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Accepts Position at North Carolina

Mathis Resigns Dean of Academic Affairs Post

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79th ANNIVERSARY -

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Hope College, Holland, Michigan

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May 19, 1967

Homes Resigns

Five Faculty Members Hired Dean f o r A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s William M a t h i s h a s a n n o u n c e d t h a t Philip Homes and E. J e a n P r o t h e r o e will not r e t u r n to the College next y e a r a n d that five m o r e new faculty m e m b e r s h a v e been hired. Mr. H o m e s a n n o u n c e d his resign a t i o n last M o n d a y . He c a m e to the H o p e College faculty in 1 9 6 5 a n d h a s served as c h a i r m a n of the art d e p a r t m e n t . Mr. H o m e s h a s accepted a position o n the faculty of G o d d a r d College in Plainfield, V e r m o n t . He will w o r k p r i m a r i l y in c e r a m i c s at G o d d a r d . Miss P r o t h e r o e , a s s i s t a n t p r o -

fessor of English, is t a k i n g a n official leave of a b s e n c e for o n e y e a r to teach at a n o t h e r institution. She h a s not yet d e t e r m i n e d the college at which she will teach next y e a r . C o m i n g to H o p e as a visiting a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r in h i s t o r y for the 1 9 6 7 - 6 8 a c a d e m i c y e a r will be Dr. N i c o l a a s A n t o n i u s Bootsma. Dr. B o o t s m a is c u r r e n t l y serving at the Historical Institute of the Catholic University of N i j m e g e n in T h e N e t h e r l a n d s , w h e r e he received his Ph.D. His field is E u r o p e a n h i s t o r y f r o m the

SCSC Groundbreaking Postponed, Says Pres. ( i r o u n d b r e a k i n g for the Student C u l t u r a l - S o c i a l Center m a y not take p l a c e before C o m m e n c e m e n t , a c c o r d i n g to President C a l v i n A. V a n d e r W e r f . At H o m e c o m i n g , the President had predicted that g r o u n d would be b r o k e n " b e f o r e the s u m m e r b r e a k . " He cited two r e a s o n s for the p o s t p o n m e n t . First, the final bluep r i n t s h a v e not been r e t u r n e d . Architect C h a r l e s E. S t a d e is now r e v i s i n g them in a c c o r d a n c e with r e a c t i o n s f r o m s t u d e n t s a n d the B o a r d of Trustees. T h e o r i g i n a l b l u e p r i n t s were d r a w n in F e b r u a r y , t a k i n g into c o n s i d e r a t i o n rec o m m e n d a t i o n s of a c o m b i n e d s t u d e n t - faculty - A d m i n i s t r a t i o n committee. HOWEVER, the m a j o r c a u s e of the d e l a y , s a i d Dr. V a n d e r W e r f , is the fact that the college h a s not yet been a w a r d e d the $ 7 0 8 , 0 0 0 f e d e r a l g r a n t for which it h a s a p p l i e d . T h e a p p l i c a t i o n h a s been a p p r o v e d by the state of M i c h i g a n a n d is n o w a w a i t i n g f a v o r a b l e a c t i o n in W a s h i n g t o n . A c c o r d i n g to Dr. V a n d e r W e r f , the a p p l i c a t i o n will be denied if g r o u n d b r e a k i n g takes p l a c e bef o r e the g r a n t w a s a c t u a l l y a w a r d ed. T h e r e f o r e , the c e r e m o n y m u s t

Frats, Sorority Help Muscular Dystrophy Drive F i v e social f r a t e r n i t i e s a n d o n e s o r o r i t y h a v e m a d e don a t i o n s to the T u r t l e I n t e r n a tional Muscular Dystrophy Drive. The d o n a t i o n s , a l o n g with the other m o n e y collected f r o m the c o m p e t i t i o n , will g o to f u r t h e r r e s e a r c h a n d t r e a t m e n t of the c r i p p l i n g disease. C a m p u s contributions came f r o m the A r c a d i a n , C e n t u r i a n , Cosmopolitan, . Emersonian fraternities, the F r a t e r n a l Society a n d the D o r i a n s o r o r i t y .

wait until final action h a s been t a k e n . This m a y h a p p e n " a n y d a y . The decision m a y c o m e as s u d d e n l y as the a p p r o v a l of the l o a n for the new Science Buildi n g , " the President said. If a p p r o v a l is not given b e f o r e Commencement, the c e r e m o n y w o u l d be put off until a n o t h e r a p p r o p r i a t e occasion. However, Dr. VanderWerf noted that the d a t e is subject to a p p r o v a l b y the B o a r d of Trustees. ACCORDING TO Director of Business Affairs C l a r e n c e J. Handlogten, the o t h e r m a j o r s o u r c e of f u n d s for the S C S C is the C a p i t a l F u n d s Drive n o w bei n g conducted b y the Reformed C h u r c h in A m e r i c a . The anticip a t e d income f r o m this is $2 million. Private c o n t r i b u t i o n s f o r the s t r u c t u r e totaled $ 1 5 0 , 0 0 0 at Homecoming. Mr. Handlogten also ann o u n c e d that p l a n s a r e p re s e n t l y b e i n g m a d e to r e m o d e l V o o r h e e s Hall. This is a c h a n g e in the Master Plan unveiled at H o m e c o m i n g , which called f o r the r a z i n g of the dormitory. It is h o p e d that a w o r k i n g d i a g r a m of the c h a n g e s will be s u b mitted to the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n tod a y so that b i d d i n g m a y t a k e p l a c e next week. P l a n n e d i m p r o v e ments include e n c l o s i n g the interior stairwells, installing new window sashes and replacing m u c h of the h e a t i n g electrical a n d plumbing apparatus. The w o r k will be completed this s u m m e r if all the p r e l i m i n a r y prep a r a t i o n s go a s p l a n n e d a n d if the needed e q u i p m e n t is r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e , a c c o r d i n g to Mr. H a n d logten. MR, H A N D L O G T E N said t h a t c o n s t r u c t i o n of the new d o r m i t o r y o n the c o r n e r of N i n t h St. a n d C o l u m b i a Ave. is g o i n g " v e r y well." C o n s t r u c t i o n is p r o c e e d i n g a week a h e a d of schedule a n d he h a s every h o p e t h a t the buildi n g will be c o m p l e t e d b y the p r o jected c o n s t r u c t i o n d a t e of Sept e m b e r 9.

Middle Ages to the 2 0 t h c e n t u r y a n d he a l s o h a s a b a c k g r o u n d in Latin A m e r i c a n h i s t o r y . Alan C a r t e r will c o m e to H o p e as a n i n s t r u c t o r in political science next y e a r , e n l a r g i n g the dep a r t m e n t to f o u r m e m b e r s . Mr. C a r t e r h a s an A. B. f r o m H o p e College a n d a n M.A. f r o m the University of Missouri. L y n n H o e p f i n g e r will s e r v e in the chemistry d e p a r t m e n t next y e a r as a G L C A - N S F intern in chemistry. Mr. H o e p f i n g e r in completing w o r k for his Ph.D. at Purdue University in b i o c h e m i s t r y . Filling the a b s e n c e in the music d e p a r t m e n t created by the y e a r leave of a b s e n c e b y J a m e s Tallis will be Robert T h o m p s o n , w h o is presently p u r s u i n g a D.M.A. in o r g a n at the University of Michigan. Mr. T h o m p s o n ' s position will be interim i nst r uct or in music. B a r r y W e r k m a n h a s been retained to serve as i n s t r u c t o r in economics and business administration next y e a r . Mr. W e r k m a n is a 1964 H o p e g r a d u a t e a n d h o l d s a n M.S. f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n . He is c u r r e n t l y teachi n g at Ferris State University.

Dr. William S. M a t h i s , D e a n of A c a d e m i c Affairs, h a s resigned f r o m his p o s i t i o n at H o p e College, a n n o u n c e d President C a l v i n A. V a n d e r W e r f t o d a y . Dr. M a t h i s ' r e s i g n a t i o n will becom e effective J u l y 1. He will a s s u m e the p o s i t i o n of C h a i r m a n of the F i n e Arts Dep a r t m e n t of the U n i v e r s i t y of N o r t h C a r o l i n a at C h a r l o t t e . I N M A K I N G the a n n o u n c e ment, President V a n d e r W e r f s a i d : " I t is with regret that I m u s t ann o u n c e the r e s i g n a t i o n of William S. M a t h i s a s Dean of A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s at H o p e College. " D e a n M a t h i s h a s accepted a p o s i t i o n as C h a i r m a n of the Fine Arts D e p a r t m e n t of the U n i v e r s i t y of N o r t h C a r o l i n a at C h a r l o t t e . His p o s t as C h a i r m a n of this new D e p a r t m e n t , e n c o m p a s s i n g the a r e a s of music, art a n d d r a m a , will e n a b l e Dr. M a t h i s to devote his time a n d energies to his o w n p a r t i c u l a r specialty m u c h m o r e closely t h a n h a s been the case in his post at H o p e College. " A L T H O U G H D E A N MATHIS' s t a y at H o p e h a s been a brief one, he leaves b e h i n d m a n y f r i e n d s — s t u d e n t s , faculty a n d adm i n i s t r a t o r s . We all wish him a n d his f a m i l y well as he r e t u r n s to a c a r e e r in the a r e a of his special interest." Dr. M a t h i s s a i d , " T h e y e a r in H o l l a n d a n d at H o p e h a s been a rich a n d r e w a r d i n g experience for m y f a m i l y a n d me. It is with g e n u i n e reluctance that we leave. U N C - C h o l d s a c h a l l e n g e to me to r e t u r n to m y discipline a n d to c o n t r i b u t e to the d e v e l o p m e n t of a s i g n i f i c a n t p r o g r a m in the fine

DR. WILLIAM S. MATHIS a r t s which I feel is unique. T h e c h a l l e n g e a n d the o p p o r t u n i t y present a n i m p e r a t i v e . " W e shall m a i n t a i n a keen affection for H o p e a n d shall follow with interest her c o n t i n u i n g development." DR, M A T H I S E A R N E D a b a c h elor of music d e g r e e f r o m Stetson U n i v e r s i t y , a m a s t e r ' s f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n , a n d a Ph.D. f r o m F l o r i d a State University . Before his a p p o i n t m e n t to the d e a n s h i p at H o p e he w a s d e a n of faculties of H a r d i n - S i m m o n s U n i v e r s i t y in Abilene, Tex., a n d a l s o served as d e a n of the School of Music there.

Van Voorst to Address Europe-Bound Hopites Bruce V a n V o o r s t , B u r e a u Chief in Berlin a n d B o n n for Newsweek M a g a z i n e a n d a 1954 g r a d u a t e of H o p e College, will deliver a n a d d r e s s next T u e s d a y at 7 : 3 0 p.m. in S n o w A u d i t o r i u m to the C h a p e l C h o i r a n d other H o p e s t u d e n t s g o i n g to E u r o p e this s u m m e r o n the topic " R e - e m e r g e n c e of G e r m a n y o n the E u r o p e a n Political Scene." Mr. V a n V o o r s t , w h o is currently on a lecture t o u r u n d e r the a u s p i c e s of the World Affairs Council will d i s c u s s the role of German Chancellor Kiesinger a n d the q u e s t i o n of G e r m a n - U . S . r e l a t i o n s in his talk.

Mr. V a n V o o r s t , w h o received a B.A. in political science f r o m H o p e , a l s o h o l d s an M.A. degree in political science f r o m the University of M i c h i g a n . T h i s s u m m e r Mr. V a n V o o r s t p l a n s to host the H o p e College C h a p e l C h o i r at a reception foll o w i n g their concert at the University of B o n n . P r i o r to j o i n i n g the Newsweek staff, he w a s M a n a g e r of the American T e x t b o o k C o m p a n y with h e a d q u a r t e r s in Duesseldorf, Germ a n y a n d a l s o served a s Political A f f a i r s Officer at the U.S. Emb a s s y in E t h i o p i a .

Commencement, Baccalaureate

Mrs. Romney, Thomas to Speak L e n o r e R o m n e y , wife of Michi g a n ' s g o v e r n o r , will be the s p e a k er at the g r a d u a t i o n of H o p e ' s 1 0 2 n d class at the c o m m e n c e m e n t c e r e m o n i e s on J u n e 5 at 10 a . m . in the H o l l a n d Civic Center. Rev. N o r m a n Edwin T h o m a s , Pastor of the First R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A l b a n y , N.Y., will p r e a c h the bacc a l a u r e a t e s e r m o n to the class of 1967 o n J u n e 4 at 2 : 3 0 p . m . in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel. MRS. ROMNEY is a g r a d u a t e of G e o r g e W a s h i n g t o n U n i v e r s i t y ,

w h e r e s h e c o m p l e t e d the u s u a l f o u r y e a r p r o g r a m in three. A f o r m e r H o l l y w o o d a n d New York actress, s h e is a v e t e r a n p e r f o r m e r b e f o r e a n audience. She often s h o u l d e r s p a r t of her h u s b a n d ' s s p e a k i n g l o a d a n d is a n experienced c a m p a i g n e r . G o v e r n o r R o m n e y reiers to her as his "secret w e a p o n " a n d s a y s that n o o n e " a n t i c i p a t e d a w o m a n c o u l d be s o effective a political speaker."

erous churches and as an a r m y c h a p l a i n d u r i n g the K o r e a n War. His service o n the f r o n t e a r n e d him the B r o n z e Star. REV. T H O M A S h a s e a r n e d degrees from Rutgers University a n d New B r u n s w i c k T h e o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y . He h a s conducted postg r a d u a t e s t u d y at U n i o n Theological S e m i n a r y . C h a i r m a n of the 1967 C o m mencement and Baccalaureate C o m m i t t e e is Russell De Vette.

Mrs. R o m n e y pinch hit for Gove r n o r R o m n e y at W e d n e s d a y ' s Tulip T i m e l u n c h e o n in the Civic Center, w h e n he w a s d e l a y e d b y a c o m m i t t e e meeting. She s p o k e for 2 5 i^inutes "off the c u f f cove r i n g topics r a n g i n g f r o m religion to civil rights, d e l i n q u e n c y , y o u t h and women. Mrs. Romney b l e n d e d a series of Biblical a n d classical q u o t e s into her speech. S H E C O M M E N T E D " I ' v e alw a y s h a d a lot to s a y , but no o n e w a n t e d to listen until G e o r g e became governor." Rev. T h o m a s will p r e a c h o n the topic " T h e D i m e n s i o n of Life."

REV. NORMAN THOMAS

He h a s s e r v e d a s president of the General S y n o d a n d the B o a r d of World M i s s i o n s of the Reformed C h u r c h in A m e r i c a . In a d d i t i o n to his present p o s i t i o n in A l b a n y , Rev. T h o m a s h a s s e r v e d in n u m -

MRS. LENORE ROMNEY


Hope College anchor

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May 19. 1967

45 Seniors Receive Help

Grads Aided at Many Schools F o r t y - f i v e of H o p e College's g r a d u a t i n g s e n i o r s h a v e been accepted a n d h a v e received either fellowships o r a s s i s t a n t s h i p s to a v a r i e t y of g r a d u a t e s c h o o l s a c r o s s the c o u n t r y . F o u r H o p e College s e n i o r s h a v e been a w a r d e d three-year F o r d F o u n d a t i o n F e l l o w s h i p s to d o g r a d u a t e work at the U n i v e r s i t y of C h i c a g o , Dr. C l a r e n c e T. De G r a a f , p r o f e s s o r of E n g l i s h a n d H o p e College c o o r d i n a t o r for the Ford Program announced. T H E S T U D E N T S include Gord o n K o r s t a n g e , J o h n C o x , Ruth Z i e m a n n a n d Wes M i c h a e l s o n . K o r s t a n g e a n d Cox were a w a r d ed fellowships in F n g l i s h ; Miss Z i e m a n n received o n e in G e r m a n a n d M i c h a e l s o n received his in p h i l o s o p hy. M i c h a e l s o n a l s o received a fell o w s h i p f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of K a n s a s in A m e r i c a n Studies a n d a Rockefeller fellowship for a " t r i a l y e a r " in s e m i n a r y . He h a s turned d o w n the U n i v e r s i t y of K a n s a s a n d F o r d fellowships a n d will be a t t e n d i n g Princeton Semin a r y u n d e r the Rockefeller. T h e N a t i o n a l Defense F d u c a tion Act Fellowship w a s a w a r d e d to six students. In c h e m i s t r y . Ken-

Chapel Choir Offers Concert This Sunday The H o p e College C h a p e l C h o i r will present its 15th a n n u a l h o m e concert Sunday a f t e r n o o n at 3 p.m. in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel. The v a r i e d p r o g r a m will include selections f r o m the 16th c e n t u r y , i n c l u d i n g w o r k s b y T o m as de Victoria ( 1 5 4 9 - 1 6 1 1 ) and Pierluigi d a Palestrina ( 1 5 2 4 - 1 5 9 4 ) . Besides these e a r l y c o m p o s e r s , the concert will include a m o d e r n selection by Ralph V a u g h a n Williams. T h e choir will a l s o sing pieces a r r a n g e d b y N o r m a n d L o c k w o o d and R o b e n S h a w . A v e r y u n i q u e aspect of the concert will be the v a r i e t y of foreign l a n g u a g e s in which the c h o i r will s i n g . Three n u m b e r s will be s u n g in Latin, one in G e r m a n a n d o n e in Hebrew. Dr. Robert W. C a v a n a u g h , director of the C h a p e l C h o i r a n d head of H o p e ' s music d e p a r t m e n t , a n t i c i p a t e s a l a r g e t u r n o u t Sund a y a f t e r n o o n , not o n f y b e c a u s e of the p o p u l a r i t y of this concert in the p a s t , but a l s o b e c a u s e the concert coincides with the end of Tulip T i m e in H o l l a n d .

neth K e e g s t r a received one to the University of C o l o r a d o . R a n d a l l Bos and J o h n T a n is received the N D F A in physics. T h e y will continue their studies at the U n i v e r s i tv of Missouri and the U n i v e r s i t y of Iowa, respectively. R A N D A L L M I L L E R received the N D F A at Ohio State U n i v e r sity to p u r s u e his s t u d y in h i s t o r y , a n d Robert Donia received a fell o w s h i p to I n d i a n a U n i v e r s i t y to s t u d y R u s s i a n h i s t o r y . J o h n Mulder received an N D F A for s t u d y in p h i l o s o p h y at W a y n e State University. Mulder h a s t u r n e d it d o w n a n d will be a t t e n d i n g Princeton S e m i n a r y . Rick Rietveld will attend Color a d o State University with a n a s s i s t a n t s h i p in speech. Three s t u d e n t s were a w a r d e d the N a t i o n a l Science F o u n d a t i o n T r a i n e e s h i p a n d F e l l o w s h i p in the field of c h e m i s t r y . David And e r s o n will g o to N o r t h w e s t e r n University, Paul S c h a a p will attend H a r v a r d University, and Frederick V a n Lente will a t t e n d ''rinceton U n i v e r s i t y . FRANK B A R R O N , w h o received a N a t i o n a l Institute of Mental Health F e l l o w s h i p in psyc h o l o g y , will attend B o s t o n University. Hal H u g g i n s , who is a l s o a p s y c h o l o g y m a j o r , received an assistantship from State University of New Y o r k in A l b a n y a n d one f r o m New Y o r k University. He is as yet u n d e c i d e d as to which one he will accept. S c h o l a r s h i p s were a w a r d e d to two other H o p e s t u d e n t s , D a v i d T u b e r g e n , a m u s i c m a j o r , will attend Yale University tor g r a d uate s t u d y in p e r f o r m a n c e , a n d Oegema will attend the University of M i c h i g a n for g r a d u a t e s t u d y in c h e m i s t r y . A N U M B E R of t e a c h i n g assist a n t s h i p s were a w a r d e d , w h i c h include a few f r o m each d e p a r t ment. T h e b i o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t h a s 1 1 a w a r d e d s t u d e n t s , including G e o r g e H u n g e r f o r d , Robert Lootens, a n d Preston M a r i n g , who will attend the U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan Medical School. Cornelius A g a r i - I w e a n d Pierre Sende were given a s s i s t a n t s h i p s . T h e y will a t t e n d H o w a r d U n i v e r s i t y Medical School. C h a r l e s W a l v o o r d h a s been accepted to N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i ty Medical School in C h i c a g o , T h e o d o r e V a n D a m at C a l i f o r n ia College of Medicine, J a m e s Klein at University of Illinois Medical School, Dale DeBoer and G a r y G a r w o o d at the U n i v e r s i t y

SHIRTS

of M i c h i g a n Dental School, a n d J o h n Z i m m e r m a n at the College of V e t e r i n a r y Medicine at the University of Illinois in U r b a n a . LARRY VANDE HOEE, a m a t h m a i o r , h a s received an ass i s t a n t s h i p in E c o n o m i c s a n d Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n at the University of Wyoming. Gerald Auten, a l s o in B u s i n e s s Administ r a t i o n , will attend the University of M a r y l a n d . Albert B r u n s t i n g a n d E d w a r d C h a n g , p h y s i c s m a j o r s , both received a s s i s t a n t s h i p s in p h y s i c s a n d will attend the University of New Mexico a n d P e n n s y l v a n i a State U n i v e r s i t y respe\ ively. IN C H E M I S T R Y , D o n DeMaster received a n a s s i s t a n t s h i p to the U n i v e r s i t y of N e b r a s k a , Henry D y k e m a to Western M i c h i g a n U n i v e r s i t y , R o n a l d Mathews to I n d i a n a U n i v e r s i t y , W. Frederick Oettle to the I niversity of K a n sas, M a r t i n O n d r u s to the University of I o w a , H o w a r d Tigel a a r to the U n i v e r s i t y of Illinois, a n d T i m o t h y Su to the University of K a n s a s . D a v i d Noel, a h i s t o r y m a j o r , received a n a s s i s t a n t s l r i to attend T o l e d o U n i v e r s i t y to pursue his s t u d y of A m e r i c a n history. T w o political science m a jors, Robert B o s n i a n a n d Marilyn H o f f m a n , will a t t e n d A l b a n y State U n i v e r s i t y a n d T o l e d o University respectively. A N E N G L I S H MAJOR, S u s a n F e n i g e n b u r g , received an assist a n t s h i p to attend the University of A r k a n s a s .

