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Next Ifear's Faculty Changes Announced Six Hope College p r o f e s s o r s will be leaving the faculty at the end of the y e a r a n d five others will be t a k i n g leaves of absence d u r i n g the 1967-68 academic y e a r for d o c t o r a l and post-doctoral studies, a n n o u n c e d Dean f o r Academic Affairs William Mathis. Dean Mathis a n n o u n c e d the a p p o i n t m e n t of nine new professors to the Hope College faculty for next year. RETIRING IN J u n e will be Mrs. Helen S c h o o n , assistant professor of education, and Dr. Dwight Yntema, p r o f e s s o r of economics and b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a tion a n d c h a i r m a n of the department. Mrs. Schoon h a s been a member of the Hope College faculty since 1946 a n d is director of the College's r e a d i n g center. Dr. Yntema also joined the faculty in 1946. F o u r faculty m e m b e r s a r e leaving for positions elsewhere. Dr. .lerry Mohrig, a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r

of chemistry, will be j o i n i n g the faculty at Carleton College in Northfield, Minn.; Dr. Ralph Perry, p r o f e s s o r of r o m a n c e langu a g e s a n d c h a i r m a n of the dep a r t m e n t , will be j o i n i n g the faculty at Illinois State University at N o r m a l , 111.; D o n a l d Clelland, instructor in sociology, will be j o i n i n g the faculty at W a y n e State University, a n d Robert Burton, instructor in p h i l o s o p h y , will be j o i n i n g the faculty at the University of G e o r g i a , Athens, Ga. TAKING L E A V E S of absence for d o c t o r a l a n d post-doctoral work will be Dr. Morrette Rider, p r o f e s s o r of music; Dr. Irwin Brink, p r o f e s s o r of chemistry a n d chairman of the d e p a r t m e n t ; .lames Tallis, a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of music; and Dr. Phillip C r o o k , p r o f e s s o r of b i o l o g y . Mr. Tallis will be finishing work t o w a r d s his Ph.D. at Union Semi n a r y , New York City; Dr. Rider will be c o n d u c t i n g p o s t - d o c t o r a l study at the University of Wash-

Sue Albers Is May Queen; Mortar Board Taps Girls This a f t e r n o o n j u n i o r S u s a n Albers was crowned the 31st M a y Day Queen of Hope College. She will reign o v e r the weekend's festivities, the " C h a n s o n de M a i . " Miss Albers' court includes j u n iors Linda D u e r w a a r d e r , J a n e Kallemyn, Linda Patterson, Phyllis Peacock, S a n d y T o m l i n s o n and Gretchen VanderWerf. The queen and her court were chosen last M o n d a y and T u e s d a y f r o m all j u n i o r w o m e n , a n d their coronation highlighted the a n n u a l May Day celebration in the Pine Grove. MORTAR BOARD, the senior women h o n o r s o r o r i t y , t a p p e d 12 new m e m b e r s f r o m the j u n i o r class. They include Irene Edb r o o k e , D e a n n a Gross, M a r y Hesselink, Janice K e m i n k , Linda Kloote, S u s a n Kutscher, L i n d a Patterson, C a r o l e Roden, Gretchen VanderWerl, Helen Verhoek, Louise Verhoek, and F r a n Webinga. The scholastic t r o p h y winners for the first semester were a l s o a n n o u n c e d this a f t e r n o o n . Leading the men were the Emersonian F r a t e r n i t y with a g r a d e point of 2.694. R u n n e r s u p were the men of A r c a d i a n with a 2 . 6 7 3 . The C e n t u r i a n s with a 2 . 6 4 8 finished a close third, followed by the C o s m o s , F r a t e r s a n d Knicks. IN SORORITY competition, the scholastic t r o p h y went to S i g m a

ington in Seattle; Dr. Brink will be d o i n g p o s t - d o c t o r a l study at the University of Michigan, a n d Dr. C r o o k will be c o n d u c t i n g postd o c t o r a l s t u d y at Silliman University in the Phillipines. DR, J. C O T T E R T H A R I N , presently a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of geo l o g y at Wesleyan University in Middletown, C o n n . , will be chairm a n of the new geology department. He holds a B.S. degree f r o m St. J o s e p h College, Rensselaer, Ind. and a n M.S. a n d Ph.D. degree f r o m the University of Illinois. Richard V a n d e r Velde h a s been n a m e d a n a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of m a t h . He is presently a t e a c h i n g assistant at the University of Iowa. He holds a B.A. degree f r o m S i m p s o n College, I n d i a n o l a , la., a n d his M.S. degree f r o m the University of Iowa. Robert Ritsema h a s been appointed an a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of music. He is presently on the faculty at Wisconsin State University at O s h k o s h . Mr. Ritsema

University of Cincinnati and a n M.S. degree f r o m the University of Wisconsin. Dr. F i t z s i m m o n s is presently a research a s s o c i a t e in the dep a r t m e n t of b i o l o g y at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wis. He received his B.S. degree from W a s h i n g t o n State College, Pullm a n , Wash., a n d his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees f r o m the University of Minnesota. MARTIN URBERG h a s been n a m e d an a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of chemistry. He is presently working t o w a r d s his Ph.D. degree at the University of C h i c a g o . He received his B.A. degree from St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. G e o r g e K r a f t will serve as an a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of physical education. He is presently a teaching assistant at the University of Ind i a n a and is w o r k i n g t o w a r d s his Ph.D. degree. He received his B.A. d e g r e e f r o m Wheaton College and M.S. degree f r o m the University of I n d i a n a .

OPE COLLEGE

anc or OLLAND, MICHIGAN 79th ANNIVERSARY -

25

HÂŤpc O U e f c . HolUad. M i c k i g o

May 5, 1967

Students React Favorably

Views Voiced Over RLC Plan SUSAN ALBERS S i g m a with a a v e r a g e . Delta n e r u p with a sororities had

2.950 cumulative Phi w a s the runclose 2.945. All averages over a

2.6.

T o n i g h t there will be a b a n quet at 6:30 in Durfee d i n i n g hall in h o n o r of the queen a n d her court. The climax of May Day will be reached at the casual d a n c e b e g i n n i n g in Phelps Hall at 8:30 this evening.

