l s of our Reformed Church. There is the feeling within me that I am not alone in my attitude toward Hope College. I would like to conclude by saying, "Thank you", to all who have made our stay here so pleasant and so profitable. We won't f o r g e t it! Sincerely, A r t h u r O. Van Eck

g u a r d s all believers against the unseen difficulties in life. We can either accept or reject

^&S8S@8Sa888a88@8SS888^

"Ye

T.N.T.!

World War II brought not only the danger of the atomic bomb, but it brought, also, the many other results t h a t accompany war. During World W a r II, our Country was disgraced with several race riots. On June 22, 1943, it required the a r m y to quell the Detroit race riot, and America was neglecting the fact that in her own backyard, she wan fighting for the Four Freedoms. Another f r u i t of war is the increase in crime. Murder was committed on an average of thirty-six times a day in 194(5 as major crime in the United States reached an all-time high. A major crime was committed every 81.7 seconds. There are many other f r u i t s of w a r ; but the author is citing only one more; namely, divorce. In 1945, there was one divorce for every three marriages. It is estimated that f o r 194(5, the ratio would increase to two divorces for every five marriages. Thousands and thousands of words have been thrown at us about America, the "land of the f r e e and the home of the brave," with ideas about how we could make our nation really a g r e a t one, but few even a t t e m p t to do anything about c a r r y i n g them out.

M u st r nx

he DOES, likewise a good nation

t h e i r technical under- if they realized t h a t one pound of made my classes more enjoyable. standing, i n t e l l e c t u a l a c u m e n and moral uranium (which is fairly common) At various times the chapel servis equal of one thousand tons of courage. ices have been disappointing to me.

Experiment With Exams

cedures.

t o tlfe E d i t o r

Perhaps, it would startle people dent.

The world welcomes \8SSSSSS8SSSSS@SSSSSSSSS8SSSS8@8SSSS>

Summer Vacation!

Setters

Commendi

Hope Students

If we accept the Dear Editor: It is customary to editorialize Master's light, we will safely reach before vacation time about reprethe port of peace and security. If senting the college well when off we renounce Christ, our ship-of- the campus. Hope students need state is certain to be stranded in no such editorializing about t h e the seas of darkness and distress. reflections they cast upon the colC h a r a c t e r is like a fence — it lege when away from it. Hope stu dents, it was learned, a r e ladies can't be strengthened by whitewash. and gentlemen off t h e campus. Many people feel t h a t if they a t Two members of the B o a i i of tend Church on Sunday, they a r e Trustees of the Michigan Christian practicing Christianity in its f i n e s t Endeavor Union told me they had way. How stupid they are! Chris- taken a train to New York j u s t before Easter. In their coach were tianity is infintely more t h a n t h a t . many Hope College students going Christianity is Christ-like action home. Their conduct w a s most applied in their own lives for commendable. I was told by my S E V E N days a week ~ not just on friends, who also were very much impressed h o w n e a t l y and well the Sabbath! dr«s<^d our people were. Christianity is not something Thank you Eastern students. t h a t we can put on and t a k e off Christ's light.

Donald Lam.

business meeting for election of officers. Don Hoek has t a k e n over the duties as President. He reports t h a t already a vesper is being planned f o r the beginning of next year. Too often we a r e unaware that Musical A r t s sponsors the f r e e concerts and vespers given on campus. I'm sure we can say t h a t the Club may well be proud of its success this year. T h e orchestra and band also presented final concerts f o r the year. I guess we all realize how much the size and calibre of these two organizations has increased. Orchids to the members and to Mr. Rider, their conductor. Congratulations to the winners of the music scholarships. Marge Angus, Herb Ritsema, and F r a n c e s Rose. Talent plus much time and practice makes f o r reward. Truly the winners this year have these qualities. May the scholarships aid you in soaring to unknown heights in the musical world. The Men's Glee Club is planning a beach p a r t y as a final touch to their activities. I've heard a rumor members have worked hard, but that they intend to go "beachcombing" in search of some " d r y bones." Recently the Choir, under the direction of Miss Paalman, rendered a most excellent concert. T h e Choir thoroughly enjoyed giving this concert. P e r h a p s this is one of the reasons why it was so well received and appreciated by t h e audience. Mrs. Baughman held a student recital Sunday. Mrs. B a u g h m a n ' s wonderful v o i c e t e a c h i n g and charming personality is known and appreciated by all her students. Hope to see you back with us next year, Mrs. B. T h a t winds up our last and final recording of the year. May I say that it's been f u n digging out the music notes from week to week. I hope I've hit most of the musical highlights of the year. Wishing a most enjoyable s u m m e r to all; until next year then, it's " m o r e music to you." — " E v i e " Van Dam.

Mulder C o r o n a t e d A t M a y Day Fe+e Miss J u d i t h Mulder of New York, N. Y., was crowned May Day Queen on May 14th at ceremonies held in the Pine Grove. Members of her court who were escorted by retiring m e m b e r s were Claire Wierenga, Grand Haven, Michigan; Betty Boelkins, Muskegon Heights, Michigan; P e g g y Prins, Holland, Michigan; B a r b a r a Van Dyke, Zeeland; Mary Van Loo, Kalamazoo; and Connie Hinga, Holland. The Queen was escorted to h e r throne by Donald Mulder, Student Council President. New Alcor members w e r e also escorted to the t h r o n e by senior members. They a r e Lucille Brunsting, Hull, Iowa; Marie B u t t l a r , Warwick, N. Y.; Alice Moolenaar, DeMotte, Ind.; P e g g y P r i n s , Holland; Carolyn I n g h a m , F e r n d a l e , Mich.; and Hazel Vander Woude, McBain, Mich. At the banquet, announcements of a w a r d s were made by t h e Queen. Winners of t h e Wom en's T r a c k Meet was the Sophomore Class, while the F r a t e r s were victors in the Men's events. T h e J a c k Schouten medal f o r men w a s awarded t o Bud Van De Wege and t h e a w a r d for women t o Doris Koskamp. T h e Alcor scholarship f o r an o u t s t a n d ing girl w a s given to M a r g a r e t Moerdyke. Announcements were also made of t h e r e s u l t s of S t u d e n t Council elections. Tim Harrison will assume the d u t i e s of P r e s i d e n t with Carolyn I n g h a m assisting a s VicePresident,


Poge Three

Hop* College Anchor

YWCA Releases Plans Reeverts Entertains For Annual Breakfast House Board Members

Bert Brower Speaks Knoll Places First At YM Meeting Tues. In Speech Contest Reverend B e r t Brower, p a s t o r of the U n i t y R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in Muskegon, w a s s p e a k e r a t the weekly Y.M. m e e t i n g held T u e s d a y evening. Reverend B r o w e r is a g r a d u a t e of H o p e College and W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y . Upon the completion of his theological t r a i n i n g , he accepted a call to Home Acres in G r a n d R a p i d s . He served in O r a n g e City, I o w a until he assumed his p r e s e n t c h a r g e in Muskegon. Rev. B r o w e r is known to m a n y of us t h r o u g h his articles in t h e Sunday School Guide. His a d d r e s s to t h e m e n of Y concerned the r e c e n t m e e t i n g of religious leaders in W a s h i n g t o n w i t h General M a r s h a l l .

The Y W C A will hold its a n n u a l Senior Girl b r e a k f a s t on J u n e 5th, 9:30 A . M., a t Hope Church. All Senior girls, f a c u l t y women, a n d H o u s e m o t h e r s will be g u e s t s on this occasion. C y n t h i a F i s k e will be in c h a r g e of t h e p r o g r a m . E l e a n o r S h o r t and Irene H e e m s t r a will a c t as social c h a i r m e n and P e g g y P r i n s will t a k e c a r e of the invitations. A joint Y.W.C.A. a n d Y.M.C.A. h y m n s i n g was held on May 25th lead by Bud Van Eck and Leon Dykstra.

Miss Luella Knoll w a s a w a r d e d first

honors

speech

in

contest

the

semi-annual

sponsored

by

the

Speech D e p a r t m e n t a m o n g the v a r ious sections of Speech 11. R o b e r t Kranendonk

and

John

F.

Ter-

k e u r s t tied f o r second and t h i r d , in t h e opinion of t h e t h r e e j u d g e s : Rev. Henry Schoon, P r o f . E d w a r d V. Avison, and Dr. D. Ivan Dyk-

His

s t r a , Hope College f a c u l t y m e m bers.

The

contest

was

held

in

Room VR-103 a t 3 p. m. T u e s d a y May

18th.