HOLY ELECTRiCUTION—John Cage is shown composing one of his works at the lecture-recital as presented at Hope last Thursday. Shown is Jast a sample of the paraphernalia used to create his sounds.

Cage Forces Awareness Of the Form of Music "Unusual" is the a d j e c t i v e which w o u l d d e s c r i b e the lecture a n d concert by J o h n C a g e in Dimnent C h a p e l last T h u r s d a y . T h i s w a s not a concert in the accepted sense of the w o r d but r a t h e r a "listening experience." MR, C A G E a t t e m p t s to f o r c e p e o p l e to listen a n d to b e c o m e a w a r e of the f o r m of music. He describes his m u s i c as timeless. It h a s no b e g i n n i n g or end yet it can be r e c o g n i z e d as h a v i n g s o m e f o r m . He w a n t s to b r i n g forth new s o u n d s a n d e v o k e a r e s p o n s e f r o m his audience. A c c o r d i n g to Mr. Cage, we a r e c o n d i t i o n e d to classical m u s i c

Final Performance Tonight

Opera and Concerto Offered T h e final p e r f o r m a n c e of the p r o g r a m p r o d u c e d b y the H o p e College speech a n d m u s i c d e p a r t ments will be given tonight at H:15 in H o l l a n d High School Auditorium. The p r o g r a m will include J o h a n n S. B a c h ' s " C o n c e r t o for Two H a r p s i c h o r d s " a n d K u r t Weil's o p e r a , " D o w n in the Valley." HOPE S T U D E N T S will be admitted free to the p e r f o r m a n c e s , but they m u s t o b t a i n the complim e n t a r y tickets f r o m the Business Office. Tickets for p e o p l e who a r e not affiliated with H o p e are a l s o

a v a i l a b l e f r o m the Business Office. Lead roles in " D o w n in t h e V a l l e y " a r e p l a y e d by A n d r e a M a r t i n a s J e n n y P a r s o n s , T o m Griffen a s b r a c k W e a v e r , Dirk W a l v o o r d as T h o m a s Bouche, a n d H a r v e y Lucas as T h e L e a d e r . G e o r g e Ralph, a s s i s t a n t p r o fessor of speech a n d a s s o c i a t e director of Little T h e a t r e will direct " D o w n in the V a l l e y . " Music for the o p e r a will be p r o v i d e d by the H o p e College o r c h e s t r a u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n of Dr. Morrette Rider. T h e o p e r a ' s c h o r u s will be directed b y J a m e s Tallis.

1

Or More With Dry

Folded Or On Hangers

NEW YORK d e s i g n e r R i c h a r d C a s s l e r is r e s p o n s i b l e for the sets, a n d his a s s i s t a n t is Tom C o l e m a n . M a x i n e De B r u y n is t h e c o r r e o g r a p h y d i r e c t o r , a n d Dr. Robert C a v a n a u g h and Joyce Morrison are vocal coaches. L i g h t i n g for the p l a y w a s des i g n e d b y Mike V o g a s , a n d the s t a g e m a n a g e r is J a n e Riso. Her assistants are Sherry Van Fenwyk and Donna Davidsmeyer.

Dr. Victor Hill Presents Recital At Hope Church Dr. Victor Hill, o r g a n i s t a n d h a r p s i c h o r d i s t , will p r e s e n t a n org a n recital at H o p e C h u r c h tom o r r o w at 1:30 p . m . He will p l a y " T h e Art of the F u g u e " b y Bach. " T h e f u g u e is of a p r o f o u n d and an extraordinarily complex s t r u c t u r e , " stated Dr. Hill. As B a c h ' s last m a j o r w o r k , the c o m p o s i t i o n c o n s i s t s of twenty f u g u e s b a s e d o n a single subject. The last a n d the l o n g e s t of these r e m a i n e d u n f i n i s h e d at B a c h ' s d e a t h in 1750, Dr. Hill s a i d . Dr. Hill is the a s s i s t a n t p r o fessor of m a t h e m a t i c s at Will i a m s College .

25c Each For 4

Cleaning Order.

a n d listen to s o u n d s in g r o u p s which m a k e up c o m p o s i t i o n s . We m u s t be m a d e to listen to individual sounds. D R RIDER e x p r e s s e d s u r p r i s e that t w o - t h i r d s of the a u d i e n c e did not w a l k out. He s a i d that the l e n g t h of the concert prevented Mr. C a g e f r o m a c h i e v i n g the d e s i r e d effect. Mr. C a g e ' s music, which is f r a g mented a n d difficult to listen to, seemed to m a k e e a c h selection endlessly l o n g . A c c o r d i n g to Dr. Rider, there h a s been a g r e a t deal of r e a c t i o n a g a i n s t Mr. C a g e s i m p l y b e c a u s e p e o p l e d o not u n d e r s t a n d w h a t he is a t t e m p t i n g to do.

TRUE LOVE NEVER RUNS SMOOTH - Dirk Walvoord (left) as Thomas Bouche and Tom Griffen as Brack Weaver fight to the finish over their true love Jennie Brown in Hope's presentation of Kurt Weil's "Down in the Valley".

Dr. Hill h a s studied u n d e r org a n i s t s s u c h as V e r n o n d e T a r of U n i o n S e m i n a r y , New Y o r k City, J a m e s E v a n s of P i t t s b u r g h a n d Paul J o n e s of the U n i v e r s i t y of Wisconsin.

Cash & Carry In N e a r b y SAUGATUCK I f i

IL FORNO'S For the Best in Food and Dining Atmosphere

SHIRT LAUNDRY

College at 6th

(

LfANEBS HOLLAND, MICH.

famous pizza

gourmet table

banquet and party a c c o m m o d a t i o m

OPkN YEAR 'ROUND Ju*t a Quick 15-Minute Hop Down 1-196


May 19. 1967

Hope College anchor

Three Named Professors

Maggie Fills Many Jobs As Dorm Cleaning Lady

Fourteen Faculty Promoted F o u r t e e n H o p e College f a c u l t y m e m b e r s h a v e received p r o m o t i o n s effective Sentemhpr 1 Q 6 7 - 6 8 , President C.A V a n d e r W e r f a n nounced today. Three faculty m e m b e r s h a v e b e e n p r o m o t e d to p r o f e s s o r s . Dr. E v a V a n S c h a a c k will b e c o m e a p r o f e s s o r of b i o l o g y , Dr. G e r h a r d M e g o w a p r o f e s s o r of G e r m a n a n d Dr. J o s e p h Z s i r o s a p r o f e s s o r of Greek. Dr. V a n S c h a a c k j o i n e d the H o p e C o l l e g e f a c u l t y in 1 9 5 6 . She received a n A . B . d e g r e e f r o m H o p e C o l l e g e in 1 9 2 9 a n d c o m pleted g r a d u a t e w o r k at Johns H o p k i n s U n i v e r s i t y in 1 9 3 7 . DR. MEGOW h a s b e e n a m e m ber of the H o p e f a c u l t y since 1 9 5 9 . H e received his b a c h e l o r , m a s t e r a n d d o c t o r a t e d e g r e e s f r o m In diana University. Dr. Z s i r o s j o i n e d the H o p e C o l lege f a c u l t y in 1 9 4 7 . H e w a s a w a r d e d his T h . D . d e g r e e f r o m Tisza T s t a m U n i v e r s i t y i n D o b r e cen in 1 9 3 1 . Promoted to a s s o c i a t e p r o fessors a r e Dr. N o r m a n N o r t o n , b i o l o g y ; Dr. D o u g l a s N e c k e r s , c h e m i s t r y ; Dr. A r t h u r Jentz, p h i l o s o p h y ; Dr. F. Phillip V a n E y l , p s y c h o l o g y ; Dr. H u b e r t Weller, S p a n i s h ; M. H a r o l d Mikle, s p e e c h ' a n d Miss M. L o i s Bailey, l i b r a r y . C H A I R M A N of the b i o l o g y dep a r t m e n t , Dr. N o r t o n j o i n e d the H o p e C o l l e g e f a c u l t y in 1 9 6 4 . H e received his B.S. d e g r e e f r o m S o u t h e r n Illinois U n i v e r s i t y a n d his M.S. a n d Ph.D. d e g r e e s f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of M i n n e s o t a . Dr. N e c k e r s , a 1 9 6 0 H o p e College g r a d u a t e , j o i n e d the f a c u l t y in 1964. H e w a s a w a r d e d his Ph.D. b y the U n i v e r s i t y of K a n sas. Dr. Jentz h a s been a m e m b e r of the f a c u l t y s i n c e 1 9 6 2 . He w a s g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o p e C o l l e g e in 1956, w a s a w a r d e d a B.D. deg r e e f r o m N e w B r u n s w i c k Semin a r y in 1 9 5 9 a n d received his Ph.D. d e g r e e f r o m C o l u m b i a U n iversity in 1 9 6 5 . DR, V A N E Y L , c h a i r m a n of

the p s y c h o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t , h a s Deen a m e m b e r of the f a c u l t y since 1959. H e w a s g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o p e C o l l e g e in 1 9 5 5 , received his A.M. a n d Ph.D. d e g r e e s f r o m C l a r e m o n t G r a d u a t e School. Dr. Weller j o i n e d t h e faculty in 1 9 6 2 . He received his A. B. degree from the University of M i c h i g a n in 1 9 5 6 a n d w a s a w a r d e d his A.M. a n d Ph.D. degrees f r o m I n d i a n a University. MR, M I K L E received his A.B. d e g r e e f r o m Western M i c h i g a n U n i v e r s i t y in 1 9 3 1 a n d a n A.M. d e g r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n in 1 9 4 0 . He h a s been a m e m b e r of the H o p e faculty since 1 9 6 2 . Miss Bailey h a s s e r v e d as refe r e n c e l i b r a r i a n f o r the college since 1 9 5 4 . She received a n A. B. d e g r e e f r o m M o n m o u t h College in 1 9 2 5 , a n A.M. d e g r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of W i s c o n s i n in 1 9 2 8 and w a s a w a r d e d a B.S. degree in L.S. f r o m Western Reserve in 1941. F o u r faculty m e m b e r s have been p r o m o t e d to a s s i s t a n t p r o -

Band and Dance Group Present Outdoor Concert The H o p e College b a n d , in c o n j u n c t i o n with the H o p e C o l l e g e Modern Dance Group and ARA Slater f o o d service, will p r e s e n t the y e a r ' s f i n a l c o n c e r t at 6 p . m . next T u e s d a y in the Pine G r o v e . Dinner for b o a r d i n g students will be a b a r b e c u e . F a c u l t y a n d t o w n s p e o p l e m a y p u r c h a s e tickets f o r this m e a l in the m u s i c b u i l d i n g office f o r $ 1 . 5 0 . A F T E R D I N N E R , t h e b a n d will b e g i n the e v e n i n g ' s e n t e r t a i n m e n t with v o n S u p p e ' s " P o e t a n d Peasa n t O v e r t u r e , " f o l l o w e d b y the " B a l l e t Music f r o m P r i n c e I g e r " by Borodin. T r u m p e t e r s Ken Aus-

Hope College Gets Federal Science Grant *

H o p e C o l l e g e h a s been a w a r d ed a m a t c h i n g $ 4 7 , 3 9 6 f e d e r a l g r a n t f o r the f i n a n c i n g of l a b o r a t o r y a n d other special equipment, the U . S . D e p a r t m e n t of Health, Education a n d Welfare announced. T h e g r a n t , o n e - h a l f of a $ 9 4 , 7 8 8 p r o j e c t p l a n n e d b y the college, w a s a w a r d e d u n d e r Title V I of t h e H i g h e r E d u c a t i o n Act of 1 9 6 5 . H o p e C o l l e g e is a m o n g s e v e n colleges a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s in Michigan sharing $177,979. P r o j e c t s o n the H o p e C o l l e g e c a m p u s b e n e f i t t i n g f r o m the fede r a l g r a n t i n c l u d e the e x p a n s i o n of a n a l l - c a m p u s a u d i o v i s u a l a i d s c e n t e r , the e n l a r g e m e n t o f a n a l l - c a m p u s statistic l a b o r a t o r y a n d the i m p r o v e m e n t a n d e x p a n s i o n of the e x i s t i n g l a n g u a g e l a b oratory. The college also p l a n s to obt a i n i n t e r v i e w e q u i p m e n t f o r the d e p a r t m e n t s of e d u c a t i o n a n d p s y chology, audio reproduction and p l a y b a c k e q u i p m e n t f o r the m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t a n d new l a b o r a t o r y e q u i p m e n t f o r the c h e m i s t r y department.

f e s s o r . I n c l u d e d a r e two m e m b e r s ol the a r t d e p a r t m e n t — S t a n ley H a r r i n g t o n a n d Delbert Michel. A l s o p r o m o t e d were R. D i r k Jellema, English and Andrew V a n d e r Zee, l i b r a r y . MR, H A R R I N G T O N , a 1 9 5 8 H o p e College g r a d u a t e , joined the f a c u l t y in 1 9 6 4 . He h o l d s a n M . F . A . d e g r e e f r o m the State U n i v e r s i t y of I o w a . Mr. Michel h a s been a m e m b e r of the f a c u l t y since 1 9 6 4 . H( w a s a w a r d e d a n A. B. a n d a M F.A. d e g r e e f r o m De P a u w U n iversity. Mr. J e l l e m a h o l d s a n A. B. deg r e e f r o m C a l v i n College a n d a M . F . A . d e g r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i ty of O r e g o n . He j o i n e d the H o p e f a c u l t y in 1964. Mr. V a n d e r Zee h a s s e r v e d a s c a t a l o g l i b r a r i a n since 1 9 6 3 . H e received a n A.B. d e g r e e f r o m Calv i n C o l l e g e in 1 9 3 3 , a n A.M. deg r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of Michi g a n in 1 9 4 2 a n d a n A.M. in L.S. d e g r e e f r o m Western M : chig a n U n i v e r s i t y in 1962.

RLC Defines and Amends Chapel Alternative Proposal T h e R e l i g i o u s Life C o m m i t t e e a m e n d e d a n d d e f i n e d s o m e of the m e c h a n i c s of the c h a p e l alt e r n a t i v e p r o p o s a l at its final m e e t i n g last M o n d a y a f t e r n o o n . The a m e n d m e n t provided that the lecture p l a n c o n s i s t of eight lectures e a c h s e m e s t e r . A s t u d e n t c h o o s i n g this p l a n i n s t e a d of c h a p el w o u l d b e r e q u i r e d to attend all eight lectures. O r i g i n a l l y the p r o p o s a l c a l l e d for 12 lectures, n i n e of w h i c h the s t u d e n t w o u l d h a v e to a t t e n d in o r d e r to fulfill the r e q u i r e m e n t . Dr. E l t o n B r u i n s , c h a i r m a n of the c o m m i t t e e , s a i d t h a t this w a s d o n e b e c a u s e of the p r a c t i c a l difficulties i n v o l v e d

tin, T i m C r a n d a l l , a n d J a c k Rits e m a will be the s o l o i s t s in L e r o y Anderson's "Bugler's Holiday." "Dimitri Shostakovitch's "Festive O v e r t u r e , Op. 9 6 , " will precede the f e a t u r e d n u m b e r , Vincent Persichetti's c o n t e m p o r a r y " M a s q u e r a d e f o r B a n d , " which p r e s e n t s the d e b u t of the H o p e College Modern Dance Group. M A X I N E DE BRUYN,director of the g r o u p , c h o r e o g r a p h e d this interpretation of the "Masq u e r a d e . " C o n c e r n i n g the s y m b o lism of this w o r k , s h e c o m m e n t s , " M a n h a s m a n y m a s k s . Ours are s h y n e s s , guilt, a n d j o y . Our contemporary s o c i e t y is s t r i v i n g m i g h t i l y f o r the latter. F o r s o m e this is e a s i e r to a c q u i r e t h a n others." The dancers are Elaine Franco, M a r y A n n Gilder, A m y J o h n s o n , Sue N e h e r , J a c k i e N y b o e r , Gretchen V a n d e r W e r f , S u e V a n Wyk a n d Helen Ver H o e k . T h e y a r e d i v i d e d into two g r o u p s w h i c h s y m b o l i z e S h y n e s s a n d Guilt. A soloist possesses contentment a n d j o y a n d tries to s h a r e it with the others.

in p r o c u r i n g 24 t o p - n o t c h lecturers e a c h y e a r . T H E COMMITTEE also sug gested t h a t a f i v e - m e m b e r c o m mittee b e e s t a b l i s h e d to c h o o s e lecturers. The committee would c o n s i s t of the c h a p l a i n , t w o stud e n t s a n d two f a c u l t y m e m b e r s . T h e c h a i r m a n w o u l d be a f a c u l ty m e m b e r a n d w o u l d receive secr e t a r i a l help. T h e s t u d e n t m e m b e r s w o u l d be a p p o i n t e d b y the S t u d e n t S e n a t e President. It w a s a l s o decided to a s k the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n f o r $ 3 , 2 0 0 p e r sem e s t e r to p a y f o r the l e c t u r e r s . H o w e v e r , it w a s s t i p u l a t e d t h a t all l e c t u r e r s w o u l d n o t receive the s a m e fee, a l l o w i n g f u n d s to b r i n g n a t i o n a l l y k n o w n s p e a k e r s into the p r o g r a m f r o m time to time. I N A D D I T I O N , the R L C suggested t h a t the d e c i s i o n w h e t h e r to a t t e n d c h a p e l o r lectures m u s t b e m a d e at r e g i s t r a t i o n . T h e c o m mittee s t r e s s e d , h o w e v e r , t h a t a s t u d e n t c h o o s i n g c h a p e l will be p e r m i t t e d to a t t e n d the l e c t u r e s a n d vice v e r s a . T h e entire p r o p o s a l n o w g o e s b e f o r e the f a c u l t y . A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s . In o t h e r a c t i o n , the c o m m i t t e e a c c e p t e d a s u g g e s t i o n f r o m Dr. I r w i n B r i n k to h a v e C h a p e l B o a r d m e m b e r s a p p o i n t e d this S p r i n g to h e l p a v o i d s o m e of the difficulties e x p e r i e n c e d b y the b o a r d at the b e g i n n i n g of this y e a r .

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F o r t w e n t y - o n e y e a r s Mrs. M a r g a r e t Wolters, b e t t e r k n o w n a s Maggie, h a s been serving H o p e College. Besides h e r j o b a s cleani n g l a d y , M a g g i e is s e a m s t r e s s , chauffeur, nurse, disciplinarian, s u b s t i t u t e - m o t h e r a n d f r i e n d to the m e n of the f r a t e r n i t y h o u s e s a n d K o l l e n Hall. She h a s even a s s u m e d t h e role of a n a l a r m clock f o r o n e sleepy F r a t e r w h o w o u l d n e v e r m a k e it t o c h a p e l w i t h o u t h e r aid. M A G G I E W O R K E D in H o p e ' s W o r l d W a r II b a r r a c k d o r m s a n d in s e v e r a l girls r e s i d e n c e h a l l s before a c q u i r i n g her present position in m e n ' s h o u s i n g . M a g g i e s a i d s h e h a s e n j o y e d all the p l a c e s s h e w o r k e d but a d m i t t e d , " 1 like m y b o y s the b e s t . " Her " b o y s " a r e not a l w a y s a n g e l s b u t this p r e s e n t s n o p r o b lem to M a g g i e w h o r e m a r k e d , " W h e n they a r e n a u g h t y , I g o right after ' e m . " A C C O R D I N G T O M a g g i e , the ' n a u g h t y " tricks the b o y s a r e liable to get b a w l e d out f o r include " b o r r o w i n g " b r o o m s and m o p s f o r e x t e n d e d p e r i o d s of lime, a l l o w i n g white mice to " a c c i d e n t l y " r u n o u t into the hall directly in the p a t h of a n o n - c o m i n g cleaning l a d y a n d not k e e p i n g their o w n r o o m s clean. " I told o n e b o y he h a d m o r e of a m a t t r e s s u n d e r h i s bed t h a n o n it, b e c a u s e of all t h e dust t h e r e , " she said. W H E N N O T b e i n g teased b y the b o y s , M a g g i e is u s u a l l y g i v i n g them a d v i c e o n a b i r t h d a y gift for m o m or girlfriend, sewing

MRS. CLEANâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mrs. Margret Wolters, substitute mother for Hope's males for the past 21 years, feels there just "ain't no such thing as a bad boy." b u t t o n s o n their s h i r t s o r l e n d i n g h e r c a r out i o r " s p e c i a l " occasions. Last year Maggie was m a d e an official p l e d g e of the A r c a d i a n f r a t e r n i t y a n d at the s a m e time w a s " p i n n e d " to R o y A n k e r . S h e recalled this h a p p i l y , " T h e y g a v e m e r o s e s a n d s a n g to me. It w a s really nice." She a n d her h u s b a n d H e n r y live q u i e t l y at R o u t e 1 West Olive w h e r e they s h a r e t h e s a m e h o b b y b u g g y a n d cutter riding. Even while o u t r i d i n g , M a g g i e m a y see s e v e r a l of h e r " b o y s " w h o greet h e r with a c h e e r y " H i , Maggie!"

Rider Receives Grant To Continue Studies Dr. M o r r e t t e Rider, d i r e c t o r of i n s t r u m e n t a l m u s i c at H o p e , h a s been a w a r d e d a F'ord F o u n d a tion g r a n t t h r o u g h the A m e r i c a n C o u n c i l o n E d u c a t i o n f o r the a c a d e m i c y e a r b e g i n n i n g in September 1967. He h a s been a s s i g n e d b y the C o u n c i l a s A d m i n i s t r a t i v e Intern to the P r o v o s t of the U n i v e r s i t y of W a s h i n g t o n in Seattle w h e r e he will o b s e r v e a n d s t u d y the a d m i n i s t r a t i v e o p e r a t i o n of the

U n i v e r s i t y . He will r e m a i n a m e m b e r of the H o p e f a c u l t y o n l e a v e d u r i n g that year. Dr. Rider is o n e of a b o u t 3 0 college p r o f e s s o r s t h r o u g h o u t the United States w h o h a v e been selected f o r this p r o g r a m . H e is a g r a d u a t e of the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n a n d h o l d s a E d . D . degree from C o l u m b i a University. He is p a s t p r e s i d e n t of t h e Michi g a n String T e a c h e r s Assn. a n d the M i c h i g a n O r c h e s t r a A s s n .