Student a n d faculty reaction to the Religious Life C ommittee's c h a n g e in chapel policy h a s been varied, a l t h o u g h generally in f a v o r of the p r o p o s a l . The RLC recommendation, which h a s yet to be a p p r o v e d by the Board of Trustees, suggests that there be a choice between c o m p u l s o r y chapel and a series of lectures f o r the students. The students w h o choose the lectures would h a v e to attend nine out of 12 offered per semester. The lectures would be on M o n d a y m o r n ing f r o m 9 : 3 0 to 10:20, and first h o u r on M o n d a y would start at 7:30. THOSE STUDENTS who c h o o s e chapel would be required to attend twice per week. Chapel

Is It Good or Bad?

Inbreeding Exists in Faculty By George Arwady If y o u ' r e a m e m b e r of the H o p e College faculty, the chances a r e better than even that y o u received your B a c h e l o r ' s degree f r o m Hope, Central, or C a l v i n College. It is even m o r e likely that a n y a d v a n c e d degrees which you hold were earned at a large, midwestern university. F A C U L T Y I N B R E E D I N G , as

h o l d s a B.A. degree f r o m Hope College a n d a M.A. f r o m the University of Michigan. Hewill teach cello a n d direct the orchestra. Miss Elizabeth Reedy h a s been n a m e d a n assistant p r o f e s s o r of English. She will be c o m i n g to H o p e f r o m Rice University in H o u s t o n , Tex. Miss Reedy holds a B.A. degree f r o m L a k e Forest College a n d a n M.A. degree f r o m Yale University. DAVID MYERS will serve a s a n assistant p r o f e s s o r of p s y c h o l o g y a n d a social-psychologist when he joins the Hope faculty. He is presently w o r k i n g for his Ph.D. degree at the University of Iowa. Mr. Myers holds a B.A. degree f r o m Whitworth College, Spok a n e , Wash., and a n M.A. degree f r o m the University of Iowa. E d w a r d Ervin a n d Dr. Robert F i t z s i m m o n s h a v e been n a m e d assistant p r o f e s s o r s of b i o l o g y . Mr. Ervin is presently w o r k i n g t o w a r d s his Ph.D. degree at the University of Wisconsin. He received his B.A. degree f r o m the

this is called, c a n be seen in a b r e a k d o w n of the H o p e College faculty. Of the a p p r o x i m a t e l y 9 0 faculty m e m b e r s actually e n g a g e d in instruction, 37 received an A. B. f r o m H o p e a n d a n o t h e r 15 were given their first degrees at either Calvin o r Central. In addition, 6 3 m e m b e r s of the faculty earned Masters or Doctorates f r o m l a r g e midwestern

FACULTY LOUNGE—Hope professors (I. to r.) Dirk Jellema, Dr. Bastian Kruithof, and Stuart Wilson gather for a coffee break and discussion in the faculty lounge. Mr. Jellema and Dr. Kruithof earned their A.B. degrees from Calvin College and Mr. Wilson from Hope.

schools, principally the University of Michigan, M i c h i g a n State University a n d Western Michigan University. ACCORDING TO a study by the Carnegie Institute, faculty : nbreeding is "generally disa p p r o v e d , but widely practiced in A m e r i c a n colleges a n d universities." The d i s a p p r o v a l stems f r o m a belief that faculty i n b r e e d i n g tends to p e r p e t u a t e the s a m e a c a d emic point of view t a u g h t at a n institution a n d puts a d a m p e r on o r i g i n a l t h o u g h t and d i a l o g u e resulting f r o m c o n t r a s t i n g o p i n i o n s o n v a r i o u s matters. " F a c u l t y i n b r e e d i n g is certainly not p e c u l i a r to H o p e College," pointed out Dean of Academic Affairs William Mathis._ D E A N M A T H I S pointed out the " g r e a t difficulty" of h i r i n g the exact type of p e r s o n n e l a college desires. A college tends to attract a p p l i c a n t s w h o a r e a l u m ni o r who h a v e had s o m e contact in the p a s t with the school. Most of these p e o p l e in these categories h a v e d o n e their g r a d u a t e w o r k at midwest universities, especially those in Michigan. Faculty and administrators, while g e n e r a l l y a g r e e i n g t h a t inb r e e d i n g existed on the c a m p u s , ( C o n t i n u e d on p a g e 3 )

would be held T u e s d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y at 10 a.m. and classes would start at 8 a.m. If this p l a n is accepted this y e a r , it would only be on a trial basis a n d would be r e e v a l u a t e d next year. F r e s h m a n Lois A m i d o n said, " I think it's horrible. Eight o'clock chapel is the best thing on this c a m p u s . It was i m p o r t a n t in m y c h o o s i n g H o p e Colleize." Bruce R o n d a , a m e m b e r of the c h a p e l slip retainers, said, " I t ' s the kind of c o m p r o m i s e that will p r o b a b l y p a s s the B o a r d of Trustees. Of c o u r s e for those who c h o o s e chapel, it will be voluntary. I certainly h o p e it p a s s e s . " When a s k e d which he will attend next y e a r he said, " I will prob a b l y attend the lectures and watch to see who is in chapel and go when 1 think it will be beneficial to m e . " CHAIRMAN OF the RLC Dr. Elton B r u i n s said that he h a d his d o u b t s a b o u t the plan. He said, " T h e w o r k a b i l i t y of it will be difficult to achieve." Doreen A d o l p h , c o - a u t h o r of the letter f a v o r a b l e to compuls o r y chapel printed in the a n c h o r

two weeks a g o , a l s o expressed uncertainty. She s a i d , "I have my doubts a b o u t e q u a t i n g the lectures with chapel. It will p r o b a b l y depend on the type of s p e a k e r s they h a v e . " Dr. David C l a r k , a m e m b e r of the history d e p a r t m e n t s a i d , " Brilliant c o m p r o m i s e . " Another faculty m e m b e r c o m p l a i n e d , "I d o n ' t care to teach at 7:30 in the morning." RICHARD TIMMER, a junior, s a i d , " P r o b a b l y most of the students will take chapel at the later time, just lor a c h a n g e if nothing else. I've g o n e here three years a n d getting up for chapel two d a y s a week doesn't really bother me. . . .1 m a y be g o i n g at it all wrong." M a r k V a n d e r L a a n , new president of the class of '70, said, " I think the choice is a g o o d one. The lectures could be m o r e beneficial to the College, but they could a l s o just be used to get out of chapel twice a week. It all dep e n d s on the sincerity of the students in their l o o k i n g for a real religious ex perienee.''

