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HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Hope College — Holland, Michigan

LXVIII—17

Four Former Students to Receive Honorary Degrees at Commencement F o u r prominent f o r m e r students will receive honorary degrees f r o m their Alma Mater when Hope College holds its Commencement Exercises on J u n e 4. Each has attained a measure of achievement in his respective field, according to Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, who made the announcement today. Those receiving degrees are as follows: Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) to Dr. Bernadine Siebers DeValois; Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) to Mr. Simon Den Uyl; Doctor of Literature (Litt.D.) to Dr. J a m e s MuilenDr. Wyand Wichers, f o r m e r presb u r g ; and Doctor of Divinity ident of Hope College and currently (D.D.) to the Reverend Henry Bast. vice-president of Western Michigan Dr. DeValois, a hope g r a d u a t e of College in Kalamazoo, will be the li)3(), has served as a medical speaker at Hope's Ninety-first Commissionary to India f o r many years, teaching in the Women's Medical mencement Exercises, to be held in College at Vellore. She is currently the Chapel, J u n e 4. home on f u r l o u g h . Mr. Den Uyl, who attended Hope in 1916 and 1917, is currently president of the Boh'n Aluminum Company of this city. Dr. Muilenburg, a Hope g r a d u a t e in the class of 1920, is at present P r o f e s s o r of the Old Testament at Union Theological Seminary of New York City. He was a member of the committee of P r o t e s t a n t scholars responsible for the publication several years ago of the Revised S t a n d a r d Version of the Holy Bible. An expert on the much-discussed "Dead Sea Scrolls," Dr. MuilenDr. W y n a n d W i c h e r s b u r g has spent a good deal of time Dr. Wichers, a Hope College in the Holy Land. Rev. Bast, at present pastor of g r a d u a t e of 1909, t a u g h t at the Bethany Reformed Church of Grand college f o r several y e a r s prior to Rapids, Michigan, and radio minis- his election as president in 1931. t e r of Temple Time, weekly Gospel He served in that office until 1945, broadcast of the Reformed Church at which time he left to a s s u m e his in America, is a g r a d u a t e in the duties with Western Michigan Colclass of 1930, and a f o r m e r inlege. His subject will be "A Cols t r u c t o r in the d e p a r t m e n t of Bible. lege of Distinction."

Current Grants To Hopeites The following s e n i o r s are listed at this time in the Registrar's office as having received scholarships for graduate work: William Holt, Physics, to the University of Kansas, Clarence Huizenga, Economics, to the Carnegie Institute of Technology; Robert De Young, Math., to the University of Cincinnatti; and Ronald Ackermann, Math., to the University of Wisconsin.

'Key' Adds 2 More; Selects Officers

rr

Four-Part Harmony" to Govern

Last Call For Edward

J.

Wolters,

chairman of the committee on scholarships, has announced that there

Historic Graduation

are many opportunities available for foreign travel and study next year under various p r o g r a m s of

Kooiker Addresses Senior Banquet The annual senior class banquet was held on Tuesday evening. May 22, in the Terrace Dining Room at Durfee Hall. B a r b a r a Kruizenga was chairman of the s p r i n g dinner honoring the Class of 1956. Master of Ceremonies f o r the evening was Jack De Pree, with Ed Coon leading the g r o u p in devotions. Music was supplied by a group of senior girls, the Minors, under the direction of Marcia Veldman. The "Will" and " P r o p h e c y " were read by Lois Van Delinder. Toasts to the g r a d u a t i n g class were given by Dean Vander L u g t and Dr. Lubbers. P r e s e n t i n g the main address to the seniors w a s Anthony Kooiker.

The eleven new members of Blue Key, the national honorary f r a t e r nity, were announced on May 4th a t a chapel service lead by the retiring senior members. The eleven J u n i o r men a r e : John De Vries, Howard H a r r i n g t o n , Gordon Hondorp, Theodore Redding, Harold Ritsema, L a r r y Siedentop, N a t h a n Decorations were planned by BarVander W e r f , Marlin Vander Wilt, William Vander Yacht, David Van b a r a J e f f r e y and included miniature Eenenaam, and Robert Winter. g r a d u a t e s , which decked t h e tables. L a t e r , at a meeting of these new A dinner of sirloin steak w a s members, two others were elected, served to the seniors and guests, namely, Lawrence Lup and Robert which included Dr. and Mrs. Irwin Lubbers, Miss E m m a Reeverts, Mr. Ritsema. The new officers for the 1956-57 Anthony Kooiker, Dr. and Mrs. Blue Key were elected and t h e re- Douglas Blocksma, Mr. and Mrs. sults a r e : President, Gordon Hon- Milton Hinga, and Dr. and Mrs. d o r p ; S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r , John De William Vander Lugt. Vries; and Corresponding SecreOther seniors who helped to plan t a r y , Howard H a r r i n g t o n . Robert the event were Tom H a r r i s , Skip Ritsema will act as Student Man- Day; Marianne Wierks, P r o g r a m ; a g e r of the Blue Key Bookstore f o r Virginia H a r t s e m a , P r o g a m s ; and the coming year. Bud Failor, Tickets.

A basic change in the s t r u c t u r e of the administration of Hope College f o r the coming year was announced today by Dr. Irwin J. Lubbers, president. Terming the change a " m a j o r reorganization" in the functioning of the colege administration. Dr. Lubbers called attention to the fact that increased enrollment and the consequent problems of administration have required many hours of his time which he feels could be better spent in maintaining contact with churches, alumni, and other f r i e n d s of the college.

grants-in-aid to students wishing to attend European universities. Among the p r o g r a m s included are the Rhodes a n d F u l b r i g h t Scholarship plans sponsored respectively by the Oxford University of England and the United S t a t e s government. Also included a r e fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, a privately-endowed American organization, and several opportunities available f r o m the Institute of International Education, a non profit organization which acts as a clearing house f o r m a n y outstanding travel p r o g r a m s not included in the above three catagories. Since applications are closed on all of these plans in early J u n e , Mr. Wolters advises all interested students to contact h i m immediately in the office of the Department of Latin, Van Raalte 312.

Annual S.C. Retreat Held at Castle Park On Tuesday, May 22, the present and f o r m e r Student Councils held their annual Retreat at Castle Park to discrss and to evaluate the various phases of student government.

Of Education There is no single m a j o r a m o n g the women of Hope more f r e q u e n t ly selected than education—elementary and secondary. If only all those sophomores who have applied for an education m a j o r , and all those juniors and seniors who will soon be teaching in e a r n e s t could share in the vision of Gibran's Prophet when he said:

Lubbers, president of Hope College. tior, but also f r e e Dr. Lubbers for To date, one new professor has i m p o r t a n t work on and off the been added to the faculty, with one campus. other r e t u r n i n g f r o m a leave of absence.

Van Putten to Lead New W.A.A. Board

aught but t h a t which already lies half asleep in the dawning •

J

, •

ers, gives not of his wisdom but r a t h e r of his faith and his lovingness.

"The musician may sing to you of the r h y t h m which is in all space, but he cannot give you the e a r which a r r e s t s the rhythm nor the voice t h a t echoes it. "And he who is versed in the science of numbers can tell of the regions of weight and measure, but he cannot conduct you thither. F o r the vision of one man lends not its wings to another man. "And even a s each one of you s t a n d s alone in God's knowledge, so m u s t each one of you be alone in his knowledge of God and in his understanding of the e a r t h . " .

a u t h o r i t y in their fields, beginning with the Fall Semester of next year. Those designated are as follows: in the area of finance, Mr. Henry Steffens, t r e a s u r e r of the college; concerning academic af-

fairs, Dr. William Vander Lugt, dean of the college; and in student S t u d e n t s in attendance included affairs, Mr. Milton L. Hinga, presthe heads of m a j o r campus organ- ent dean of men, who will become izations and publications, as well as dean of students. Replacing Hinga the council members. The following as dean of men will be Mr. John members of the administration and Visser of the d e p a r t m e n t of history faculty were invited: President I. and political science. J. Lubbers, Dean William Vander New Post Created Lugt, Dean Milton Hinga, Dean E m m a Reeverts, Dr. Roert CavanThe f o u r t h post, t h a t of dean of augh. Miss Marjorie Pickens, Miss administration, will involve "interEleanor De Pree, Mr. Paul Ried, nal administrative problems," acDr. Paul Fried, Mr. E. Gearhart, cording to Lubbers, who stated that and student council advisors Mr. no appointment has as yet been Howard Zandbergen and Mr. made to t h a t post. Charles Lininger. J a n e Gouwens Dr. Lubbers stressed t h a t each was general chariman for the event. of these deans is to have final jurisdiction in his field, deriving his a u t h o r i t y f r o m the Board of Trustees, through the president of the college, to whom each will report. It is expected t h a t the new P r e l i m i n a r y changes in the staff for the coming year were an- system will not only clarify the nounced today by Dr. Irwin J . question of authority and jurisdic-

"No man can reveal to you

"If he is indeed wise, he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdom, but r a t h e r leads you to the threshold of your own mind. The a s t r o n o m e r may speak to you of his understanding of space, but he cannot give you his understanding.

F o r this reason, f o u r members of the administrative staff have been designated as having final

Harton to Return; One Added to Staff

The Limits

of your knowledge. The teacher who walks in the shadow of the temple, a m o n g his follow-

5 6 - ' 5 7 Staff

Visser Fills Dean of Alen's Post

European Study Professor

,

1956

Hinga to Become Student Dean;

Wichers to Speak at

According to Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, president of Hope, both the speaker and the subject a r e particularly a p p r o p r i a t e , since Commencement Day 1956 will m a r k the ninetieth a n n i v e r s a r y of t h e incorporation of Hope College under the present system of administration.