NOTICE OF DISSOLVEMENT

Dyno- Vybe Enterprises DYNO VYBE DIVISION GASSMEN DIVISION As of June 3, 1967, Dyno V y b e Enterprises w i l l no longer b e available for entertainment services in Western Michigan. The last two years have been very successful, a n d w e wish to thank the f o l l o w i n g organizations for making it possible for us to serve them:

THE STUDENT OftlRCH Corporate Worship at 10:45 a.m.

Sunday* May 21 Dimnent Chapel Participating as leaders in worship: DICK SHIELS, worship leader CHAPLAIN HILLEGONDS, preaching MR. ROGER DAVIS, organist Alpha Gamma Phi will usher

Sermon subject: "Man, havo you been bom again?"

Hope College Student Senate Classes of '69 and '70, Hope College Alpha Phi Sorority Fraternal Society Delta Phi Sorority West Ottawa Kappa Beta Phi Sorority Junior High School Kappa Chi Sorority Zeeland High School Sigma Sigma Sorority Zeeland High School Arcadian Fraternity Theater Club Centurian Fraternity Ron Harper's Teen Chalet

Boh Schroeder Gary Peiper


Page 4

May If, 1967

Hope College

anchor editorials

A T i m e for Concern

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H E T I M E HAS C O M E for concern. T h e resignation this week of Dr. William S. Mathis as Dean of Academic affairs came as no surprise to the majority of the campus. T h e news had been widely circulated before President VanderWerf's official announcement, and the reaction o n the part of students, faculty and administrators was and continues to be o n e of profound disillusionment.

Last September H o p e College began the year with three new m e n in three of the most important positions of the College administration: Director of Development, Dean of Academic Affairs, Director of Business Affairs. Not even nine months later, William Hender, the Director of Development, and D e a n Mathis have resigned, leaving only Clarence Handlogten, the Director of Business Affairs, remaining with the College. If these two resignations were unusual incidents on Hope's campus, we might not be so concerned. However, the four years of President Vander Werf's administration have marked a turnover in personnel that can only impeed the progress of this school and damage the educational process.

D

U R I N G P R E S I D E N T Vander Werf's administration, we have witnessed the resignations of two Deans of Men, two Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs, one Business Manager, one Director of Public Relations, one Assistant to the President, o n e Director of Church Relations, one Dean of the College, one D e a n of Academic Affairs, one Chaplain, and one Director of Development. Surely some administrators from the preceding Lubbers administration were expected to resign so that President VanderWerf would be able to find his own g r o u p of men with w h o m he could work. Some may have been unsuitable.

But let's stop kidding ourselves. A good number of highly qualified men have left this College because of internal conflict within the administration. T h e source of this conflict in nearly all cases centers around the President. W e have always maintained that a degree of conflict is a healthy characteristic of the educational process. However, when conflict results in a breakdown of communications so se vere that men have n o other choice than to resign, that conflict is destructive to the very educational process we are all seeking to maintain and improve. Because of the present situation, stability, continuity, and leadership have become desirable desir: but rarely found. R O M D E A N M A T H I S during the past year has come some of the leadership, especially in academic affairs, which H o p e College so desparately needs to insure the stability necessary for growth. H e has won the confidence and loyalty of the entire faculty and many students. W e d o not blame him for leaving, for there is a point beyond which any reasonable man cannot g o when he finds himself in an intolerable situation. H e simply must get out. T h e gravity of the present situation demands that the present state of instability, bred by the conflict within the administration, be subject for great concern on the part of students and faculty. T h e relationship between the President of H o p e College and the rest of tht College must be examined, and concrete steps must be taken to prevent the present situation from continuing. If instability is allowed to continue as the distinguishing characteristic of the leadership of H o p e College, it can only have a damaging effect for the students it is committed to educate.

On Hope's T h e a t e r

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H E H I G H Q U A L I T Y of the student production "The Clouds," appearing in Castle Park Amphitheater last weekend, points to a void that has come into life at Hope College. Once c o m m o n near-professional theater ofterings have of late been conspicuous by their absence, much to the detriment of our college education. Viewed as a part of the educational process, which theoretically almost all extra-curricular activities are, the Little Theater has lived up to neither present expectations nor past achievements. It has done little for either the particiapents or the audience. Part of the problem lies in the plays chosen for production. In years to come pieces such as "What Say They?" and Motherlant's "Queen After Death" may be recognized for their literary and dramatic merit. But for present collegiate audiences they are not as valuable as more established works. T h e r e is a wealth of dramatic literature that can be tapped for college theater performjances. For examples we need only t^rrt to the plays produced by the Little Theater last year. "Hippolytus," " T h e Fantastiks" and Ibsen's "The Master Builder" are recognized classics which can be put on the college stage. It seems that they would also teach the actors more about the Western dramatic heritage and the subtleties of acting than d o the lesser known pieces we have seen this year. Such plays, however, have not been selected.

A

N U N F O R T U N A T E result of this has been an appreciable loss of student enthusiasm for the college productions. W h e n compared to the fervor that preceeded and followed "The Fantastiks" and "Hippolytus" for

J

weeks, the feeling about recent plays has been insignificant. If students are to benefit from Little Theater efforts, they must be exposed to works that exemplify the principles of good theater. H o w an English teacher could effectively illustrate a point with reference to "Queen After Death" is difficult to say. T h a t it would be easier using " T h e Master Builder" is obvious. T h e quality of the performances has also been deficient. In almost all cases the direction has been inadequate and the acting sub-standard. If the plays were to be salvaged at all, it would have to have been with superb interpretation of the works. Unfortunately we have not seen this.

T

H E L I T T L E T H E A T E R has not been without bright spots. T h e program of bringing professional technical advisors to assist in lighting and set design is o n e of the most ambitious in the country. But even this has not improved the dramatic and educational value of the productions, and at times has merely served to accentuate other deficiences. A beautiful, realistic set is only "putting new patches on the old garments" of inappropriate plays and inadequate direction. Despite the fact that it is not a Palette and Masque product, "The Clouds" is a step in the right direction. But more must be done. T h e College is preparing to invest a considerable sum of money for new and improved theater facilities in the long-promised Student Cultural-Social Center. If this is to be a profitable expenditure, the Little Theater must again be made a valuable part of the social and cultural life of the college.

Art Buchwald

Too Old to Work T h e t r o u b l e wim t h e A m e r i c a n D r e a m these d a y s ; i s t h a t t h e r e h a s b e e n s u c h a n e m p h a s i s o n y o u t h in o u r c o u n t r y t h a t a m a n c a n b e w a s h e d u p at the a g e of 4 0 a n d n o t e v e n k n o w it. I d i d n ' t realize h o w s e r i o u s it w a s g e t t i n g until I s t a r t e d t r y i n g to find s o m e j o b s f o r f r i e n d s w h o w e r e v i c t i m s of T h e W o r l d J o u r n a l T r i b u n e closing. T h e first q u e s t i o n p e o p l e w o u l d a s k m e w a s , " H o w old is h e ? " If I s a i d he w a s 4 0 o r o l d e r I'd get a s h r u g a n d s o m e c o m m e n t like, " H e ' s t o o old f o r u s . " IT S E E M S TO M E t h a t if the t r e n d c o n t i n u e s the a g e g a p is g o i n g to be o n e of the m o s t s e r i o u s p r o b l e m s this c o u n t r y faces. It's q u i t e p o s s i b l e in a n o t h e r 10 o r 15 y e a r s t h a t the f o l l o w i n g scene m i g h t become very oommon. P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e r : " I see y o u r q u a l i f i c a t i o n s a r e in o r d e r except f o r o n e t h i n g . " Applicant: "What's that?" P e r s o n n e l m a n a g e r : " I'm a f r a i d y o u ' r e t o o o l d f o r the j o b . " Applicant: " W h a t d o you m e a n , too old f o r the j o b ? I ' m 2 3 . " P.M.: " Y e s , I see that. We d o n ' t h i r e a n y o n e o v e r 2 1 y e a r s of a g e . " A p p l i c a n t : " B u t I j u s t g o t o u t of college. I ' v e n e v e r h a d a j o b . H o w c a n I b e too old?" P.M.: " A C C O R D I N G TO o u r p e n s i o n p l a n n e r s w h o h a v e the final s a y a s to h o w o l d o u r e m p l o y e e s s h o u l d be, a n y b o d y a b o v e 2 1 y e a r s of a g e is o v e r the h i l l . " A p p l i c a n t : " H o w c a n I b e o v e r the hill if I ' v e n e v e r been o n ? " P.M.: " T h e r e ' s n o r e a s o n to get testy a b o u t this. We h a v e n o t h i n g p e r s o n a l a g a i n s t y o u . It's j u s t t h a t we h a v e f o u n d t h r o u g h e x p e r i e n c e t h a t men of y o u r a g e r e a l l y d o n ' t d o their best w o r k w h e n t h e y r e a c h 2 3 o r 2 4 y e a r s of a g e . Oh, t h e r e h a v e b e e n e x c e p t i o n s , but o n the w h o l e w e ' d r a t h e r t a k e o u r c h a n c e s with the y o u n g e r m a n w h o c a n s t a n d u p u n d e r the p h y s i c a l a n d m e n t a l p r e s s u r e s of the j o b . "

Applicant: " I appreciate y o u r thinking, but I can assure you I can do a n y t h i n g a 2 1 y e a r old c a n d o . I ' m still v e r y s t r o n g . I p l a y t e n n i s twice a week. I ' m in excellent h e a l t h a n d I w a s e v e n c a p t a i n of m y football team last y e a r . " P.M.: "SIR, 1 D O N ' T d o u b t e v e r y t h i n g y o u s a y , b u t we c a n ' t j u d g e y o u a s a n i n d i v i d u a l . Statistics s h o w y o u r a g e g r o u p is p r o n e to c o l d s , b a c k a c h e s a n d b u r s i t i s . E v e n if we w a n t e d to h i r e y o u , our group health insurance advisers w o u l d n ' t let us. T h e y c a n ' t a f f o r d to t a k e the r i s k with a 2 3 - y e a r - o l d m a n , n o m a t t e r h o w h e a l t h y he m a y l o o k . " A p p l i c a n t : " B u t if I c a n ' t get a j o b n o w t h a t I ' v e f i n i s h e d college, w h a t a m I g o i n g to d o the rest of m y life?" P.M.: " W h y d o n ' t y o u r e t i r e a n d m o v e to F l o r i d a ? " A p p l i c a n t : " W h a t the hell a m I g o i n g to r e t i r e o n if I n e v e r w o r k e d ? " P.M.: " T H A T ' S n o t o u r f a u l t , is it? D o n ' t f o r g e t , this c o m p a n y is in a f i e r c e l y c o m p e t i t i v e m a r k e t a n d if we h i r e o l d e r p e o p l e like y o u r s e l f we'll h a v e t o e x p l a i n it to o u r s t o c k h o l d e r s . B e s i d e s , it l o o k s b a d w h e n a c u s t o m e r c o m e s in a n d sees a 2 3 - y e a r - o l d m a n h u n c h e d o v e r his d e s k . " A p p l i c a n t : " I h a t e to b e g , b u t I r e a l l y need this j o b . T h i s is the f o u r t h c o m p a n y I ' v e b e e n to w h i c h s a y s I ' m t o o o l d . P l e a s e , m i s t e r , g i v e m e a c h a n c e . I still h a v e 10 g o o d y e a r s to m e . " P . M . : " I ' m s o r r y , sir. I d o n ' t w i s h to b e c o l d h e a r t e d a b o u t this b u t I t h i n k y o u s h o u l d f a c e reality. Y o u ' r e w a s h e d u p . Y o u s h o u l d h a v e p l a n n e d f o r y o u r old a g e years ago." Applicant: "Let me ask one m o r e q u e s t i o n a n d then I'll g o . H o w o l d a r e y o u ? " Personnel M a n a g e r : " 1 3 . " C o p y r i g h t (c) 1967, The W a s h i n g t o n Post Co. D i s t r i b u t e d b y L o s A n g e l e s T i m e s Syndicate. i ON COLUOI

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Hope College

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Donia, Mulder Reflect on 4 Years at Hope People, Progress Problems; 4 Years Of Hope By B o b D o n i a W h e n e n t e r i n g this s c h o o l f o u r y e a r s a g o I r e m e m b e r s o m e t h i n g s a i d b y Rev. William H i l m e r t — t h e n D e a n of M e n — a b o u t H o p e College. " W e will t r y o u r h a r d e s t to help a s t u d e n t get t h r o u g h this college. We w o n t flunk s o m e o n e u n l e s s he himself isn't t r y i n g . " At t h a t t i m e I v i e w e d this s t a t e m e n t a s a s i g n of the c o l l e g e ' s a c a d e m i c weakn e s s — a h i g h d r o p - o u t r a t e w a s o n e ind i c a t i o n of a d e m a n d i n g p r o g r a m . Since then I h a v e c o m e to see Mr. H i l m e r t ' s s t a t e m e n t a s b u t o n e e x p r e s s i o n of a n a t t i t u d e w h i c h p e r v a d e s the e n t i r e c a m -

i

BOB DONIA p u s . The f a c u l t y of H o p e C o l l e g e , while i n c r e a s i n g l y s e e k i n g to s t i m u l a t e intellectual c u r i o s i t y in all of their s t u d e n t s , h a v e t e m p e r e d their d e m a n d s f o r a c a d e m i c excellence with c o n c e r n for their s t u d e n t s in a c o n t e x t of m u t u a l h u m a n respect. T H I S O V E R R I D I N G R E S P E C T for h u m a n beings has characterized education at H o p e . We h a v e seen this in p r o f e s s o r s w h o p r o f e s s their o w n d e e p conv i c t i o n s a n d a d m i t their b i a s e s with e q u a l o p e n n e s s . We respect t h o s e w h o , u n d e r s o m e p r e s s u r e to p u b l i s h o r i g i n a l w o r k , believe t h a t f o r them p e r s o n a l l y to d o s o w o u l d c o m p r o m i s e their effectiveness a s t e a c h e r s . We see in o u r p r o f e s s o r s a p a s s i o n to m a k e s t u d e n t s into s c h o l a r s . We see in o u r p r o f e s s o r s the m o r a l a n d ethical s e n s i t i v i t y to s h a r p e n o u r o w n a w a r e n e s s of the p r o b l e m s a n d d i l e m m a s of o u r a g e . A n d we see the a t m o s p h e r e of o u r college p e r m e a t e d with c o n c e r n f o r H o p e College, its t r a d i t i o n , its p r e s e n t m i s s i o n a n d its g r o w t h i n t o the f u t u r e . F r o m this e x a m p l e we h a v e been inf u s e d with a s e n s e of respect f o r h u m a n integrity. P e r h a p s this, m o r e t h a n a n y t h i n g else we h a v e a b s o r b e d in the p a s t f o u r y e a r s , will e n a b l e us to w a l k into the world as whole men. T h e p a s t f o u r y e a r s h a v e seen cons i d e r a b l e a d v a n c e s in m a n y a r e a s of c a m p u s life. M A N Y OF T H E R E S T R I C T I O N S w h i c h h a v e t r a d i t i o n a l l y been a s s o c i a t e d with the c h u r c h - r e l a t e d c o l l e g e a r e n o w gone; a l t h o u g h m a n y , especially pertaining to w o r m e n s t u d e n t s , still r e m a i n . T h e year before o u r arrival, dancing on camp u s w a s strictly v e r b o t e n ; o u r s o p h o m o r e y e a r the d r i n k i n g r e g u l a t i o n w a s m o d i fied. W o m e n ' s rules h a v e been s l o w l y b u t consistently m a d e m o r e tolerable. T h e net result h a s b e e n a m o r e o p e n , h o n e s t a t m o s p h e r e o n c a m p u s . T h e rift b e t w e e n l e g a l i t y a n d r e a l i t y h a s b e e n red u c e d ; we feel the p r e s s u r e of h y p o c r i s y less i n t e n s e l y . O u r a p p r o a c h to C h r i s t i a n i t y h a s simi l a r l y i m p r o v e d in spirit. M u c h credit is

d u e to o n e R e v e r e n d W i l l i a m H i l l e g o n d s , who has a blunt, honest and penetrating w a y of b r i n g i n g college s t u d e n t s into conf r o n t a t i o n with the i m p l i c a t i o n s of their own a c t i o n s a n d the i m p a c t of the Christian faith. H e h a s j u s t l y e a r n e d the wides p r e a d respect of the s t u d e n t b o d y . T H E S T U D E N T C H U R C H h a s con tributed to a v o l u n t a r y a f f i r m a t i o n of the C h r i s t i a n f a i t h . P e r h a p s , if the B o a r d of Trustees a g r e e s to c h a n g e the c h a p e l policy, o u r c a m p u s next y e a r c a n f o l l o w the m o d e l of C a r l e t o n College, w h o s e situa t i o n is d e s c r i b e d b y the f o l l o w i n g h e a d line in their p a p e r ; " R e l i g i o u s Interest Persists Despite End of R e q u i r e m e n t . " T h i s c o l l e g e h a s m o v e d f o r w a r d by l e a p s a n d b o u n d s in t e r m s of a l m o s t e v e r y q u a n t i t a t i v e m e a s u r e m e n t . Credit f o r this centers o n o u r P r e s i d e n t , Dr. V a n d e r W e r f . Our a l u m n i g i v i n g h a s s k y r o c k e t e d ; o u r church s u p p o r t has increased substantially; government grants and loans have made m u c h of o u r b u i l d i n g p r o g r a m p o s s i b l e . But a l o n g side of these a m a z i n g adv a n c e s is a p r o b l e m of c o n c e r n to e v e r y friend of H o p e College. We h a v e s o u g h t in the p a s t f o u r y e a r s to b u i l d u p a n i m a g e ; a n d we h a v e , o n b a l a n c e , succeeded. O u r c o l l e g e c a n b e " s o l d " to a l m o s t a n y o n e , i n c l u d i n g the g o v e r n m e n t , f o u n d a t i o n s a n d a l u m n i . But this c o l l e g e c a n not l o n g exist in p u r s u i t of a n i m a g e a l o n e ; o u r g o a l s m u s t be m o r e s u b s t a n tively f o r m u l a t e d , a n d the p u b l i c r e l a t i o n s i m a g e must be distinguished f r o m those ideals to w h i c h o u r f a c u l t y a n d s t u d e n t s are deeply dedicated. T H E MOST C R U C I A L PROBLEM f a c i n g this c o l l e g e is the l a c k of leadership in f o r m u l a t i n g the f u t u r e c o u r s e of H o p e C o l l e g e . All t o o little a t t e n t i o n is given to p r e s e r v i n g a n d f u r t h e r i n g " T h e n a t u r e of the i n s t i t u t i o n a s we h a v e k n o w n it for a c e n t u r y . " O u r f u t u r e a s a college seems d e p e n d e n t o n p r a g m a t i c c o n s i d e r ations without r e g a r d for a consistent problem-solving approach, g r a d u a l i s m in c h a n g e , n o r a t h o r o u g h c o n s i d e r a t i o n of the l o n g - r a n g e effects of o n - t h e - s p o t d e c is ions. T h e r o o t of this p r o b l e m is in o u r s h i f t i n g a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h e r a p i d turno v e r h a s p r e v e n t e d the e v o l u t i o n of a n y strong, consistent leadership for our academic p r o g r a m ; the result h a s been f r a g mented a n d w i d e l y d i f f u s e d efforts. T h e persistent t u r m o i l within the A d m i n i s t r a tion c o n t i n u e s to c a u s e a p e r v a s i v e une a s i n e s s a n d u n r e s t ; it c e r t a i n l y d o e s not i n s p i r e c o n f i d e n c e in the f u t u r e of the college. T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i v e crisis, m o r e t h a n a n y o t h e r s i t u a t i o n o n o u r c a m p u s , is in d a n g e r of d o i n g i r r e p a r a b l e h a r m to H o p e College. We a l s o h a v e a p r o b l e m of i n c r e a s i n g c o m m u n i c a t i o n between the f a c u l t y , students a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d p r o m o t i n g a sense of c o m m u n i t y . T h e f a c u l t y meets at i r r e g u l a r i n t e r v a l s , i n s i s t i n g o n the fine Medieval t r a d i t i o n t h a t the f a c u l t y is the u n i v e r s i t y a n d t h a t all p o w e r s h o r t of the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s is u l t i m a t e l y in their h a n d s . T h e S t u d e n t S e n a t e a l s o meets o n quite s e p a r a t i s t t e r m s , o v e r t u r n i n g " T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n " a n d t a l k i n g of " T h e Fac u l t y " a s entities q u i t e s e p a r a t e a n d removed. G R O U P S W I T H I N the d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g p r o c e s s , s t r u c t u r e d a s t h e y a r e to segreg a t e the s e c t o r s f r o m o n e a n o t h e r , necess a r i l y d e t e r m i n e the c a t e g o r i e s in which we all view the c a m p u s . T h e result is the f r a g m e n t a t i o n of a n y idea of " c o m m u n i t y " into at least t h r e e s e c t o r s , with a n y p o l i t i c a l l y s i g n i f i c a n t d i a l o g u e restricted to s m a l l a n d e x c l u s i v e s t u d e n t - f a c u l t y committees t h a t seem to a v e r a g e o n e i m p o r t ant d e c i s i o n a y e a r at m o s t . M a n y f a c u l t y m e m b e r s view the Student S e n a t e a s a 6 : 0 0 M i c k e y M o u s e C l u b d e a l i n g with s o c i a l t r i v i a . A n y m e m b e r s of t h a t b o d y will r e a d i l y g r a n t the p a r tial v a l i d i t y of such a view; h o w e v e r , I refuse to b e l i e v e t h a t the f a c u l t y , in contrast, d e a l s with n o t h i n g b u t issues of e a r t h - s h a t t e r i n g s i g n i f i c a n c e . C o u l d n ' t we get t o g e t h e r a n d talk o v e r o u r t r i v i a in u n i s o n ? We m i g h t e v e n c o n f r o n t s o m e b i g g e r issues s o o n e r o r l a t e r .