Poet Snodgrass to Lecture At Assembly on Monday Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, W. D. S n o d g r a s s will give a lecture at 10:30 a.m. in Dimnent Memo r i a l C h a p e l on M o n d a y , May 8 at a n all-college a s s e m b l y . Mr. S n o d g r a s s will r e a d f r o m his own w o r k s a n d then lecture on contemporary poetry, g i v i n g his o p i n i o n s on the recent trends in poetry. S n o d g r a s s , w h o won the Pulitzer Prize in 1960, holds three degrees f r o m the State University of Iowa a n d h a s t a u g h t at Rochester, W a y n e State and Cornell Universities. Besides w i n n i n g the Pulitzer prize, he h a s received a w a r d s f r o m the Poetry Society of America, the Guinness Poetry A w a r d in England, a Ford Foundation G r a n t , a N a t i o n a l Institute of Arts a n d Letters G r a n t and fellowships f r o m b o t h the Ingram-Merrill F o u n d a t i o n a n d the H u d s o n Review.

*

W. D. SNODGRASS


P W 2

Hope College anchor

May 5, 1967

'Dream' School in Saugatuck

Dr. Crawford's Plan Approved Final a p p r o v a l of a p r o p o s e d experimental school in S a u g a tuck, Michigan, h e a d e d by Dr. C l a u d (". C r a w f o r d of the education d e p a r t m e n t , w a s given by a meeting of the faculty of H o p e College last M o n d a y night. The s c h o o l ' s p r o p o s a l w a s b r o u g h t before the faculty after receiving a p p r o v a l f r o m the Social Science and Kducational Policies Committees. ACCORDING TO Dean of Academic Affairs William S. Mathis, there was quite s t r o n g o p p o sition to the p l a n f r o m a significant p o r t i o n of the faculty for two reasons. " T h e r e was a general q u e s t i o n i n g of the p r o p o s a l first because the report w a s not sufficiently lucid and descriptive to give a clear u n d e r s t a n d i n g of what was involved in the p l a n , " he said. Therefore m a n y of the ques-

tions were m e a n t merely to obtain c l a r i f i c a t i o n . " " T h e n , t o o , " he a d d e d , " t h e r e was a basic p h i l o s o p h i c a l conflict between those who f a v o r the structured system and t h o s e behind the less structured p l a n . " T H E SCHOOL will consist of elementary s c h o o l aged children but will d i s r e g a r d the t r a d i t i o n a l practice of student stratification into g r a d e levels. The student will be allowed f r e e d o m c o n c e r n i n g his p e r s o n a l rate of d e v e l o p m e n t . The most r e v o l u t i o n a r y p l a n of the school lies in the use of curricula for d e v e l o p i n g in the student a positive self-concept a n d c o m m u n i c a t i o n skills. Besides this, the e d u c a t i o n dep a n m e m will be a t t e m p n n g iu discover the a d v a n t a g e s a n d dis-

Prins Last Chance Talk About 'Important Things' Life is full of j o y a n d w o n d e r , very m u c h worth l i v i n g . " I his was Dr. A. J a m e s Prins' m e s s a g e at F r i d a y n i g h t ' s Last C hance talk at c r o w d e d Dimnent Memorial Chapel. DR, PRINS noted that e v e r y c h a n c e to s p e a k offers the s a m e o p p o r t u n i t y . " I n 2 0 y e a r s of teaching at H o p e College 1 h a v e said the most i m p o r t a n t t h i n g s 1 know o v e r a n d o v e r . " When trying to decide on a topic for this talk, Dr. Prins said he considered m a n y possible topics. He could h a v e presented his p h i l o s o p h y of life, his p h i l o s o p h y of teaching, o r the " m o r e exciti n g " topic of protest. "Tonight, however, nature pricks us in o u r hearts, we de-

sire to m o v e o u t , " he said. Dr. Prins e m b a r k e d on a " d e f e n s e of poetry, a defense of s p r i n g , a defense of life." "ALL T H E POETS of the world h a v e celebrated the j o y of life, h a v e s u n g the s a m e s o n g of life, or they were not p o e t s , " he said. Dr. Prins m a d e his point as he quoted Dylan T h o m a s , S t e p h a n Spender a n d Alfred H o u s m a n . If you h a v e the " r e s p o n s i v e sensibility" of the poets, life will alw a y s be worth living, he a d d e d . Dr. Prins concluded his pleas for a "renewed j o y i n t h e c o m m o n a n d o r d i n a r y " with a final admonition to " k e e p y o u r eyes open a n d b r i g h t to the w o n d e r of life."

a d v a n t a g e s of on-the-job teacher e d u c a t i o n . Nine college senior interns will t a k e p a r t in g u i d i n g the 3 7 5 students involved in the program. DR, CRAWFORD called the experiment a " d r e a m " he h a s had for the last 10 y e a r s . He talked a b o u t the idea of a n o n - g r a d e d school of this kind while teaching at the I ' n i v e r s i t y of Tennessee before c o m i n g to Hope but it never got off the g r o u n d . In a j o b interview with Dr. Robert De H a a n , c h a i r m a n of the education d e p a r t m e n t , he voiced his ideas a n d received e n c o u r a g e m e n t . Farlier this y e a r Dr. C r a w f o r d sent a p r o p o s a l of a s i m i l a r school to W a s h i n g t o n D.C. for subsidation. He was t u r n e d d o w n , however. R E A L I Z A T I O N OF his d r e a m finally c a m e with what he calls a p r o v i d e n t i a l meeting with Mr. A n t d i f f . " The two met at a meeting of school a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and discovered their a g r e e m e n t on the n o n - g r a d e d school idea. Dr. C r a w f o r d would like to see this e d u c a t i o n a l b r e a k t h r o u g h become a " m i s s i o n a r y endeavor." If the p r o p o s a l w o r k s in S a u g a tuck he would a n t i c i p a t e " e x p a n d ing to other needy p a r t s of the country, possibly Appalachia." 1 his he feels could be accomplished by " t r a n s p l a n t i n g " the S a u g a tuck p r o p o s a l a n d s o m e teachers experienced in the S a u g a t u c k experiment into other school systems.

m

GREEK COMEDY—Sophistry (Bonnie Tompkins) attempts to seduce Pheidippides (Mike Vogas) as Strepsiades (Dave Crothers) watches in rehearsal for the student production of Aristophanes' "The Clouds."