M a y 25,

At the annual W.A.A. A w a r d s Banquet, held Wednesday, May 23, the officers f o r 1956-1957 were announced. Barb van P u t t e n will head the new Board as president, while B. J . Burnett will assist her as vice-president. Joyce Leighley was elected as Secretary, Mary Kay Diephuis as Point-Recorder, and Sandy Dressel will be in c h a r g e of publicity.

The recipient of the Hazel Kleyn S p o r t s m a n s h i p Award was also anR e t u r n i n g f r o m a one year's nounced a t the banquet. The award leave of absence will be Miss Helen is given to a sophomore girl who Harton, of the Speech D e p a r t m e n t , has actively participated in intrawho h a s been away f r o m campus m u r a l s and who h a s displayed this y e a r while working towards sportsmanlike conduct. The sophoher Doctor of Philosophy degree. more girl chosen was Joyce LeighN o r t h w e s t e r n University of Evan- ley. ston, Illinois, will make her Dr. The present W.A.A. Board anH a r t o n this A u g u s t . nounced t h a t the annual picnic supA u g m e n t i n g the staff of the Psy- per will be held on May 31st. chology D e p a r t m e n t next year will Seniors on the present Board are be Dr. Robert De Haan, currently planning the picnic f o r the 1955-56 a m e m b e r of the staff of the Uni- members and also the new officers versity of Chicago. Dr. De H a a n and board members. received his bachelor's degree f r o m On May 10, 11, and 12 the WoCalvin College in 1947. A f t e r re- men's Tennis and A r c h e r y Teams ceiving his Ph.D. f r o m the Uni- attended the M.I.A.A. conference versity of Chicago in 1951, Dr. De f o r a r c h e r y and tennis a t Albion H a a n remained on their staff, doing College. The Archery T e a m came special work with the university- home with second-place honors and sponsored Quincy (111.) Youth De- archer Dot Winstrom received spevelopment Project. H e is considered cial honors f o r the highest score. to be a n expert in t h e field of In tennis, Kalamazoo and Calvin . applied psychology. College tied f o r first place. Miss

Helen

Harton


Page Two

HOPE

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Member Associated Collegiate Press PRESS

Published every week by the students of Hope College except during holiday or examination periods. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at a special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $1.00 per year.

Co-Editors News Editor Feature Editor Society Editors Sports Editor Typists

EDITORIAL S T A F F Marianne Wierks, Robert Winter Joyce Leighley Sally Schneider Connie Miller, Hans Doele Tom Harris Jane MacEachron, Jan Peck, Harriet Van Heest BUSINESS STAFF

Business Manager Assistants Advertising Circulation

Harold Ritsema Fred Birdsall, Ron Vander Schaaf Mil Decker Art Martin

The Indians . . . and the Chiefs There is a story of a tribe of redmen who were once prosperous and successful. However, a f t e r a period of years, they found themselves declining rapidly i n s o f a r as t h e i r s t a t u s a m o n g the various tribes was concerned. When asked the source of the trouble by a newspaper reporter, one old and wise sachem replied: ' T o o Many Chiefs; Not Enough Indians." Prima Facie (which is Latin f o r a hasty peek at a f e w f a c t s followed by magnificent leap to conclusions), this would seem to sum up what we expect will be the general attitude on the p a r t of student and f a c u l t y alike with regard to Dr. Lubbers' announcement of the three-dean system of administration next year. And I am as guilty as any, f o r this was my initial reaction as well. But upon reflection, it would seem that several f a c t s deserve to be brought to the s t u d e n t s ' attention before conclusions are drawn. Deans: Servants or Rulers? Administrative duties have assumed an unusual significance in the academic world of today. Somehow, the Deans seem to be a variety of " s u p e r - p r o f e s s o r s " who s u b j u g a t e faculty and students alike as they extend t h e i r grasp over the entire school. And yet, in the educative process, which college everywhere claim to p e r p e t u a t e , is it not the professors, r a t h e r t h a n the deans, who are actually involved in the m a j o r business of a college? Their function, a f t e r all, is more to train minds than to receive and file records of class and chapel attendance. As Dr. Lubbers put it: "The top-ranking position at Hope College is t h a t of professor." If the professor is the basis for the educative process, what then is the t r u e function of a d e a n ? It would seem t h a t his is the way 9f service: he is here solely to c a r r y the burden of administration, in order to f r e e the professor f o r the latter's more n a t u r a l task as educator. The other m a j o r objection which we anticipate will be raised is t h a t the new system smacks of an academic hierarchy, designed to confuse the already h a r r a s s e d student and professor. Such is hardly the case. Authority Now Clear One of the p r i m a r y difficulties in " g e t t i n g things done" at Hope in the p a s t has been t h a t there was no clear division of a u t h o r i t y ; no easy basis f o r jurisdiction. A specific problem could be r e f e r r e d to any one of three or f o u r people, and the way was open f o r indecision and delay. (Polite words f o r the Ancient and Honorable A r t of BuckPassing!) Under the new system, lines of a u t h o r i t y and responsibility a r e as clear as could be desired; rare indeed will be t h e problem t h a t will not naturally fall into one of these catagories: Academic Concerns; Financial Affairs; Student Activities; and Administrative Problems. As was mentioned earlier, the t r u e t a s k of both t e a c h e r and student is the production of a trained mind. We sincerely expect and fervently hope t h a t this task will be the easier now t h a t both parties know where to c a r r y their ideas, problems, and disputes. —R. A. W.

Swan Song

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

The Body % Mind of Race

Encoreby Ruth Moore

On Tuesday, May 15, Mr. Nick Pool f r o m Union City, New J e r s e y presented his senior piano recital to an enthusiastic audience. The p r o g r a m included Bach-Bersoni's Chaconne in 1) Minor; Beethoven's Sonata in C Major ( " W a l d s t e i n " ) ; Chopin's Three Etudes from Opus 25; and Balakireiv's Islamey ( " F a n taisie Orientale"). Mr. - Pool p e r f o r m e d with inveterate understanding and innate musicianship. The entire p r o g r a m exemplified his potential as a technician. During the " I s l a m e y " Mr. Pool suffered a memory lapse, which although p e r h a p s the most obvious f a i l i n g to an audience, is the most forgivable one to a musician, especially when it is abted as neatly by the p e r f o r m e r as was Mr. Pool's. A f t e r receiving an appreciative ovation, Mr. Pool ended his prog r a m with "The Girl with the Flaxen H a i r " by Debussy.

I.F.C. Revises Rushing Rules 1. Each s u m m e r the I.F.C. will publish a letter of welcome and introduction to the new male students of Hope College. This letter will be sent with the Dean of Men's s u m m e r letter of welcome to all new male students. 2. There shall be a minimum of seven full weeks of rushing. It shall commence in time to c a r r y out article 6 of this paper. 3. There shall be no limitations on f r a t e r n i t i e s during rushing and initiation except those dictated by the college bulletin and administration concerning college activities and conduct. 4. The I.F.C. will publish weekly in the Anchor a list of f r a t e r n i t y activities f o r rushees. In order to avail themselves of this privilege each f r a t e r n i t y m u s t turn in their activities r two weeks in advance. 5. Each y e a r one week before rushing commences, there shall be a banquet f o r all n o n - f r a t e r n i t y men. It shall be the purpose of this banquet to familiarize them with 1) the rushing procedure, and 2) the five f r a t e r n i t i e s on Hope's campus. 6. Rushing will end on Wednesday night at 12:00 P.M. one week prior to Thanksgiving Vacation. 7. Bids will be mailed not earlier than 12:01 A.M. on the Monday before Thanksgiving Vacation. In order to receive a bid a student must have a 1.7 minimum a v e r a g e in mid-semester grades. This is based on 4.0 f o r an A, 3.0 f o r a B, etc. A list of ineligible men will be provided a t mid-semester timeby the Office of the Dean. (Continued on page 3)

It is customary for the retiring and incoming editors of the Anchor to take space in the last issue of a given school year either to justify the past or speculate about the future, whichever the case may be. This year, I am in the unusual position of being able to do both at the same time.

—Bob Winter

In the beginning, when God created the heavens and the e a r t h . He brought into existence many varieties of animal and vegetable m a t t e r . One such single species was the human race. A unique male and a unique f e m a l e were conceived f r o m the dust, and to the descendents of these original creations were given identical corporeal s t r u c t u r e . However, the world in which this being found himself did not possess similar physical identity. Instead, it was filled with a g r e a t variance in climate and other influential conditions. As a result, man was obliged to change outwardly in order to achieve accord with his external environment. The most notable of these changes was in the color of the skin. Thus, the black man and the yellow man came into being. Undeniably, the g r e a t e s t single force which binds men of all colors to one another, is the power of the human mind. It is m a n ' s intellect which renders him superior to the beings with whom he s h a r e s the e a r t h . A human being's mind is the only truly distinguishing f a c t o r he possesses, for it produces the c h a r a c t e r and personality which compose the individual. One could scarcely deny t h a t t h a t which set Shakespeare a p a r t f r o m other men was the g r e a t wisdom of t h o u g h t and word which his mind produced. Neither his skin color nor his facial s t r u c t u r e influenced in any w a y his m a s t e r y of the expression of basic t r u t h s which so immortalized him. Certainly, t h a t which has moved men to call Albert Schweitzer the g r e a t e s t man of our century is a recognition of the maginficent breadth and depth of his mind. Dr. Schweitzer's physical being, regardless of its outward appearance, has been a mere vehicle f o r a mental being which h a s led him to the evolution of a stirring philosophy of life, and to the dedication of his own life and talents to the natives of Africa. Truly, the outward appearance of a man is insignificant in m e a s u r i n g his merits as a person. Yet, how sadly t r u e it is t h a t he who differs f r o m us in race must be of a grossly superior intellect or personality before we are shamed into recognition of him. T h a t same mind which serves to make every man an equal and unique individual also serves to render him identical in some a r e a s of human experience with every other person. The black man and the yellow m a n are moved by the same loves, joys, and s o r r o w s in a world filled with emotions shared by all. The Negro, Mongolian, and Caucasian a r e affected by the same passions and f e a r s , which a r e the product of that binding mind—the heritage of the h u m a n . Indeed, the power of the physical self is f a r inferior to t h a t of the mental self. The mind is supreme. It alone distinguishes one m a n f r o m another, yet it securely binds the human race t o g e t h e r . It seems inevitable then that men shall someday place less importance upon the physical condition of their fellows, and seek the power and beauty of their mental selves. When this h a s been done, the world will have begun the difficult road to one race. The way is obstructed with the g r e a t obstacle of the proud desire of each race to preserve its kind. However, it would seem that the supposedly e x t r e m e differences between the races which are so momentous to men, a r e but another exemplification of the foolish social superficialities which man h a s imposed upon h i m s e l f — f o r out of the dust God A l m i g h t y created one and only one race—the human race. —S. L. S.