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

MOULD WO LIKE TO BE THE F1R5T MAN ON THE MOON?

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The Life Of Significant Soil By John M. Mulder H o p e C o l l e g e is a n u n u s u a l i n s t i t u t i o n , a n d its p e c u l i a r i t y lies in its n a m e . It lives in a s m a l l , m i d w e s t e r n t o w n in the latter half of the twentieth c e n t u r y — a t i m e c h a r acterized m o r e b y d e s p a i r , a l i e n a t i o n , pessi m i s m , a n d futility t h a n b y a n y o p t i m i s m c o n s t r u e d at its e x t r e m e a s h o p e . It lives in a w o r l d in which G o d is d e a d , o r supp o s e d to b e d e a d , o r a s P o g o p u t it, " m e r e l y u n e m p l o y e d . " A n d c u r i o u s l y , this College lives—operating on hope a n d sometimes p r e c i o u s little else. Its h o p e is in G o d , a n d its g r a d u a t e s l e a v e either a f f i r m i n g the b a s i s f o r that h o p e , d e n y i n g it, o r wondering. I N MY Y E A R S a s e d i t o r of this newspaper, m a n y kind words h a v e been spoken a b o u t the q u a l i t y of o u r p r o d u c t . T h e credit g o e s to a l o y a l g r o u p of s t u d e n t s w h o e a c h week h a v e c o n t r i b u t e d time a n d effort a n d d e v o t i o n to a t a s k w h i c h often s e e m s t h a n k l e s s a n d i n s i g n i f i c a n t . My g r a t i t u d e is c e r t a i n l y g i v e n to t h e m , a n d I h o p e those w h o have appreciated o u r product a p p r e c i a t e the efforts of all. As f o r the u n k i n d w o r d s a n d the b l a m e , 1 t a k e full r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r w h a t we h a v e d o n e to i n s p i r e t h e m . If the a n c h o r is eventually praised or faulted for a n y t h i n g , it is t h a t it h a s been e s s e n t i a l l y the v i s i o n o r l a c k of v i s i o n of o n e m a n . M y v i s i o n h a s h a r d l y b e e n s h a r p , n o r will it ever be. A j o u r n a l i s t is a H e r a c l i t u s , o b s e r v i n g the r i v e r of c h a n g e w h i c h flows a r o u n d h i m a n d b y h i m . His task is o n e of the m o m ent—to state w h a t the r i v e r is, w h e r e it is g o i n g , a n d w h y it is f l o w i n g the w a y it is. His p u r p o s e is to tell the t r u t h a b o u t the r i v e r , a n d if p e r s p e c t i v e is a n y aid in s e e i n g t h a t t r u t h , he s u f f e r s f r o m a l a c k of it. T H E E N O R M I T Y OF T H E T A S K is c o m p o u n d e d f o r a n e d i t o r of the a n c h o r , a p u b l i c a t i o n of a c o l l e g e w h i c h b e a r s witness to the i n t r u s i o n of the e t e r n a l in time. His title implies t h a t he is n o t purelyc o n t e m p o r a n e o u s n o r a r e his e f f o r t s m e a n t to be. R a t h e r , he s h o u l d be a s a i n t f o r "to apprehend T h e p o i n t of intersection of the timeless With t i m e is a n o c c u p a t i o n f o r the saint." — T . S . Eliot, " T h e D r y S a l v a g e s " F o r two y e a r s I h a v e s t o o d [ f T a n u n u s u a l r i v e r which flows in a n alien l a n d . As it flows a n d e v a p o r a t e s , it s a y s t h a t m a n is n o t h i n g w i t h o u t the b e a u t y of k n o w l e d g e , that k n o w l e d g e is the h u m a n i z a t i o n of m a n . But the k n o w l e d g e which m a n g a i n s is d i s t o r t e d in a life t a i n t e d by self-concern. Beyond k n o w l e d g e a n d the e x c i t e m e n t of o b t a i n i n g it m u s t lie a faith in G o d w h o m a k e s c l e a n w h a t is t a i n t e d a n d p u r e w h a t is d i s t o r t e d . T h i s r i v e r Hows in a n a r i d l a n d , w i t n e s s i n g to the b e a u t y of k n o w l e d g e , c o n d e m n i n g its d i s t o r t i o n s , a n d p r o c l a i m i n g t h a t w h a t is w r o n g c a n be m a d e r i g h t . T h a t is h o p e , a n d H o p e is a p a r a d o x f o r its b a s i s is the p a r a d o x of d e a t h - b e c o m e life, of sin r e d e e m e d . I N T H E C L A S S R O O M S t e a c h e r s aff i r m t h a t life is q u a l i t y , n o t a s u b s t a n c e , a n d the q u a l i t y is w h a t we a r e all seeking. P e r h a p s this e x p l a i n s the l e g a l i s m — the s i m p l e d e s i r e to i n f u s e q u a l i t y r a t h e r t h a n let s t u d e n t s find it. H o w e v e r , in the C o l l e g e ' s a t t e m p t s to l i b e r a l i z e life here, it a p p e a r s t h a t b o t h m a n a n d f r e e d o m h a v e w o n the h o u r a n d 1 h o p e the d a y . E d u c a t i o n is a p r o c e s s of f i n d i n g a n d u n c o v e r i n g , not p a c k a g i n g a n d delivering. In the f u t u r e 1 h o p e this C o l l e g e shall p a u s e a n d remember Eliot's words: " . . . r i g h t action is f r e e d o m F r o m p a s t and future also. F o r m o s t of us, this is the a i m N e v e r h e r e to be realized; Who a r e o n l y u n d e f e a t e d B e c a u s e we h a v e g o n e o n t r y i n g . " — " T h e Dry S a l v a g e s " M y t r y i n g h a s b e e n to b r i n g the q u a l ity of life t o these p a g e s , to s o m e lives.

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THE FIFTH MAN WILL HAVE A LOT TO LIVE UP TO BECAME OF (OHAT THE OTHERS DID, AND THE SIXTH WILL HAVE TO WORK HARD AROUND THE M0ON-6TAT1ON...THE SEVENTH (T]ILL „

a n d to this College. Whether it h a s been w o r t h it f o r me, w h e t h e r it h a s b e e n w o r t h it for the C o l l e g e , I d o n o t k n o w . I h o p e it is t r u e t h a t the m o s t s e v e r e critics of H o p e m a y be n u m b e r e d a m o n g t h o s e w h o l o v e it m o s t . I h a v e criticized b e c a u s e I s a w things that were w r o n g , and I s p o k e out b e c a u s e I believe in the p o s s i b i l i t y of c h a n g e . TODAY HOPE IS SUFFERING t h r o u g h a n identity crisis a n d I see little attempt b e i n g m a d e to g i v e t h a t crisis direction, s c o p e , o r s o l u t i o n . I a m a p p a l l e d b y the d i s i l l u s i o n m e n t a n d d i s e n c h a n t m e n t in the f a c u l t y , a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d s t u d e n t s . In a d d i t i o n , I find little in the e f f o r t s of o u r t r a n s i e n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n s w h i c h will p r o v i d e the s t a b i l i t y , c o n f i d e n c e , a n d h o p e necessary for growth. My o p i n i o n of the p r e s e n t s t a t e of this C o l l e g e h a s been the s o u r c e of s o m e c o n t r o v e r s y here, but if I s t a n d b y a n y t h i n g this p a p e r h a s a s s e r t e d , it is that

rr JOHN MULDER the p e r s o n n e l of H o p e ' s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a v e failed to p r o v i d e the l e a d e r s h i p which is i m p e r a t i v e f o r o u r p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n . H o p e is l o s i n g its c h a r a c t e r p r i m a r i l y b e c a u s e it refuses to believe in w h a t it really is. S a y i n g these t h i n g s h a s at t i m e s put me in a s i t u a t i o n which I f o u n d v e r y difficult to live with, but r e m a i n i n g silent would h a v e been d e a d l y . One of m y cons o l a t i o n s is that of a n a n c h o r e d i t o r of s o m e 4 0 y e a r s a g o , m y f a t h e r . In his last e d i t o r i a l he wrote: " A T T I M E S , WE H A V E been a n t a g onistic o r d e s t r u c t i v e , a n d this w a s a l w a y s d o n e with the belief t h a t s u c h a n t a g o n i s t i c o r d e s t r u c t i v e a t t i t u d e w a s the h o n e s t reflection of p o p u l a r s t u d e n t o p i n i o n . Sometimes this o p p o s i t i o n h a s been r a t h e r b o l d l y e x p r e s s e d a n d this f o r r e a s o n of s e n s a tionalism and snap. . . .In short, anyt h i n g w h i c h m a y h a v e c a u s e d a n y stir w a s p u b l i s h e d f o r the p u r p o s e of m a k i n g the a n c h o r a w a n t e d weekly. A n d t h r o u g h it all, we h a v e p r o m o t e d w h a t we believed were p r o j e c t s t h a t w o u l d m a k e H o p e a better s t u d e n t h o m e . " T h a t w a s o u r aim—if we h a v e m a d e f r i e n d s t h r o u g h it, we a r e g l a d . A n d if we h a v e m a d e e n e m i e s , we will o p t i m i s tically r e g a r d t h e m a s n e c e s s a r y a c c o m p a n i m e n t s to f r i e n d s h i p s . " T h e t r u t h w a s w h a t we w e r e a b o u t a n d w h a t we h o p e the a n c h o r w a s a b o u t . 1 h o p e t h a t t h o s e w h o h a v e r e a d it will s a y of o u r r e p o r t i n g w h a t H u c k F i n n s a i d ol M a r k T w a i n ' s a c c o u n t in " T h e A d v e n t u r e s of T o m S a w y e r " : " T H E R E WAS S O M E T H I N G S which he s t r e t c h e d , but m a i n l y he told the t r u t h . " We m a y not h a v e told the t r u t h ; we m a y h a v e h a r m e d the College; b u t as I l e a v e this office a n d the d a r k e n e d Pine G r o v e , 1 l e a v e with affection f o r this p a p e r , its staff, a n d the p e o p l e of H o p e College. 1 l e a v e with h o p e , a n d it c o n s i s t s in this: " W e c o n t e n t at the last If o u r t e m p o r a l r e v e r s i o n n o u r i s h ( N o t t o o f a r f r o m the yew tree) T h e life of s i g n i f i c a n t s o i l . "

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VOOR BROTHER 1$ THE ONLV PERSON I KNOO) tOHOLOANTSTOBETHE FORTV-THIRP MAN ON THE MOON I


Page 6

May 19, 1967

Hope College anchor

T h e anchor: T h e S t o r y of a W e e And the scene c h a n g e s f r o m that very s m a l l place to other small places a r o u n d the c a m p u s : faculty offices, the Kletz, the President's office, s t u d e n t s ' r o o m s a n d the v a r i o u s Deans' offices, where r e p o r t e r s of v a r i o u s stripes a n d with differing skills ask essentially: " W h a t ' s h a p p e n i n g , b a b y ? " Only m o r e respectfully. The task here is to a s k e n o u g h q u e s t i o n s a n d the right q u e s t i o n s s o that the s o u r c e of the news will give a complete account. Sometimes it's a s e a s y as simply f i n d i n g out what h a p p e n e d or will h a p p e n , but it r a r e l y stops there. The g o o d reporter l o o k s behind the b a r e facts for a n interp r e t a t i o n , a r e a s o n why things a r e the w a y they are. And the g o a l of it all lies in just this: to tell others a b o u t it. The fun and g a m e s begin when that cesspool of i n f o r m a t i o n , the r e p o r t e r , sits b e f o r e the k e y b o a r d of a typewriter, and trys to report his s t o r y . He cuts, trims, omits, s h a p e s , a n d o r d e r s his s t o r y and with a feeling of a c c o m p l i s h m e n t o r relief, he types that mythical s y m b o l for the end: -30-.

a

l

m'

ONE BIG, HAPPY FAMILY—See the scowling people around the table. They are copyreaders (1. to r.) Carol Koterski and Janice Bakker. They are scowling because they have to find all the mistakes the reporters made. If they miss one, the managing editor, George Arwady, (standing) gets angry. Now, is that nice?

By John M. Mulder anchor Editor

S

O R E N K I E R K E G A A R D h a s written: " T h e lowest depth to w h i c h p e o p l e c a n sink before God is defined by the word ' j o u r n a l i s t . ' If I were a father a n d had a d a u g h t e r who was seduced, I s h o u l d not d e s p a i r over her; Iwould h o p e for her salv a t i o n . But if I h a d a son w h o b e c a m e a j o u r n a l i s t and continued to r e m a i n one for five y e a r s , I would give him u p . " Every d a y for 2 9 to 3 0 weeks of the y e a r 3 0 to 4 0 H o p e students court d a m nation, and their flirtation is w o r k on the Hope College a n c h o r . K i e r k e g a a r d ' s adm o n i t i o n s to the c o n t r a r y , these students m a y spend as little as two h o u r s in the case of a cub reporter on a m i n o r story o r as much a s 5 5 h o u r s in the case of a m e m b e r of the editorial b o a r d . And s o m e h o w , m i r a c u l o u s l y , by s o m e divine stroke of Providence it seems, each week 2 , 2 0 0 printed copies of their work a p p e a r on the c a m p u s on F r i d a y at 2 p.m. T h e whole j o b is a kind of hell, a hell in a very small place—the a n c h o r office. Each m e m b e r of the staff is r a c i n g to beat a deadline, and when it isn't m a d e the fires a n d ire g r o w hotter a n d s t r o n g e r in that very small place.

M a k i n g the Story List The torment begins on F r i d a y aftern o o n at 4 when the editorial b o a r d meets to p r e p a r e a story a n d picture list for the next issue a n d look o v e r the last week's issue. At this meeting, unless in class o r asleep in bed, a r e George A r w a d y , the m a n a g i n g editor; T o m H i l d e b r a n d t , the news editor; Pat Canfield, the feature editor; Dick A n g s t a d t , the l a y o u t editor a n d chief p h o t o g r a p h e r , a n d 1. Amidst c o m p l a i n t s a b o u t the missed t y p o in the editorial and the two head-

lines that were butted together o n t h e s p o r t s p a g e , we l a u n c h into a n o t h e r issue. T o m H i l d e b r a n d t b r i n g s in a list of c o m i n g events o n the c a l e n d a r which he thinks we o u g h t to cover, a n d then the fires begin to flare a little. The m a j o r i t y of the news which the a n c h o r reports is never listed officially o n a n y c a l e n d a r , a n d it is the responsibility of each editor to be a w a r e of w h a t ' s h a p p e n i n g on the c a m p u s . Simple? T r y it. Every c o n v e r s a t i o n becomes a potential story for the p a p e r , for w h a t each article a i m s at is presenting the total picture of what h a p p e n e d or will h a p p e n .

Hey -

What's H a p p e n i n g ?

And so, the c o n v e r s a t i o n will r u n something like this: " H e y , one of the girls in V o o r h e e s told me they're g o i n g to picket the President's h o u s e a n d protest the fire conditions." "Well, get b a c k to her a n d find out when t h e y ' r e g o i n g to d o it a n d we'll send Satch ( o n e of o u r p h o t o g r a p h e r s with the likely last n a m e of P a g e ) to get a pix." " D i d you g u y s notice that fraternity r u s h is d o w n this semester over last y e a r ? M a y b e there's a story there. P e r h a p s it's b e c a u s e the students who come to Hope a r e n ' t interested in fraternities a n y more. "1 bet it's b e c a u s e they're all ineligible. One of the R.A.s in Kollen told me that the g u y s o n his w i n g really got low g r a d e s . " "Well, let's try it. . . . " Then as we s u r v e y the week before us, c r e a t i n g in o u r own m i n d s the Platonic ideal of that next issue, we begin m a k i n g a s s i g n m e n t s . Most of the stories a r e f a r m e d out to reporters, a n d the big stories, which will p r o b a b l y g o p a g e 1 o r which require s o m e e x t r a w o r k , a r e h a n d l e d by one of the b o a r d . News editor Hilde writes notes to each of the reporters, e x p l a i n i n g what the story is, what it involves, w h o m to see, and then with a pessimistic sneer, he writes very firmly: " D e a d l i n e : 3 p.m., T u e s d a y . "

H

IS T A S K IS E N O R M O U S a n d his responsibility is overwhelming. Some 2,()()() people will d e p e n d on his account of a n event to form their o p i n i o n s o r o r d e r their lives. The relative weight which he gives to s o m e item of news a g a i n s t a n o t h e r is a matter of j u d g m e n t a n d insight, and the truth is what he seeks to b r i n g to his readers. P e r h a p s it's the p o w e r of sitting before that k e y b o a r d or the sense of integrity in b r i n g i n g the truth o r a p o r t i o n of it to o t h e r s that m o t i v a t e s a reporter. P e r h a p s it's the p e r s o n a l p r i d e o f s e e i n g " m y article" in print. Or p e r h a p s it's just a j o b to be done.

Into the "Very S m a l l Place" T h e power wielded and the j o b done, he b r i n g s the article d o w n the s t a i r s into the b a s e m e n t of G r a v e s , into a now rather dirty, very small place, a n d a n n o u n c e s : " W h e r e d o I put this?" Hilde, w h o of c o u r s e has been l o o k i n g for the article ever since T u e s d a y at 3 p.m., g r u n t s his a p p r e c i a t i o n and t h r o w s it in the direction of o n e of o u r copy r e a d e r s : J a n i c e B a k k e r , C a r o l Koterski, o r Lew V a n d e r N a a l d . T h e d a y is W e d n e s d a y a n d the h o u r is a p p r o x i m a t e l y 8 p.m. The office is a grotesque, chaotic c o m b i n a t i o n of Roller D e r b y with Angstadt on his l a y o u t c h a i r a n d the tuberculosis w a r d of a hospital with A r w a d y t h r o w i n g c o u g h i n g fits. This is the night when the p a p e r is " p u t to b e d " but the editors r a r e l y are. Their w o r k begins at 7 or 8 in the e v e n i n g a n d ends s o m e t i m e a r o u n d 4 a.m. While the editors check the stories to m a k e s u r e that the articles a r e accurate, r e a d a b l e , a n d complete, the p h o t o g r a p h e r s a r e l o o k i n g over negatives, p r i n t i n g pictures a n d c o n t r a c t i n g a mild c a s e of hysterical c l a u s t r o p h o b i a in that smallest and d a r k e s t place—the a n c h o r office d a r k r o o m .

FINAL PRESS RUN—See the man with the scowl on his fee printer, Paul Van Koevering. The press is giving him troubU will be late this week. "Say, John . . .!"

f f

W e r e it l e f t t o m e t o d e c i d e w h e t h e r we s h o u l d

ernment

without

n e w s p a p e r s or n e w s p a p e r s withoui

merit, I s h o u l d n o t hesitate to p r e f e r the latter. T h e o n l y s e c u r i t y of all is in a f r e e press.

— Tfiorrn

W e d n e s d a y N i g h t Blast Wednesday night is the w o r s t stretch for o u r b a n d . Stories a l w a y s seem to b r e a k o n W e d n e s d a y a f t e r n o o n , so that much of the evening is spent a d d i n g to an alr e a d y lilled story list o r rewriting the story that begins:

m

. ..IV v . MAYBE IF I . . .—See the man with the ruler and the scowl on his face. He is Dick Angstadt, the layout editor. He decides how the stories will fit on each page. He is scowling because he has to squeeze 800 inches of copy into 640 inches of space. Sometimes he can't do it.

1

WRITING IT UP—See the man at the typewriter with the scowl on his face. His name is Glenn Looman. He is a reporter. He is writing up something that has happened on campus during the week. He is scowling because if he makes a mistake, the copyreaders will get angry. Isn't working on a newspaper fun?

WHAT THE . . .?—See the two men with the icowlt m editor Tom Hildebrandt John if ashing Tom whal a


May 19, 1967

Page 7

Hope College anchor

kly H e l l in a V e r y S m a l l P l a c e That t a l e n l e d a n d l a m e d v i r t u o s o o n tlu 1 v i o l i n , L a w r e n c e F. ( i r o n k n o r t s e L will wield his b o w t o n i g h t with the H o p e College O r c h e s t r a within the r e s o u n d i n g w a l l s of IHinnent M e m o r i a l C h a p e l . "

V

V.

rn

T

ill'. CI L\( )S ol t h e s c e n e ha.s s o m e c o m i c reliel. l-'or e x a m p l e , there w a s the f r e s h m a n w h o d r o p p e d d o w n to the offici.* a n d a s k e d il we needed a n e d i t o r i a l writer. 1 i n f o r m e d him t h a i u s u a l l y a fellow Marls a s .i r e p o r t e r a n d m o v e s into e d i t o r i a l wri ting Liter. His r e s p o n s e : "Well, t h a t ' s okay. I just w a n t e d to know il y o u needed me." I h e r e s a l w a y s a c o u p l e p i c t u r e s which a r e l a u g h e d at lor v a r i o u s r e a s o n s a n d then d u l y tiled a w a y in the " M o r a l i t . \ " file o r d u b b e d " O g r e of the W e e k . " " P a n d a " A r w a d y h a s the all time r e c o r d a s the o g r e t o r all weeks with a reign of s o m e six months.