Greek Comedy 'The Clouds' Will Open Next Thursday " T h e C l o u d s , " a satirical burlesque by A r i s t o p h a n e s , o p e n s a three night run at the Castle Park Amphitheater next Thursday night at 9. T h e p r o d u c t i o n is presented by the students of the college a n d all proceeds will be donated to the SCSC. IN T H E PLAY, A r i s t o p h a n e s w a g e s a w a r of w o r d s on the c o n t r a d i c t i o n s and c h a o s f o u n d in the e d u c a t i o n a l m e t h o d s of ancient (ireece. He d r a m a t i z e d the new m o r a l i t y a n d the i m m o r a l logict a u g h t by the y o u n g e r Greek generation.

Columnist Drew Pearson Spea ks Tuesday Mom ing

CAMPUS FAVORITE

DREW PEARSON

Drew P e a r s o n , n a t i o n a l l y syndicated c o l u m n i s t , will s p e a k to a n all-college a s s e m b l y in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel at I p.m. o n T u e s d a y , April 9. Mr. P e a r s o n ' s c o l u m n , " W a s h ington M e r r y - C o - R o u n d , " which he h a s written since 1932, a p p e a r s daily in the Detroit Free Press. Pearson attended S w a r t h m o r e College in P e n n s y l v a n i a , w o r k e d o v e r s e a s for the A m e r i c a n F r i e n d s Service Committee, a n d h a s reported i n t e r n a t i o n a l a f f a i r s since 1922. Mr. P e a r s o n is r e g a r d e d as a p r o b i n g r e p o r t e r for his e x p o s e s of c o r r u p t i o n a n d illegal lobbying in the n a t i o n ' s capital. He recently a c c u s e d Democratic Sena t o r T h o m a s Dodd of Connecticut of d i v e r t i n g c a m p a i g n f u n d s to p e r s o n a l use. The c h a r g e s resulted in an i n v e s t i g a t i o n by the Senate Fthics Committee.

BAY VIEW SUMMER COLLEGE Education

Deck Shoe

Recreation plus

by P.P. 1967 Session

June 26-August 18

BOOTERY For Catalog

Navy or White

17

Open Every Day 'Til 5:30 p.m. (Including Wed.) Mon. and Fri. T i l l 9 p.m.

and Information

Write:

Dr. Keith J. Fennimore, Dean Albion College

Albion, Michigan

The plot revolves a r o u n d the p h i l o s o p h i c a l e d u c a t i o n t a u g h t by S o k r a t e s in the " T h i n k e r y . " A Creek father a n d son a r e both exposed to this new e d u c a t i o n a n d the result is r a n k e d a m o n g the best satirical b u r l e s q u e s ever written. The p l a y uses a new t r a n s l a t i o n of A r i s t o p h a n e s ' o r i g i n a l by William A r r o w s m i t h of the I'niversity of Texas. He has, in the w o r d s of director Mike V o g a s , " p u t a s p a r k into ' T h e C l o u d s ' which c a n s p e a k to a m o d e r n a u d i e n c e . " D I R E C T E D a n d p r o d u c e d by s e n i o r speech m a j o r Mike V o g a s , the p l a y features F r a n k Hine in the role of Sokrates. Other m a j o r roles in the p r o d u c t i o n a r e filled by D a v e C r o t h e r s , B o n n i e T o m p kins, Diane P a r k e r , Jeff L a m b kin, T o m Woo a n d V o g a s .

Francis Hopper To Give Recital At Hope Church Dr. F r a n c i s H o p p e r , p r o f e s s o r of music at M a c M u r r a y College, .Jacksonville, III., will present a n o r g a n recital at H o p e Reformed C h u r c h on S u n d a y at 4 p.m. T h e recital is one of a series s p o n s o r ed by H o p e C h u r c h . Dr. H o p p e r is a n a t i v e of Muskegon and was graduated from the I ' n i v e r s i t y of Michigan. He received his m a s t e r ' s a n d doctorate degrees f r o m U n i o n T h e o l o g ical S e m i n a r y , New York City. Dr. H o p p e r was on the faculty of the University of Louisville for 12 y e a r s a n d was h a r p s i chordist for the Louisville Symp h o n y Orchestra.

Huge discounts with the International Student ID Card Air travel t h r o u g h o u t Europe, Israel a t 6 0 % less. S a m e h u g e s a v i n g s o n accommodations, admissions, etc. T h e ID C a r d is a m u s t f o r e v e r y traveling student.

The Official Student Guide to Europe Lists student hotels, restaurants, discounts, local tours, and complete r o u t e s , s c h e d u l e s , p r i c e s of s t u d e n t f l i g h t s , t r a i n s , e t c . An e s s e n t i a l c o m p a n i o n t o t h e ID C a r d . $ 1 . 9 5

Also 4-Day $31 Expo '67 Tour

AMBASSADOR Styl es In Accordance With The Tastes of Discriminating Young Men

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Includes 4 nights' accommodation, 4 breakfasts, 3 Expo passes, a French d i n n e r , and s i g h t s e e i n g t o u f of Montreal.

U.S. N a t i o n a l S t u d e n t A s s n . , D e p t . CP 2 6 5 M a d i s o n A v e . , N . Y . , N. Y. 1 0 0 1 6 P l e a s e s e n d i n f o o n ID C a r d • T h e Official Guide (payment enclosed) • D e t a i l s on E x p o ' 6 7 . • Name Address City

State.