Miss Knoll's w i n n i n g

This l a s t issue of t h e Anchor should be s o m e t h i n g special, I suppose.

speech dealt with t h e s u b j e c t of

AvisOIl

Jlidg'G

e x a m 8

But f e w will have t i m e to read this until next week, w h a t with g^JiQQ] F o r e n s i c M e e t t h e t o m o r r o w , and no t i m e to s p a r e . schools. The contest p a r t i c i p a n t s It's been a p r e t t y good y e a r , all told. T h e s p o r t s squads d i d n ' t t a k e I^r* W m . Schrier and P r o f . E. V. were chosen by t h e i r respective any firsts, which is unusual, but showed up honorably. The d r a f t h a s n ' t r ^ ' 8 0 " College Speech , , , . . ^ ^ ^ D e p a r t m e n t , j o u r n e y e d to G r a n d classes d u r i n g a round of convic- begun - y e t . and everybody kept r i g h t on s t u d y i n g , a little d i f f e r e n t Cre8ton H j g h School Thur!! tion speeches. O t h e r contest en- than 1942. A lot of t h i n g s a r e different now, especially the a t t i t u d e of day a f t e r n o o n . May 13, to serve a s peace

Lubbers, Vander Borgh Attend General Synod

through

education

in

t r a n t s w e r e : Paul De Kok, E l m e r the s t u d e n t s . More serious, a l m o st too much so. E x t r a - c u r r i c u l a r clubs j u d g e s in the oratorical, oratorical Dr. L u b b e r s and P r o f e s s o r Van- V r u g g i n k , K e n n e t h Smouse, and have a t o u g h t i m e of it occasionally, with m e m b e r s p r e f e r r i n g to s t a y M e c , a m a t ' o n ' d r a m a t i c declamation, d e r Borgh h a v e been a t t e n d i n g the Miss Luella Rozeboom. home and study'. " H a v e to keep the g r a d e s u p , " they say. And i t J a n d . e x t ® m P ° [ e speech c o n t e s t s of . . , . . Region 7. The c o n t e s t s a r e spont r u e . T h e real, old-fashioned college spirit seems t o have e v a p o r a t e d General Synod m e e t i n g of t h e Reby the Michigan H i g h Schoo| f o r m e d Church in America a t Buck Hill Falls, P e n n s y l v a n i a .

Mr. and

Zuidema Acclaimed Biology Club Head

Mrs. V a n d e r Borgh accompaniec On Monday evening. May 10, the Rev. and Mrs. De Velder on Wednesday. T h e m e e t i n g which began Biology Club held its s e m i - a n n u a l T h u r s d a y , May 20, lasted five days. elections f o r the v a r i o u s executive 388888888888888888888888?

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a w a r d e d the distinction of office: P r e s i d e n t , George Z u i d e m a ; ViceP r e s i d e n t , A n n o V a n d e r Kolk; Secr e t a r y , Betty Koch; T r e a s u r e r , Dale Vanden B r i n k . T h e o r g a n i z a tion paid due t r i b u t e to the r e t i r ing officers f o r the services they had rendered d u r i n g t h e p a s t y e a r , a n d especially f o r t h e induction of visual aids as a m e a n s of e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r education. F i n a l l y bef o r e closing, J e r r y G n a d e g a v e a report on the potentialities of becoming connected with a N a t i o n a l H o n o r a r y Biology F r a t e r n i t y . W i t h g r e a t optimism f o r the coming y e a r , the last meeting of t h i s semester was b r o u g h t to a close. Commerce is the g r e a t civilizer, We e x c h a n g e ideas when we exc h a n g e fabrics. — Robert G. Ingersoil. ,888888888888888888888885

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in the cloud of d u s t t h a t hovered around f o r so m a n y years. W h e n the Forensic Association u n d e r the ausdust d i s a p p e a r e d , f a m i l i a r scenes were only f a m i l i a r e x t e r n a l l y . Those y e a r s seemed to h a v e taken s o m e t h i n g along, some p a r t of everyone, It probably won't be t h a t w a y in a y e a r or so, when t h a t p a r t i c u l a r element now on most c a m p u s e s will have been absorbed into communities. Each new class t h a t a r r i v e s at Hope seems younger and more youthful in their e x h u b e r a n c e , more c a r e - f r e e in spirit, less troubled by the w o r r i e s of t h e world. And it's good — t h a t ' s the way a college should be, and t h a t ' s the way Hope w a n t s to be . . . and almost is, a g a i n . A g r e a t big h a n d f u l of Hope p r o f s a r e going back t o school t h i s summer, to work on P H . D ' s , they say. H a v e r k a m p , G r a n b e r g , V a n d e r b u s h , C a v a n a u g h , P r i n s and Ten Hoor, are a m o n g the enthusiastic. Incidentally, if you w a n t a laugh, check up on some of t h e thesis's t h a t are written f o r these degrees. I saw one on "Spelling Mistakes in S o u t h e r n Cookbooks." Most of them are, however, more c u l t u r a l than c u l i n a r y .

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On Monday evening. May 17, the activities of K a p p a Delta w e r e culm i n a t e d f o r t h i s t e r m in a d i n n e r a t the T e m p l e lounge. A f t e r s o m e g r o u p singing, president E m m a belle J e w e t t r e a d S c r i p t u r e and led the g r o u p in p r a y e r . T h e officers f o r the coming y e a r w e r e installed. Hazel V a n d e r Woude, t h e new president, made t h e response and recognition of the senior members. E a c h senior was p r e s e n t e d with a " M a y p o l e g i r l " and a tulip, as she told her plans f o r next y e ar . Bernie Nichols, in behalf of the g r o u p , presented our counselor, Mrs. O s t e r h a v e n , with a g i f t of appreciation. Miss Reeverts, our g u e s t f o r the evening, addressed the g r o u p b r i e f l y . The s p e a k e r f o r the m e e t i n g w a s Miss Boyd. The tables w e r e cfeverly deco r a t e d by Eunice Post, Carolyn Heckeler, and Pauline H e n d r i e t h .

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Dinner Culminates Kappa Delta's Year

The G e r m a n Club held its las:t m e e t i n g of t h e y e a r W e d n e s d a y , 0 GIFT ITEMS May 19th at Tunnel P a r k . The G e r m a n Club m e m b e r s had hot Billfolds - Compacts dogs and cokes f o r r e f r e s h m e n t s Shoetre«B and t h e n played baseball. M a r g a r e t Expert Repairing W o l f f e n s p e r g e r and Bill D e P r e e Shoe Polish - Laces were in c h a r g e of t h e g a m e s and Many s t o r i e s a r e c i r c u l a t i n g as to w h a t building will be done this M a r y McKlean and Glenn Van s u m m e r on the Hope campus. I have it all here, in a n exclusive. The H a i t s e m a w e r e in c h a r g e of t h e Science building will be moved to the location now occupied by t h e T r e f r e s h m e n t s . 13 E. 8th Street barracks, which will be moved to the site now occupied by t h e president's home. The home will be torn down, and t h e bricks used to line a new s w i m m i n g pool, to be s i t u a t e d in the main lounge of W e s t Hall. Columbia, F a i r b a n k s , and Beach will all be moved to the a t h l e t i c field and joined t o g e t h e r with t u n n e l s , and will house a n i m a l s f o r the Psychology e x p e r i m e n t a l lab. All women s t u d e n t s will live a t Castle P a r k , men at M a c a t a w a . Classes will be held in the Civic Auditorium buildThat Are Sure fo Please ing, which the city of Holland is building in appreciation to Hope College. Van Vleck Hall will be a m u s e u m , a classic example of 10th cent u r y Celtic a c h i t e c t u r e . F i r s t floor Voorhees will be used as a bowling FOR HER . . . alley, the second and third floors as rooms f o r Tulip T i m e g u e s t s . G r a v e s Compacts library will be used as a library. Van Raalte hall will be moved t o the Colognes Perfu mes Van R a a l t e homestead, which will house athletic equipment. Andrew Carnegie w a n t s his g y m back. FOR HIM . . . Have a good s u m m e r and don't be too s u r p r i s e d when you r e t u r n in the fall. Pipes . . G r o o m i n g Essentials

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Hope College Anchor

THESAURIAN

DELPHI

Thcsaurian Sorority ended the The Delphians will end the year last F r i d a y night with a pic- s c h o o l - y e a r w i t h their annual nic a t Kollen's P a r k . With the iouse-Party on J u n e 4th. The smell of smoke and burning hot- p a r t y will be held in a cottage at dogs in the air, Thesaurians ate, Ottawa Beach. A t this time, election of officers played ball, and had a good time. will be held and a "fond farewell" New officers f o r the year 1948 will be given to the senior memwere elected. They are the follow- bers. ing: Betty De Ryke, President; The annual Alumnae luncheon Kathryn Ponstein, Vice-president; will take place a t o t h e Holland Susan Brink, S e c r e t a r y ; Bernie Country Club on S a t u r d a y , May Nichols, T r e a s u r e r . A f t e r an in- 29th. formal installation of the new officers, the meeting closed with DORIAN Theta Gamma Phi looking forward to more good times next year. The members of Kappa Beta Phi

o SOROSIS

The trend of recent international developments and their implications

The faculty women will hold their last meeting of the year a t f o r the United States was disthe residence of Mrs. Schoon on cussed at the last IRC meeting. Friday, May 28. It will be in the Such issues as United States recogform of a Potluck Supper. nition of the new Jewish state, the exchange of notes concerning

recently enjoyed the "Pastel Parade". P. J . Sherman brought us " T r u e Blue" as she led devotions. A nortion of "White C l i f f s " was read by Joan Wilson and Betty Brinkman put us in a "Deep Purple" mood. "Red all over" was presented by Esther Schmidt as she ?ave us the important news of the day. Carol Brandt helped us to get " 'Aqua'inted" by reading the "Education of Hyman Kaplin". A f t e r plans were discussed foi the Alumnae Tea, the meeting was adjourned with the singing of the Dorian Hymn.