L a y o u t , H e a d s and Cutlines

t. He is the The paper

At a p p r o x i m a t e l y II p . m . A n g s t a d t s t a r t s the l a y o u t , a n d I tell him w h a t s l o r ies o u g h t to g o o n p a g e o n e . w h a t s t o r ies o u g h t to he f e a t u r e d , a n d which s t o r i e s h a v e to g o into the p a p e r . A s e c o n d a r y c a t e g o r y a r e the s t o r i e s t h a t " w o u l d be n i c e " b u t d o n ' t h a v e to r u n . Mis j o b is to lit m o r e t h a n 8 0 0 inches of c o p y , p i c t u r e s , a d s . h e a d l i n e s , a n d cutlines into ()4() i n c h e s of the p a p e r . T h e a d s a r e f u r n i s h e d d u t i f u l l y e a c h week b y Hob S c h r o e d e r , w h o sells the g u l l i b l e m e r c h a n t s of H o l l a n d a n a d twice the size t h e y r e a l l y need. A d v e r t i s i n g t a k e s u p a p p r o x i m a t e l y 100 i n c h e s e a c h week, a n d A n g s t a d t sits w ith r u l e r a n d pencil a n d p l e n t \ ' o f l a y o u t sheets a n d tries to fit the s t o r i e s in s o m e where. W h e n he f i n i s h e s a p a g e a n d selects a t y p e f a c e f o r e a c h h e a d l i n e . .lim Pohl a n d A r w a d y t a k e o v e r a n d b e g i n the h e a d l i n e w r i t i n g . Hilde writes cutlines f o r .ill the p i c t u r e s while I read all the c o p \ r e a d a r t i c l e s a n d d i s c o v e r t h a t they h a v e n t been c o p y r e a d . S o m e m a j o r crisis u s u a l l y o c c u r s a b o u t 2 : 3 0 a . m . Kither we d o n ' t h a v e a s t o r y w h i c h we a b s o l u t e l y m u s t h a v e o r a s t o r y is w o e f u l l y i n c o m p l e t e o r we lose a s t o r y o r A n g s t a d t r u n s out ol c i g a r e t t e s . lUit s l o w l y the a n c h o r g o e s to p r e s s .

l a y o u t sheets. In Z e e l a n d the t y p e is set o n a offset type-setting m a c h i n e w h i c h exp o s e s the letters o n p h o t o g r a p h i c p a p e r . T h e l o n g g a l l e y s of t y p e a r e cut a p a r t a n d p a s t e d dow n o n l a r g e sheets ot p a p e r , p r o v i d e d they h a v e been r e a d , c o r r e c t e d a n d o k a y e d b y o n e of o u r h a w k e y e p r o o l readers. Keith V a n K o e v e r i n g . P a u l ' s b r o t h e r , is a n o t h e r p a r t ot the 1 a m i l \ d y n a s t y w hie h r u n s the Z e e l a n d Record C o . . a n d he sets m o s t ol the h e a d l i n e s a n d c u t l i n e s a n d e d i t o r i a l o n the I m o t x p e m a c h i n e . This m a c h i n e p r o d u c e s l e a d c o p y t r o m which p r o o f s a r e m a d e a n d p a s t e d into the p.iper. His f a v o r i t e p a s t t i m e is w r i t i n g letters to the e d i t o r o n the l i n o t y p e m a c h i n e a n d then tr\ ing to tit it into the p a p e r w ithout s o m e o n e seeing it. Both Keith a n d P a u l ' s ties with the a n c h o r and H o p e College a r e strong, tor they a r e a l u m n i a n d h a v e been p r i n t i n g the p a p e r f o r .it least six y e a r s . Kach h a s a m a s t e r ' s d e g r e e in t\ p o g r a p h y a n d print ing f r o m C a r n e g i e Institute ol T e c h n o l o g y a n d utilizes t h a t k n o w l e d g e e a c h tall in e x p l a i n i n g to a n o t h e r new m e m b e r ot the a n c h o r staff how the p a p e r is printed. T h e i r b r o t h e r in-law. R o g e r H e e k m a n . p h o t o g r a p h s all the pictures a n d reduces them to the size which they will h a v e in the p a p e r . I r e p o r t to Z e e l a n d at 1 0 : 3 0 a . m . a n d check in with the p a t r i a r c h ot the o p e r a t i o n there. C o r r i e V a n K o e v e r i n g . w h o is e d i t o r ol the Record a n d Paul a n d Keith's lather. Alter r a i s i n g r h e t o r i c a l l y the (inestion ot w h y n e w s p a p e r w o r k is s o hectic, he c o u n s e l s m e with the a d m o n i t i o n that il I d o n ' t like to w o r k . I s h o u l d n ' t be in the w o r k . ()n the m o r n i n g alter the night b e f o r e . I'm a l w a y s s l i g h t l y inclined to a g r e e with him.

1

TYPE-SETTING—See the man with a scowl on his face. He is linotype operator Keith Van Koevering. He is preparing the linotype to set the editorial. He is scowling because he does not like the editorial. He will also s<'t a letter to the editor about it. He won't be the only one! that goes into details. T h e p r o o f r e a d e r c o r r e c t s " j u d g e m e n t " to r e a d " J u d g m e n t a n d " t h e a t r e " to r e a d " t h e a t e r . " When 1 l e a v e , I m u s t m a k e s u r e that all the headlines a r e in p l a c e , articles a r e not p a s t e d into the p a g e out of o r d e r o r c r o o k e d l y , a n d with the final o k a y the p a g e s a r e photographed. The n e g a t i v e s of the p a g e s a r e used to m a k e offset plates which a r e c h a r g e d with electric c u r r e n t in such a w a y that w h e n the p l a t e , p a p e r , a n d ink meet, it p r o d u c e s g r e y s , whites, a n d b l a c k s .

Attention to Details T h e d a y in Z e e l a n d is like W e d n e s d a y night in the t r e m e n d o u s a m o u n t ol e n e r g y

O

\ F R I D A Y M O R M N C . the a n c h o r is p r i n t e d , f o l d e d , a n d t r i m m e d , a n d b a r r i n g a c a t a s t r o p h i c b r e a k d o w n of the p r e s s , the p a p e r is in the l o b b y of V a n Raalte b e f o r e '1 p . m . T h e r e s t u d e n t s s w a r m to pick up their o w n c o p i e s ol the a n c h o r , a n d if t h e r e is a n y t r i b u t e to the w o r k of the 3 0 to 4(1 s t u d e n t s w h o s p e n d at least 2 0 0 h o u r s in p r e p a r i n g e a c h w e e k ' s issue, it is that F r i d a y two o ' c l o c k traffic j a m .

Joy in the M o r n i n g pave .i gova ''ovcrn-

]c "'rrson

T h e j o y s of the d a y in Z e e l a n d a r e m a n i f o l d a n d p r o f o u n d . Kither the stories a r e t o o s h o r t o r t o o l o n g o r a n article isn't set or a t r e m e n d o u s f r o n t p a g e s t o r y b r e a k s o n T h u r s d a y m o r n i n g o r the s m a l l p l a c e h a s s i m p l y been t r a n s p o r t e d 10 miles with us, a n d I w o r k with the feeling of impending disaster. K v e n t u a l l y the p a p e r is r e a d y to g o to p r e s s , a n d the p r o o f r e a d e r s a n d I l e a v e f o r the c a m p u s a n d the bliss of realizing that it is f i n i s h e d .

T h e joys ol t h o s e e a r h m o r n i n g h o u r s a r e few: the h o n o r ol p i c k i n g the P e a n u t s c a r t o o n l o r the week. Muck M e n n i n g b r i n g ing d o w n his c o n t r i b u t i o n to the l i g h t e r >ide of the a n c h o r , telling stories, o r w a telling the s u n c o m e up. A n d t i n a l l y . with the last of the s t o r i e s a b o u t the " n e t m e n . " h o o p s t e r s . " a n i l " s i l k s t e r s " is p u t in p l a c e a n d crow ned w ith a h e a d , the w e a r y crew s t a g g e r s out of the otlice t h r o u g h that e o r r i d o r ol d a r k n e s > between V a n K a a l t e a n d the C h a p e l , i l l u m i n a t e d o n l y l)> the li^ht in the otlice ot Western s e m i n a r y . As we p a r t , we y a w n . sa> - a t i r i c a l l y . "^-re y o u m c h a p e l , a n d p r o b e t h e s a d i s i n u! the m i n d t h a t s t a r t e d c l a s s e s al 8 : 3 0 • 1 . I I I. Al 7:3(1 a . m . Paul V a n K o e v e r m g I r o m tiie / e e l a n d R e c o r d visits the scene ot the n i g h t that w a s a n d p i c k s up the c o p ; a n d

The

m

SHOOTING THE PIXKS—See the man with the scowl on his face. That is Roi? Beekman operating the offset camera. He is reproducing Muck Menning's cartoon. He is scowling because he does not think the cartoon is funny. Who asked him. anyway?

f f

The

lowest d e p t h

to w h i e h

people ran

d e f i n e d hv t h e w o r d ' |t)m nalist.' . . . a daughter

w h o was s e d u c e d ,

w o u l d h o p e lot

sink before G o d

Reincarnation of Hell

F o r two h o u r s the entire stall exists in l i m b o , but at 4 p . m . the s a m e crew a s s e m b l e s in that v e r y s m a l l p l a c e a g a i n f o r a n o t h e r s h o t at t h a t next issue. T h e hell b e g i n s a g a i n , with new stories, newpictures. new w o r k , a n d with the s a m e g o a l : to b r i n g the c o m p l e t e news, written c l e a r l y a n d d i s p l a y e d a t t r a c t i v e l y , to y o u . l-'or tho>e two b r i g h t , s h i n i n g h o u r s o n F r i d a y between two a n d f o u r , it is C a m e lot; a n d then it's b a c k to the salt m i n e s again. He it m a s o c h i s m , a F r e u d i a n d e a t h wish, or rebellion f r o m a k i n d ot K i e r k e g a a r d i a n parental authority, welike it here, e v e n in this hell in this v e r y s m a l l place.

$

is

11 1 w e r e a l a t h e r a n d h a d

1 should

not

d e s p a i r ovei

hei,

1

h e r s a h a t i o n . l>u( it 1 h a d a s o n w h o b e c a m e a

j o u m a list a n d ( o n t i n u e d

t o r e m a i n o n e l o r five v e a r s . 1 w o u l d

oive him up. —Snrcti

facet. They are (L to r.) editor John Mulder and news U all a b o u t Tom doesn't know.

Kierkegaard

MAKING PRINTS—See the man in the darkroom. He is Don Page, the photographer. He is enlarging pictures. He is the only one who is not scowling. This is because he goes to bed before dawn on Wednesday nights. About 4 a.m. the editor wishes he were a photographer.


Page 8

Hope College anchor

How Much

May 19. 1967

Freedom?

Hope Committed to In Loco Parentis Editor's note: This is the second of two crticles written by Bruce Ronda dealing with the issue of college authority based on in loco parentis. By Bruce R o n d a anchor Editorial Assistant T h e Mope College a d m i m s i r a t i o n position o n in l o c o p a r e n t i s is b y no m e a n s unified. While Dr. C a l v i n V a n d e r W e r f , President of the College, H e n r y Steffens, T r e a s u r e r a n d Vice President, a n d Academic Dean William Mathis all a g r e e d that the school d o e s s t a n d in l o c o p a r e n t i s , a p o s i t i o n especially useful w h e n a s t u d e n t is in legal difficulty, there w a s s o m e disagreement over further extensions of the policy. W H I L E DR, V A N D E R W E R F a n d Mr. Steffens noted the need for rules to aid in the m a t u r i n g p r o c e s s , Dr. Mathis prop o s e d that rules themselves a r e the worst w a y of e n c o u r a g i n g m a t u r i t y . The Academic Dean f u r t h e r s u g g e s t e d that the quest i o n i n g of rules is educative, a n d n e v e r the rules themselves, a l t h o u g h they m a y act as c a t a l y s t s in the attack.

BRUCE RONDA All three a g r e e d t h a t the c o n s t i t u e n c y of the college ( t o w n s p e o p l e , c h u r c h m e m bers, p a r e n t s of students, a n d a l u m n i ) p l a y a l a r g e role in the m a i n t a i n e n c e of a c o m p l e x a n d extensive set of rules, but Dr. M a t h i s s a i d that all we (the college c o m m u n i t y ) really owe o u r c o n s t i t u e n c y is the responsibility of setting p e o p l e free f r o m stifling leg alis m a n d intellectual stagnation. Ideally, the a d m i n i s t r a t o r s noted, the rules u n d e r which a student places himself u p o n a g r e e i n g to attend the college s h o u l d be d e t e r m i n e d by a c o n t i n u i n g three w a y a d m i n i s t r a t o r , faculty, student c o n v e r s a t i o n , but Dr. M a t h i s pointed out that in reality both r e g u l a t i o n s and a c a d emic f r e e d o m on c a m p u s a r e d e t e r m i n e d t h r o u g h a series of c o m p r o m i s e s a n d evas i o n s between college a n d c o n s t i t u e n c y . P E R H A P S T H E MOST R E V E A L I N G statement of college policy c o n c e r n i n g the a g r e e m e n t m a d e between student a n d H o p e College can be seen in the letter sent to s o m e of the C h a p e l Slip Retainers w h o were p r o t e s t i n g c o m p u l s o r y chapel this semester. In p a r t , the letter r e a d s as follows: " Y o u a r e a w a r e that H o p e College is a n i n d e p e n d e n t college, a c o m m u n i t y with which i n d i v i d u a l s of their own volition a s s o c i a t e themselves. The College as a n entity h a s the r e s p o n s i b i l i t y for estab l i s h i n g its p u r p o s e s , p r o c e d u r e s , rules, a n d r e g u l a t i o n s for s t a t i n g these c l e a r l y for the p e r u s a l of those interested in affili a t i n g with the College. . . . " A student w h o registers at H o p e College v o l u n t a r i l y c o m m i t s himself to the legal a n d m o r a l c o m m i t m e n t s of the College. In s h o r t , the student a n d the College enter into a n a g r e e m e n t that the College will fulfill its responsibilities a n d that the s t u d e n t will expect the College to do so. . N u l l i f y i n g the a g r e e m e n t that the s t u d e n t be a p a r t of the College c o m m u n i t y , its policies, p r o c e d u r e s , rules a n d r e g u l a t i o n s , c a n o n l y m e a n that the student is no l o n g e r a p a r t of the College c o m m u n i t y , that he is. o p e r a t i n g o u t s i d e the s p h e r e of those t h i n g s that m a k e for c o m m u n i t y . . A C C O R D I N G TO A N A R T I C L E in M o d e r a t o r m a g a z i n e , F e b r u a r y , 1 9 6 2 , the r a t i o n a l e developed in the p r e c e d i n g letter

L

placed the H o p e College a g r e e m e n t between student a n d college u n d e r the contract t h e o r y . M a t r i c u l a t i o n m e a n s acceptance of the rules, a n d this m u c h is a c c e p t a b l e to even the m o s t v o c a l critics of in l o c o p a r e n t i s . But c o n t r a c t a l s o implies e q u a l b a r g a i n i n g p o w e r , a n d , if the a n a l o g y to l a b o r - m a n a g e m e n t is p u r s u e d , the p r e s e n c e of a n indifferent third p a r t y to a d j u d i c a t e disputes. F i n a l l y , c o n t r a c t implies t h a t the a g r e e m e n t c a n n o t be c h a n g e d without the consent of all the a g r e e i n g parties. II O b v i o u s l y the q u e s t i o n of in loco p a r entis h a s b e c o m e a legal one. T h e c o u r t cases d e a l i n g with in loco p a r e n t i s h a v e dealt, in the m a i n , with state colleges a n d universities. In a 1 9 0 2 r u l i n g , Goldstein V Y o r k " U n i v e r s i t y , the c o u r t ruled that " I he r e l a t i o n s h i p existing between a university a n d a matriculated student thereof is c o n t r a c t u a l . " T h i s w a s f u r t h e r clarified in the 1 9 1 3 c a s e of Gott v. Berea College: " C O L L E G E A U T H O R I T I E S s t a n d in loco p a r e n t i s c o n c e r n i n g the p h y s i c a l a n d m o r a l welfare a n d m e n t a l t r a i n i n g of the pupils, a n d we a r e u n a b l e to see why to that end they m a y not m a k e a n y rules or r e g u l a t i o n s for the g o v e r n m e n t or betterment of their p u p i l s that a p a r e n t could for the s a m e p u r p o s e . . . . T h e c o u r t s a r e not d i s p o s e d to interfere, unless the rules and aims are unlawful, or against public policy." The y e a r s f o l l o w i n g the e a r l y 1 9 0 0 ^ s a w a refinement of in l o c o p a r e n t i s c o u r t rulings. In Ingersoll v. C l a p p ( 1 9 2 8 ) the court o b s e r v e d : ". . . T h e e n f o r c e m e n t of the d i s c i p l i n a r y rules of the state universities is c o m m i t t e d to the officials thereof, a n d unless they a r e p a l p a b l y u n r e a s o n a b l e o r in e n f o r c i n g them they act a r b i t r a r i l y , c o u r t s will not i n fe rfe re . " Civil Rights activities by college students c o m p e l l e d the c o u r t s to rule in 1961 ( K n i g h t v. B o a r d of E d u c a t i o n ) that: " . . . the a u t h o r i t i e s u n i f o r m l y recognize that the g o v e r n m e n t a l p o w e r in respect to matters of student discipline in public s c h o o l s is not unlimited a n d that d i s c i p l i n a r y rules must not o n l y be f a i r a n d r e a s o n a b l e but they a l s o m u s t be a p p l i e d in a fair a n d reasonable manner." Does a different r e l a t i o n s h i p exist between a s t u d e n t a n d a p r i v a t e institution t h a n that which exists between a student and a p u b l i c college o r u n i v e r s i t y ? While H o p e College, a c c o r d i n g to H e n r y Steffens, h a s never been i n v o l v e d in litigation with a n y of its s t u d e n t s , the f o l l o w i n g statement b y Michael J o h n s o n in T e x a s Law Review is r e l e v a n t to the p r o b l e m : " T H E E D U C A T I O N OF A s u b s t a n tial p o r t i o n of o u r public is s u r e l y not an essentially p r i v a t e f u n c t i o n even when it is c o n d u c t e d b y p r i v a t e l y o w n e d a n d o p e r a t e d universities. T h e federal g o v e r n ment h a s recognized the i m p o r t a n c e to the p u b l i c of the role p l a y e d by these institutions b y e x t e n d i n g s u b s t a n t i a l a m o u n t s in f o r m of f i n a n c i a l aid a n d s c h o l a r s h i p s to p e r s o n s a t t e n d i n g them. By a n a l o g y to the d e v e l o p m e n t in other a r e a s where the services in q u e s t i o n were i m p r e s s e d with a deep public interest, it is entirely p o s s i b l e that the activities of p r i v a t e colleges a n d universities will be held to fall within the limits of the P'ourteenth A m e n d m e n t . " ( X L 11, 1964; 3 5 0 ) T h i s p o s i t i o n is f u r t h e r clarified a n d m a d e m o r e specific b y Dr. Kenneth M a r cus, w r i t i n g in the Illinois State University Vidette: " T h e First A m e n d m e n t of the U. S. Constitution m a d e a p p l i c a b l e to the states t h r o u g h the F o u r t e e n t h A m e n d m e n t d o e s not g r a n t f r e e d o m of speech, a s s e m b l y , religion a n d p r e s s j u s t to a d u l t A m e r i c a n citizens. It g r a n t s these f r e e d o m s to all p e r s o n s . W h a t the Constitution g r a n t s to the people, the college a d m i n i s t r a t i o n cannot t a k e a w a y . " T H E O A T H TO S U P P O R T this C o n stitutional h e r i t a g e , Dr. M a r c u s s a y s , " i s violated e v e r y t i m e a n a d m i n i s t r a t o r tells a college n e w s p a p e r editor he c a n n o t p u b lish a n item b e c a u s e it is c o n t r o v e r s i a l . It is v i o l a t e d e v e r y t i m e a key is turned in a d o r m i t o r y r o o m without consent a n d the r o o m is s e a r c h e d without w a r r a n t . It is violated e v e r y t i m e s t u d e n t s a r e told they c a n n o t a s s e m b l e to petition for redress of g r i e v a n c e s . " ( N o v . 7, 1 9 6 3 )

m What these conflicting perspectives point to is essentially a crisis in v a l u e s . As p o i n t e d out at the b e g i n n i n g of this s t u d y , in l o c o p a r e n t i s w a s feasible as l o n g a s the p r e s u p p o s i t i o n s of the entire college c o m m u n i t y r e m a i n e d h o m o g e n eous, as l o n g as s t u d e n t s r e m a i n e d willing to s t a y o u t s i d e the d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g activities of the u n i v e r s i t y structure. But a Policy D e c l a ra t i o n of U S N S A , " S t u d e n t C o n d u c t

NEW PRIVILEGE—Students are pictured enjoying a dance in the Julianna Room. A long-standing rule prohibiting student dancing was modified in 1952 to permit off-campus dancing supervised by the college and was aboUshed in 1%3, as evidenced by the Student Life Committee proposal for dancing in the temporary student union. a n d Social F r e e d o m . " reflects a new student interest in b e c o m i n g a p a r t of the rulem a k i n g activity: " I n s o f a r as the d o c t r i n e (of in l o c o p a r e n t i s ) r e m o v e s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r pers o n a l d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g f r o m the i n d i v i d u a l student, it w e a k e n s a n d distorts a significant p h a s e of the e d u c a t i o n a l p r o c e s s . T h e u n e x a m i n e d a c c e p t a n c e of a u t h o r i t y which is often a p p r o p r i a t e to the c h i l d - p a r e n t r e l a t i o n s h i p m u s t be replaced b y the enc o u r a g e m e n t of a critical a n d dialectical r e l a t i o n s h i p between the student a n d his c o m m u n i t y . The r a n g e of i n q u i r y within or b e y o n d the c l a s s r o o m m u s t not be restricted out of p a t e r n a l c o n s i d e r a t i o n s but m u s t be o p e n e d out of e d u c a t i o n a l ones. . . p a t e r n a l i s m induces o r reinforces i m m a t u r ity, c o n f o r m i t y a n d disinterest a m o n g t h o s e w h o s e i m a g i n a t i o n , critical talent a n d c a p a cities f o r integrity a n d g r o w t h s h o u l d be encouraged." (p.42) PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS and other o r g a n i z a t i o n s a s well as s t u d e n t s h a v e called for a r e e x a m i n a t i o n of in l o c o p a r e n t i s . Dr. J o s e p h K a u f f m a n a s k s : " I s it now time for colleges a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s to r e m i n d l e g i s l a t o r s a n d b e n e f a c t o r s t h a t

the f r e e d o m it g r a n t s f a c u l t y a n d s t u d e n t s is a p a r t of the n e c e s s a r y climate of l e a r n ing. . . .? Institutions will h a v e to recognize that m o r e a n d m o r e , they m u s t a c h i e v e their g o a l s t h r o u g h c o n s e n s u s r a t h e r t h a n f i a t . " T h e A m e r i c a n Civil Liberties U n i o n echoes K a u f f m a n in s a y i n g : " W e c a n n o t w r a p the s t u d e n t in c o t t o n wool to protect him a g a i n s t the h a z a r d s of f r e e d o m a n d at the s a m e time h a b i t u a t e him to the m a k i n g of intelligent choices a m o n g p o l i c i e s . " The c o n s e n s u s a m o n g student o r g a n i zations a n d professionals points toward a r e p l a c i n g of the t r a d i t i o n a l in loco p a r e n t i s with an i n c o r p o r a t i o n of all el ements of the a c a d e m i c c o m m u n i t y in its decisionm a k i n g activities. Ideally, the u n i v e r s i t y is c o m p o s e d of a n u m b e r of s c h o l a r s , all of them t e a c h e r s a n d s t u d e n t s to v a r y ing degrees. THE TENSION AND CONFLICT implicit in s u c h e q u a l i t y is f a r p r e f e r a b l e to the a p p a r e n t h a r m o n y of g o v e r n m e n t by in l o c o p a r e n t i s fiat. As Dr. M a t h i s h a s p o i n t e d out, s u c h h a r m o n y , s u c h facile s o l u t i o n s to o u r difficulties m e a n s a loss of f r e e d o m to s o m e o n e ; real f r e e d o m in a c a d e m i a is s y n o n y m o u s with conflict.