The Educated Man A Guest Editorial The 1956 senior (junior, sophomore, or f r e s h m a n ) has gone to a liberal a r t s college. He's educated.

He can conjugate Greek verbs, but he can't write legibly.

BOONE'S CITY KITCHEN

Errors cannot be totally eliminated, but I feel that they can and will be greatly reduced. For such blunders as the staff and I do make, I must ask your indulgence; publication of a college paper is an exacting, time-consuming, often thankless, but — fortunately — extremely rewarding task.

Such an inner concept is indeed a highly personal thing, which cannot be dictated by one person to another. Yet, it seems unavoidable t h a t each of us, upon reflection, must come to a similar conclusion in regard to the ultimate solution in God's universal plan of an exceedingly pertinent problem of today — the conflict in men's minds and h e a r t s between the races. To my mind, there is but one u l t i m a t e solution to this dilemma which will be with man until he perishes f r o m the e a r t h — one race worshiping the one God who created it.

He knows that the bite of the Phlebotomus fiy causes Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis but doesn't care if he sneezes in somebody's face.

First, concerning the past: The staff (and I include myself in this catagory) was largely without recent experience. This led to a number of results, the most obvious being late (and sometimes absent) issues, and a variety of more-or-less serious mistakes of diverse kinds. For G O O D FOOD these, I, as the seat of final responsibility, must take the blame. But we have learned from our errors, and often enough, the error per se is less important in the long view of things than the educational experiences derived therefrom. I don't think there are many kinds of journalistic blunders that I haven't made at one time or another. But this, you see, leaves very f e w left for next year! I have a number of new policies which I wish to test during the coming semesters, and I feel that we shall have a staff both able and willing to carry them out.

Since the time when man first received the knowledge of the reality of God, he has sought a comprehension of his Maker's design f o r human life, and of his consequent responsibilities to and position in eternity. F o r only through such an individual inner-realization of the scope of a plan bringing order and logic to this topsy-turvy universe can a m a n come to know the secure belief in a guiding, omnipotent force which most men desire. To recognize the u l t i m a t e aim of the complex blueprint of human existence, however, requires a wisdom f a r beyond the humble capacity of the human. Yet, if a man determines to find the (almost made trite by common u s a g e ) inner joys of life, it is inevitable that he come to discern within himself the concept of a " p l a n " which fulfills and satisfies each one of his questionings and wonderings.

He knows the names of the wives of Henry the Eighth, but he thinks Bulgaanin plays third base for the Baltimore Orioles. He can identify Beethoven's Fugue in G minor, but can't sing on pitch. He has taken sociology 21, 22, 41 and 48, but can't get along with his roommate.

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68 East Eighth Street Open 7 A.M. to 7 P.M. Closed Only on Sundays

He has taken community recreation and individual sports, but doesn t know what to do with himself when a television tube blows out. He has taken Shakespeare and world literature, but spends his leisure time with "Dead Men Don't Talk" and "The Sin Club That Shocked Paris." He can solve a quadratic equation, but can't keep his bank balance straight. He knows the details of Christ's journey to Jerusalem; he's sure because he's got the answer right here on his crib notes. He can tell you the basic philosophies of Plato and Aristotle, but he hasn't bothered too much to build his own philosophy of life In short, he can remember a lot of things. He's been to college He's been educated. —Reprinted from the Central College Ray:


HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Hope C o l l e g e — H o l l a n d , Michigan

LXVIII—17

Four Former Students to Receive Honorary Degrees at Commencement Four prominent f o r m e r students will receive honorary degrees from their Alma Mater when Hope College holds its Commencement Exercises on June 4. Each has attained a measure of achievement in his respective field, according to Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, who made the announcement today. Those receiving degrees are as follows: Doctor of Science (Sc.D.) to Dr. Bernadine Siebers DeValois; Doctor of Laws (LL.D.) to Mr. Simon Den Uyl; Doctor of Literature (Litt.D.) to Dr. J a m e s MuilenDr. Wyand Wichers, f o r m e r presburg; and Doctor of Divinity ident of Hope College and currently (D.D.) to the Reverend H e n r y Bast. vice-president of Western Michigan Dr. DeValois, a hope g r a d u a t e of College in Kalamazoo, will be the 1930, has served as a medical speaker at Hope's Ninety-first Commissionary to India for m a n y years, mencement Exercises, to be held in teaching in the Women's Medical College at Vellore. She is currently the Chapel, J u n e 4. home on f u r l o u g h . Mr. Den Uyl, who attended Hope in 1916 and 1917, is currently president of the Bohn Aluminum Company of this city. Dr. Muilenburg, a Hope g r a d u a t e in the class of 1920, is at present Professor of the Old T e s t a m e n t at Union Theological Seminary of New York City. He was a member of the committee of P r o t e s t a n t scholars responsible f o r the publication several years ago of the Revised Standard Version of the Holy Bible. An expert on the much-discussed "Dead Sea Scrolls," Dr. MuilenDr. W y n a n d W i c h e r s burg has spent a good deal of time Dr. Wichers, a Hope College in the Holy Land. Rev. Bast, at present pastor of g r a d u a t e of 1909, t a u g h t at the Bethany Reformed Church of Grand college f o r several years prior to Rapids, Michigan, and radio minis- his election as president in 1931. ter of Temple Time, weekly Gospel He served in t h a t office until 1945, broadcast of the Reformed Church at which time he left to assume his in America, is a g r a d u a t e in the duties with Western Michigan Colclass of 1930, and a f o r m e r in- lege. His subject will be "A Colstructor in the d e p a r t m e n t of Bible. lege of Distinction."

Wichers to Speak at

Historic Graduation

Current Grants To Hopeites The following s e n i o r s are listed at this time in the Regist r a r ' s office as having received scholarships for g r a d u a t e work: William Holt, Physics, to the University of Kansas, Clarence Huizenga, Economics, to the Carnegie Institute of Technology; Robert De Young, Math., to the University of Cincinnatti; and Ronald Ackermann, Math., to the University of Wisconsin.

'Key' Adds 2 More; Selects Officers

According to Dr. Irwin J. Lubbers, president of Hope, both the speaker and the subject are particularly appropriate, since Commencement Day 1956 will m a r k the ninetieth anniversary of the incorporation of Hope College under the present system of administration.

Kooiker Addresses Senior Banquet The annual senior class banquet was held on Tuesday evening, May 22, in the Terrace Dining Room at Durfee Hall. B a r b a r a Kruizenga was chairman of the spring dinner honoring the Class of 1956. Master of Ceremonies f o r the evening was Jack De Pree, with Ed Coon leading the group in devotions. Music was supplied by a group of senior girls, the Minors, under the direction of Marcia Veldman. The "Will" and " P r o p h e c y " were read by Lois Van Delinder. Toasts to the g r a d u a t i n g class were given by Dean Vander L u g t and Dr. Lubbers. Presenting the main address to the seniors was Anthony Kooiker.

The eleven new members of Blue Key, the national honorary f r a t e r nity, were announced on May 4th at a chapel service lead by the retiring senior members. The eleven J u n i o r men a r e : John De Vries, Howard H a r r i n g t o n , Gordon Hondorp, Theodore Redding, Harold Ritsema, L a r r y Siedentop, N a t h a n Decorations were planned by BarVander W e r f , Marlin Vander Wilt, William Vander Yacht, David Van b a r a J e f f r e y and included miniature Eenenaam, and Robert Winter. g r a d u a t e s , which decked the tables. Later, a t a meeting of these new A dinner of sirloin steak was members, two others were elected, served to the seniors and guests, namely, Lawrence Lup and Robert which included Dr. and Mrs. Irwin Lubbers, Miss E m m a Reeverts, Mr. Ritsema. The new officers f o r the 1956-57 Anthony Kooiker, Dr. and Mrs. Blue Key were elected and the re- Douglas Blocksma, Mr. and Mrs. sults a r e : President, Gordon Hon- Milton Hinga, and Dr. and Mrs. d o r p ; S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r , John De William Vander Lugt. Vries; and Corresponding SecreOther seniors who helped to plan t a r y , Howard H a r r i n g t o n . Robert the event were Tom H a r r i s , Skip Ritsema will act as Student Man- D a y ; Marianne Wierks, P r o g r a m ; a g e r of the Blue Key Bookstore f o r Virginia H a r t s e m a , P r o g a m s ; and Bud Failor, Tickets. the coming year.

ft

M a y 25,

1956

Four-Part Harmony" to Govern '56-'57 Staff

Last Call For European Study Professor

Edward

J.

Wolters,

chairman of the committee on scholarships, has announced t h a t there are many opportunities available for foreign travel and study next y e a r under various p r o g r a m s of grants-in-aid to students wishing to attend European universities. Among the p r o g r a m s included are the Rhodes a n d Fulbright Scholarship plans sponsored respectively by t h e Oxford University of England and the United S t a t e s government. Also included a r e fellowships from t h e Woodrow Wilson Foundation, a privately-endowed American organization, and several opportunities available from the Institute of International Education, a non profit organization which acts as a clearing house f o r many ^outstanding travel p r o g r a m s not included in t h e above three catagories. Since applications a r e closed on all of these plans in early June, Mr. Wolters advises all interested students to contact h i m immediately in the office of the Department of Latin, Van Raalte 312.