Sigma Sigma's informal spring party "Caberet Capers", was held at the Holland Country Club, Sat., May 22nd. An informal b u f f e t supper was served in the evening which proved sufficient nourishment for all. The program consisted of Evie Van Dam's own version of the tune " F r a n k i e and Johnny", and Jean Snow's rendition of "Golden E a r r i n g s " . Sorosites Pat Letz, Marty Den Herder, Marilyn Wolbrink, P r u Haskins, and Shirley Gess literally "brought down the house" with their origin— o al Chorus Line Review. Progressiveness is looking forGeneral chairman f o r the party ward intelligently, looking within was Dot Milne, assisted by Jean critically, and moving on incessantSibley, invitations, and Marian ly.— Author Unknown. Reichert program. Guests for the evening included Mr. Prins, Miss Holleman, and Mr. and Mrs. Milton Hinga. FATHER'S DAY-SUNDAY. JUNE 20 Plans are being formulated f o r the annual Sorosis Houseparty which will begin J u n e 4 with the seniors taking over f o r the eve ning. At this time elections for the fall term will take place.

o SIB-COSMO The joint Sib-Cosmo meeting was opened by a welcome by Cosmo President, George Toren ant Sib President, Marcia De Young on Friday, May 21. Alternate roll calls were read by secretaries Alice Moolenaar and George Zuidema. Lillian High led devotions which were followed by "The Lord's Prayer", sung by Tim Harrison. A serious paper was given by Micky Van Egdom, while the humor paper was presented by Cy Dyer. Bob Kronendonk then sang his little tale about the barber. Lucille Brunsting, Dot Burgers, and Connie Voogd ended the program with a beautiful trio, followed by the critic f o r the evening, Felicia Herbek. The Sibs and Cosmos both sang their sorority and f r a t e r n i t y songs at the close of the meeting. W h i l e delicious refreshments were served, Bob Kronendonk led the group in singing some folk songs which everyone enjoyed. The meeting was planned by Dot Oldenberg and Jim H o f f m a n .

Faculty Women To Hold Last Meetings of Year

RC Considers Recent ntemational Situations

^ororttl^B

peace

negotiations

between

the

Social Service Members Meet A t Gunn Cottage

United States and Russia and other topics were discussed. This was the

The

last meeting of the IRC until next fall. Plans were discussed for holding a banquet next fall at which time new prospective m e m b e r s would be invited to join the club.

Social

Service

Club

held

their last meeting of the current

o

Dr. Schrier Delivers Commencement Talks Dr. William Schrier delivered commencement speeches recently at Kaleva, May 19, Copemish, May 20, and is scheduled to appear at Kent City, May 25th, and at Big Rapids on June 3rd.

o One should be truly convinced that there is no end to improvement. There is never any one best way — it is only today's best way. — Claude V. McBroom.

FRATER

ARCADIAN

Formal initiation was held by the F r a t e r n a l Society in the basemen; of the Chapel a s the F r a t e r s welcomed two new members into the f r a t e r n i t y on Thursday evening, May 20. The new members aic James Pfingstel and Robert Van Dyke. After t h e initiation ceremony, read by F r a t e r s Clarence Hopkins, Ken Weller, Don Ladowig, and Dell Boersema, Fratei President Lew Bixby welcomed the new members. The F r a t e r s then retired to the lounge in Van Raalte Hall f o r their literary a r d business meeting. F r a t e r Rodgci Kempers opened the meeting with prayer, after which F r a t e r Don Ladewig presented his "Philosophy of Life." During the business meeting plans were made for the "Swan Song" which will be held at Tunnel Park, Friday, May 28.

Athletic events, including hiking and ping-pong, and group games started the activities at the informal spring party staged on Saturday, May 15, at Camp Gray, Saugatuck. A f t e r a luncheon had been served to the Arcadians and their guests, Ted Flaherty led a song fest. Clyde G e e r l i n g s assisted throughout the evening by providing tha calls for f o l k g a m e s . Program highlights were provided by comments by Jack Van Reenen, cornet music by Cal Swart and Victor Kleinheksel, a humorous monologue by Neil Cocker, and a

school year recently when the group journeyed to Gunn's Cottage on Lake Michigan f o r a picnic supper. Outdoor games were played, and the meal was prepared over an indoor fireplace. Retiring President Pierce Maassen presided at a short businens meeting at which the following officers were elected for the coming y e a r : Donald Boss, President; Roger Gunn, Vice-President; JoAnn COSMOPOLITAN Moessner, Secretary; and Dorothy On Friday, May 28, the CosmoMilne, T r e a s u r e r . Dr. Henry politan Fraternity will hold its Voogd will continue as Faculty spring party, "Variation Prelude", Advisor. at the Spring Lake Country Club. The afternoon will be devoted lo participation in various sportj, such as golfing, tennis, and horseback riding. Dinner will be served FOR YOUR PARTIES in the Club House, followed l y musical entertainment. The chapA N D ALL SOCIAL erones are Dr. and Mrs. Kleinheksel and Prof, and Mrs. Clyde AFFAIRS Geerlings. Serving on the parly committee are Cosmos Eugene Ma Choice Corsages cus, Max Frego, Robert Schuitema, Russell Clotingh, and Clayt Van Roses Gardenias Hall.

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humorous skit enacted by Kenneth Leetsma and William Miedema. Paul Klomparens served as general chairman f o r the event. Dan Geary w a s p r o g r a m committee chairman, J e r r y Van Hest took charge of transportation, and Dennis Shoemaker directed the meal arrangements. Faculty guests were Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Geerlings, Miss Jantina Holleman, and Mr. James Prins. Last Friday evening the Arcadian Fraternity held a literary and business meeting. William Hoekenga provided a humorous paper entitled "Epho," a description of an imaginary mid-western college. During the business session the following men were elected to serve in executive capacities for the next semester: Ted Flaherty, President; Floyd Goulooze, VicePresident; Walt Studdiford, Secret a r y ; Dave Dykstra, Treasurer; Art Tuls, Student Council Representative; Virgil Dykstra, Earl Kragt, Inter-Fraternity C o u n c i l Representatives; Ricardo Esparza, George Reineke, Sergeant-at-Arms.

Holland Country Club was the scene of the Knick Spring Party. The members of KHN invited their 17 W . 8th St. Holland, Mich. P h o n e 9 4 9 6 O p p . P o s t O f f i c e guests to "Take A Break" on the afternoon and evening of May l."». SSSSSSSSf^^^SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^SSSSSSc With everything but their spirits dampened by the rain, everyor.e PHONE 2120 joined in for Softball and volleyball until it was time f o r the evening meal. After dining, the guests were entertained by MC Warren agency Eickelberg, who introduced the 29E.EIGHTH ST. HOLLAND.MICH. KHN Quartet s i n g i n g Negio Spirituals. These plantation men were Bill DeMeester, Dick Leonard, Bud Van Eck, and Bob Westerhoff. Next Ken Smouse, the poor man's Victor Borge, demonstrate 1 how to play the piano. The program closed with Bud Van Eclc leading group singing. Honored guests for the evening were Mr. and Mrs. Haverkamp, and Mr. a n l Mrs. Vanderbush. Hal Grissen was party chairman, thanks Hal. DIAMONDS—WATCHES —GIFTS

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Van Raalte Lounge was the place where the Knicks met f o r the last time this year. A f t e r Bob Westerhoff led devotions the new officeis were installed when Jim Cook handed over the gavel to Phil Meengs, the new president. Following the inaugural address, and some lusty singing, the meeting adjourned with refreshments.

o EMERSONIAN "Vacation time" was the theme of the regular meeting of the Emersonian

Fraternity,

as

the

new,

second semester pledges conducted the meeting.

To s t a r t things off

in fine style, MC Phil Feenstra opened the meeting with a humorous poem, depicting a phase of life important to all members of the human race. Since Tulip Time was in full swing and is one of the biggest t o u r i s t a t t r a c t i o n s in Michigan, J a k e DeJong presented the serious paper, giving a history of this g r e a t event, and the purpose behind the various types of attractions. After a lively song fest under the baton of "Bud" Holeman, a humor paper prepared by Gerry Boerman and was read by Walter Boerman, much to the enjoyment of all present. Master Critic, Bob DeYoung, closed the meeting with appropriate criticism of the evenings literary pieces. Plans were announced and discussed for the forthcoming Spring P a r t y to be held this Friday night. A f t e r Roger Rietberg, alumnus had offered several renditions on the piano, the meeting was adjourned.