Mr. Swan's Song By G o r d y K o r s t a n g e Bam! The rubber stamp slaps " G r a d u a t e d " o n y o u r f o r e h e a d , a n d as y o u ride off into the sunset y o u r eyes t u r n o n c e a g a i n to the white b e a c h e s a n d f r i e n d l y Dutch girls who h a v e m a d e y o u r visit s o pleasant. !• o u r y e a r s in a c o c o o n ! Colleges, t o w n s a n d m i n d s c a n all be c o c o o n s . Life itself m a y be a c o c o o n f r o m which a butterfly m a y or m a y not be b o r n . F l y i n g is d a n gerous. After that brilliant m e t a p h o r y o u p r o b a b l y t h i n k I m g o i n g to l a u n c h into sentimental m e m o r i e s of life a n d times at a n institution of h i g h e r l e a r n i n g " T H E N T H E R E WAS T H E T I M E they put the row b o a t in the old O p u s office; a n d time Bryce went s w i m m i n g in the n u d e at Kollen P a r k , 4 a . m . ; a n d t h a t certain p r o f e s s o r with b a g g y clothes w h o a l w a y s l o o k s d e s p o n d e n t ; a n d the N e w Y e a r ' s eve we did the town, the d a y we tore the g o a l posts d o w n . . . . " T h a t k i n d of " m o m e n t s to r e m e m b e r " t h i n g is not antithetical to m y p r e s e n t state of m i n d , but I rejected it, d e c i d i n g that H o p e relies t o o m u c h on the p a s t already—the great p a r a d o x . The M o o n is a clown, the M o o n is a clown, W a l k i n g the b a b y u p s i d e d o w n . Better get m o v i n g if I'm g o i n g to m a k e c h a p s — t h e y ' l l close those big, thick d o o r s . . . T h e c a m p u s is v e r y b e a u t i f u l t o d a y , p e r h a p s b e c a u s e of the s u n l i g h t a n d the c r i s p n e s s of the air. T o o cold f o r the b e a c h . " O u r o l d e r universities still p a i n f u l l y try to e x t r a c t f r o m art s o m e s h a d o w of justification for their o w n w a y of life.

but at H o p e we try for a fresh view of C h r i s t i a n life. D o n ' t y o u a g r e e ? " Quickly, q u i c k l y , the time d r a w s n e a r . H a s the river risen yet? Will the f r e s h m e n pull the w i n ? T w o s q u i r r e l s a r e c h a s i n g e a c h o t h e r in the Pine G r o v e . How comf o r t a b l e to p e r c h on the r a i l i n g w h e n noo n e is a r o u n d a n d reflect on w h a t these buildings mean. H A V E WE T U R N E D IDEAS into a p a y i n g f o r m of t o u r i s m ? All these p e o p l e f r o m the F a s t , w h y d o they c o m e h e r e ? The tinkle of a h a r p s i c h o r d f r o m the r o o m next d o o r . "We a r e g a t h e r e d here in the Kletz t o d a y to c e l e b r a t e t h a t i m m o r t a l A m e r i c a n rite, the coffee h o u r , a n d d o y o u t h i n k the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is y o u r p a r e n t while y o u sip v o t r e c a f e ? " My m o m m y went here a n d d a d d y too, a n d my teachers also, a n d I know almost all of them a n d t h e y ' r e v e r y n i c e ' p e o p l e . T h e winter s n o w s r e a l l y pile u p a r o u n d this a r e a m a k e s f o r red cheeks a n d mittens. What shall we d o this weekend besides listen to the a l m a m a t e r which often l u m p s in m y t h r o a t but not in m y m i n d . I w o n d e r w h o lives in the tower a b o v e the c h o i r of the c h a p e l — b e t t e r there t h a n in Kollen Hall. It w a s a g o o d lecture but not a g r e a t lecteur, a n d with a little w o r k . . . F o u r y e a r s I've w a l k e d this sidew a l k , e v e r y c r a c k is a c h a s m . N o . Yes. Arrested! You c a n ' t t a k e m e but I w a n t to go. T H E L I G H T S GO O N as the s h a d o w o n the c h a p e l l e n g t h e n s . T h e s i d e w a l k f r o m G r a v e s to V a n R a a l t e is e m p t y a n d f r o m a d i s t a n c e a s o u n d is h e a r d , the s o u n d of a s t r i n g b r e a k i n g , d y i n g a w a y .


V

May 19, 1997

Page 9

Hope College anchor

Poetr

Opus Works Sucre Editor's note; This year's Opus is reviewed b y Dr. Stanley Wiersm a , p r o f e s s o r of English at C a l v i n College. Dr. Wiersma is an alumnus of C a l v i n and received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. B y Dr. Stanley Wiersma T h e s e were m y i n s t r u c t i o n s f r o m "critiques" editor John Cox: . . w e ' d like to see a d i s c u s s i o n oriented to the pieces t h e m s e l v e s rather t h a n a n e s s a y which concent r a t e s a g r e a t d e a l o n its o w n integrity." I h a v e t a k e n him literally. Peg W e l m e r ' s p o e m o n the untapped subconscious ("Somew h e r e Deep in d r e a m i n g m i n d s " ) h a s a delicate, m y s t e r i o u s t o n e t h a t c h a r m e d me, until I d i s c o v e r ed t h a t her p o e m o n g i v i n g a n d receiving ( " F a r , half-remembere d " ) h a s not o n l y the s a m e delicate, m y s t e r i o u s tone, but a l s o the s a m e c o l o r i m a g e r y a n d t h e . s a m e vaguely sentimental moral. T h e m o r a l : " h a p p i n e s s f o r two w o r l d s " in the first a n d in the s e c o n d " W h e r e a gift is received/ w h i c h is p a r t of the g i v e r . " Miss W e l m e r s o b v i o u s l y m u s t w o r k at e x p a n d i n g her r a n g e . E v e n in f a n t a s y , o n e ' s m a n n e r m u s t not become a mannerism. B R U C E RONDA'S poem " D o Y o u R e m e m b e r W h e n " h a s a firm n a r r a t i v e s t r u c t u r e : a riot t a k e s o v e r a city. T h e tone is wellsustained f a n t a s y (children are the r i o t e r s ) , a n d the i m a g e f o r m o r n i n g is the m o s t i n v e n t i v e i m a g e in the b o o k : " d a y light k n o c k e d s u b m i s s i v e o n potted geraniums." My only o b j e c t i o n to t h a t i m a g e is t h a t it d o e s n o t relate to a n y o t h e r idea o r i m a g e in the p o e m . It d o e s not w o r k . In fact, the p o e m h a s n o s t r u c t u r e of i m a g e s at all, a n d hence there is no p r i n c i p l e for including or excluding any i m a g e : v o l c a n o , tide, ant-hill, w a r , k n o c k i n g at d o o r s , h i d e - a n d - s e e k , a n d f l o o d s (all s e v e n i m a g e s ext r a n e o u s to the n a r r a t i v e ) a r e e v o k e d in eight lines w i t h o u t a n y a t t e m p t to relate a n y of the i m a g e s to e a c h o t h e r o r to a n y t h i n g else in the p o e m . T h e r e a r e e n o u g h i m a g e s in this o n e p o e m f o r Rond a ' s first b o o k . B E C A U S E OF the l o o s e imag e r y in " R e m e m b e r , " I m u c h prefer R o n d a ' s " O n Violence D o n e to C h i c a g o Civil Rights W o r k e r s S u m m e r 1966." To explain why I like it, I m u s t d i s t i n g u i s h between

the pathetic f a l l a c y ( w h i c h presents the p o e t ' s o w n m o o d reflected in n a t u r e : the m o o n seemed to t u r n to b l o o d while I l a y beside the wreck, w o u n d e d ) a n d a p o c a l yptic i m a g e r y (which p r e s e n t s w h a t the Bible s a y s will h a p p e n at the end of time: the m o o n , for one thing, will t u r n to b l o o d ) . P a r t I of " V i o l e n c e " a n n o y e d m e at first b e c a u s e of the pathetic fallacies: the r a i n w a t e r a n d e g g s a r e a m a z e d , the p a v e m e n t experiences a n g u i s h , the g r a s s registers shock and outrage. P a r t I struck m e as s e n t i m e n t a l . Then in Part II the i m a g e r y turned a p o c a l y p t i c for me: stones s p e a k at a final j u d g m e n t a s passion a n d t e r r o r dissolve. In m e m o ry, even the i m a g e s of P a r t I t u r n e d h a r d a n d a p o c a l y p t i c as s o o n a s I got to P a r t II. When reality c o m e s a p a r t at the final judgment, eggs and rainwater m a y well be a m a z e d , p a v e m e n t m a y well e x p e r i e n c e a n g u i s h , a n d g r a s s m a y well register s h o c k a n d o u t r a g e . In the light of P a r k II a n d its a p o c a l y p t i c violence, the s e n t i m e n t a l i m a g e r y of P a r t I is m e t a m o r p h o s e d into a m i n o r a p o calypse. T H A T S T R A T E G Y , p l a n n e d or accidental, is g o o d . The r e a d e r b e g i n s t h i n k i n g of civil rights as a s e n t i m e n t a l cliche. He meets a n a p o c a l y p s e in P a r t II. In the light of it, he modifies his s e n t i m e n t a l r e s p o n s e to P a r t I. P e r h a p s the s t r a t e g y w o u l d be helped b y a title which d o e s not give the p o e m a w a y a n d b y a brief P a r t III, m a d e u p of i m a g e s of P a r t I, f o r c i n g the r e a d e r to reinterpret them as only a p p a r e n t p a t h e t i c fallacies, a n d g i v i n g the p o e m a s a t i s f y i n g A-B-A structure. Ronda's " A Birthday Verse" h a s a n u n c o n f u s e d s t r u c t u r e , alt h o u g h it exploits c o n f u s e d seas o n s , c o n f u s e d i m a g e s a n d confused identities. His " A S e q u e l " does not w o r k at all. Why o n l y three e x a m p l e s b e f o r e D e d a l u s , a n d why t h o s e three? Why not three o t h e r s ? Why not s e v e n ? Or twenty-two? T h e p o e m suffers f r o m the s a m e a i l m e n t as "Rem e m b e r " : it h a s n o p l a n . I F O U N D R o n d a ' s " F i n i a n and •he P e a c o c k s " the m o s t s a t i s f y i n g p o e m in the b o o k . T h e p e a c o c k is a n a c a d e m i c a b s t r a c t i o n a s FMnia n m u s e s at the b e g i n n i n g . As F i n i a n a p p r o a c h e s sleep, the peacock b e c o m e s a s i m u l t a n e o u s s y m b o l of success a n d violence.

When F i n i a n sleeps, the p e a c o c k s i n g s a n d preens. The s t r a t e g y of the whole p o e m is sure, a n d there is n o waste i m a g e in it. T h e single s u s t a i n e d i m a g e in "A Negro Mother's Prayer" m a k e s it Alan J o n e ' s best p o e m . T h e excessive a l l i t e r a t i o n in the first s t a n z a of " A n n u n c i a t i o n , " the v e r b a l cuteness of the third stanza ("graced fullfingers," " t e m b l e " ) , a n d the u n c o n t r o l l e d F r e u d i a n i s m of the last m a r a p o e m which is s a l v a g a b l e . " P R A Y E R A T the F o n t " suffers f r o m triteness ( " a w e s o m e s h u d d e r " ) a n d f r o m m o r e theatrics t h a n so slight a p o e m c a n b e a r . Mor e t h a n a n y o n e in the b o o k , h o w e v e r , J o n e s is inventive a n d skillful with i m a g e s . His m a j o r weaknesses are verbal and technical. I find R i c h a r d Boese's " Raind r o p s " as tediously o p a q u e as I find his " U p r i g h t M a n " tediously o b v i o u s . Delwyn Sneller's s o n n e t " O n e B o y " is o b v i o u s too, but interesting b e c a u s e of its a b u n d a n c e of concrete detail. G o r d o n K o r s t a n g e ' s a t t e m p t at p a s t o r a l is n o m o r e t h a n a n exercise. G r e g Phillips' " G a s t r o p o d a " suffers from adjectivitis: "verdant breath," "mighty/Booming v o i c e , " " d e e p twisted c a t a c o m b s , " " t h i c k green f a t h o m s . " T H E MOST e x a s p e r a t i n g a n d m o s t a m b i t i o u s piece in the a n t h o l o g y is " T h e y C a n W o n d e r "

b y A n n e De Velder. It is the m o s t ambitious piece because it a t t e m p t s a s h o r t s t o r y with a child at the center of c o n s c i o u s n e s s . T h e o p e n i n g c h i l d ' s c h a n t , the h a i r b a l l s in the s t o m a c h , the i m a g i n e d Mister a r e all the kind of detail that I wish I c o u l d think o f — a n d then h a n d l e a s well as Miss De Velder. It is the m o s t e x a s p e r a t i n g piece in the b o o k b e c a u s e of its m a n y adjectives ( " l i t t l e b a l l e d f i s t , " " s o f t m e l l o w t h u d , " a n d " f r u s t r a t e d hysterical w a i l " ) , b e c a u s e of its lack of focus a n d b e c a u s e of its vacill a t i n g center of c o n s c i o u s n e s s . E v e n the i m a g i n a t i v e little girl w o u l d not t h i n k that her m o t h e r ' s speeches were " g n a t s o f t h o u g h t , " or thatherfather"interposed (odd L a t i n a t e w o r d ) g r u n t s of indifference," o r t h a t her " p a r a m o u n t " attention w a s e n g a g e d . If the center of the s t o r y ' s c o n s c i o u s n e s s were a l a d y of sixty with a Ph.D. in a r c h a e o l o g y , p a r a m o u n t m i g h t be the best w o r d . A T FIRST, outside of the h o m e , the child s e e m s u n h a p p y b e c a u s e b o t h p a r e n t s i g n o r e her. L a t e r , inside the h o m e , the child is unh a p p y b e c a u s e her f a t h e r h a s died a n d her m o t h e r is in grief. G r a n t ed, her o w n i n o r d i n a t e grief a n d her m o t h e r ' s m a y be traced to a n e u r o t i c f a m i l y pattern even w h e n the f a t h e r w a s alive, but then the s i t u a t i o n is f a r too c o m p l e x to e x p l o r e in five p a g e s . The c h i l d ' s

m e m o r y of her father a n d m o t h e r , the first g l i m p s e we get of them (p. 2 9 ) , c o n t a i n s no hint that the f a t h e r is d e a d . She w o u l d not h a v e f o r g o t t e n , surely, o r if she h a s , s u c h forgetting s h o u l d be m a d e credible. When we a r e told later that the father is d e a d , that fact seems to c o n t r a d i c t this memo r y . The s t o r y needs at least ano t h e r rewriting. I hesitate to b r i n g u p J a n e Boum a n ' s " A b s u r d . " If the c h a i r is a n u n r e s p o n s i v e male, a n d if the b r e a s t s t r o k e is what I think it is, a n d if G r a n n y is the old m o r a l i t y , I like the p o e m for its cleverness. B E C A U S E COX instructed m e a s he did, these a r e m y r o u g h notes f o r a review. Like m a n y pieces : n Opus and Loci (the lite r a r y m a g a z i n e of m y s c h o o l ) , these r o u g h notes w o u l d h a v e imp r o v e d with rewriting. Just as I find m o r e to s a y b e c a u s e s o m e pieces in Opus a n d L o c i a r e not rewritten often e n o u g h , s o I h o p e y o u will find m o r e to s a y a b o u t m y notes t h a n if I h a d rewritten them. I h o p e that the chief thing y o u miss in this n o n - r e v i e w is architecture—deliberately m i s s i n g b e c a u s e of instructions given me. But like m y o w n students who write in Loci, you w h o write in: O p u s m u s t be r e m i n d e d that without architecture—without deliberate o r d e r — n o t all the flair for w o r d s a n d i m a g e s will ever m a k e y o u r p o e m s a n d stories whole.

Two Faculty Members Honor Retiring Colleagues Dr. Yntema Aided In Establishing Hope's Reputation

Teaching Skills Made Challenging By Helen Schoon By J o h n Ver Beek Helen H a b e r l a n d S c h o o n joined the H o p e College faculty in 1 9 4 6 w h e n her h u s b a n d , the late Rev. H e n r y S c h o o n , b e c a m e a m e m b e r of the H o p e College staff. I N 1 9 4 8 Mrs. S c h o o n j o i n e d the e d u c a t i o n staff, a n d in 1 9 4 9 s h e was a p p o i n t e d Director of t h e R e a d i n g Center. She h a s serve d in this d u a l c a p a c i t y u p to her r e t i r e m e n t In fulfilling the g o a l s of the R e a d i n g Center s h e h a s h e l p e d s c o r e s of college s t u d e n t s In d e v e l o p i n g b o t h speed a n d c o m p r e h e n s i o n in their r e a d i n g h a b i t s . As a m e m b e r of the e d u c a t i o n staff she w a s a b l e to a p p l y her k e e n insights in the a r e a of readi n g in p r e p a r i n g e l e m e n t a r y teachers, a n d c h a l l e n g e d them with a comprehensive and thorough s t u d y of the field. A firm believer in the t h e o r y t h a t l e a r n i n g m u s t be a n integ r a t i n g e x p e r i e n c e t h r o u g h techn i q u e s s u c h as unit t e a c h i n g , s h e h a s m a n y disciples in the p u b l i c s c h o o l c l a s s r o o m s of this generation who are highly regarded in the t e a c h i n g p r o f e s s i o n . She w a s able to c o m b i n e a p e r s o n a l interest in her s t u d e n t s with a c h a l l e n g e to t h e m to b e c o m e teache r s with p r o f i c i e n c y a n d skill. MRS. S C H O O N excells in hos-

By K e n n e t h Weller

MRS. HELEN SCHOON pitality. H e r h o m e o n the l a k e h a s been the scene of m a n y Student E d u c a t i o n A s s o c i a t i o n a n d faculty g a t h e r i n g s . She is a n a r d e n t t r a v e l e r , h a v ing visited m a n y c o u n t r i e s in E u r o p e a n d Asia. As a n excellent p h o t o g r a p h e r , she h a s a n extensive slide l i b r a r y of her m a n y tours. As s h e enters retirement with h e r sister, a l s o retiring this y e a r , we c a n a n t i c i p a t e t h a t m o r e t r a v e l will b e in store. We p a y t r i b u t e to the dedicated service Mrs. S c h o o n h a s r e n d e r e d t h r o u g h H o p e College f o r these m a n y years.

T h e y e a r 1 9 4 6 m a r k e d the end of a w a r a n d the b e g i n n i n g of a new era for H o p e College. Enrollment tripled as men released b y the a r m e d services a n d e n c o u r a g e d by the G.l. Bill of Rights descended o n the c a m p u s in droves. F a c e d with the task of ass e m b l i n g a faculty to teach these s t u d e n t s , the President recognized a g r e a t new interest in e c o n o m i c s a n d business. T h e a p p o i n t m e n t of a d e p a r t m e n t c h a i r m a n in this a r e a w a s a c r u c i a l concern. D W I G H T B. Y n t e m a seemed a logical choice for the position. An o u t s t a n u i n g student as a n und e r g r a d u a t e at H o p e a n d in his d o c t o r a l p r o g r a m at the University of M i c h i g a n , he h a d disting u i s h e d himself as a p r o f e s s i o n a l e c o n o m i s t in W a s h i n g t o n . He knew a n d u n d e r s t o o d the c o n s t i t u e n c y a n d the objectives of H o p e College. His f a t h e r h a d s e r v e d as a p r o f e s s o r of science at H o p e for m a n y y e a r s a n d his b r o t h e r s a n d sister were h i g h l y respected m e m b e r s of the a l u m n i . T h e w i s d o m of that decision two d e c a d e s a g o is o b v i o u s t o d a y . Dr. Y n t e m a h a s p l a y e d a key role in b r i n g i n g the College t h r o u g h the p e r i l o u s y e a r s of rela-

tive o b s c u r i t y in the late forties to its present level of effectiveness a n d recognition. He h a s s e r v e d with distinction in three a r e a s — f a c u l t y l e a d e r s h i p , research and teaching. FACULTY LEADERSHIP: N e v e r f l a m b o y a n t but a l w a y s inf o r m e d , n e v e r a g g r e s s i v e but alw a y s d e t e r m i n e d , he h a s g i v e n solidity a n d p u r p o s e to faculty g o v e r n m e n t . He h a s d o m i n a t e d n o o n e but counseled m a n y f r o m the President a n d Vice President to the lowliest f r e s h m a n . In the presence of wild ideas he h a s t h r o w n the cold water of a n a l y sis a n d a s u r e sense of the welf a r e of the College, but in the face of t i m e - c o n s u m i n g d i s c u s s i o n a n d p e d e s t r i a n thinking, his m i n d h a s often p r o d u c e d the new insight, the f r e s h a p p r o a c h , the new w a y to a t t a c k a n old p r o b l e m . When he s p o k e the faculty listened. Research: At a time when f a c u l t y r e s e a r c h w a s r a r e at H o p e College, he p i o n e e r e d in p e r s o n a l res e a r c h o n t a x e s a n d in d i r e c t i n g a m a j o r s t u d y of u n e m p l o y m e n t c o m p e n s a t i o n which was requested b y the M i c h i g a n Senate a n d fin a n c e d b y the Merrill F o u n d a t i o n . T E A C H I N G : In c o n t r a s t with t e a c h e r s with w h o m c o n t i n u e d exp o s u r e creates disenchantment, his r e l a t i o n s h i p with s t u d e n t s is characterized by a constantly g r o w i n g a p p r e c i a t i o n for h i g h q u a l i t y s c h o l a r s h i p a n d the v a l u e of e d u c a t i o n . As the s t u d e n t p r o c e e d s t h r o u g h the m y s t e r i e s of s o p h o m o r e e c o n o m i c s , u p p e r

DR. DWIGHT B. YNTEMA level c o u r s e s , a n d f i n a l l y into the c o m p e t i t i v e w o r l d of g r a d u a t e school a n d the m a r k e t place, he is i n c r e a s i n g l y a w a r e that he h a s studied u n d e r a g r e a t teacher. It h a s been said that the acc u r a t e a p p r a i s a l of t e a c h i n g takes p l a c e at a l u m n i meetings, not in f r e s h m e n d o r m i t o r i e s . On this s c o r e Dwight Y n t e m a scores well. He is r e m e m b e r e d b y t h o u s a n d s of a l u m n i with g r a t i t u d e a n d affection. His active t e a c h i n g m a y be c o n c l u d e d , but h i s influence a n d his r e p u t a t i o n will c o n t i n u e to g r o w wher ever his students m a y be f o u n d .