The Limits Of Education There is the women ly selected tary and

no single m a j o r a m o n g of Hope more f r e q u e n t t h a n education—elemensecondary. If only all

those sophomores who have applied for an education m a j o r , and all those juniors and seniors who will soon be teaching in e a r n e s t could s h a r e in the vision of Gibran's Prophet when he said:

Hinga to Become Student Dean; Visser Fills Dean of Men's Post A basic change in the s t r u c t u r e of the administration of Hope College f o r the coming year was announced today by Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, president. Terming the change a " m a j o r reorganization" in the functioning of the colege administration. Dr. Lubbers called a t t e n tion to the fact t h a t increased enrollment and the consequent problems of administration have required many hours of his time which he feels could be better spent in maintaining contact with churches, alumni, and other friends of the college. For this reason, f o u r m e m b e r s of the administrative staff have been designated as having final a u t h o r i t y in their fields, beginning with the Fall Semester of next

Annual S.C. Retreat Held at Castle Park On Tuesday, May 22, the present and f o r m e r Student Councils held their annual R e t r e a t at Castle P a r k to discrss and to evaluate the various phases of student government. S t u d e n t s in attendance included the heads of m a j o r campus organizations and publications, as well as the council members. The following members of the administration and faculty were invited: President I. J. Lubbers, Dean William Vander Lugt, Dean Milton Hinga, Dean E m m a Reeverts, Dr. Roert Cavanaugh, Miss M a r j o r i e Pickens, Miss Eleanor De Pree, Mr. Paul Ried, Dr. Paul Fried, Mr. E. Gearhart, and student council advisors Mr. Howard Zandbergen and Mr. Charles Lininger. J a n e Gouwens was general c h a r i m a n for the event.

Harton to Return; One,Added to Staff

J

the temple, among his followers, gives not of his wisdom but r a t h e r of his f a i t h and his lovingness.

"And he who is versed in the science of numbers can tell of the regions of weight and measure, b u t he cannot conduct you t h i t h e r . For t h e vision of one man lends not its wings to another m a n . "And even as each one of you s t a n d s alone in God's knowledge, so must each one of you be alone in h i s knowledge of God a n d in his understand. ing of the e a r t h . "

The f o u r t h post, t h a t of dean of administration, will involve "internal administrative problems," according to Lubbers, who stated that no appointment h a s as yet been made to t h a t post. Dr. Lubbers stressed that each of these deans is to have final jurisdiction in his field, deriving his a u t h o r i t y f r o m the Board of Trustees, through the president of the college, to whom each will report. It is expected t h a t the new system will not only clarify the question of authority and jurisdic-

Van Putten to Lead New W.A.A. Board

a u g h t but t h a t which already lies half asleep in the dawning of your knowledge. The teacher who walks in the shadow of

"The musician m a y sing to you of the rhythm which is in all space, but he cannot give you the e a r which a r r e s t s the rhythm nor the voice t h a t echoes it.

New Post Created

Preliminary changes in the staff for the coming year were announced today by Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, president of Hope College. tion, but also f r e e Dr. Lubbers f o r To date, one new professor has i m p o r t a n t work on and off the been added to the faculty, with one campus. other r e t u r n i n g f r o m a leave of absence.

"No man can reveal to you

"If he is indeed wise, he does not bid you enter the house of his wisdom, but r a t h e r leads you to the threshold of your own mind. The astronomer may speak to you of his understanding of space, but he cannot give you his understanding.

year. Those designated are as follows: in the area of finance, Mr. Henry Steffens, t r e a s u r e r of the college; concerning academic affairs, Dr. William Vander Lugt, dean of the college; and in student affairs, Mr. Milton L. Hinga, present dean of men, who will become dean of students. Replacing Hinga as dean of men will be Mr. John Visser of the department of history and political science.

At the annual W.A.A. A w a r d s Banquet, held Wednesday, May 23, the officers for 1956-1957 were announced. Barb van P u t t e n will head the new Board as president, while B. J . Burnett will assist her as vice-president. Joyce Leighley was elected as Secretary, Mary Kay Diephuis as Point-Recorder, and Sandy Dressel will be in c h a r g e of publicity.

The recipient of the Hazel Kleyn Sportsmanship Award w a s also anReturning f r o m a one year's nounced a t the banquet. The award leave of absence will be Miss Helen is given to a sophomore girl who Harton, of the Speech Department, has actively participated in intrawho has been a w a y f r o m campus murals and who has displayed this y e a r while working towards sportsmanlike conduct. The sophoher Doctor of Philosophy degree. more girl chosen was Joyce LeighN o r t h w e s t e r n University of Evan- ley. ston, Illinois, will make her Dr. The present W.A.A. Board anH a r t o n this A u g u s t . nounced t h a t the annual picnic supA u g m e n t i n g the staff of the Psy- per will be held on May 31st. chology D e p a r t m e n t next y e a r will Seniors on the present Board are be Dr. Robert De Haan, currently planning the picnic f o r the 1955-56 a m e m b e r of t h e staff of the Uni- members and also the new officers versity of Chicago. Dr. De H a a n and board members. received his bachelor's degree f r o m On May 10, 11, and 12 t h e WoCalvin College in 1947. A f t e r re- men's Tennis and Archery T e a m s ceiving his Ph.D. f r o m the Uni- attended the M.I.A.A. conference versity of Chicago in 1951, Dr. De f o r a r c h e r y and tennis a t Albion H a a n remained on their staff, doing College. The Archery Team came special work with the university- home with second-place honors and sponsored Quincy (III.) Youth De- a r c h e r Dot Winstrom received spevelopment Project. He is considered cial honors f o r t h e highest score. to be an e x p e r t in the field of In tennis, Kalamazoo and Calvin applied psychology. College tied f o r first place. Miss Helen

Harton


Page Two

HOPE

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Member Associated Collegiate Press

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

The Body % Mind of Race

Encoreby Ruth Moore

PRESS

Published every week by the students of Hope College except during holiday or examination periods. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at a special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $1.00 per year.

Co-Editors News Editor Feature Editor Society Editors Sports Editor Typists

EDITORIAL S T A F F Marianne Wierks, Robert Winter Joyce Leighley Sally Schneider Connie Miller, Hans Doele Tom Harris Jane MacEachron, Jan Peck, Harriet Van Heest BUSINESS STAFF

Business Manager Assistants Advertising Circulation

Harold Ritsema Fred Birdsall, Ron Vander Schaaf Mil Decker Art Martin

The Indians . . . and the Chiefs There is a story of a tribe of redmen who were once prosperous and successful. However, a f t e r a period of years, they found themselves declining rapidly i n s o f a r as their s t a t u s among the various tribes was concerned. When asked the source of the trouble by a newspaper reporter, one old and wise sachem replied: "Too Many Chiefs; Not Enough Indians." P r i m a Facie (which is Latin f o r a hasty peek at a few f a c t s followed by magnificent leap to conclusions), this would seem to sum up what we expect will be the general a t t i t u d e on the p a r t of student and faculty alike with r e g a r d to Dr. Lubbers' announcement of the three-dean system of administration next year. And I am as guilty as any, f o r this was my initial reaction as well. But upon reflection, it would seem t h a t several f a c t s deserve to be brought to the s t u d e n t s ' attention before conclusions are drawn. Deans: S e r v a n t s or Rulers? Administrative duties have assumed an unusual significance in the academic world of today. Somehow, the Deans seem to be a variety of " s u p e r - p r o f e s s o r s " who s u b j u g a t e f a c u l t y and students alike as they extend their g r a s p over the entire school. And yet, in the educative process, which college everywhere claim to perpetuate, is it not the professors, r a t h e r than the deans, who a r e actually involved in the m a j o r business of a college? Their function, a f t e r all, is more to train minds than to receive and file records of class and chapel attendance. As Dr. Lubbers put it: "The top-ranking position at Hope College is t h a t of p r o f e s s o r . " If the professor is the basis f o r the educative process, what then is the t r u e function of a d e a n ? It would seem t h a t his is the way ef service: he is here solely to c a r r y the burden of administration, in order to f r e e the professor f o r the l a t t e r ' s more n a t u r a l task as educator. The other m a j o r objection which we anticipate will be raised is t h a t the new system smacks of an academic hierarchy, designed to confuse the already h a r r a s s e d student and professor. Such is hardly the case. Authority Now Clear One of the p r i m a r y difficulties in " g e t t i n g things done" at Hope in the past h a s been t h a t there was no clear division of a u t h o r i t y ; no easy basis f o r jurisdiction. A specific problem could be r e f e r r e d to any one of t h r e e or f o u r people, and the way was open f o r indecision and delay. (Polite words f o r the Ancient and Honorable A r t of BuckP a s s i n g ! ) U n d e r the new system, lines of authority and responsibility a r e as clear as could be desired; r a r e indeed will be the problem t h a t will not n a t u r a l l y fall into one of these catagories: Academic Concerns; Financial A f f a i r s ; Student Activities; and Administrative Problems. As was mentioned earlier, the t r u e task of both t e a c h e r and student is the production of a trained mind. We sincerely expect and f e r v e n t l y hope t h a t this task will be the easier now t h a t both p a r t i e s know where to carry their ideas, problems, and disputes. —R. A. W.