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Spain - A Model Colonizer By Don Carlos Hispanic A m e r i c a is a land w h e r e m a n y races have learned to live in peace. T h e y practice the t r u e C h r i s t i a n principle of e q u a l i t y ; so t h a t racial d i s c r i m i n a t i o n is p r a c t i cally non-existent. W h i t e man, red m a n , and black m a n h a v e learned to w o r k and play w i t h o u t f r i c t i o n . T h i s is d i s t i n c t l y a H i s p a n i c h e r i t age, f o r t h e S p a n i a r d s a n d P o r t u g u e s e have n e v e r practiced racial d i s c r i m i n a t i o n — a m a n is judged on his personal merits, not on his a n c e s t r a l stock. F r o m t h e very e a r l y d a y s of the Conquest of the New World, the S p a n i s h crown bestowed f u l l citizenship on the v a n q u i s h e d r a c e s a s soon as they accepted C h r i s t i a n i t y so t h a t the m e a s u r e of a m a n ' s r i g h t s w a s the e x t e n t of his acceptance of J e s u s C h r i s t as the redeemer of mankind. It is t r u e t h a t m a n y abuses w e r e in f a c t p e r p e t r a t e d on the helpless I n d i a n s , yet Spain holds the distinction of actually e n a c t i n g laws such as the Laws of t h e Indies, which g u a r a n t e e d the r i g h t s of the conquered people, a t the very time t h a t they w e r e being conquered. W h a t o t h e r conquering nation has ever done t h a t ? A n o t h e r very g l a r i n g f a c t that should go f a r to deny the Black Legend propogated by e a r l y British and New E n g l a n d historians, concerning t h e supposedly blind g r e e d for gold of the Conquistadores. is t h a t these conquerors who braved untold d a n g e r s discovering and e x p l o r i n g unknown regions, never knowing w h a t lay beyond, these so-called r u t h l e s s conquerors also colonized vast regions, cultivated the land, built g r e a t cities, and t r a n s p l a n t e d W e s t e r n E u r o p ean civilization. Witness the g r e a t religious m o n u m e n t s and the educational i n s t i t u t i o n s still s t a n d i n g . To u n d e r s t a n d the g r e a t u n d e r t a k ing Ixune by these conquerors, let us r e m e m b e r t h a t Spain w a s the f i r s t g r e a t modern empire, and had to devise her political, economic and social system at the time t h a t the Conquest w a s going on. O t h e r nations building l a t e r e m p i r e s were able to p r o f i t by S p a i n ' s successes and f a i l u r e s . To f u r t h e r visualize the speed with which Spain secured her l e a d i n g role f o r nearly 200 y e a r s one should remember t h a t the I ' n i v e r s i t i e s of Mexico and of Lima w e r e founded nearly a cent u r y b e f o r e H a r v a r d , and that Mexico City was a l r e a d y a worldrenowned center of c u l t u r e when Boston w a s still a little more t h a n a village.

D u r i n g seven c e n t u r i e s S p a n i a r d s lived in high tension comb a t i n g the Moors. D u r i n g t h i s tremendous s t r u g g l e (711-1492) t h e religious zeal of the S p a n i a r d s was g r e a t l y m a g n i f i e d . No o t h e r E u r o pean c o u n t r y b e f o r e S p a i n had engendered t h i s s p i r i t of s t r u g g l e on behalf of the F a i t h , and no o t h e r c o u n t r y preserved t h i s s p i r i t of C h r i s t i a n Mission for so long, nor with such tenacious m a n n e r . When the rest of E u r o p e b a r e l y rememSpain actually guaranteed

holds the distinction of enacting laws which the

Emmies, Sikkema Pace Frat Nines

Madrid

she succumbed b e f o r e t h e press u r e of the i n v a d e r , b u t in each case t h e i n v a d e r became H i s p a n ized.

rights

of

the

con-

quered people, at the very time that they were being conquered. What other conquering nation has ever done that? bered the C r u s a d e s as a v a g u e a n d . e m o t e e n t e r p r i s e , the S p a n i a r d s were in full battle a g a i n s t the infidel. This ideology was kept alive and vigorous by the g r e a t religiom i l i t a r y o r d e r s of C a l a t r a v a , Saniiago, A l c a n t a r a , and Montesa. The cry of "Santiago!" (Saint James) is l e g e n d a r y as the w a r - c r y of these religious f i g h t e r s . D u r i n g the s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r y and the e a r l y p a r t of the seventeenth Spain knew one of the most brilliant m a n i f e s t a t i o n s of its cult u r e . Many l i t e r a r y m a s t e r p i e c e s , o f t e n showing the way to the rest of E u r o p e , were w r i t t e n t h e n — L a Clestina, Lazarilla de Tonnes, La Galatea, Don and the g r e a t d r a m a of the Golden Age. S p a n i s h c u l t u r e is not only i m p o r t a n t bec a u s e of its contribution to L e t t e r s , but because of the novelties of her discoveries, and the s i n g u l a r creations of her genius. T h i s is a period of g r e a t creations in the fields of philosophy and theology, :oo. Spanish c u l t u r e and t h o u g h t was d i f f u s e d t h r o u g h o u t all of Europe, thus greatly influencing international thought. The f i r s t half of the 10th cent u r y belongs to C a r l o s V ( C h a r l e s V, who really was C h a r l e s

I of

S p a i n ) , King of S p a i n a n d

Em-

peror of the Holy Roman E m p i r e . The second half of the c e n t u r y was under the leadership of Felipe 11 ( P h i l l i p I I ) . C a r l o s was Flemish, born and raised in the Low Countries. He reached manhood without s p e a k i n g a word of S p a n i s h . Yet he converted himself into the nost genuine exponent of S p a n i s h imperial ideas. His e m p i r e w a s in reality the last g r e a t historic attempt at an international e m p i r e . VVhthi America was conquered, it was believed t h a t these t e r r i t o r i e s were to belong to the H i s p a n i c world on the basis of e q u a l i t y . The lands of the New World were elevated to a political category s i m i l a r to t h a t of European dominions. T h i s was a new d e p a r t u r e and political t h o u g h t .

Even though it is t r u e t h a t f r o m the d e m o c r a t i c point of view the Indian, and in some few a r e a s the Negro, is in the m a j o r i t y , it is no less t r u e t h a t the Spanish race that discovered and colonized these tt-rritories contributed not only its Mood, but what is more i m p o r t a n t in the long run, it contributed its culture, its tongue, its religion, and its m a n n e r of life. The Hispanic s t a mp is u n e r a s a b l e and unmistakable in all Hispanic America. The g e n i u s of the colonizers was t r a n s m i t t e d to the natives until they w e r e molded in t h e i r image. C a r l o s V was the builder p a r The g r e a t social and political in- excellence of the Spanish e m p i r e . stitutions, the o r g a n i z a t i o n of life But his successor, his son Felipe and society, and the very concept II, w a s very d i f f e r e n t — r a t h e r t h a n • •f lift* proceeds almost entirely from S p a i n and P o r t u g a l . T h e r e fore, it behooves us to examine the Spain of the 10th c e n t u r y in o r d e r to see w h a t kind of a man was GOOD FOOD that S p a n i a r d , w h a t t y p e of society he lived in, and w h a t mode of thinkwith Quick Service ing he h a d . So m a n y racial c u r r e n t s have converged upon the t e r r i t o r y of Spain t h a t it is .almost impossible to d e f i n e its e t h n i c composition, i ' u r i n g m a n y c e n t u r i e s Spain 68 Emit 8th Street played the role of d e f e n d e r of Southwest E u r o p e a g a i n s t the inJust Around the comer at cursions and invasions of nonCollege Avenue E u r o p e a n peoples. Spain defended OfM 7100 AM. to 7.00 P.M. the c u l t u r a l p a t r i m o n y of E u r o p e CUmJ W«dmM<UT " 1'30 P.M. a s i with all the s t r e n g t h of her resources and m a n p o w e r . Sometimes All Day Suadar