USNSA is non-profit for studtnts.

I 1


Page t

Hope College aschor

M a y 5. 1967

1 a.m. on Weekends

SLC Revises Women's Hours T h e Student Life C o m m i t t e e , at last T u e s d a y ' s m e e t i n g , a p p r o v e d motions concerning women's h o u r s a n d a s a l a r y for the Student S e n a t e President. C a r o l Schakel r e p o r t e d that the AVVS h a d p a s s e d a m o t i o n at a m e e t i n g held earlier that evening a s k i n g that c l o s i n g h o u r s for all w o m e n be extended until 1 a . m . o n F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y nights. T h e r e w a s no d i s c u s s i o n of the m o t i o n a n d it w a s p a s s e d u n a n i m o u s l y . W e d n e s d a y the Admini s t r a t i v e Council a p p r o v e d the p l a n , effective this weekend. CRAIG H O L L E M A N , newly inaugurated Senate President,

b r o u g h t a m o t i o n f r o m the Senate r e c o m m e n d i n g that the Senate President b e p a i d a s a l a r y of $ 4 0 0 . Past S e n a t e President Gene P e a r s o n , w h o h a d s u b m i t t e d the m o t i o n to the Senate, noted that the Senate President does quite a bit of w o r k at his j o b d u r i n g the week. T h o s e in s i m i l a r p o s i t i o n s on o t h e r c a m p u s e s receive a sala r y , as d o certain student leaders at Hope. P e a r s o n o b s e r v e d that the Senate, under the direction of its President, o p e r a t e s m a n y college f u n c t i o n s , s u c h as H o m e c o m i n g . Also, b e c a u s e of his position, he d o e s n ' t h a v e e n o u g h time to hold

Haack Chosen to Head N.Y. Stock Exchange Robert W. H a a c k , H o p e College g r a d u a t e of the class of ' 3 8 a n d president of the N a t i o n a l Assn. of Securities Dealers, h a s

ROBERT W. HAACK

Initial Balloting For Hope Award Set for Monday T h e Senior C l a s s will hold initial b a l l o t i n g for the a w a r d to H o p e ' s O u t s t a n d i n g ProfessorK d u c a t o r on M o n d a y of next week in V a n Kaalte Hall, a c c o r d ing to s e n i o r c l a s s President Bob Donia. T h e H O P E A w a r d is b e i n g given for the third c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r by the S e n i o r C l a s s to o n e p r o f e s s o r w h o they believe represents those q u a l i t i e s which h a v e been m o s t valuable in H o p e p r o f e s s o r s . D o n i a e m p h a s i z e d that the a w a r d w a s m e a n t as a s y m b o l of the c l a s s ' s a p p r e c i a t i o n to the entire faculty, a n d that it w a s t h e r e f o r e m o r e t h a n just a n i n d i v i d u a l honor. B a l l o t i n g will t a k e place f r o m 8 : 3 0 a . m . to 4 p . m . M o n d a y in V a n R a a l t e l o b b y ; all s e n i o r s will be eligible to select five faculty m e m b e r s for the final b a l l o t i n g , which will t a k e p l a c e W e d n e s d a y .

been f o r m a l l y d e s i g n a t e d as the next president of the New York Stock K x c h a n g e . He expects to a s s u m e his new position s o m e time this fall. Mr. H a a c k , a n a t i v e of W a u w a t o s a . Wis., m a j o r e d in b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n at H o p e a n d received an M.A. B. f r o m H a r v a r d { niversity. After g r a d u a t i o n f r o m H a r v a r d , Mr. H a a c k joined the Wisc o n s i n Co., p r e d e c e s s o r of Robert W. Baird a n d Co., Milwaukee ipvestment firm. In 1950 he bec a m e a g e n e r a l p a r t n e r in the f i r m and a n allied m e m b e r of the N e w York Stock K x c h a n g e . Prior to a s s u m i n g the N A S D p r e s i d e n c y he served v a r i o u s l y as g o v e r n o r of the Midwest Stock K x c h a n g e , a director of the Midwest Stock K x c h a n g e Service C o r p . a n d vice c h a i r m a n of the NASD. While at H o p e Mr. H a a c k w a s vice president a n d president of the K n i c k e r b o c k e r f r a t e r n i t y a n d president of his s e n i o r class. He w a s a m e m b e r of Blue Key, Pi K a p p a Delta, a n d s e r v e d on the staff of the a n c h o r . As a n a l u m n u s , Mr. H a a c k w a s active as o n e of the c o - c h a i r m e n of the Wisconsin d i v i s i o n of the " L o o k ing A h e a d With H o p e " c a m p a i g n in 1956. While at H o p e College, interestingly e n o u g h , the s e n i o r class prophecy d u b b e d him " J o h n J a c o b A s t o r . " Investment m e n w h o k n o w him h a v e a l s o sized him up as the right m a n to d e a l with the i n d u s t r y ' s p r o b l e m s a n d cite him chiefly for his b r o a d experience in the b u s i n e s s , a c c o r d ing to a New York p r e s s report.

the p o s i t i o n of resident a d v i s o r or any other employment. Committee secretary Frank S h e r b u r n e asked whether this w a s b e i n g used as a wedge to eventually o b t a i n s a l a r i e s for a s yet u n p a i d student leaders. P e a r s o n replied that this w a s not its intent, a n d that a n y f u t u r e requests of this n a t u r e s h o u l d b e j u d g e d o n their o w n merit. C H A I R M A N Dr. A r t h u r Jentz a s k e d if there m i g h t be a n o t h e r m e a n s of c o m p e n s a t i n g the President, such as a free r o o m , which m i g h t be offered instead of a c a s h s a l a r y . Mr. S h e r b u r n e noted that p r o b l e m s might a r i s e if a President were elected w h o lived in town. It w a s a l s o noted that resident a d v i s o r s , w h o s e s a l a r y is e q u a l to the cost of b o a r d , a r e p a i d in c a s h a n d c a n s p e n d it in a n y w a y they choose.