Swan Song

On Tuesday, May 15, Mr. Nick Pool f r o m Union City, New J e r s e y presented his senior piano recital to an enthusiastic audience. The p r o g r a m included Bach-Bersoni's Chaconne in 1) Minor; Beethoven's Sonata in C M a j o r ( " W a l d s t e i n " ) ; Chopin's Three Etudes from Opus 25; and Balakireiv's Islamey ( " F a n taisie Orientale"). Mr. Pool p e r f o r m e d with inveterate understanding and innate musicianship. The entire p r o g r a m exemplified his potential as a technician. During the " I s l a m e y " Mr. Pool suffered a m e m o r y lapse, which although p e r h a p s the mcst obvious failing to an audience, is the most forgivable one to a musician, especially when it is abted as neatly by the p e r f o r m e r as was Mr. Pool's. A f t e r receiving an appreciative ovation, Mr. Pool ended his prog r a m with "The Girl with the Flaxen H a i r " by Debussy.

I.F.C. Revises Rushing Rules 1. Each s u m m e r the I.F.C. will publish a letter of welcome and introduction to the new male students of Hope College. This letter will be sent with the Dean of Men's s u m m e r letter of welcome to all new male students. 2. There shall be a minimum of seven full weeks of rushing. It shall commence in time to carry out article 6 of this paper. 3. There shall be no limitations on f r a t e r n i t i e s during rushing and initiation except those dictated by the college bulletin and administration concerning college activities and conduct. 4. The I.F.C. will publish weekly in the Anchor a list of f r a t e r n i t y activities f o r rushees. In order to avail themselves of this privilege each f r a t e r n i t y must turn in their activities two weeks in advance. 5. Each y e a r one week before rushing commences, there shall be a banquet f o r all n o n - f r a t e r n i t y men. It shall be t h e purpose of this banquet to familiarize them with 1) the rushing procedure, and 2) t h e five f r a t e r n i t i e s on Hope's campus. 6. Rushing will end on Wednesday night at 12:00 P.M. one week prior to Thanksgiving Vacation. 7. Bids will be mailed not earlier than 12:01 A.M. on the Monday before Thanksgiving Vacation. In order to receive a bid a student must have a 1.7 minimum a v e r a g e in mid-semester g r a d e s . This is based on 4.0 f o r an A, 3.0 f o r a B, etc. A list of ineligible men will be provided a t mid-semester time by t h e Office of the Dean. (Continued on page 3)

It is customary f o r the r e t i r i n g and incoming editors of the Anchor to take space in the last issue of a given school y e a r either to j u s t i f y the p a s t or speculate about the f u t u r e , whichever the case m a y be. This year, I am in the unusual position of being able to do both a t t h e same time.

—Bob W i n t e r

4

In the beginning, when God created the heavens and the e a r t h , He brought into existence many varieties of animal and vegetable m a t t e r . One such single species was the human race. A unique male and a unique f e m a l e were conceived f r o m the dust, and to the descendents of these original creations were given identical corporeal s t r u c t u r e . However, the world in which this being found himself did not possess similar physical identity. Instead, it was filled with a g r e a t variance in climate and other influential conditions. As a result, man was obliged to change outwardly in order to achieve accord with his external environment. The most notable of these changes was in the color of the skin. Thus, the black man and the yellow man came into being. Undeniably, the g r e a t e s t single force which binds men of all colors to one another, is the power of the human mind. It is man's intellect which renders him superior to the beings with whom he s h a r e s the e a r t h . A human being's mind is the only truly distinguishing f a c t o r he possesses, for it produces the character and personality which compose the individual. One could scarcely deny t h a t t h a t which set S h a k e s p e a r e a p a r t f r o m other men was the g r e a t wisdom of t h o u g h t and word which his mind produced. Neither his skin color nor his facial s t r u c t u r e influenced in any way his m a s t e r y of the expression of basic t r u t h s which so immortalized him. Certainly, that which has moved men to call Albert Schweitzer the g r e a t e s t man of our century is a recognition of the maginficent breadth and depth of his mind. Dr. Schweitzer's physical being, regardless of its outward appearance, has been a mere vehicle f o r a mental being which has led him to the evolution of a stirring philosophy of life, and to the dedication of his own life and talents to the natives of Africa. Truly, the outward appearance of a man is insignificant in m e a s u r i n g his m e r i t s as a person. Yet, how sadly true it is t h a t he who differs from us in race must be of a grossly superior intellect or personality before we are shamed into recognition of him. T h a t same mind which serves to make every man an equal and unique individual also serves to render him identical in some a r e a s of human experience with every other person. The black man and the yellow man are moved by the same loves, joys, and sorrows in a world filled with emotions shared by all. The Negro, Mongolian, and Caucasian a r e affected by the same passions and f e a r s , which a r e the product of that binding mind—the h e r i t a g e of the h u m a n . Indeed, the power of the physical self is f a r inferior to t h a t of the mental self. The mind is supreme. It alone distinguishes one man f r o m another, yet it securely binds the h u m a n race together. It seems inevitable then that men shall someday place less importance upon the physical condition of their fellows, and seek the power and beauty of their mental selves. When this h a s been done, the world will have begun the difficult road to one race. The way is obstructed with the g r e a t obstacle of the proud desire of each race to preserve its kind. However, it would seem t h a t the supposedly e x t r e m e differences between the races which are so momentous to men, are but a n o t h e r exemplification of the foolish social superficialities which man h a s imposed upon h i m s e l f — f o r out of the dust God Almighty created one and only one race—the human race. —S. L. S.

The Educated Man A Guest Editorial The 1966 senior (junior, sophomore, or f r e s h m a n ) h a s gone to a liberal a r t s college. He's educated.

He can conjugate Greek verbs, but he can't write legibly.

BOONE'S

He knows the names of the wives of Henry the E i g h t h , but he thinks Bulgaanin plays third base f o r the Baltimore Orioles.

CITY KITCHEN

E r r o r s cannot be totally eliminated, but I feel t h a t they can and will be g r e a t l y reduced. F o r such blunders as the staff and I do make, I must ask y o u r indulgence; publication of a college p a p e r is an exacting, time-consuming, o f t e n thankless, but — f o r t u n a t e l y — extremely rewarding task.

Such an inner concept is indeed a highly personal thing, which cannot be dictated by one person to another. Yet, it seems unavoidable that each of us, upon reflection, must come to a similar conclusion in regard to the ultimate solution in God's universal plan of an exceedingly pertinent problem of today — the conflict in men's minds and h e a r t s between the races. To my mind, there is but one u l t i m a t e solution to this dilemma which will be with man until he perishes f r o m the e a r t h — one race worshiping the one God who created it.

He knows t h a t the bite of the Phlebotomus fiy causes Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis but doesn't care if he sneezes in somebody's face.

F i r s t , concerning the p a s t : The staff (and I include myself in this c a t a g o r y ) was largely without recent experience. This led to a n u m b e r of results, the most obvious being late (and sometimes absent) issues, and a variety of more-or-less serious mistakes of diverse kinds. F o r G O O D FOOD these, I, as the seat of final responsibility, must t a k e the blame. But we h a v e learned f r o m our errors, and often enough, the e r r o r per se is less important in the long view of things t h a n the educational experiences derived t h e r e f r o m . I don't think there a r e m a n y kinds of journalistic blunders t h a t I haven't made a t one time or another. But this, you see, leaves very f e w l e f t f o r next year! I have a n u m b e r of new policies which I wish to t e s t d u r i n g the coming semesters, and I feel t h a t we shall have a staff both able and willing to c a r r y t h e m out.

Since the time when man first received the knowledge of the reality of God, he has sought a comprehension of his Maker's design f o r human life, and of his consequent responsibilities to and position in eternity. F o r only through such an individual inner-realization of the scope of a plan bringing order and logic to this topsy-turvy universe can a man come to know the secure belief in a guiding, omnipotent force which most men desire. To recognize the ultimate aim of the complex blueprint of human existence, however, requires a wisdom f a r beyond the humble capacity of the human. Yet, if a man determines to find the (almost made trite by common usage) inner joys of life, it is inevitable that he come to discern within himself the concept of a " p l a n " which fulfills and satisfies each one of his questionings and wonderings.

He can identify Beethoven's F u g u e in G minor, but can't sing on pitch. He h a s taken sociology 21, 22, 41 and 48, but can't g e t along with his roommate.

AT PRICES YOU LIKE TO PAY

68 East Eighth Street Open 7 A.M. to 7 P.M. Closed Only on Sundays

H e h a s taken doesn't know what H e h a s taken leisure time with Shocked P a r i s . "

community recreation and individual sports, but to do with himself when a television tube blows out. Shakespeare and world l i t e r a t u r e , but spends his "Dead Men Don't T a l k " and "The Sin Club T h a t

He can solve a quadratic equation, but can't keep his bank balance straight. H e knows the details of Christ's journey to J e r u s a l e m ; he's sure because he's got the answer right h e r e on his crib notes. H e can tell you the basic philosophies of Plato and Aristotle, but he h a s n ' t bothered too much to build his own philosophy of life. In short, he can r e m e m b e r a lot of things. H e ' s been to college. He's been educated. —Reprinted f r o m the Central College R a y