CITY KITCHEN

Page Five

Though f a i l i n g to chalk up a the builder, he was the p r e s e r v e r . single win, a h a r d - h i t t i n g crew of He did c o n t r i b u t e much to Spanish E m m i e s walked off with top honc u l t u r e by the f o u n d i n g of libraries o r s in the b a t t i n g d e p a r t m e n t of and academies. the i n t r a m u r a l Softball t o u r n a m e n t T h e S p a n i a r d s of the 10th cen- concluded last week. T h e cellart u r y were men of g r e a t c o u r a g e dwellers edged out the Cosmos .204 and intrepidity as can be j u d g e d to .202, while the F r a t e r s , who regby the m u l t i t u d e and m a g n i t u d e istered t h e most hits, 38, w e r e of the e n t e r p r i s e s u n d e r t a k e n . placed third with .257. T h e chamThey were men of g r e a t emotions pion Knicks were the most able —men of pulsations r a t h e r t h a n r u n - g e t t e r s with 35, and the F r a calculations. Can anyone imagine t e r s and E m m i e s each socked out these conquistadores wisely cal- 4 home runs. c u l a t i n g and c o m p u t i n g the posIn the individual b a t t i n g race sibilities of c o n q u e r i n g Mexico and Gordy Brewer, E m m i e s ' outfielder, P e r u . It was not in their m a k e - u p who played only t h r e e g a m e s , took to do so. It is t h e i r zeal t h a t im- top laurels with a .600 a v e r a g e in pelled them to seemingly senseless, a league t h a t heralded a score of but really glorious a d v e n t u r e s . .H00 hitters. Bill Smith, IndependIt seems t h a t history was slow- ent infielder, sidelined in his last ly p r e p a r i n g Spain for this g r e a t g a m e on account of injuries, foltask. And Spain was p r e p a r e d at lowed Brewer to the finish with r the o p p o r t u n e time, because of her .500 clip. Brewer and S m i t h e n d long t r a i n i n g in w a r , her devotion had the most hits, 0, while Bob to t h e cause of European culture, Becksfort, Cosmo first-baseman, led and the s t a t e of the spirit of her the runs d e p a r t m e n t with a simipeople, who believed they had a lar total. Mike Kromp, Independmission to f u l f i l l . e n t s , and Paul Myrehn, Emmies, Spain took her c u l t u r a l and led the home run h i t t e r s with a economic riches to the rest of the pair apiece. Pitching honors went to Vern world, and finally became exhausted while a t t e m p t i n g to fulfill Sikkema, ace r i g h t - h a n d e r of the her mission. It must IM* remembered Knicks who won 4 and lost 1 in t h a t Spain did not p r o f i t very r e g u l a r play and who also pitched much f r o m her conquest of Amer- his team to the play-off championica, and in fact was so poor, t h a t ship. Chuck Baskin of the Areashe never knew p r o s p e r i t y , even at | ( , i a n s whiffed the most b a t t e r s , 31, a,so the height of her glory. This is ^ yielded the f e w e s t hits, 1,: in 24 u n d e r s t a n d a b l e when we see t h a t innings. F r a t e r Fred in the e n t i r e history of Spain, ma- j , { r i e v e u a s ^ e stingiest t w i r l e r in ov terial wellbeing h a s never been w a l k s ' ^ a n d i n r u n s . er a c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of her people, n ( ) r | space of 21 innings. have they ever shown g r e a t conTKAM BATTING All K K IIK Ave. cern over this m a t e r i a l phase of Kmmlcs rjy 26 34 4 .264 life. CimmoK ... \12 :'.2 32 0 .262 i jh •>: 3 s 4 .257 Knitfrs The s u p r e m e ideal in the con- I n.li'ix-nilvnt * I'.'H IM 32 3 .2.10 Knicks 142 r . 3.*, 2 .246 quest of America was not t h e oc- Amuli.'HK 11« 2(i 2 s 1 .241 cupation of t e r r i t o r i e s and the exI N D I M D I AL HATTING G AH K H Ave. ploiting of the natives, for the Itii w c r . Em 6 .600 S p a n i a r d s saw in t h i s New World S m i t h . In 6 .500 l l o l u . ' l l l . l . Co .4:.:. of such challenging g e o g r a p h y , the K. rl, . En. 4 .441 Kr.imii. I ml 1 I 4 .400 o p p o r t u n i t y to f o u n d , and to c r e a t e . V a n IliH'Vi'ti, ("i .3H.r. Audacity, intrepidity, intensity of lluyst r. Kn r. .:K'. I•• Vounir. Ar .-i .3H:, life, honor, and c o i n a g e at all n n . ' . In :• .3s:> l i i P f f p . Kti 4 .364 times a r e some well-defined charVuk. A r 4 .361 acteristics of this e x t r a o r d i n a r y P I T C H ING race t h a t conquered, populated, IP K H SO W L i k k i m n . Kn 30 1 2 : . 2.'. 4 1 civilized, and i m p r e g n a t e d its cul- SMri. v.-. F r 21 7 1:. 2 I K u s k i n . Ar 24 13 16 31 2 2 t u r e on most of the W e s t e r n HemiHolw i n l a . Co 23 17 19 11 2 sphere. In the midst of the a g i t a tions of life the S p a n i a r d never lost t h a t marvellous quality t h a t distinguishes him f r o m o t h e r OcINSURANCE c i d e n t a l s — the ever-present mixt u r e of the human and the divine.

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Frater Thinclads Soph Women Win Tally 120y2 Points May Day Laurels For Track Crown Paced by Doris K o s k a m p ' s 14% A s e x t e t of F r a t e r t h i n c l a d s tallied 8 1 % points between them to pace t h e i r f r a t e r n i t y to a lopsided t r i u m p h in the m e n ' s May Day T r a c k Meet. The easy victors rolled up 120% points ( m o r e t h a n the total o u t p u t of all o t h e r t e a m s ) , ncluding eleven f i r s t s and a tie. [n second were the E m m i e s who g a v e the F r a t e r s trouble in the t r a c k e v e n t s only to f l o u n d e r on the field a n d end up with a trio of f i r s t s and 03 points. The Independents were t h i r d with 21 points, followed by the Knicks, Cosmos, a n d A r c a d i a n s , respectively, with 12, ID 1 .., and 5 points. Individual h:';!i scorer f o r the meet was F r a t e r Bud Vande Wege '•'ho, though his only look at f i r s t ).&:e was with Cosmo J i m L a m b n the pole event, tallied 17% points on a second in the high hurdles, and t h i r d s in the lowhurdles, broad j u m p , and high j u m p . The o t h e r f i v e high-scoring F r a t e r s ' included Ted B a r r e t t , who g a r n e r e d 10*4 points, including t h r e e f i r s t s in the 100, 220, and broad j u m p ; Fred Kalsbeek with f i r s t s in the 880 and the mile; Bob Van Dyke with a p a i r of f i r s t s in the shot p u t and high j u m p ; Don Ladewig, first in the javelin event and second in the shot and d i s c u s ; and Paul Hendrickson who added 11 points on places in f o u r events. O t h e r f i r s t place w i n n e r s w e r e : Decker of the Emmies, who scored points in the meet including top honors in the low h u r d l e s ; J e r r y F o r m s m a , a n o t h e r Emmie, in the high h u r d l e s ; F r a t e r s Bob Koop and F r e d Veltman in the 440 and discus, respectively; a n d . Independent Don V a n d e n b e r g , who led the two-milers to the t a p e .

points, t h e s o p h o m o r e s rolled u p 42 tallies, including six out of seven firsts, a s they doubled t h e combined e f f o r t s of t h r e e o t h e r classes to win the a n n u a l May Day W o m e n ' s Track and Field Meet. T h e f r e s h m e n were d i s t a n t r u n n e r - u p s with 14 points, while t h e j u n i o r s a n d seniors g a t h e r e d 4 and 3 m a r k e r s , respectively. K o s k a m p took top h o n o r s in t h e high j u m p and broad j u m p e v e n t s and finished second in t h e 50-yard d a s h besides a n c h o r i n g the sophom o r e relay t e a m to victory. M a r g Moerdyke annexed first place l a u r els in the 50 and 75 y a r d dashes, and also placed third in the high j u m p to add 11 big points to t h e winner's total. Still a n o t h e r sophomore, M a r g A a r d e m a g a t h e r e d a fifth first place by t a k i n g the s o f t ball throw. Only non-sophomore to haul down a blue ribbon was J e a n n e Allen, who showed the way in t h e basketball t h r o w . The sophomore relay t e a m finished off the big success f o r t h e w i n n e r s in the d a y ' s most thrilling race, when K o s k a m p overcame a t w e n t y - y a r d handicap in the final fifty y a r d s and o u t - s p r i n t e d senior L a u r a Johnson to the wire. The summaries: 50-yard d a s h Moerdyk (So); Koskamp ( S o ) : R i c h a r d s ( F r ) . 6.0. 75-yard dash Moerdyk (So): Aardema ( S o ) : Keizer ( F r ) . 9.5. Hiith J u m p K o s k a m p (So): Heemstra ( J r ) : Moerdyk ( S o ) . 4' 5". Broad J u m p K o s k a m p ( S o ) : Nederveld ( F r ) : Post ( F r ) . 12' Softball Throw — Aardema (So): Allen ' F r ) : W o l f f e n a p e r K e r ( S o ) . 16.H' 6". B a s k e t b a l l T h r o w - A l l e n ( F r . I : WolfTensIierjjer ( S o ) : A a r d e m a ( S o ) . 7 6 ' . Relay S o p h o m o r e s ( M c R a e , E i l a n d e r . D«Graaf, Koskamp): S e n i o r s : Juniors. 1:65.0.