Page 10

May 19, 1967

Hope College anchor

jS f ..N..s........vs

i Review of the News 1 Washington Two incidents i n v o l v i n g U.S. a n d Soviet w a r s h i p s h e i g h t e n e d tensions between the two c o u n tries. Last W e d n e s d a y , a Soviet des t r o y e r , the Besslednyi, s c r a p e d against the U.S. d e s t r o y e r Walker, which w a s o n m a n e u v ers in the Sea of J a p a n . T h e next d a y the W a l k e r w a s struck again by another destroyer f r o m the Soviet U n i o n . At this p o i n t it a p p e a r s to o b s e r v e r s that these incidents were d e s i g n e d to u n d e r l i n e w a r n i n g s to the U.S. a b o u t the V i e t n a m s i t u a t i o n Selective Service f i g u r e s s h o w that d r a f t v i o l a t i o n s a r e inc r e a s i n g as a f o r m of protest a g a i n s t the w a r but h a v e not r e a c h e d the K o r e a n w a r level. A federal s u r v e y h a s listed the top five most a i r - p o l l u t e d cities in the c o u n t r y listed in a l p h a betical o r d e r : C h i c a g o , Clevel a n d , Los A n g e l e s - L o n g Beach, New York, P h i l a d e l p h i a .

h e r o here, a n d w a s c a r r i e d a b o u t L i m a o n the s h o u l d e r s of f r i e n d l y P e r u v i a n s .

'Valley'1 Called 'Dated'

Bach More Timely Than Weil By John C o x

Florida C o n s e r v a t i o n officials s a y that for m o r e t h a n three m o n t h s s o u t h e r n F l o r i d a , i n c l u d i n g the 1.4 million acres of the Everglades National Park, has had no r a i n . As a result, F l o r i d a ' s f a m e d wildlife r e f u g e m a y be faced with extinction. California After n e a r l y f o u r m o n t h s in office, C a l i f o r n i a Governor Ronald Reagan rates a higher score in the a l l - C a l i f o r n i a poll on the w a y he is h a n d l i n g his j o b t h a n his p r e d e c e s s o r ever achieved. France Great B r i t a i n ' s h o p e s f o r g a i n i n g a d m i t t a n c e to the C o m m o n M a r k e t were s h a k e n b y F r e n c h President C h a r l e s De G a u l l e ' s s t a t e m e n t that British s u p p o r t of United States policy •y in V i e t n a m m a y lead to the denial of a request for e n t r a n c e .

Peru F o r m e r Vice President Richa r d N i x o n w a s greeted as a

The music a n d d r a m a departm e n t s a r e c o o p e r a t i n g this week in a v e n t u r e at H o l l a n d H i g h . It includes a p r e s e n t a t i o n of K u r t Weil's o p e r a , " D o w n in the Vall e y , " which is preceded b y a p r o g r a m of c h a m b e r m u s i c p l a y e d by the s y m p h o n e t t e . It is p e r h a p s u n f o r t u n a t e t h a t w h a t we a s s o c i a t e t o d a y with Birm i n g h a m jail p r o v i d e s a r a t h e r bitter c o n t r a s t with pastel s k i r t s o n p o o r white s o u t h e r n belles — to s a y n o t h i n g of the u n a d u l t e r a t ed v e r s i o n of " R o s e s Are R e d . " I h a d f o r g o t t e n that the ditty ever really e n d e d with a n y t h i n g but a kind of a b s u r d i s t r e a s o n a b l e n e s s — s o m e t h i n g like " C o c o n u t s a r e brown; b a n a n a s are yellow." The o r i g i n a l w a s s h o c k i n g l y nice. " D o w n in the V a l l e y " is, in s h o r t , d a t e d ; like red r u b y lipstick a n d full, s t a r c h e d crinolines. H A R P S I C H O R D S ARE d a t e d too, of c o u r s e — a n d so is B a c h . T h e s y m p h o n e t t e , Mr. Tallis a n d

Dr. Hill g o a l o n g w a y t o w a r d p r o v i n g t h a t dates m e a n little, h o w e v e r , w h e n o n e is d e a l i n g with genius. W h a t e v e r K u r t Weil's talents m a y h a v e been, " D o w n in the V a l l e y " is not the p r o d u c t of genius. T o m G r i f f e n ' s fine t e n o r a n d A n d r e a Martin's prim complement c e r t a i n l y give the tip to o u r m u s i c i a n s w h e n the total e v e n i n g is c o n s i d e r e d . H a r v e y L u c a s l e a d s the c h o r u s with a sufficiently r e s o n a n t b a r i t o n e to p r o v i d e a better c o n t r a s t with the o r c h e s t r a t h a n does m o s t of the d i a l o g u e which too often c a n n o t b e h e a r d . Dirk W a l v o o r d deserves recognition for e x c e p t i o n a l p r o j e c t i o n . T H E S E T , a s a l w a y s this y e a r , is a p p r o p r i a t e l y designed a n d well executed. But its light, s u g g e s t i v e quality cannot counteract a certain m o n u m e n t a l i t y in the acting. T h e c h o r u s is p a r t i c u l a r l y static a n d o n e is g l a d to see t h a t its m e m b e r s c a n indeed m o v e when they d o a n e a t l y c h o r e o g r a p h e d s q u a r e dance.

T h o u g h i n c o n g r u i t y a n d platitudes m a r k the Weil p r o d u c t i o n , they a r e not sufficient to s p o i l the pieces b y J. S. B a c h a n d Will i a m Boyce which precede the m u s i c a l . In all its f r a g i l e perfection the h a r p s i c h o r d concert a l o n e m a k e s the e v e n i n g w o r t h w h i l e .

Theater Group Offers Three German One-Act Plays Today T h r e e one-act p l a y s will be presented t o d a y b y the Hope College G e r m a n T h e a t e r G r o u p at 2 p . m . a n d 8 p . m . in the Little Theatre. T h e three c o n t e m p o r a r y p l a y s to be p r e s e n t e d will be " I n d e r Gondel" by Hans Bender, "Anatol, Weihnachtseinkaufe" by Arthur Schnitzler and "Die R a c h e " b y K u r t Goetz. Director of m o v e m e n t s for the p l a y s is M e n n o K r a a i . The p r o d u c t i o n staff includes M a r k Menning, s t a g e m a n a g e r ; V i r g i n i a H a g e r , l i g h t i n g ; Pat Canfield, costumes; J u d i t h L i n d a u e r , m a k e u p ; B r i a n G i b s o n , p r o p e r t i e s a n d Patricia W o o d , publicity.

Give our used VWs o good inspection. W e did.

WILLARD MOTORS 23 West 7th Street Holland

Phone 396-3525

SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS Applications now being accepted for summer jobs with major corporation. Students 18 yrs. of age & over wanted to learn marketing, sales promotion, & brand identification techniques during summer period. High level e x e c u t i v e m a n a g e m e n t training courses given to qualified a p p l i c a n t s . Salary$105 per wk. for first 3 wks. $13U per wk. plus bonuses starting 4th week.

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W i n all expense paid holiday in Europefor an entire week.

Best Positions Going Fast! Call Today For Appointment 9:00 A.M. — 1:00 P.M. GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. & IND. . . . Mr. Schmitt . . . A.C. 6 1 6 459-5079 MILWAUKEE, WIS. A IOWA Mr. Bergman A.C. 4 1 4 2 7 6 - 4 1 1 9 CHICAGO LOOP & SO. ILL Mr. Vass A.C. 312 346-6108 CHICAGO LOOP A NO. ILL Mr. Anderson A.C. 312 782-4362 Wo have offices located in most cities, however, please contact our district offices listed above for an appointment.

M e m b e r s of the cast for " In der G o n d e l " a r e Phyllis P e a c o c k , Linda Deurwaarder, Susan Van K o e v e r i n g a n d L i n d a Weessies. Cast members in " A n a t o l , Weihnachtseinkauge" are Margo N a b e r and David Duitsman. D e a n n a G r o s s , B a r b a r a Kollen a n d S u s a n Achterhof will p r e s e n t "Die Rache."

WHERE CAN IT BE?—-Tom Griffen portrays Brack Weaver in Hope's presentation of "Down In the Valley".

Annual Honors Assembly Will Be Tuesday Morning The a n n u a l H o n o r s A s s e m b l y will b e held next T u e s d a y at 1 0 : 3 0 a.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. S c r i p t u r e will be r e a d a n d a n a n t h e m will be s u n g b y the C h a pel C h o i r . Dean of A c a d e m i c Aff a i r s , Dr. William S. M a t h i s will then d i s t r i b u t e special a w a r d s . A m o n g these a r e the P a t t e r s o n M e m o r i a l Prize in b i o l o g y , the A. A. R a v e n Prizes in o r a t o r y , the A d e l a i d e Prize in o r a t o r y a n d the j u n i o r , s o p h o m o r e a n d freshm a n Biblical prizes. T h e S l o a n S t e g e m a n Prizes will be given to the two s t u d e n t s w r i t i n g the best

e s s a y s on f o r e i g n m i s s i o n s ; the Peter Bol A w a r d will g o to the u p p e r c l a s s student w h o h a s m a d e s i g n a l c o n t r i b u t i o n s in counseling underclass students a n d who g i v e s p r o m i s e of a c a r e e r of service of y o u t h . T h e William B. E e r d m a n Poetry Prize a n d the E e r d m a n P r o s e Prize, the Metta J. Ross H i s t o r y Prize, a n d the Rolf I t a l i a a n d e r Prizes for h i s t o r y or political science will a l s o be a w a r d e d . All of these a r e c a s h awards. N e w m e m b e r s of the h o n o r a r y f r a t e r n i t i e s on c a m p u s will a l s o be a n n o u n c e d .

Ton're under 25 bat yon drive like an expert. Why should YOU have to pay extra for your car Insurance? Sentry says you may not have to. Sentry's own Preferred Young Driver program may save you u p to $50 or more. All you d o is fill out a simple questionnaire to find out if you qualify. It's not a test of driving skill. And . . . there's no penalty for young men who d o not qualify. Here's your opportunity. Kenneth J. Etterbeek invites you to attend one of these sessions:

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P a g e 11

Hope College anchor

Dr. Weller Appointed Econ Dept. Chairman T h e a p p o i n t m e n t of Dr. Kenneth J. Weller a s the new C h a i r m a n of the D e p a r t m e n t of Economics and Business Administration at H o p e College w a s a n n o u n c e d b y Dr. William Mathis, Dean of A c a d e m i c Affairs. The a p p o i n t m e n t is effective with the s t a r t of the 1 9 6 7 - 6 8 a c a d e m i c y e a r . Dr. Weller will succeed Dr. Dwight B. Y n t e m a w h o is retiring at the end of the present school y e a r . Dr. Y n t e m a h a s been a m e m ber of the H o p e College faculty since 1946. Dr. Weller h a s been a m e m b e r of the H o p e College faculty since 1949. He received his A. B. d e g r e e f r o m H o p e College in 1 9 4 8 a n d w a s a w a r d e d his M.B.A. d e g r e e f r o m the S c h o o l of B u s i n e s s at the University of M i c h i g a n in 1949. Dr. Weller received a D a n f o r t h C r a n t for d o c t o r a l s t u d y in 1 9 5 5 , w a s a w a r d e d a R a c k h a m Pred o c t o r a l F e l l o w s h i p f r o m the University of M i c h i g a n in 1 9 5 6 a n d

DR. KENNETH WELLER w a s the recipient of a F o r d F o u n d a t i o n g r a n t for s t u d y in 1957-58. He received his Ph.D. degree f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n in 1961.

Nine Faculty Members Given Summer Study, Research Grants N i n e H o p e College faculty m e m b e r s h a v e been a w a r d e d s u m m e r g r a n t s for s t u d y a n d r e s e a r c h projects. Dr. A n t h o n y K o o i k e r , p r o f e s s o r of Music, h a s been a w a r d e d the $ 1 , 0 0 0 S i m o n Den Uyl A w a r d . Dr. K o o i k e r will s t u d y p i a n o a n d p i a n o l i t e r a t u r e with F r a n k M a n n h e i m e r at the U n i v e r s i t y of Minnesota. J U D I T H W H R E N , instructor in G e r m a n , h a s received a g r a n t for i n d e p e n d e n t s t u d y in S o u t h e r n G e r m a n y , Salzburg and Vienna. T h e .lulia R e i m o l d A w a r d h a s been a w a r d e d to Dirk J e l l e m a , i n s t r u c t o r in E n g l i s h . He p l a n s to complete a n o v e l l a , revise a n d rewrite f o u r s h o r t stories, outline a n d o r g a n i z e a novel a n d write a s y n o p s i s of a project novel. Dr. E z r a G e a r h a r t , p r o f e s s o r of G e r m a n a n d c h a i r m a n of the G e r m a n D e p a r t m e n t , h a s been a w a r d e d a g r a n t for i n d e p e n d e n t s t u d y a n d t r a v e l in E u r o p e . DR, A R T H U R H. Jentz, J r . , a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of r e l i g i o n a n d Bible, h a s received a g r a n t to s t u d y aesthetics a n d m u s i c o l o g y at the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n . Charles Aschbrenner, assistant professor in music, h a s been a w a r d e d a g r a n t to s t u d y p i a n o with Stanley Fletcher at the I niversity of Illinois.

Classes Choose Next Year's Officers Elections for the c l a s s offices of vice p r e s i d e n t , s e c r e t a r y a n d t r e a s u r e r for 1 9 6 7 - 6 8 were held last week. T h e results of this a n d of the p r e v i o u s p r e s i d e n t i a l contests a r e as follows: s e n i o r class officers for next y e a r a r e Bruce White, p r e s i d e n t ; R i c h a r d Appleton, vice-president; Bernie Brunsting, s e c r e t a r y , a n d Al K i n n e y , treasurer. T h o s e elected to offices for next y e a r ' s j u n i o r c l a s s are: Ron H o o k , president; L a d McQueen, vice-president; Julie M o r g a n , s e c r e t a r y ; and Jane Breckenridge, treasurer. Filling p o s i t i o n s in the s o p h o m o r e class f o r next y e a r are: M a r k V a n d e r L a a n , president; A n d y Mulder, vice-president; M a r ilyn J o n e s , s e c r e t a r y ; a n d J i m Bekkering, treasurer.

A g r a n t h a s been a w a r d e d to Dr. Allen B r a d y , a s s i s t a n t professor of b i o l o g y , to c o n t i n u e research on the s p i d e r f a m i l y O x y o p i d a e a n d a complete m o n o g r a p h i c revision of the g e n u s Hamataliwa. DR. D A V I D M A R K E R , assistant p r o f e s s o r of p h y s i c s , h a s been a w a r d e d a g r a n t for the continua t i o n of the w o r k d o n e for his d o c t o r a l d i s s e r t a t i o n o n the calc u l a t i o n of p r o t o n - p r o t o n b r e m s strahlung cross sections.

Student Court in Review

Rapport Developed With Deans By George A r w a d y anchor Assistant Editor W h a t h a s the Student C o u r t been d o i n g this y e a r ? T h i s q u e r y u s u a l ly e n g e n d e r s a b l a n k s t a r e f r o m H o p e College students. O N E OF T H E L E A S T k n o w n but m o s t i m p o r t a n t o r g a n s of the College's student g o v e r n m e n t , the Student C o u r t h a s dealt with a variety of c a s e s d u r i n g the 1 9 6 6 - 6 7 s c h o o l y e a r . U n d e r the l e a d e r s h i p of Chief Justice J i m Klein it h a s a v o i d e d the jurisdict i o n a l d i s p u t e s which m a d e it a s o u r c e of c o n t r o v e r s y last y e a r a n d d e v e l o p e d a better l i a s o n with the Deans. A c c o r d i n g to the Senate constitution, " T h e C o u r t shall h a v e original jurisdiction and penalty l e v y i n g p o w e r s in all m a t t e r s pert a i n i n g to the r e g u l a t i o n of student ethics a n d discipline at H o p e College." IN C O N J U N C T I O N WITH these powers, the c o u r t h a s h a n d l e d 16 c a s e s thus f a r this y e a r . T w e n t y - n i n e s t u d e n t s were i n v o l v e d in these cases, nine of which involved d r i n k i n g . T h e m i s use of meal tickets in three cases, two cases of theft, a n d two a p p e a l cases c o m p r i s e d the rest of the c o u r t ' s docket d u r i n g the y e a r . In a d d i t i o n to the Chief Justice, six j u n i o r s a n d s e n i o r s s e r v e d on the c o u r t this y e a r : Dick Shiels, B r a d Race, Dennis F a r m e r , Bill Mills, Ruth Z i e m a n a n d J a n Kemmink. In all but two of the c o u r t ' s cases this y e a r , the d e f e n d e n t s pleaded guilty. In the two instances when the defendent claimed innocence, the c o u r t a g r e e d a n d acquitted the student. THE COURT ACQUITTED a girl o n d r i n k i n g c h a r g e s b e c a u s e of a lack of evidence. She h a d h a d a l c o h o l o n her b r e a t h , b u t e x p l a i n e d that the peculiar a r o m a was picked up o s c u l a t i n g her escort, w h o is o v e r 21.

Synod Meets in June To View Church Merger The R e f o r m e d C h u r c h S y n o d will meet this J u n e in Briston, T e n n . , in o r d e r to d i s c u s s the p r o p o s e d m e r g e r of the R.C.A. with the S o u t h e r n P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h a n d other p r e s s i n g issues. The S o u t h e r n P r e s y b e r i a n s will be meeting d u r i n g the s a m e week in B r i s t o n , a n d the S y n o d will meet with their General C o n g r e s s o n several o c c a s i o n s . T h e m e r g e r p r o p o s a l was m a d e several years a g o b y m e m b e r s of b o t h d e n o m inations. T H E S O U T H E R N Presbyterian C h u r c h is a d e n o m i n a t i o n of a p p r o x i m a t e l y o n e million m e m b e r s w h o b r o k e a w a y f r o m the United P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h during the Civil War. T h e i r doctrines a r e s i m i l a r to those of the Reformed Church. A n o t h e r topic s c h e d u l e d to be discussed at the S y n o d meeting will be a p r o p o s e d " C o v e n a n t of M u t u a l Responsibilities." T h i s a g r e e m e n t between the R.C.A. a n d

the three R e f o r m e d C h u r c h colleges, if a p p r o v e d , will call for the s c h o o l s to seek to " i n s p i r e their s t u d e n t s to a life of c o n t e m p l a t i o n a n d s e l f - g i v i n g " a n d end o w their e d u c a t i o n in the liberal a r t s with " a m a t u r e u n d e r s t a n d ing of the s o u r c e s a n d r e s o u r c e s of the C h r i s t i a n h e r i t a g e . " IN T H E C O V E N A N T , the C h u r c h will p r o m i s e to give its " w h o l e - h e a r t e d interest, f a v o r a n d f i n a n c i a l s u p p o r t " to H o p e , Central a n d N o r t h w e s t e r n Colleges. T h e c o v e n a n t will a l s o a s s u r e the s c h o o l s "full f r e e d o m to p u r s u e all t r u t h . " A n o t h e r p r o p o s a l which m a y c o m e b e f o r e the S y n o d is b e i n g worked on by a Reorganization of Structure c o m m i t t e e h e a d e d byM a x DePree. T h i s c o m m i t t e e is c o n s i d e r i n g a revision of the n u m ber of m e m b e r s on the B o a r d s of Trustees of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h Colleges, i n c l u d i n g H o p e .