#

H O P E

Hope to Hold "Summer School" In Several European Cities It should be a d e l i g h t f u l s u m m e r f o r the Hope collegians who a r e planning to s t u d y abroad this season. All-in-all, t h e r e a r e t w e n t y Hope s t u d e n t s f r o m the L a n g u a g e and History D e p a r t m e n t s whose names a r e on the travel roster. In addition, one s t u d e n t f r o m Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y and one recent Hope g r a d u a t e will also join the group. This y e a r t h e E u r o p e a n tour will be divided into t h r e e secThe Cosmoplitan F r a t e r n i t y came tions: Spanish s t u d e n t s will study out victorious in the quest f o r t h e in Spain under Dr. B r o w n ; French i n t r a m u r a l All-Sports Trophy in s t u d e n t s will enroll a t a French what proved to be the closest comUniversity f o r a s u m m e r course; petition since the inception of t h e and German and history s t u d e n t s a w a r d . The Cosmos came along will spend several weeks in A u s t r i a with a s p u r t in the S p r i n g S p o r t s s t u d y i n g u n d e r Dr. F r i e d . to o v e r t a k e the F r a t e r s and Arkies Traveling with Dr. Brown will and c a p t u r e the trophy. The bearbe: J a n Peck, sophomore; Anita ers of the Green and White a m a s s e d Van Lente, j u n i o r ; M a r y K. Diepa total of 51 points while t h e huis, sophomore; Ron Kuiper, sophArkies totaled 49 and F r a t e r s omore; and R o g e r Garvelink, sophscored 48Mj f o r their y e a r ' s work. omore. A s t u d e n t f r o m Michigan The E m m i e s with 40 points and the S t a t e University will also be inKnicks with 21 ^ took f o u r t h and cluded in this group. Sheryl Yntefifth place respectively. ma, and Deanna Deas, both sophoThe coveted 1955-56 All-Sports mores, will s t u d y in F r a n c e . T r o p h y will abide in the hallowed The g r o u p going to Vienna with halls of Cosmopolitan as t h e y capDr. Fried includes: Bob Cook, tured the a w a r d f o r the first time senior; N o r m a D a m s t r a , j u n i o r ; in history. D u r i n g the S p r i n g comDavid D e t h m e r s , sophomore; Janice petition the Cosmos captured first E v e r t , junior; Ev. Nienhouse, sophplace in t r a c k , they tied f o r first omore; Joe P a l m e r , Grad.; J u d y in volleyball, and they finished third Ripma, Kay R y n b r a n d , and Donald in s o f t b a l l . T h u s the Cosmos picked Van Lare, juniors, who will be enup 25 points which proved to be rolled in a course on " E u r o p e since enough to put them on top to stay. 1918." Five o t h e r s t u d e n t s in the An individual can readily see t h a t g r o u p will spend t h e i r t i m e in this y e a r ' s overall competition w a s Vienna s t u d y i n g " G e r m a n Civilizathe closest ever. Only 2 V2 points tion." They a r e : Ed. Anderson, s e p a r a t e d the first and third place senior; Mel De Weerd, sophomore; positions. To go a little f u r t h e r J a c k Walchenbach, j u n i o r ; Bill only 11 points s e p a r a t e d the top W a g g o n e r , and Ricky Volkenborn, f o u r t e a m s . This is most certainly sophomores. an i m p r o v e m e n t in balance as compared to previous years. The t e a m s Embark June 23 The entire Hope g r o u p will em- were in the thick of t h e contest bark on t h e Italian s t e a m s h i p and as a result competition was Roma f r o m New York on J u n e much more intense this year. At 23rd. A f t e r s t o p p i n g a t Lisbon, times this proved to be a d e t r i m e n t , G i b r a l t a r and Barcelona, t h e Roma however, competition will undoubtwill dock in Genoa, Italy. F r o m edly keep the i n t r a m u r a l p r o g r a m there, the g r o u p under Dr. Brown improving in t h e f u t u r e . C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s are in order to will proceed w e s t w a r d t h r o u g h F r a n c e to Spain, while Dr. Fried the champions and to the o t h e r f o u r and his g r o u p will t r a v e l t h r o u g h f r a t e r n i t i e s as well. I n t r a m u r a l Venice and the A u s t r i a n Alps to competition has been fine this y e a r Vienna. The G e r m a n - H i s t o r y g r o u p s and it is hoped t h a t it will be even will remain in Vienna f o r several better next y e a r with all five f r a weeks of concentrated s t u d y , broken ternities in the race to the finish. A C E F K by travel to Yugoslavia and points Football ___9 6 4 9 2 of interest in A u s t r i a . 4 3 1 5 2 The g r o u p s will unite a g a i n in Tennis 2 5 1 2 4 P a r i s t o w a r d s the middle of A u g u s t Golf 8 6 10 2 and will spend the rest of t h e time Basketball _4 1 4 5 3 in Europe s i g h t s e e i n g in Holland, Handball __2 3 4 1^ IV2 Belgium, G e r m a n y , and Switzer- Bowling ___5 9 6 3 3 land before r e t u r n i n g to Genoa f o r Volleyball _9 the trip home. Track 6 10 4 8 2 Softball ___8 6 10 4 2

Cosmos CopCoveted

All-Sports

All-Sports 49

Trophy

51

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Revised IPC Rules (Continued f r o m p a g e 2)

8. Silent period begins a t the close of r u s h i n g period and ends a t the opening of bids by the I.F.C. a t 4:00 P.M. on the second school Student Council Meeting of May day following T h a n k s g i v i n g Vaca- 8, 1956. tion. It will be the purpose of The m e e t i n g was called to order silent period to give each rushee by the President a t 8:30 P.M. in a chance to m a k e his own decision Van R a a l t e Hall. The roll was r e g a r d i n g t h e f r a t e r n i t y he wishes taken and the m i n u t e s were read to join. D u r i n g this period no f r a - and corrected. ternity m e m b e r is allowed to talk Officers' Reports: f r a t e r n i t y with any non-member. President Dave Van E e n e n a a m 9. Each bid sent to a rushee m u s t reminded the Council of the r e t r e a t be accepted or refused by f o r m a l scheduled f o r May 15, and he asked letter. All bids not answered by f o r suggestions concerning a place the stated t i m e a r e considered to f o r the r e t r e a t . Dave then anbe a negative reply unless other- nounced t h a t on S a t u r d a y about 200 wise agreed upon by the I.F.C. The new s t u d e n t s would be on campus, reply to the bids m u s t be at the and he requested guides f o r t h a t Office of the Dean by 4:00 P.M. of morning. Tornado w a r n i n g sheets the second school day following were l e f t on the desk f o r all those T h a n k s g i v i n g Vacation. They m a y interested. be either mailed in or delivered in Vice President Carol Matheis person. asked t h a t we consider the prospect 10. Rushees shall be notified t h r o u g h of disbanding WUS. She then clarithe Daily Bulletin as to the t i m e of fied the rule on absences, s t a t i n g silent period and the d a t e due f o r t h a t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s can be sent in the acceptance or rejection of bids. the place of a Student Council 11. I n f o r m a l and f o r m a l initiation member. Absentees must submit may be held at a time and in a excuses, and no more t h a n 3 unm a n n e r prescribed by each individ- excused absences a r e allowed. Carol s u g g e s t e d t h a t each council memual f r a t e r n i t y . ber sign up f o r h o u r s in t h e Student Council office f o r each S t u d e n t Council Member. Dave Van E e n e n a a m then gave the T r e a s u r e r ' s r e p o r t , s t a t i n g t h a t QUICK SERVICE another $90 was spent, leaving a OLD NEWS PRINTERV balance of about $269.63 in the 7 4 W . 0th S t . P h o n t 2020 treasury.

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Committee Reports: 1. Educational Policies: At the meeting on May 7 a recommendation was made concerning giving 1 hr. credit f o r 2 s e m e s t e r s of gym. This would not be counted toward the 16 h r . load. It was also announced t h a t the Cooperative Research project was disbanded. Old Business: None. New Business: Mary J o Hospers spoke concerning the W U S project. As c h a i r m a n , she gave a f a v o r a b l e report of the fine work t h a t w a s done. She then stated t h a t if the project w a s to be on t h e a g e n d a f o r next year, a c h a i r m a n should be selected immediately. However, Mary J o suggested t h a t the W U S project be disbanded. A f t e r explaining W U S to the new council m e m b e r s , a motion was made to accept the recommendation of the c h a i r m a n and disband W U S on c a m p u s next year. C a r r i e d ! A discussion of the D a t e Book followed, b r i n g i n g out the point that d a t e s which had been accepted were changed f o r other occasions. It was decided t h a t the officers and the Social C h a i r m a n would contact the Dean about the situation. A motion was made to approve the new committee s y s t e m . Carried! Therefore, the new c o m m i t t e e s will be as f o l l o w s : I. F a c u l t y - S t u d e n t C o m m i t t e e s : 1. Student Direction: Bob Lesniak A. Gordon Hondorp and Elena B y l s e m a : m e m b e r s a t large. 2. Library Committee: Dick Brockmeier A. Nella S w a r t and Dorothy Hesselink: m e m b e r s at large. 3. Athletic Committee: L a r r y Ter Molen A. Jo Ann Barton: member at large.

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4. Educational Policies: Chuck Hesselink A. L a r r y Siednetop a n d J a n e Mac E a c h r o n : m e m b e r s at large. II. S t u d e n t Council Committees 1. Social: J e a n Albers A. Susie Graves: Soph. Tom Lubbers: Soph. Mary H u n t e r : J r . John Angus: Jr. J o h n Hood: Y M a r g e Ten H a k e n : Y E r m a Van Dyke: WAA Mary Kay Diephuis: WAL 2. Religious A f f a i r s : Carol Ten Haken A. Carol Ten H a k e n : S.C. J o h n H e i n s : S.C. Holly Meyer: Y Cabinet Lois Thorns: Y Cabinet Helen T a y l o r : Y N a t e Vander W e r f : Y 3. Educational A f f a i r s : J o h n Ten P a s A. Dick Brockmeier Dave K o t s ( o t h e r s not known) 4. Student A f f a i r s : J i m Evenhuis A. Dick Brown L a r r y T e r Molen A r t Olson Roger Garvelink Helen Van Dyke ( o t h e r s not known) 5. N.S.A.: A. Blaine T i m m e r Bob V a n d e r L u g t J o a n Peelen Isla Van Eenenaam Carl Ver Beek Norma Damstra 6. M.A.C.S.G.: A. Sue Underwood J o h n Ten Pas Reiko Kim 7. Publications: Aileen Mc Goldrick A. Ann Bloodgood: Sr. Dave S p a a n : J r . Ann De P r e e : Soph. J o h n De Vries: Blue Key A n i t a V a n Lente: Alcor Lois H o e k s e m a : Sr. S.C. c a r r y over III. O t h e r A p p o i n t m e n t s 1. O r i e n t a t i o n : Lois Hoeksema 2. N y k e r k C u p : Diane Johnson 3. L e a d e r s h i p : Ed Vander Kooy 4. Mom and Dad's D a y : H e n r y Doell 5. Senior D a y : Bob Vander Lugt 4. Pull: Paul Dewey A. Soph.: Dave Kinkema B. F r o s h : Bob Lesniak Respectfully submitted, Lynn V a n ' t Hof S t u d e n t Council S e c r e t a r y

College seniorsour most wanted men Today, as a college grad, you have a choice of more jobs than ever. Which should you take? June Reader's Digest tells you what big companies are doing to recruit promising students. salaries offered, the kind of background and personality they look for—and why the class of '56 faces some hard decisions. Get June Reader's Digest at your newsstand: 43 articles of lasting interest, including the best from leading magazines and current books, condensed to save your time.