O

Sluggeroos W i n As 27 Women Honored

T h e F r a t e r s and E m m i e s split the two relay races, the f o r m e r T h e Sluggeroos won the women's t a k i n g the one-half mile f o u r s o m e softball t o u r n a m e n t by s l u g g i n g and the E m m i e s f i n i s h i n g f i r s t in out a 22-15 t r i u m p h over the r u n the mile contest. n e r u p H u n y a k s in the f i n a l round The Hummiiru-s: of play last week. At the s a m e 100 Harrt-U ( 1'): !)«•<• ki-r ( E ) a m i IK Voojrd i F): H f m l r i c k s u n I - ) : F o r m s m n time the Holland H i t t e r s were i E ) . 10.3. shellacking F a i r b a n k s , 20-9, for 220 H a r r . l t ( K ) ; I).Voo»nI ( F ) ; Decker t h i r d place. Members of the cham"'3*'' ^ o r m n m u ( E ) ; K r a n e n d o n k ( C ) . pionship crew a r e : S h o r t , Hemmes, 440 Koop ( F ) : H o t r m a n ( E ) : V a n d e r Baker, Allen, Moerdyke, Post, Ford, W o u d e ( E ) ; HrunK< r» H . ( E j ; D e J o n x ( A ) . .14.It. Hendrieth, Coffey, Van Neuren, HMO KitUbeek ( F ) : K r a a k ( K ) : V a n d e r High, and Oldenburg. W o u d e ( E ) : HruKKen. G. ( E ) : Visncher 1 ^ ). 2:14.3. On the i n t r a m u r a l t e n n i s f r o n t , Mile KalnlM-ek ( F ) : O t t i p o b y ( I ) : V a n J e a n n e Allen, one of the f i n a l i s t s , Sinirel ( F ) : Mel|>older ( K ) ; H e a s t y l i ) . 4 : j.1..6. battles the w i n n e r of t h e E d i t h T w o Mile V a n d e n b e r i r ( I ) ; O t t i p o b y ( I ) : Gnade-Phyl Dietrich match f o r the K a N b e e k ( F ) : H l a a u w ( F ) . 11:19.2. Low Hurdled D e c k e r ( E ) : F o r m s m a ( E ) : singles crown. The doubles competiV a n d e Wette ( F ) : V a n i n ^ e n ( F ) . 25.0. tion has reached the s e m i - f i n a l s Hijrh Hurdles F o r m s m a ( E ) ; V a n d e W e g e • F ) ; H e n d r i c k s o n ( F ) . 15.0. with W e a v e r - H e e m s t r a f a c i n g DietJ a v e l i n Ladewig ( F ) : Hoermnn ( E ) ; rich-Demian and H i n g a - V a n d e H e e m s t r a ( E > : K o r v e r ( E ) : Pout ( F ) . Wege matched a g a i n s t Allen-MoerS h o t P u t Van Dyke ( F ) : L a d e w i * ( F ) : dyke. B r i e v e (l-J; K o r v e r ( E ) ; Meyer ( C ) . 39 s . Twenty-seven m e m b e r s of the Discus Veltman ( F l : L a d e w i g ( F ) : Moer- W A A received a w a r d s t o d a y f o r l ,, , W,?lltr , F : ' Oocks ( K ) . 1 1 2^ the 11)47-48 y e a r a c c o r d i n g to Miss Pole Vault L a m b ( C ) a n d V a n d e W e ^ o Louise Van Dommelen, head of ( F ) : Ross ( I ) ; Liurers d ) ; Van Dyke 1 r ) a n d M u y s k e n s i E ) . 11'. women's athletics. On the list were IliKh J u m p - V a n Dyke ( F ) : H e e m s t r a Ike Demian and Phyl Dietrich, who iL): Vande Weife ( F ) ; Hendrickson ( h >: Decker ( E ) . 5 ' 7". e a r n e d the Senior a w a r d s f o r f o u r I'road J u m p Harrett (F): H e n d r i c k s o n y e a r s competition, and the eight i M : Vande W e ^ e ( F ) ; Ross ( I ) ; Ebn e t h ( A ) . 21' 3 " . tennis team members who received O n e - h a l f Mile R e l a y F r a t e r s ( B o v e n . De a p p r o p r i a t e medals. The e i g h t : Vooitd. T e r r i l l . B a r r e t t ) : E m m i e s ; Arc a d i a n s : K n i c k s : Cosmos. 1:44.0. Dietrich, Hemmes, Demian, Van O n e Mile Relay E m m i e s I BniKKers H . . Alst, Gnade, Breid, Allen, and B r u i o t e r s (J.. V a n d e r W o u d e . B o e r m a n ) ' : Moerdyke. I - r a t e r s : Knicks. 3:50.5.

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Pag® Six

Hope College Anchor

Britons Repeat As Vol+man Takes 1st

Hope Net, Diamond Squads Second In Ml A A Tourneys

Albion's thinclads c h a l k e d

their third consecutive MIAA track championship

Duteh Trio Stars As Hornets Win

FINAL TROPHY

Coach Harold Haverkamp's netmen came through in expected form last week-end as they finished second to K a l a m a z o o ' s perennial champions in the annual MIAA tournament on the Stowe courts in Kazoo. The Dutch netters added 11 tournament points to 12 tallies accumulated during the season for a 23-point total, 11 more than Albion gathered for third place honors. The Hornets were easy finalists with 39 points. Adrian with 8 and Hillsdale with 3 were fourth and fifth, respectively, while Alma finished last, not garnering a dual or tournament point. Three Hope stalwarts, Becksfort, Ken Etterbeek, and Jack Tirrell. advanced through the quarterfinal round before running into Kalamazoo men to chalk up all the poinU the Dutchmen needed to cinch runnerup honors. In the doubles H o p e ' s Becksfort-Etterbeek d u o got as f a r as the semi-finals before being eliminated by the eventual champions, Leighton and Beresky of Kazoo. Albion's No. 1 doubles combination of Jones and Casteel won the consolation honors in their division by defeating the Dutch semi-finalists. Besides finishing second in the conference tournament, Hope won five, i n c l u d i n g four conference matches and lost three during the regular season. All but one of the losses, that one being to Kazoo, was avenged in return duals. Coach Haverkamp awarded letters to Gene Barendse, Bob Becksfort, Ken Etterbeek, John Ligtvoet, and Jack Terrill for the recently concluded season. Summaries of the MIAA tournament: SINGLES Firit Round K n i r r i m (Ad I def. S m i t h ( A l m a ) . «-6. 6-3. Berkiforl ( H o ) dcf. Hummel! ( H i ) .

.'1-6. 6-0.

6-2.

G n j c o r y . (Alb> def. Slul»k» ( H i ) . 6-1. 6-0. Cantefl ( A l b ) d e f . W e l U ( H i ) . 6-2. 6-1. Ktterb««k ( H o ) def. D e n n y A i m ) . 6-4. 6-3. Beresky ( K ) d e f . H u n t e r ( A l b ) . 6-0. 6-0. Ko\ ( Ailr) d e f . Gentry ( A i m ) , 6-1. 6-3. F r e v e r t ( A l b ) def. L e o n a r d ( A d ) . >-6. '^-6. 6 - 1 .

Lirtvoet

i Ho)

def.

Driesbeok

(K)

def.

Harsen

(Hi).

6-1.

(Aim).

6-3.

6-1.

I^-iifbton 6-0.

M a r t i n ( K ) d e f . Massinjfill ( A d ) . 6-4. 6-0. B a r n e s ( H i ) d e f . Iindi ( A i m 1 , 6-3. T-.V Barrndir ' H o ) d e f . Wil.-on ' A d ) . 6-3. 6-3 Braden ( K ) d e f . J o n e s ( A l b ) . 6-0. 6-0.

STANDINGS

F BK CC 0 10 10 9 4 K 6 7 4 9 1 0 4 7 2 2 1 6

Albion Kar.oo Hot*' Hillsdale Alma Adrian

BS G 6 6 0 4 S 2 10 8 4 10 0 0

Te Tr 6 10—48 0 6 -41 8 0—3r. 2 4-34 0 2-29 4 6 21

Albion Walks Away W i t h 47-48 Sports Trophy; Hope Third Most coveted honors in the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association, the All-Sports Trophy, won last year by Hope, this week rested in the hands of the Albion Britons following the conference field day at Kalamazoo last weekend. The new trophy-holders amassed 48 points as the MIAA concluded its initial seven-sport program. Kalamazoo, though unrepresented in 'mseball, finished second with 41 allies, while Hope's '4()-'4T holders mrely came in third beating out Jillsdale, 35-31. Alma in f i f t h had Ji) points, while Adrian, also with»ut a baseball team, rounded out Lhe conference's six schools with 21 points. The Britons worked from the >ottom up in their quest for the MIAA's highest pvize as they failed lo tally in the year's first sport, "ootball. Cross country and basketball, however, Iwith produced chamlionship squads, which, added to i spring sport aggregate of 28 joints, including another title in track, gave Albion the trophy in a walkaway. Other individual sport winners were Alma in golf, Kalamazoo in ennis, and Hillsdale in baseball. Kazoo and the Dales shared the pigskin crown. Hope's third place showing came .)n undisputed seconds in tennis and baseball, a tie with Alma for second in basketball, third in football, fourth in cross country, and f i f t h in golf. Presentation of the individual and All-Sports trophies were made by the queens of the respective colleges following the running of the track events at Angell Field in Kalamazoo Friday night.

Seeond Round Sunderland

(K)

def.

Knierim

(Ad).

6-0.

6-0.