John Cage Presents Avant-Garde Recital J o h n C a g e , a well k n o w n a n d widely publicized avant-garde c o m p o s e r , will present a lectured e m o n s t r a t i o n of his music in Dimnent M e m o r i a l C h a p e l on next T h u r s d a y at 8 : 1 5 p . m . He will be j o i n e d b y D a v i d T u d o r , a longtime a s s o c i a t e a n d fellow w o r k e r in the field of c o n t e m p o r a r y music. C a g e is a pioneer in " c h a n c e " c o m p o s i t i o n in which all m a n ners of v a r i a b l e s a r e used to control the sequence of notes in composition. He h a s m a d e use of m a n y m e c h a n i c a l devices a n d disguises the tones of existing instruments. H E B E L I E V E S that the silence between notes is as i m p o r t a n t as the notes themselves a n d that we a r e too interested in the melodic line. He believes in the i n d i v i d u a l s o u n d whether it be the s q u e a l of

Over One-Third of Faculty Earned Hope A.B. Degrees ( C o n t i n u e d f r o m p a g e 1) tended to view the H o p e g r a d u ates o n the faculty as a m o n g the most vital a n d respected faculty m e m b e r s . Alvin V a n d e r b u s h a n d Dr. A. J a m e s Prins, the first two recipients of the H O P E a w a r d , a r e b o t h a l u m n i of the College. Dr. R i c h a r d B r o c k m e i e r , a 1 9 5 9 g r a d u a t e , spent six y e a r s at Cali f o r n i a Institute of T e c h n o l o g y a n d then returned to the College. He s a i d that b e i n g a H o p e g r a d u a t e " d o e s n ' t i m p e d e m y ability to c o n t r i b u t e to H o p e a n d m i g h t even m a k e that c o n t r i b u t i o n m o r e valuable." A l t h o u g h the g e n e r a l o p i n i o n a m o n g the College staff w a s that i n b r e e d i n g was not a n e g a t i v e f a c t o r , s o m e s t u d e n t s expressed wishes t h a t there w a s m o r e diversity a m o n g the faculty members. S e n i o r F r a n k B a r r o n s a i d that a n atheist on the faculty w o u l d stir the m o s t c o n s t r u c t i v e religious discussions in years. Other s t u d e n t s wished they could h e a r the p o i n t of view of a c o m m u n i s t a n d felt that it w o u l d be g o o d to h a v e s o m e n e g r o p r o f e s s o r s on the faculty. CHAPLAIN William Hille g o n d s s a i d that it w o u l d be interesting to h a v e a C a t h o l i c priest a n d a Jew in the Bible d e p a r t m e n t in o r d e r to stimulate discussion. In brief, students, faculty a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a g r e e d t h a t the

H o p e g r a d u a t e s were very positive, dedicated assets to the college c o m m u n i t y but s o m e expressed a desire for m o r e differentiation in faculty m a k e u p . T h e difficulty of o b t a i n i n g a n ideal differentiation w a s e m p h a s i z e d b y the Dean.

a tire o r the a m p l i f i e d s o u n d of s o m e o n e d r i n k i n g a g l a s s of water. A c c o r d i n g to m u s i c critics he h a s extended a m u s i c a l revolution a n d served a s an irritant a n d s t i m u l u s for m o s t of t o d a y ' s respected a n d active c o m p o s e r s . CAGE R E C E I V E D his early t r a i n i n g with A r n o l d Schoenberg a n d received his first public notice for his c o m p o s i t i o n " I m a g i n a r y L a n d s c a p e s " which he h a s s c o r e d for 12 r a d i o s a n d for his " F o u r Minutes a n d Thirty-three S e c o n d s " for p i a n o s o l o in which the pianist sits m o t i o n l e s s without p l a y i n g a note at the p i a n o while the a u d i e n c e p r o v i d e s accompaniment with coughs, sneezes, a n d other noises.

Correction The anchor w o u l d like to correct incorrect i n f o r m a t i o n printed last week in r e g a r d to the new e a t i n g p l a n s a v a i l a b l e on c a m p u s next y e a r . The meal b o o k s , which are worth $ 1 5 to be used in lieu of c a s h when b u y i n g a meal at Slater, will be a v a i l a b l e only to c o m m u t i n g s t u d e n t s , according to Dean of Men Robert De Y o u n g . T h e cost will be $ 13.50. The system of b u y i n g meals M o n d a y t h r o u g h F r i d a y for $ 1 8 0 per semester is a v a i l a b l e to j u n i o r s a n d s e n i o r s only.

First Choice Of T h e Engageables

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S U N D A Y , MAY 7 IN T H E S T U D E N T C H U R C H DR. JOHN SUTHERLAND BONNELL, PREACHING. Dr. Bonnell for many years was the preaching minister of the Fifth Avenue Presybterian Church, New York City. Sermon: "What are you living for?" The Men's Chorus under the direction of Dr. Robert Cavanaugh will sing. Chaplain Hillegonds will be the worship leader.

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Page 4

Hope College anchor

May 5, 19$?

anchor editorial

On the Chapel Plan W A E U R G E the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d t h e B o a r d of T r u s t e e s to a p p r o v e the c h a n g e in chapel policy p r o p o s e d by the R e l i g i o u s Life C o m m i t t e e . T h e R L C has s p e n t the past six m o n t h s in discussion a n d serious c o n s i d e r a t i o n of various alternatives. T h e f i n a l p r o d u c t has been t h o r o u g h l y e v a l u a t e d a n d was arrived at by reconciling widely d i v e r g e n t views of c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s ; it was finally a d o p t e d by u n a n i m o u s acclaim. T h e R L C p l a n offers the s t u d e n t an o p t i o n b e t w e e n r e q u i r e d chapel twice a week a n d r e q u i r e d a t t e n d a n c e at n i n e religious lectures per semester. T h i s s h o u l d satisfy b o t h those w h o feel that the c h a p e l r e q u i r e m e n t serves a s u p p o r t i v e f u n c t i o n in their daily life and those who, for various reasons, find the idea of c o m p u l s o r y w o r s h i p objectionable. It has o f t e n been suggested t h a t the latter g r o u p should leave the College if they f i n d t h e present r e q u i r e m e n t unacceptable. T h i s a r g u m e n t is indeed shallow. It shows disregard for t h e welfare of H o p e College, which w o u l d be losing some of its finest a n d most conscientious s t u d e n t s , a n d u n d e r e s t i m a t e s the viability a n d power of the C h r i s t i a n faith. It suggests t h a t c o m m i t m e n t to Christ d e p e n d s u p o n c o m p u l s i o n alone, that n o valid response t o G o d is possible unless o n e is also willing to acquisce to a p r o g r a m of c o m p e l l e d worship. In c o n t r a s t the R L C proposal recognizes t h a t those s t u d e n t s w h o have q u e s t i o n e d t h e present policy have d o n e so in good faith a n d , in general, with an eye to i m p r o v i n g , not damaging, the welfare of t h e College. It assures t h e m t h a t l b e College stands firmly by its religious c o m m i t m e n t a n d yet is a n x i o u s to seek new a n d b e t t e r ways of fulfilling t h a t c o m m i t m e n t .