% Page Four

H O P E

Good Luck on Your Finals!

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Shaping Perspective

CHARLIE'S 18th and Columbia

' •••••••••••••

Ever since man made his advent upon earth there has been a wide disparity between his ideals and his practices, at which t h e cynics of every age have been able to

TULIP RESTAURANT 59 East 8th St.

Choir Has Various Records to Offer

RYPMA & TOPP SHELL SERVICE " S e r v i c e Is O u r Business"

In 1929 the late P r o f e s s o r W. Curtis Snow organized t h e Chapel Choir, originally made u p of 45 voices. It has grown continuously, and now numbers 59. The Chapel Choir, directed by Dr. Robert W. Cavanaugh, has assisted in the daily chapel services on campus since 1929.

Phone 7 7 6 0 Corner 15th and River Ave.

i t a O a J a

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What Savings! T e a m u p with friends and enjoy these m o n e y saving, r o u n d - t r i p bargains! G R O U P , ECONOMY F A R E S * — S a v e 25% w h e n 3 or m o r e b o u n d for t h e s a m e h o m e t o w n travel t o g e t h e r b o t h ways. T i c k e t s g o o d f o r 30 days. Grand i f r e t u r n i n g t o s u m m e r school. COACH PARTY FARES-Savings of 28% w h e n 25 or m o r e travel t o gether on g o i n g trip h o m e . Return singly or t o g e t h e r f o r s u m m e r s c h o o l or fall s e m e s t e r .

The choir attained a peak when it was invited to participate in the E a s t e r Sunrise Service a t Radio City Music Hall, in New York City. Another outstanding highlight of the Chapel Choir was a 6,000-mile Western tour, which included a short-wave broadcast around the world, f r o m Los Angeles California. The Chapel Choir has just returned f r o m an exceptionally successful E a s t e r n tour. ^ The Chapel Choir is only one of the organizations which is wellknown as a fine musical group. The Hope Symphonette, under the direction of Dr. Morrette Rider, also received enthuiastic receptions on it's 1956 Midwestern tour. This intense interest in fine music h a s extended into the building prog r a m on Hope's campus. As the new Music Building nears completion, many plans to raise money a r e being carried out by the students and f a c u l t y of the college. Many people have asked about recordings of the Chapel Choir. Because of this demand, plans have been made and confirmed with the Radio Corporation of America to cut a long-playing record of selections f e a t u r e d by the Chapel Choir t h r o u g h o u t this year. Orders are now being received at the Blue Key Book Store on the Campus. Your record m a y be purchased at any time this coming fall; records f o r seniors will be mailed f r e e of charge. E x a m s will begin May 29, and t h e r e f o r e the Music D e p a r t m e n t h a s provided f o r a period of relaxation. During exam week the Chapel Choir, under the direction of Dr. Cavanaugh, will give a concert of sacred music at 8:15 p.m. in the Chapel. This will be the only homeconcert of the year f e a t u r i n g Marcia Veldman and the Mens' Choir in their performance of B r a h m s ' Alto Rapshody. A brief history of the choir, including some of the highlights of the Choir tour of this year, will be presented on Monday evening. May 28, over radio station WHTC.

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shake their finger. Yet the world has always acknowledged the need for men who have embodied ideals in t h e i r approach to life. Plato, Jesus, Ghandi, and Wilson — these men succeeded in c a p t u r i n g the imagination and allegince of humankind t h r o u g h o u t history. This day witnesses an unusual phenomenon in the field of diplomacy, for men in high places now say t h a t it h a s become expedient to be idealistic. The new Russian " p e a c e " offensive of smiles and economic and technical assistance, as expounded by the two world-traveling bulgyboys, has necessitated a drastic reappraisal of American foreign policy. The " O u t b r e a k of Amicability", as it h a s been termed by Governor Christian A. H e r t e r of Massachusetts, has caused grave concern to our allies as well. What it boils down to is this: Since the Russians are t r y i n g to beat us at our own g a m e we must convince the rest of the world t h a t the American brand of idealism is different from t h a t posed by the Bear in sheepskin. As long as Russia was practising her old terrorism, a la Stalin, in the pre-hydrogen bomb days, we could rely on our g i f t s of military and economic aid, (with s t r i n g s attached) to demand the friendship of our allies and the uncommitted nations of the world. But with the advent of Khrushchev & Co. and their subtle talk of "Competitive Coexistence," with all its sinister implications, we can no longer demand friendship or even buy it. We must t r u s t t h a t it will be reciprocated freely. F o r no country that is independent and has political stability would go over to the Red camp willingly. We must have faith in our ideals, for, given a chance, those who are not now a g a i n s t us will be for us. Since it does not seem likely that t h i present world s t r u g g l e is going to be culminated in one horrible inferno — the only one who would profit from an all-out thermonuclear warwould be the common housefly, as nobody would be left to wield the fly-swatter—the world will eventually see the Russian ruse f o r what it really is. If it is now expedient as well as normally necessary to be idealists and to have faith t h a t given a chance the uncommitted peoples of the world will turn to us freely, our f a i t h must be long-lasting and long-suffering. As Wilson c a p t u i e d the minds of the world's millions in 1920. We must seek to do so today so t h a t we will be able to say with him: "Now the h e a r t of the world is awake and the heart of the world must be satisfied." Shall we s a t i s f y it or will R u s s i a ? —David G. Cassie

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•I

THE

A N C H O R L I N E

P a g e Five

A Pictorial Review

Of 1 9 5 5 - 5 6

n

Isla

Van

over

Homecoming

Eenenaam, this

who year

reigned as

our

queen. A freshman from Muskegon, Michigan. Nell Salm, Community who

will

used

visit

her

Ambassador

France this

experiences

for

last s u m m e r , a n d

s u m m e r , a l s o as C o m m u n i t y

as

the

basis

for

a

state

Larry S i e d e n t o p ,

Ambassador.

prize-winning

Nell

speech.

Save That Scrap! iXWWt

Ethel

Anne

P e e l e n , chosen

crowned May

as t h e

1956-57

May

Day

Queen.

She w a s

4 , a n d w i l l r e i g n over t h e b e g i n n i n g o f n e x t y e a r ' s M a y D a y .

Have you ever put an impression on paper, a brief, passing, s e e m i n g l y insignificant t h o u g h t ? Don't throw that paper away I The editors of O P U S are interested in using it. Whether that thought t a k e s the form of prose, poetry, or art, it is eagerly sought. Of course, short scholarly p a p e r s on non-imaginative subjects are also acceptable. The success of next year's O P U S will be measured by its universality of student expression. StaffEditor: David (i. Cassie Editorial Hd.: Sewell Hayes Len Howell Sharon Croswell J a n e Gouwens

The Reverend a n d b e g i n n i n g of

the

Mrs. H o w a r d second

G. H a g e m a n , w h o

semester to assist

in

Art E d i t o r s :

J a m e s Clark Diane Johnson

Advisors:

James Prins Joy Talbert

v i s i t e d c a m p u s at t h e

Religious

Emphasis

Dr. I r w i n J. L u b b e r s , w h o s e w i l l i n g n e s s to " t a l k t h i n g s o v e r " w i t h s t u d e n t s was

one

reason

why

the

1956

Milestone

was

dedicated

to

him.

Week.

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P a g e Six

HOPE

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

Hope Nine Sweeps Twin Bill From Hillsdale; Lose Two To Alma Albion 1st; Dutch Finish 2nd In Conference Track Race Hope College's track team finishtook first place in the 100 yard ed a distant second behind Albion dash. Paul had a good day on the in the M.I.A.A. t r a c k and field track as he captured two firsts and meet. Albion captured its third a second. consecutive track championship by Herb Widmer ran his best mile compiling 92-1/7 points while Hope of the year as he finished second trailed them with 92-9/14 points. in the mile run and fifth in the The Dutch thinclads put on a fine two mile. showing in the running events as • Dave Spaan took first place in Paul Wiegerink, Jim Hilmert, Dave his 440 yard specialty as he covered Spaan, Herb Widmer, and Pete the q u a r t e r mile in 51.1. Dave came Hylenga all picked up i m p o r t a n t in third in the 220 yard dash as points. he finished strong. However, Hilmert was the only M.I.A.A. Spaan's most outstanding piece of record breaker in the entire meet work came in the mile relay where as he shattered a 19 y e a r old conhe ran the anchor leg in his best ference mark in the 120 yard high time of the year in 49.4 to pull us hurdles with a 15.4 performance. into second place. Hilmert edged Wiegerink f o r the Pete Bylenga also did some very first time this y e a r as they capfine running as he took f o u r t h place tured first and second. Wiegerink broke the field record in both the 100 and 220 yard in the 220 yard low hurdles and dashes.