Beek^forl ( H o ) def. G r e g o r y ( A l b ) 6-1. 6-4. Rttrrbeek ( H o i def. Casteel ( A l b ) . 6-3. 6-2. Beresky ( K ) di f . Fox ( A d ) . 6-0. 6-0. Tirrell ( H o ) d e f . Frevert ( A l b ) . 6-1. 6-4. L e i g h t o n i K ) d e f . Liftvoct ( H o ) . 6-0. 6-0. M a r t i n ( K ) d e f . Harnes i H i ) . 6-0. 6-0. B r a d e n ( K ) d e f . Harendte ( H o ) . 6-1. 6-0 Quarter-Final* S u n d e r l a n d ( K ) def. Beeksfort ( H o ) . 6-1. 6-3. Beresky (K) d e f . Etterbeek i Ho) 6-". 6-0. L e i g h t o n ( K ) d e f . Tirrell ( H o ) . 6-o. 6-0. M a r t i n i K ) d e f . Braden ( K ) . 4-6. 6-1. 6-0 Setni-Finals S u n d e r l a n d ( K ) def. Beresky ( K ) . 6-3. 6-4. Leitrhton ( K ) d e f . M a r t i n ( K ) . 6-3. 6-4. DOUBLES F i n t Round F l s k e - L u n d l a n d ( A l b ) def. D e r m a - S m i t h ( A i m ) . 6-2. 6-4. Ftterbeek-Berkifort ( H o ) def. F o x - K n i e r i m ( A d ) . >*.6. 6-0. Braden-Maritn (K) def. Harsen-Gentry ( A l m ) . 6-4. 6-0. J o n e s - C a s t e e l ( A l b ) def. Massentnll-Leonard ( A d ) . 6-1. 6-2. Uuarter-FinaU Le 1 k h to n - Be res k y ( K ) def. F i s k e - L u n d land ( A l b ) . 6-2. 6-1. Ktterbeek-Berkifort ( H o ) def. R u m m e l l B a r n e s ( H i ) . 6-2. 6-0. B r n d e n - M a r t i n ( K ) def. Barendie-Terrill ( H o ) . 6-1. 6-1. Jones-Casteel .Alb) def. Driesbeek-Well* ( H i ) . 6-0. 6-1.

"T" SHIRTS W h i t e Shirt w i t h N a v y Blue

Hope's diamondmen split even in a pair of games last week-end in the MIAA field day a t Kalamazoo and finished in second place in the first conference baseball season since 1929. Hillsdale, which nailed down the pennant that year, took top honors in '48 by sweeping both their games last Friday a f t e r noon. Hope 2, Alma 1 Chuck Zoet's long single which scored Bill Hillegonds from second in the tenth inning gave Hope a 2-1 victory over Alma in the first round of tournament play. Bill Ver Hey chucked three-hit ball as he bested Chuck Saxton of Alma in a tight pitcher's duel. The summaries: 3

Hillsdale 7, Albion .'i In the other first round contest Hillsdale earned the right to meet Hope in the finals by nudging a persistent Albion nine, 7-5. Schultz was the winning hurler; Spyker the loser. The summaries: Albion l " l lol 001 <• 3 Hillsdale 010 130 20x 7 lo *.> B a t t e r i e s : S p y k e r . W e l l i n g t o n ( 7 ) . Benta ("•). a n d Wilcox. S e h u l t z a n d Rowe. Los.nt; P i t c h e r : S p y k e r .

Hillsdale IB, Hope 3 Inability to hit in the pinches and wildness on the mound cost Hope first place as Hillsdale, behind Mike McCarthy, overpowered the Dutchmen in the championship round, 1(1-3. Jack Marema, one of a quartet of hurlers used by Coach Schouten, was the loser.

though

Tomian.

Vinson

Season's Record

The even break in last week?nd's games gave the Schoutenmen an 8-5 record for the 1948 seaHEAVY WEIGHT son, with Aquinas and Calvin contests still on the docket. Results of recent games played prior to the conference field day showed Hope A l l Sizes splitting a doubleheader with Muskegon J. C., winning the first, 9-0, as Mike Skaalen pitched near-per$j.l9 fect, one-hit ball, and dropping the five-inning aftermath, 1-0. Bill Ver Hey allowed Alma just three hits as the D u t c h m e n b l a n k e d the Knights, 3-0, in a conference game, while Albion thumped Hope, 4-1, in Phone 9533 still another MIAA contest. 206 River Ave.

SUPERIOR SPORT STORE

Hitfh H u r d l e s W a n l ( H i ) : Allen ( A l b ) : Rosemaii ( A i m ) : Reid i K ) : F o i m s m a (Ho). i:..v sMi Sock rider ( K ): Seybrlnir ( H i ) ; J a r tit ( A l b ) : F r y ( A l b ) : B r n w n ( A i m ) . 2:03.2 l ^ s c u s Vi.ltman ( H o ) : H a a s ( M b ) : Heller ( A l b ) : M a r t i n ( A l b ) : H a r s h ( A d ) . 129' Broad J u m p W i l l i a m s (l!i): Henry ' A i m ) : E d ^ a r ( A i m ) : Nicholson i K ) B a r r e d i l l n ) . 22'.

300 000 001 4 I 0OO 000 ooo 0 6 3220

and

Relay A d r i a n McConnor): Alma. 3:32.

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Phone 2465

As this final issue of the '47-'48 Anchor brings this column to its finale, we look back f o r a moment upon a great year of athletics at Hope College. True, no All-Sports trophy testifies to any claim on greatness this year, nor is there even a single individual sport championship award present to verify our contention. Yet, as in life off the battlefields of athletics, eminence and distinction do not necessarily involve awards and nonors and trophies. Real greatness in college athletics comes only from its one practical goal — that ^oal is not to manufacture f u t u r e material for t h e p r o f e s s i o n a l spheres, nor is it merely to entertain — t h a t goal is to make an inJividual, through the medium of physical fitness, a more intellectaal, capable, and competent individual, t h e r e b y m a k i n g h i m meritorious of any possible acclaim. And so, we say, a great year of athletics at Hope, because in victory and in defeat, at home and on che road, the athletes in Orange and Blue were a credit to themselves, to the men who trained them, and to the institution they represented. Grantland Rice once said that it was not whether you won or whether you lost, but how you played the game that really counts .n the end. So, it is not whether /ou received glory or whether you failed to receive glory, nor is it ;ven whether you were ignored or ihunned in the process, but whether .n pursuit of nobility, you were be:oming a greater character, whether or not you truly merited any attainable esteem.

Veltman lined out his third hit M I A A ' s M o s t Valuable of the night in the; eighth to keep F r a t e r hopes alive, but his matet A w a r d To Don M u l d e r couldn't get him around and the Captain Don Mulder of the 11)47Knicks put a walk and single on 48 Dutch cagers, who has f o u r base before Sikkema ended the title- times been chosen to the All-Conijame with his left-field smash. ference mythical quintet, today Fielding feature of the game was awarded the Randall E. Bosch was the tournament's only triple trophy as the MIAA's Most Valuplay pulled by the Knicks in the first half of the fourth frame able Player in '47 and '48. The squelching an apparent Frater diminutive guard climaxed a g r e a t rally. With Ken Weller and Veltman on second and third, respectively, Huyser shoe-stringed Vande Wege's short fly to left, threw to Cook at third nabbing Veltman; Cook then quickly relayed the ball to George Schippers at second in time to catch the retreating Weller.

The box-wore: Prater* Kraii us Hcndrirkaon c V o n k e r 3b Visscher H. cf Brieve p - l b Weller 2b Veltmnn rf V a n d e Wetfe I b - p Visscher If 1 M : tchell, S c h u l t z . C a r t e r . Huter 2b Albion: Kazoo: H i l l s d a l

Phone 2821 !&S&&eSS8?SS& &S3eSSS&&SS&!*SSSSSSSS8S&SSSSSSSSSSSS&SSS8SSS3SSSa

Martin-Braden

Independents

M c C o n n o r ( A d ) : Polly l A l b ) : Mulligan (Alb): Bi< r m a n iK): Williams ( H i ) . 22.7. T w o Mile MrDonald ( A l b ) : S m i t h ( K ) L a r s o n ( A i m ) : H a j r a d o n e ( A l b ) : Culm a n ( A l b ) . 10:23.3. l>iw H u r d l e s W a r d ( H i ) : A l l . n ( A l b ) (•wilt ( H i ) : Reid ( K ) : V o u n n ( H i ) 2:1.9*1.

s

WHITE CROSS BARBER SHOP

•>

I. 1 2

they

10.1,

Behind Charley Wurm's six-hit pitching Albion cinched third place in the MIAA baseball tourney by shutting out Alma. 4-0. Vinson was charged with the loss. The summaries: Albion Alma B a t ' , n.--: W u r m and Pnrkes.