U T T H E M O S T o u t s t a n d i n g asset of the plan is t h a t it in n o way c o m p r o m i s e s the religious c o m m i t m e n t of H o p e College: in fact, it clears t h e wafli^for a m o r e p r o f o u n d a n d •intellectually honest c o m m i t m e n t to the C h r i s t i a n faith on the p a r t of Hope students. T h e proposal m a k e s a very i m p o r t ant d i s t i n c t i o n between the educative and w o r s h i p aspects of o u r present chapel p r o g r a m . It recognizes t h a t n o i n d i v i d u a l can be c o m p e l l e d to wor-

ship against his will, since w o r s h i p is by n a t u r e a v o l u n t a r y response to G o d .

T T H E S A M E T I M E the policy recognizes that t h e r e is a valid way to b r i n g H o p e s t u d e n t s "eyeball to eyeball with Jesus C h r i s t . " T h e key to this exposure, t h e p r e s e n t a t i o n of carefully p r e p a r e d lectures in an assembly f o r m a t , provides for a d e e p e r a n d more extensive c o n s i d e r a t i o n of the m e a n i n g of C h r i s t i a n f a i t h . It offers the c a m p u s a p r o g r a m of high q u a l i t y speakers w h o will speak t o t h e ' m a n y religious a n d m o r a l q u e s t i o n s which the C h r i s t i a n college must by its n a t u r e confront. 'It doesn't l o o k like the b o y s are in real g o o d s h a p e for May D a y . '

It is t r u e t h a t there is a substantive difference between a lecture a n d a worship service. But o n e s h o u l d not assume t h a t , because C h r i s t i a n faith may be expressed in a w o r s h i p service, it c a n n o t be f u r t h e r e d in a lecture situ a t i o n . T h e "response t o G o d " takes m a n y forms, b o t h in a private a n d highly personal act of c o m m i t m e n t in w o r s h i p a n d in t h e p u r s u i t of a r e l e v a n t and meaningful intellectual framework in which one's f a i t h may be expressed.

P

U R E W O R S H I P is essential for the C h r i s t i a n f a i t h ; this is the f u n c t i o n of daily chapel a n d particularly of the S t u d e n t C h u r c h in its many activities, especially Sunday servires. But the second task— the c r e a t i o n of a p r o p e r a c a d e m i c f r a m e w o r k in which faith a t t a i n s wide-ranging relevance—is peculiarly the f u n c t i o n of the C h r i s t i a n college. T h e lecture series will m e a n a new a n d h e r e t o f o r e neglected effort to f u r t h e r such a climate. T h i s does not d e t r a c t f r o m the chapel p r o g r a m ; indeed it reinforces it a n d c o m p l e m e n t s the w o r s h i p services in c a m p u s life. W i t h r e n e w e d emphasis on such endeavors, H o p e has good reason to look f o r w a r d with optimism to the f u t u r e . For t h e n we m a y set the pace as an i n s t i t u t i o n which has kept a s t r o n g religious t r a d i t i o n witho u t resorting to p r e s e r v a t i o n of outm o d e d c o m p u l s o r y forms. T h i s p r o p o s e d R L C policy represents a rare o p p o r t u n i t y to affirm the lie between H o p e College a n d t h e Ref o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a . It will e l i m i n a t e m u c h unr e st on the c a m p u s a n d serve to s t i m u l a t e interest in religion at H o p e College. By a d o p t i n g this proposal the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d B o a r d of T r u s t e e s will affirm t h e m u t u a l support which the college a n d the c h u r c h can give to one a n o t h e r .

Coming Events

Art Buchwald

No More Faith, Baby M r s . A d a m C l a y t o n Powell, wife of the f r e q u e n t l y elected c o n g r e s s m a n , h a s j u s t w r i t t e n in the L a d i e s H o m e . J o u r n a l t h a t h e r h u s b a n d told her he w a s n o t a X e g r o . T h i s news h a s s h a t t e r e d the p r e j u d i c e s of e v e r y o n e in this c o u n t r y , b o t h w h i t e a n d b l a c k , a n d n o o n e k n o w s if we'll b e a b l e to r e c o v e r f r o m it. T H E F I R S T c o n g r e s s m a n 1 s p o k e to s a i d , " I t d o e s n ' t c h a n g e m y p o s i t i o n at all. If there's a n y t h i n g I h a t e it's a n u p p i t y white m a n . " A n o t h e r c o n g r e s s m a n s a i d : " W e d i d not kick Powell o u t of C o n g r e s s b e c a u s e of his c o l o r . Why, s o m e of m y best f r i e n d s a r e white folk. 1 u s e d to p l a y with white child r e n w h e n 1 w a s a b o y . 1 g r e w u p with white p e o p l e , w h i t e p e o p l e w o r k f o r me, a n d e v e n t o d a y I c h e r i s h m y white f r i e n d s h i p s . Hut A d a m C l a y t o n Powell is a d i s g r a c e to the white r a c e a n d h e ' s set the C a u c a s i a n c a u s e b a c k in this c o u n t r y b y 100 y e a r s . " A third c o n g r e s s m a n the news. " T h i s p u t s a s h a d e o n the i s s u e , " he n o w h a v e to l o o k at this

was shocked by w h o l e different said. "We m a y in a new l i g h t . "