Eenenaarp a n d the Assn. of W o m e n Students' J u d i c i a l B o a r d . T h e C o u r t eased the p u n i s h m e n t o n a n a p p e a l f r o m S h a r o n Dyks t r a , r u l i n g that her disobedience of s i g n o u t p r o c e d u r e w a s a " p r o c e d u r a l o f f e n s e " w h i c h h a d been p u n i s h e d b e y o n d the scope called for in the AWS H a n d b o o k . A n o t h e r c o n t r o v e r s i a l case inv o l v e d the p r o c e d u r e for appealing decisions of the Student Court. T h e s y s t e m this y e a r g a v e appellate j u r i s d i c t i o n to the N e x u s Committee, a high echelon studentfaculty committee c h a i r e d b y the College President. T w o cases were a p p e a l e d to the N e x u s Committee. In one, the decision of the court w a s u p h e l d , in the other a N e x u s vote resulted in a d e a d l o c k , the m a t t e r w a s referred b a c k to the Student Court a n d the C o u r t rea f f i r m e d its o r i g i n a l decision.

f

CHIEF JUSTICE JIM KLEIN A n o t h e r case drew a n acquittal when the d r i v e r of a c a r disclaimed o w n e r s h i p or even k n o w ledge of the beer c a n s d i s c o v e r e d under his c a r while he w a s p a r k ed on a d a t e in a w o o d e d a r e a . In the c a s e s when the c o u r t ruled the defendent guilty, t h e c o r rective m e a s u r e s levied b y the court v a r i e d . T h e m a j o r i t y of punishments placed the offender on social p r o b a t i o n . In o n e case, students were s u s p e n d e d f r o m school for a week. Other p e n a l ties exacted were fines, w o r k assignments a r o u n d c a m p u s , and the writing of p a p e r s . T H E P U N I h H M h . i v r S meted out, h o w e v e r , were designed as much as p o s s i b l e to a p p l y to the i n d i v i d u a l c a s e at h a n d . Justice Shiels poi nt ed out that the c o u r t was " n o t c o n c e r n e d s i m p l y with p u n i s h i n g , but t a k i n g corrective m e a s u r e s that m a k e the s t u d e n t t h i n k . " With this t h o u g h t , offenders w h o h a d e x p r e s s e d distrust of the police were a s s i g n e d to w o r k with p o l i c e m e n a n d o t h e r s w h o d e m o n s t r a t e a resentment a g a i n s t the College a n d A d m i n i s t r a t i o n were m a d e to w o r k in the D e a n ' s office. Chief Justice Klein p o i n t e d out that the f a c t o r that m a d e s o m e cases difficult w a s the desire to " d o two t h i n g s at once â&#x20AC;&#x201D; be fairly consistent in m e t i n g out p u n i s h m e n t s a n d d o justice to each i n d i v i d u a l c a s e . " Klein noted that s o c i a l p r o b a t i o n c a n m e a n a g r e a t deal to o n e s t u d e n t a n d v i r t u a l l y n o t h i n g to a n o t h e r . He p r o p o s e s that the term of " s o c i a l p r o " be d o n e a w a y with next y e a r a n d leave it u p to the court to " s p e l l out w h a t a student c a n and cannot d o . " T H E "MOST E X C I T I N G " case of the y e a r , a c c o r d i n g to Shiels, was the Student C o u r t ' s reversal of a decision of p u n i s h m e n t p a s s ed by Dean of W o m e n Isla V a n

T H E L A T T E R CASE high lighted the difficulty of the a p p e a l system working t h r o u g h the N e x u s Committee. In the new Student S e n a t e C o n s t i t u t i o n , appellate j u r i s d i c t i o n p a s s e s to a committee of the three Deans: Dr. William Mathis, Mr. Robert De Y o u n g , a n d Mrs. Isla V a n Eenenaam. T h e p r o b l e m of j u r i s d i c t i o n in d i s c i p l i n a r y cases which confronted the c o u r t last y e a r h a s been s o l v e d b y a " g e n t l e m a n ' s agreem e n t " between the C o u r t a n d the Dean of Men. Klein a n d Dean De Y o u n g discussed every p r o b l e m as it a r o s e and d e t e r m i n e d whether the C o u r t s h o u l d deal with it. T h e Chief Justice s a i d , however, that a " m o r e s t r i n g e n t p o l i c y " c o n c e r n i n g which incidents s h o u l d b e c o m e m a t t e r s of Student Court concern was desirable. K L E I N SAID t h a t two prob l e m s which faced the Court this y e a r were the p r o m p t h a n d l i n g of cases as they c a m e u p a n d the follow-up on a p u n i s h m e n t to see t h a t it is enforced. T h e C o u r t took steps to i m p r o v e enforcement t h r o u g h enlisting the c o o p e r a t i o n of residents a n d a d v i s o r s . One of the C o u r t accomplishm e n t s this y e a r w a s a m o v e toward the c r e a t i o n of flexible guidelines in the h a n d l i n g of puni s h m e n t for c e r t a i n offenses. The c o u r t created s e v e r a l precedents to g u i d e its s u c c e s s o r s . A fine of $ 2 5 w a s levied for m i s u s e of Slater m e a l tickets. A n o t h e r precedent, s t e m m i n g f r o m the case which resulted in a d e a d l o c k e d N e x u s C o m m i t t e e , h o l d s that a s t u d e n t o v e r 2 1 w h o is c a u g h t d r i n k i n g with m i n o r s is subject to college discipline as responsible for the o t h e r s ' actions. S H I E L S P O I N T E D O U T that s t u d e n t s often a r e in " d o u b l e jeop a r d y " with the local police and the College. Six of the cases inv o l v e d the police d u r i n g the p a s t year.

BAY VIEW SIMMER COLLEGE Recreation

Education plus

MODEL LAUNDRY

1967 Session

June 26-August 18

For Catalog and Information

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING Dr. Keith J. Fennimore, Dean

Daily Stop at All Dorms Albion College 9 7 East 8th Street

Albion, Michigan

Phone EX 1 - 3 6 3 5

AMBASSADOR J

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Hope College anchor

May IS. 1967

10-1 Season Record

Hope Sweeps Two From Adrian C l o s i n g out the 1 9 6 7 s e a s o n in typical f a s h i o n , the M I A A c h a m p i o n H o p e College h a r d b a l l e r s took a p a i r f r o m A d r i a n last S a t u r d a y , 5 - 4 a n d 6 - 1. The sweep g a v e the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n a final l e a g u e record of ten wins a n d o n e loss, for a p e r c e n t a g e of . 9 1 0 , highest ever by a H o p e b a s e b a l l t e a m . T h e . 9 1 0 p e r c e n t a g e w a s the best in the M I A A since 1 9 5 7 when A l m a , in a n eight-club circuit, finished 13 - 1 for a . 9 2 9 m a r k . CHARLIE LANGELAND, h a r d - h i t t i n g Dutch t h i r d - s a c k e r , , went 2 for 6 in S a t u r d a y ' s twin bill to end the s e a s o n with a . 4 5 9 b a t t i n g a v e r a g e . Official l e a g u e statistics h a d not been released as the a n c h o r went to press, thus l e a v i n g the MIAA b a t t i n g c h a m p as yet u n c r o w n e d . The h e r o of the first g a m e w a s pinch-hitter D a n K r u e g e r . With the contest tied 4 - 4 in the last of the seventh, c a t c h e r T o m Pelon led off by r e a c h i n g first o n a n error by Adrian shortstop McPeek. Centerfielder Don T r o o s t followed with a s h a r p single to center, his third hit of the g a m e . At this point. C o a c h Glenn V a n Wieren went to his bench a n d

sent K r u e g e r u p to b a t for D e n n y F a r m e r . T h e lefty-swinging j u n i o r drilled the first pitch o n a line into rightfield to send Pelon a c r o s s the p l a t e with the w i n n i n g r u n . HOPE O P E N E D the s c o r i n g in the v e r y first i n n i n g when T r o o s t ' s single d r o v e in L a n g e l a n d , w h o h a d w a l k e d a n d m o v e d to s e c o n d on Pelon's hit. S c o r i n g three times in the second o n hits b y s h o r t stop H a r r y R u m o h r a n d p i t c h e r Don K r o o d s m a a n d two c o s t l y A d r i a n e r r o r s , the Dutch m o v e d out to a 4 - 0 lead. In their half of i n n i n g n u m b e r five, the B u l l d o g s p u s h e d a c r o s s two u n e a r n e d r u n s , aided b y e r r o r s by L a n g e l a n d a n d firstb a s e m a n Bruce V a n Huis a n d a wild pitch. A d r i a n ' s Dickey s c o r e d his t e a m ' s t h i r d r u n a n i n n i n g later when he singled, stole second, m o v e d to third when catcher Pelon threw the ball into centerfield, a n d s c o r e d on p i t c h e r A n d e r s o n ' s hit. M A U G H E R M A N of A d r i a n led off the seventh with a free p a s s a n d a d v a n c e d to third o n two infield outs. Leftfielder Walter " N o N e c k " Smith then d r o v e a s i n g l e to right-center to b r i n g in the t y i n g run, thus setting the s t a g e f o r

Floyd Fanner Presents Voice Recital Monday F l o y d F a r m e r , b a r i t o n e , will present his s e n i o r recital next Mond a y at 8 : 1 5 p.m. in Snow Auditorium. F a r m e r is a s e n i o r voice a n d p e r c u s s i o n m a j o r . He is a m e m b e r of Motet Choir a n d director of music at the First P r e s b y t e r i a n C h u r c h in H o l l a n d . T H E PROGRAM will begin with H e n r y Purcell's " N y m p h s a n d Shepherds" and "An Evening H y m n . " These selections will b e followed by " Recitative a n d A r i a " f r o m J. S. B a c h ' s " I c h h a b e genug." After i n t e r m i s s i o n F a r m e r will s i n g Robert S c h u m a n n ' s " T h e Last T o a s t , " followed b y " T h e O m n i p o t e n c e , " b y F r a n z Shubert. Ralph Vaughn W'illiams'songs, " T h e C a l l " a n d " I Got Me Flowe r s " a r e the next selections. C O N C L U D I N G the p r o g r a m is a g r o u p of three s o n g s b y S a m uel Barber: "Church Bell at Night," "The Crucifixion" and "Sea-Snatch."

Netmen Sweep Adrian, 5-1; Will Face Kalamazoo In their last meet of the r e g u l a r s e a s o n , the Dutch n e t m e n easily rolled over their A d r i a n o p p o nents by a score of 9 - 0. Singles s t a r s D o u g B a r r o w , C r a i g Workm a n , Ron Visscher, C r a i g Holleman, John Schadler and Tibor Safar backhanded and smashed their w a y to t r i u m p h , s t a k i n g H o p e to a 6 - 0 lead g o i n g into the d o u b l e s . After p o s t i n g a n excellent 5 - 1 r e c o r d in the MIAA, H o p e College's t o u g h tennis t e a m will seek to d e t h r o n e d e f e n d i n g c h a m p i o n K a l a m a z o o at the MIAA Field D a y festivities t o d a y a n d tomorrow. All the action will t a k e p l a c e at Calvin College's Knollcrest Campus. The Barrow-Workman, Jeff Green-Holleman, and Safar-Tom T h o m a s d u o s swept t h r o u g h their m a t c h e s to complete the t r i u m p h .

Assisting F a r m e r will be D a v i d T u b e r g e n a n d Glenys D a v i d s o n p l a y i n g violin, L y n d a B r o w n o n viola a n d J o h n Renwick on violincello. Kenneth B r u g g e r s a n d K a r o n V a n d e n H o e k will a c c o m p a n y Farmer on harpsichord and p i a n o , respectively.

K r u e g e r ' s g a m e - w i n n i n g blow. K r o o d s m a g a v e u p seven hits, struck out ten, a n d w a l k e d f o u r en r o u t e to his fifth v i c t o r y of the y e a r . His e a r n e d r u n a v e r a g e for the s e a s o n w a s a n i m p r e s s i v e 1.06. T h e Dutch b a t t e r s collected nine hits, s p a r k e d b y T r o o s t ' s three safeties. L E F T H A N D E R G a r y P>ens scattered six hits a n d f a n n e d six as he pitched a 6 - 1 t r i u m p h in the n i g h t c a p . F r e n s a n d Adria n ' s M a u g h e r m a n , w h o struck out ten a n d d e s e r v e d a better fate, dueled e a c h o t h e r t h r o u g h five scoreless i n n i n g s . T h e n in the H o p e half of the sixth, the roof c a v e d in for A d r i a n . D a v e Abel, l e a d i n g off, topped a roller in f r o n t of the plate. M a u g h e r m a n c a m e in fast off the m o u n d , p o u n c e d o n the ball a n d fired it p a s t the f i r s t b a s e m a n ' s out-stretched glove. T h e speedy Abel s c a m p e r e d all the w a y to third as the ball rolled d o w n the rightfield line. F r e n s reached first safely on a fielder's choice while Abel s c o r e d f r o m t h i r d to b r e a k the d e a d l o c k . HOWEVER, the r a l l y w a s f a r f r o m o v e r . L a n g e l a n d hit an 0 - 2 pitch to the left-centerfield fence on o n e b o u n c e f o r a t w o - b a g g e r which sent F r e n s to third. Pelon followed with a sacrifice fly to m a k e the score 2 - 0. T r o o s t w a l k e d a n d V a n H u i s reached first o n a n e r r o r to l o a d the b a s e s . With two out, R u m o h r lined his s e c o n d d o u b l e of the g a m e into left-center to send in two m o r e Hope runs. A lead-off hit b y Smith eventually b l o s s o m e d into a r u n in the sixth for A d r i a n . F r e n s ' f i n e pitching e a r n e d him his fifth t r i u m p h of the c a m p a i g n a n d lowered his ERA to 2 . 3 1 in M IAA c o m p e t i t i o n .

Trackmen Fell Records; Sprint Past JC, 83-52 Hope College's cindermen, p r i m e d for MIAA Field D a y tomorrow, ran by Grand Rapids J u n i o r College 8 3 - 5 2 at V a n Raalte Field on T u e s d a y . T w o H o p e College track r e c o r d s fell in the l o n g awaited w a r m s p r i n g w e a t h e r . Steve " S p u d " Reynen e r a s e d the 8 8 0 yd. record set at 1:57.8 by J i m R o z e b o o m in 1961 b y t u r n i n g the track twice in 1:57.3. Bill B e k k e r i n g set the o t h e r record for H o p e in the pole v a u l t . Bill's v a u l t of 13 feet 6

Arkies Are Second

Fraters Win Intramural Trophy After an i m p r e s s i v e win in M a y D a y a n d a first p l a c e tie in softball, the F r a t e r s h a v e clinched a n o t h e r all-sports t r o p h y . T h e r a c e w a s especially close this y e a r as the Arkies a n d I n d e p e n d e n t s were still in the r u n n i n g until the P'rater sweep of M a y D a y . T h e C o s m o s s n a t c h e d u p the f o u r t h position, followed b y the EmmieSj Knicks, a n d Cents. . D E S P I T E T H E F R A T E R vie tory in May D a y , the I n d e p e n d e n t s m a n a g e d to steal m u c h of the g l o r y as they set two meet r e c o r d s . Ralph Schroeder anchored a r e c o r d - b r e a k i n g mile relay t e a m , a n d H e r m K u i p e r leaped 6 ' % " to lead the a t t a c k o n the old h i g h j u m p m a r k . H o w e v e r , the F r a t e r s h a d t r e m e n d o u s depth, especially in the s p r i n t s a n d h u r d l e s , a n d were not to be denied. T h e y totaled 82 points, 10 m o r e t h a n the second-place I n d e p e n d e n t s with

72. The C o s m o s clinchtci third with 6 8 p o i n t s , followed b y the Arkies with 6 2 , the E m m i e s with 4 6 , a n d the K n i c k s w h o failed to score. T h e F r a t e r s h a d to be content with a tie for the Softball c h a m p i o n s h i p this y e a r as the Arkies d u m p e d them 9 - 0 in the last g a m e of the y e a r to g a i n a s h a r e of the title. D e n n y Weener, a s t a n d out all y e a r , fired a no-hitter at the h a p l e s s F r a t e r s a n d a l s o h o m ered to p a c e the win. T h e r e w a s a l s o a tie for s e c o n d place as the E m m i e s a n d I n d e p e n d e n t s battled to identical 4 - 2 records. L E D BY A N u n d e f e a t e d Wedn e s d a y night t e a m , the Arkies edged out the F r a t e r s to c a p t u r e the b a s k e t b a l l t r o p h y . Competition w a s keen in the well-balanced l e a g u e as the i n d e p e n d e n t s scored s e v e r a l upsets to c a p t u r e the third position.

Slater Sponsors Waitress Contest Slater F o o d Service is r u n n i n g a contest for the best waitress a n d waiter to be elected b y the b o a r d i n g students. Votes will be cast M o n d a y at the e v e n i n g meal, a n d the w i n n i n g e m p l o y e e will receive $ 1 0 . R a y m o n d H e r r i n g s h a w , Slat e r ' s District M a n a g e r , h a s don a t e d the a w a r d m o n e y f o r t h i s y e a r ' s contest.

WITH EASEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Mike Paliatsos breaks the tape to give Hope first place in the mile relay. Two college records were broken as Hope defeated Grand Rapids Junior College in the meet, 83-52.

MAY DAYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Bob Essink, E m m i e , is shown clearing a hurdle during one of the events in Hope's annual May Day track meet. The Fraters took the contest, sweeping the majority of the events.

Kollen Hall w i n g 1-B r e i g n s a s the new c h a m p i o n of the Kollen Hall B a s k e t b a l l L e a g u e . It w a s a n exciting race this y e a r , a n d the c h a m p i o n s h i p w a s not decided until the final g a m e between 1-B a n d 3-B. Both t e a m s h a d battled to 9 - 2 r ecor ds, but in the final g a m e 1-B used s u p e r ior o u t s i d e s h o o t i n g a n d b o a r d c o n t r o l to e a r n a 57 - 4 1 decision. In the evenly b a l a n c e d l e a g u e , 2-A tied with 3-B for sec o n d p l a c e b e h i n d the c h a m p i o n s of 1-B. BACK TO FRATERNITY c o m p e t i t i o n , the Arkies, led b y Bob D o n i a a n d Ron Visscher, c o n t i n u e d to m o n o p o l i z e the pingp o n g a c t i o n a n d finished with a perfect record. T h e F r a t e r s a g a i n fipished a s t r o n g second but were p u s h e d h a r d b y the E m m i e s , Cosm o s a n d I n d e p e n d e n t s in a tight race. T h e r e m a i n d e r of the tennis sched u l e h a s been c o m p l e t e d after cold w e a t h e r s u s p e n d e d action last fall. T h e I n d e p e n d e n t s p r o v e d to be surprisingly strong and captured their first c h a m p i o n s h i p of the y e a r . T h e F r a t e r s p r o v e d that consistency is the secret of their success as they e d g e d out the Arkies for a n o t h e r s e c o n d place finish. T H E F R A T E R S c a p t u r e d the volleyball and bowling champio n s h i p s . T h e y were s e r i o u s l y challenged in b o w l i n g by the E m m i e s , Cosmos and Independents who finished in a t h r e e - w a y tie for the r u n n e r - u p p o s i t i o n . The volleyball c o m p e t i t i o n w a s a l s o v e r y close with s e v e r a l t e a m s b u n c h e d b e h i n d the l e a d e r s . In the last of the ten inter-fraternity s p o r t s , the I n d e p e n d e n t s e d g e d out the Arkies for the H a n d ball C h a m p i o n s h i p . T h e consistent F r a t e r s secured the t h i r d p o s i t i o n e d g i n g the C o s m o s a n d K n i c k s w h o tied for f o u r t h . T h e f o l l o w i n g is the final s t a n d i n g s of the f r a t e r n i t i e s in the c o m petition f o r the a l l - s p o r t s t r o p h y . Fraters L07 Arkies 87 Independents 73 Cosmos 65 Emmies 55 Knicks 24 Cents 9

inches eclipsed his p r e v i o u s record of 13 feet 21/4 inches set this season at the Great L a k e s A s s o c i a tion meet. W A L T REED, D a v e T h o m a s , P a u l S l o a n a n d Jeff K l i n g s t a r t e d the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n o n their w a y to c a p t u r i n g 12 of the 16 possible first places in the 4 4 0 yd. relay. T h e " D y n a m i c D u o " of D o u g F o r m s m a a n d Rick B r u g g e r s t e a m e d u p to place 1-2 respectively in b o t h the mile a n d two mile r u n s . T h i r d place went to Paul H a r t m a n in the mile a n d to Dick B i s s o n in the two mile for a clean sweep of b o t h events. F o r m s m a ' s times were 4 : 2 3 . 4 in the mile a n d 9 : 4 5 . 3 in the two mile. TIM B A R T N I K of G R J C c a p tured o n e of the R a i d e r ' s f o u r first places in the 4 4 0 vd. d a s h . Walt Reed w a s a d o u b l e w i n n e r for the D u t c h m e n , b r e a k i n g the t a p e at 10.4 in the 100 yd. d a s h a n d 2 2 . 7 in the 2 2 0 yd. d a s h . L a r r y Wilkerson of J C beat out Jeff H o l l e n b a c h of H o p e for first p l a c e h o n o r s in the 120 yd. h i g h h u r d l e s c o v e r i n g the d i s t a n c e in 15.3. D a v e T h o m a s ' fine p e r f o r m a n c e in the 3 3 0 yd. intermediate h u r d l e s g a v e H o p e a n o t h e r first with a time of 4 0 . 8 s e c o n d s . T H E M I L E RELAY t e a m of F r a n k , Reynen, T h o m a s a n d Pali a t s o s r o u n d e d out the r u n n i n g event s with a n o t h e r first for H o p e . T h e i r time of 3 : 2 5 . 3 w a s a s e a s o n low for the H y i n g D u t c h m e n . J C m a d e its best s h o w i n g in the field c o m p e t i t i o n , t a k i n g two first p l a c e s out of a p o s s i b l e six. L E S COLE'S toss of 132 feet 2 inches g a v e him first p l a c e in the discus. B u r g e s s w a s second a n d T a i b i K a h l e r w a s third. A t h r o w of 183 feet 10% inches g a v e D o u g N i c h o l s first in the j a v e l i n followed b y M o r s e of JC a n d K a h ler of H o p e . NORM K L E I N s p r a n g to a 2 1 feet 6 inches win in the l o n g j u m p for Hope. Fultz a n d Wilkers o n of J C followed Klein for seco n d a n d third.

Aquinas Golf Team Slams Hope, 15-0 T h e A q u i n a s College golf team d o w n e d the H o p e College a n d Grand R a p i d s J u n i o r College t e a m s in a t r i a n g u l a r meet held T u e s d a y at the A m e r i c a n L e g i o n C o u n t r y Club c o u r s e . T h e hot s h o o t i n g A q u i n a s linksters s c o r e d a 1 5 - 0 v i c t o r y o v e r the H o p e s q u a d . The T o m mies were p a c e d b y G e o r g e Alksnis with a 7 3 a n d Ed K r o p i c w k z with a 74. J u n i o r G e o r g e C o o k led the H o p e t e a m with a 77. Willy J a c k s o n , F r e d MuIIer, Denny Bobeld y k a n d C h u c k Lieder followed with scores of 81, 82, 85 a n d 8 5 respectively.


05-19-1967