FINAL STANDINGS W 5 Fraters 1 Arcadians 3

Vern Sikkema, the Knicks neverwalked tiring Hurler, won his own ball game last Wednesday niffht by away with only a trio of firsts. Adrian finished second with 44 cracking out a single in the eighth inning to score Paul Cook with the points, while Kazoo and Hillsdale winning run and give the Knicks had 38 and 35',3 for third and a 6-5 victoiy over the F r a t e r s ir. fourth place, respectively. A disthe play-off contest for top honorf qualified runner in the mile relay m the intramural softball tournacost Hope fifth place, as Alma ment. The timely hit concluded u ended up with 17 and the Dutch nitterly fought battle which, though tracksters with 15 l ,i. marred by frequent errors, proved Walt McConnor, Adrian's Olymlo be the n o s t exciting tiff of tht pic hopeful, who copped individual tourney. l scoring honors with 11 A points, The F r a t e r s drew first blood in including a pair of firsts, was this '.he second frame when Hud Vande year's only record-breaker, changWege, who was nicked for the ing the 23-year-()ld, 50.7 time in winning run in the extra inning the 440 to 50.1. Hillsdale's Tom Irove in Fred Veltman. But th( Ward was the only other double -Cnicks crept ahead in their hall winner, taking firsts in both hurdle as Captain " H a w k " Huyser slam races. med out the game's only home r u r Fred Veltman, ace weight man, scoring Don Johnson ahead of him garnered top honors for Hope when The score remained 2-1 until tht he came within three feet of breaklop of the sixth when the F r a t e n ing the long-standing discus record )nce again went out in f r o n t witl with a throw of 129" 8%'. i four-run barrage. H a r r y Vis The conference meet last week jcher and Fred Hrieve both singled; ended track competition for Hope Veltman banged out a double scorfor the current season, which saw the thinclads take fourth in the .ng Visscher; Vande Wege lined MIAA indoor meet, one dual vic- jut another single to score Brieve tory, and a second in a triangular and Veltman; and, when Bob Vis match. The following men have jcher was safe on an error, Vande been awarded letters, according to Wege scored the fourth run of the track mentor, AI Vanderbush, for inning. The' trailing Knick nine nibbled the '48 season of activity: Ted Barrett, Walt Boerman, J e r r y Forms- the margin to .')-4 in the button ma, Fred Kalsbeek, Vern Kraii, half of the sixth on consecutive Pete Kraak, Bob Koop, Jim Lamb, singles by Harold Grissen, Bill DeBud Vande Wege, Bob Van Dyke, Pree, and Huyser. Then in the Fred Veltman, and Con Vander seventh, without the- use of a hit the winners knotted the score at Woude. Summaries of the MIAA meet: Vail on two walks and a pair ol iirors. event,

Pole V a u l t Editar (Aim) and Henry ( A d ) : '1 h o m a s ( H i ) : Mead ( A l b ) : V a n de W e g e ( H o ) , and L a m b ( H o ) . 11' V . Mile L a r s o n ( A d » : W i n k l e r ( K ) : l i a n a done ( A l b ) : ('.liter ( A i m ) : Kalsbeek (Ho). 4:3s.l. J a v e l i n e Flowers ( K ) : (iret-n ( K ) : Pes like ( A d ) : G w y n ( K ) ; ("hrisi ( A l b ) 167' 9 " . Shot Put H a n s ( A l b ) : Amos ( A l b ) : M a r tin ( A l b ) : ( " h r n t . n ( K ) : V a n W:,Conner ( A t l ) . 43' The summaries: Hurh J u m p C u l m a n ( A l b ) : Ball ( A l b ) Hope 001 200 000 3 4 4 Charter (Ad): Morton ( A d ) : Vande llillsdnle 014 016 tox 16 11 I Wege ( H o ) : Bl.imi ke ( H i ) . .V 7". B a t t e r i e s : M a r e m a . V e r Hey ( 3 ) . Sec- 440 M c C o n n o r ( A d ) : Tnimbley (Alb): Van Duaen ( A i m ) . C a r t e r ( A d ) : Chalt o r (61. M r C a l l u m ( 7 ) . a n d H i l l e g o n d s . m e r s ( K ) . 50.1. D e W i t t . M c C a r t y a n d Rowe. L o s i n g P i t c h 100 Vounvr ( H i ) : B a r r e t t ( H o ) : Polly er: Marema. (Alb): H e n r y ( A d ) : Mulligan ( A l b )

Flocking

FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

A

.7.-10

3

75

N ECCS^ARILY

pions heaped up points in all but

.600 .300 .200

I

up

and evening. The repeating cham-

Pet.

Alma 000 100 000 0 hope 100 000 000 I Batlerien: Saxton and I'ark.s. Ver Hey a n d Hill. Ootids.

rolling

Kalamazoo last Friday afternoon

one

W .3 ...»

Hillsdal* Hope Alb.on Alma

by

points in the conference meet at

FINAL STANDINGS

H o p e Seal in Rayon

Semi-Finali L e i g h t o n - B e r e s k y ( K ) def. Ktterbeek-Berkifort ( H o ) . 6-2. 6-1. Martin-Braden (K) def. Jones-Casteel ( A l b ) . 6-1. 6-1. Final* Leiirhton-Beresky ( K ) def. ( K ) . 6-4. 2-6. 8-6.

Dutch Nine Grabs Alma Opener, 2-1; Dales Annex Title

Albion 4, Alma (I HOPE COLLEGE

up

Knick Nine Edges Fraters In Extra Innings For Title

Totals Knirki K y s k a m p ss Fieldhouse c Grissen cf .. D e P r e e rf J o h n s o n lb H u y s e r If Cook 3b S k i p p e r s 2b S i k k e m a i>

AH 4 . 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 1 3;. AH 4 4 4 3 4 . 4 3 3 3

H 11 0 0 1 1 (1 •>

1 0 0 K 0

0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1

H 1 1 1

collegiate career this year by leading

all

Hope

scorers

with

24f»

points in 17 games, an average of 14.4 per game, and finishing second only

to

team-mate

Bud

Vande

Wege in conference tallying with 149 points. The award was won last year by Russ

DeVette, ex-Hope

forward

•_>

sensation and n e w l y - a p p o i n t e d

1 0

Dutch cage mentor. Blanket Winners

0 (

0 11 H 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

Totals 1( 32 6 Fraters 010 004 00 - : , 11 4 Knicks 020 002 11 l^isinjf Pitcher: Vande Wejte. Home Run: Huyser.

Five

graduating

seniors .were

presented " H " blankets this morning. tt was announced by Athletic Director Milton Hinga. The five were:

Glenn

Bruggers, football;

Harve

Buter,

Higgs,

football,

track;

Vern

basketball; basketball,

Dick and

Kraii, football and

io r> t r a c k ; and Don Mulder, football

Holkeboer Second; Golfers End Fifth While Alma was winning both the team and medalist honors, Hope's defending MIAA golf titlists were finishing fourth in the annual golf tournament held at Kalamazoo on May 20 and 21. In the season's final standings, however, Kalamazoo, on the basis of six dual points, edged out the Hope linkers for f o u r t h place. The Alma sextet of champions covered the 36 holes in 1037 strokes, four less than runnerup Hillsdale with 1041; Hope golfers went over in 1076. The Briton's Blanck shot a sensational 34, 1 under par, on the back green d u r i n g the second day's activity, which, along with a 40 going out and an 82 on the day before gave him medalist laurels with a 156. Hope's No. 1 man. Earl Holkeboer, followed up his first day's 80 with an 82 on the last day to g a r n e r runnerup individual honors with a 162. Coach Albert Timmer announced today the following letter-winners for the '48 season: Chris DenHerder, Baxter E l h a r t , Earl Holkeboer, Edwin Brondyke, Robert Houtman, and Henry Visser. Not counting last week's field meet the Hope Hhkmen won four and lost six matches d u r i n g the season.

and baseball.

Team and individual scoring in the conference tourney: Alma 524 513—1037 B la nc k Anderson Mcl>onell HraKk' Jadvmskas Knox Hillsdale 513

84 82 88 82 n6 91

81 —le.'i 87—169 94—182 89—171 84—170 93 184

86 86 88 90 91 93

86—172 88—174 89—177 82—172 89—180 87—180

521—1055

Kasler Hadden Denton Warner Steele Pfeuffer

-

Hope 533

543—1076

Holkeboer Houtman Elhart Vis«er DenHerder Brondyke

80 82—162 87 8S—170 92 96 - 1 8 8 93 103—196 88 91—179 93 88—181

Kalamazoo 555 Southworth Hansen Corfleld Williams Hassburtrer Lonjjacre Adrian

74—156 85 — 167 85—169 91 — 182 95-188 83 175

528—1041

Frey H e)hlmacher Parker R«-y B Roby Smeltier Albion 534

82 H2 84 91 93 92

604

Hod i o n Evant Schumn Bolton McKean ... Brown

533—1088

90 81—171 _n.

87 84—171 92 89—181 98 91—189 90 100 - 1 9 0 98 88—186

692—II»6

95 98—193 98 91—189 92 99—191 110 96—206 10« 102-208 103 101—209

FINAL STANDINGS Dual Alma Hillsdale .. Albion ...... Kalamaioo Hope

Adrian

Tour

...10

10

... 6 ... 6 ... •

8

... 2

0

Total 20 14 12 8

t 0

Profile for Hope College Library

05-27-1948  

05-27-1948  

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