Through The Keyhole The time has come, as the old adage tells us, to speak of many things; but words wax long and the sands of time a r e following s w i f t l y through the hour-glass, bearing us and all our t h o u g h t s into the welcome a r m s of oblivion. Another season ended, another g a m e won or lost. The shouts and cheers of the spectators wing t h e i r way into the stillness of the night, and then are lost forever. A single figure stands alone in the midst of the deserted stadium, reliving the triumphs of a bygone day. Time fiys by, and bears us all upon its beating wing, till all our yesterdays a r e but shadows of their f o r m e r selves, t h a t walk alone in the hallowed hall of memory. So it is; so let it be. A win, a loss; recorded in the record book, imprinted indelibly upon the soul of the participant, to be brought f o r t h , resavored, and relived — then to be tucked into the reservior of life. The past, with all its h e a r t a c h e s and triumphs, f o r good or ill, is through. Let the dead bury their dead; and let the living vision new castles in the clouds. Another athletic year has d r a w n to a close. It has not been an overt success, but neither h a s it been a dismal failure. Like all years it had its heros and its clowns; as always t r a g e d y hovered on the brink of triumph. True, mistakes and mis-

calculations were made, and t r u e things didn't always work out as planned; but now all is past, and through it all we have kept alive that celestial s p a r k of hope that beats eternal in the human breast. Tomorrow is a new day. Soon the air will be filled with pig skin, and another year will be a t hand. Another y e a r upon which to build f r o m the foundation wrought in the trials of today. A clean slate has been prepared upon which to s t a r t anew. The storm is past and once again the sun will poke its shining beams, through the dismal blackness. To those who end their athletic careers with this parting, we say "well done", our congratulations, best wishes, and thanks go out to you. To those who are destined to r e t u r n we can only say that the challenge lies in the f u t u r e , f o r the past remains only as a pedagogical spectre. And now I have done, but these things remain: A deflated football, a punctured basketball, a bent driver, a tennis racket without any strings, a runner's shoe without any spikes, and a broken bat; symbols of w h a t has been, but challenges to what yet m a y be. The night is here, the dawn will come; but f o r now a peek Through the Keyhole reveals nothing but the dismal, dusty, mistenshrouded stillness of an empty locker room.

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JEUULRY

Scots Swamp Hope Hope Downs Dales In Double-Header A f t e r dropping both ends of a twin bill to MIAA champion Alma by scores of 13-0 and 4-3, Hope College's baseball a g g r e g a t i o n went on to close out the season with double wins over Hillsdale and Olivet, with clutch pitching and timely hitting being the password. The Dutch topped Hillsdale 5-4 and 2-1 and Olivet 4-3 and 10-2. Hope finished the season with a 7-6 record. S a t u r d a y , May 12, was a miserable day f o r the local nine. Alma hitters pounded hurlers W a y n e Westenbroek and Jim Stout f o r 13 runs and 19 hits, while Alma firebailer Cook blanked Hope on three hits. Dick Ortquist, A r t Olson, and Arnie Boeve picked up Hope's only safeties, all singles. Westenbroek absorbed the loss. The story was somewhat different in the second game, however. Alma needed a pinch-hit single in the final stanza to win. Alma tallied first, picking up a p a i r of runs in the f o u r t h . They were helped along by two Hope e r r o r s while collecting but two hits. Hope ended their daylong f a m i n e in the sixth. Ortquist's two-out single was followed by Adams' single. Ortquist was able to score when the Alma centerfielder bobbled Adams' hit and then made a wild throw in. Alma surged ahead 3-1 in the bottom of the sixth on a walk, two singles, and a sacrifice. An inning-ending double play by way of the plate eliminated any f u r t h e r Alma scoring in t h a t inning. In Hope's h a l f of the seventh, Carl De Vree singled. Jack Kempker then poled a f o u r - b a g g e r onto the centerfield roof to knot the score at 3-3. Singles by Woodcock and Thompson went to no avail as John Adams ended the inning bouncing out to first. Alma iced the g a m e in the seventh. A pinch-hit single scored an Alma r u n n e r f r o m second who had singled and had been pushed ahead by an error. Mert Vanderlind was the losing pitcher.

Emmies Fraf

Breeze

Softball

Into

Honors

The undefeated Emersonians are the i n t r a m u r a l softball champions for 191)6. The Emmies walked off with the trophy without too much trouble as they received exceptionally fine pitching f r o m J o h n Van Iwaarden throughout the season. The Arkies lost only to the E m m i e s and thus finished in second place. The Cosmos, F r a t e r s , and Knicks finished the season in third, f o u r t h , and fifth respectively. The Emmies, in claiming their lone championship f o r the year, played well as a unit. No other team could come close to them in any game.

For Things M u s i c a l —

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HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Monday the 15th proved to be more successful f o r the Dutch. Again at Riverview Park, Hope took two f r o m Hillsdale, b o t h g a m e s being close ones. The scores were 5-4 and 2-1. The locals s t a r t e d off quickly in the first, scoring three runs on singles by Ortquist and Adams, a passed ball, an infield hit by Ron Weatherbee, a single by A r t Olson, and an infield error. Hillsdale bounced back with two in the second when Hillsdale's catcher Eugenio leveled one of Jack Kempker's curves and parked it on the left field roof. A solo homer by Bob Duncan, which soared f a r over the centerfield stands, provided Hillsdale's third run in the following inning. In the fifth, Hope went ahead 4-3 on a single by A r t Olson, 2 passed balls, and Carl De Vree's infield out. Hillsdale tied it again in the sixth on two singles on either side of an infield out. Dave Woodcock's 350-foot blast over the right centerfield fence provided the winning margin. Jack Kempker registered the victory. The second contest was equally close, but W a y n e Westenbroek's m a s t e r f u l f o u r - h i t t e r opened the g a t e s f o r the double win. The Dales went ahead momentarily in the second on a ground rule double followed by a single, but the Dutch moved ahead to stay in the third. Carl De Vree singled home John Adams, who had singled, and Arnie Boeve, who was s a f e on an error. Westenbroek displayed precise control in holding the opposition to two safeties the rest of the way to pick up his third win of the campaign.

Arkies, Cosmos Tie With 4-1 VB Records

Coach Russ De Vette gave his subs a chance in the second game, as the Dutch rambled on, 10-2. S t a r t e r Arnie Boeve ran into trouble in the early innings, and w a s hoisted in f a v o r of F r e s h m a n Jim Stout. Arnie then finished the g a m e in right field. Although Hope piled up ten runs, scoring in every inning but the first, they only collected seven hits. Reliefer Stout led the p a r a d e with two solid singles, while J o h n A d a m s scored three runs. Altogether, seventeen men saw action f o r Hope. Although limited to a scant two runs, the Olivet stickmen amassed a total of eleven safeties, all singles but one. Stout got the win.

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SPORT STORE 0

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0

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Golf

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0

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0

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0

Skating

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0

Trophies

Holland, Mich.

Playing at Zeeland High field on the 17th, Hope closed out the season as they swept a twin bill f r o m Olivet 4-3 and 10-2. A f t e r Olivet had nicked Mert Vanderlind f o r two runs in the first, the locals began to peck away, scoring single tallies in the third and f o u r t h innings. Ortquist led off the third with a single. A d a m s and W e a t h e r bee walked to fill the bases. A f t e r Olson forced Ortquist at the plate, Jack Kempker sacrifice fly to left scored Adams. In the f o u r t h , J e r r y Boeve walked and stole second. He advanced to third on Woodcock's long fly to right, and came across on Vanderlind's fly to center. Olivet tallied in the sixth on a base on balls, a single, an error, and a sacrifice fly. The Dutch also scored in the sixth to even things up Jack F a b e r took ball f o u r and went to second on J e r r y Boeve's single. Woodcock's long fly to center sent F a b e r to third, where he scored on Vanderlind's two-bagger. The ball g a m e was all even going into the bottom of the ninth, with the top of Hope's order due up. Ortquist and A d a m s were both safe on infield errors. W e a t h e r b e e ' s bunt single loaded the bases, and paved the way f o r Art Olson's game winning single.

SUPERIOR

Table Tennis

17 W 8th St.

As Dutch Win Twice

The Arkies and Cosmos both finished with 4-1 records in volleyball and thus were co-champions. The Arkies lost to the Knicks for their lone loss while the Cosmos fell before the Arcadian brothers Hope finished in f o u r t h spot in for their single defeat. Undoubtedthe MIAA with a 7-6 record, bely the most exciting matches of hind Alma, Albion, and Calvin. the year were the E m m i e - F r a t e r Captain Dick Ortquist was selected games. This was the final match as the t e a m ' s most valuable player and proved to be the most crucial by his t e a m m a t e s . The squad also as the Emmies defeated the F r a t e r s selected catcher Dave Woodcock to in the battle f o r third place. The Captain next year's nine. The Emmie victory dropped the —Bob Van W a r t F r a t e r s into a tie for f o u r t h place and enabled the Cosmos to clinch the All-Sports title. As co-sharers of the Volleyball Hope 4th in M / A A championship the Arkies and CosTrophy Contest mos are titlists f o r the first time Hope College finished f o u r t h in in this sport. the race f o r the M.I.A.A. AllSports trophy. The Dutchmen trailed Albion who has won the trophy eight times, Kalamazoo, and Hillsdale. Hope did not c a p t u r e a single championship throughout the y e a r and thus did not have much chance of capturing the award. 0

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With Double Wins Comets Slow Down

Albion captured the title by acc u m u l a t i n g 75 points, fifty of them in the f o u r S p r i n g Sports of baseball, track, golf, and tennis. Kalamazoo was r u n n e r - u p with 67, Hillsdale followed with 62, Hope totaled 55, and w a s followed by Alma, 51; Calvin, 46; Adrian, 25; and Olivet, 11. It h a s been t h r e e years since Hope h a s placed a strong challenge for t h e All-Sports trophy. Let's hope t h a t we can s t a r t off with a b a n g in the Fall and r e t u r n home with it next May.

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Profile for Hope College Library

05-25-1956  

05-25-1956