W E L L , H E really d i d n ' t d o a n y t h i n g w r o n g , did h e ? I m e a n , he m i g h t n o t h a v e kept a c c u r a t e b o o k s , a n d he c o u l d h a v e been l o o s e with his e x p e n s e s . But m a n y of u s w o u l d h a v e d o n e the s a m e t h i n g if we h a d been in his p o s i t i o n . Y o u g i v e a white m a n all t h a t p o w e r a n d h e ' s b o u n d to r u n a w a y with himself. I t h i n k h e s h o u l d at l e a s t be g i v e n a n o t h e r c h a n c e . " A Southern c o n g r e s s m a n was so m a d w h e n I b r o k e t h e news t h a t h e c o u l d h a r d l y talk. " If t h e r e ' s a n y t h i n g w o r s e t h a n a b l a c k m a n p a s s i n g a s o n e of us, it's a white m a n p a s s i n g a s o n e of them. H o w c a n we j u d g e p e o p l e f a i r l y if we d o n ' t k n o w w h a t r a c e they b e l o n g t o ?

1 think we s h o u l d find

o u t h o w m a n y m o r e white p e o p l e a r e pretending they're black so they can reap the b e n e f i t s of the G r e a t S o c i e t y . " A L I B E R A L c o n g r e s s m a n s a i d : "11 we d o n ' t seat A d a m C l a y t o n Powell this lime, the white p e o p l e all o v e r A m e r i c a a r e g o i n g to rise u p in a n g e r a n d t a k e o u t their f r u s t r a t i o n s o n this C o n g r e s s . A d a m C l a y t o n Powell m a y n o t h a v e b e e n p u n i s h ed b e c a u s e h e is white, b u t the i m p o r t a n t t h i n g is t h a t the w h i t e p e o p l e t h i n k he w a s , a n d he h a s n o w b e c o m e a r a l l y i n g c a u s e for 'white power.' " T h e n y o u predict a l o n g hot s u m m e r with white riots in the s t r e e t s ? " "It could c o m e to that. T h e white people are getting tired of having everyone p r o m i s e t h e m t h i n g s a n d u o o n e deliveri n g t h e m . T h e y see in A d a m C l a y t o n Powell not a w r o n g d o e r , but s o m e o n e w h o is b e i n g p u n i s h e d o n l y b e c a u s e h e ' s Caucasian." S E V E R A L N E G R O l e a d e r s were a l s o u p s e t b y the r e v e l a t i o n t h a t Powell told his wife he w a s white. O n e s a i d : " I ' v e g o t n o t h i n g a g a i n s t A d a m C l a y t o n Powell p e r s o n a l l y , but 1 t h i n k he s h o u l d b e p u n i s h e d a s a n e x a m p l e to o t h e r m e m b e r s of C o n g r e s s w h o t h i n k t h e y c a n get a w a y with a n y t h i n g j u s t b e c a u s e w e ' v e m i s t r e a t ed the white p e o p l e all these y e a r s . " A m i l i t a n t N e g r o s a i d , "Well, t h e r e g o e s the f a i t h , b a b y . T h e o n l y t h i n g t h a t c a n s a v e u s n o w is it Sen. D o d d t u r n s o u t to be o n e of u s . " 1 he last N e g r o 1 s p o k e to j u s t s h o o k his h e a d a n d s a i d , " A n d to t h i n k Powell w a n t e d to m a r r y m y s i s t e r . " C o p y r i g h t ( c ) 1 9 6 7 , T h e W a s h i n g t o n Post C o. D i s t r i b u t e d b y L o s A n g e l e s T i m e s Syndicate.

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May 5, 1967

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Page i

Faculty Focus

Languages: Systems of Arbitrary Symbols Dr. William E. Welmers is Professor of African L a n g u a g e s at the U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a , L o s Angeles, currently on s a b b a t i c a l l e a v e a n d c o n t r i b u t i n g his services to H o p e C o l l e g e by w a y of t e a c h i n g a c o u r s e in Introductory Linguistics. He received his A . B . d e g r e e f r o m H o p e in 1 9 3 6 ; the T h . B . a n d Th.M. degrees f r o m Westminster T h e o l o gical S e m i n a r y in 1 9 3 9 ; a n d the Ph.D. d e g r e e from the University of P e n n s y l v a n i a in 1 9 4 3 . By Dr. William E. Welmers Some linguists are semanticists. 1 a m a l i n g u i s t . It d o e s n o t follow t h a t 1 a m a s e m a n t i c i s t , a n d 1 d o not p r e t e n d to be o n e . 1 only k n o w that " s e m a n t i c s " h a s to d o with s y m b o l s a n d their m e a n i n g s , o r the r e a c t i o n s t h e y elicit. S o m e s y m b o l s a r e l i n g u i s tic s y m b o l s - w o r d s , p r e f i x e s , suffixes, intonations, and other types. As a l i n g u i s t , 1 believe 1 c a n

Reviewed

p o i n t o u t s o m e w i d e s p r e a d misc o n c e p t i o n s a b o u t s e m a n t i c s at a n e l e m e n t a r y level. Justice c a n h a r d l y b e d o n e to the p r o f u n d i ties of p h i l o s o p h i c a l s e m a n t i c s unless such misconceptions a r e overcome. SYMBOLS ARE arbitrary. T h e r e is n o u n i v e r s a l l y v a l i d reason why a bright-colored octagon s h o u l d m e a n " S T O P . " In the upp e r N i l e v a l l e y , s p i t t i n g o n a pers o n ' s h e a d is a s y m b o l of b l e s s i n g . No w o r d , as a s y m b o l , is i n h e r e n t l y either g o o d o r b a d ; two English " u n m e n t i o n a b l e s " would p a s s f o r the n u m e r a l s ' t h r e e ' a n d ' e i g h t ' in B u r m e s e . A n d a ' r o s e ' b y a n y other n a m e w o u l d smell as sweet. We t e n d , h o w e v e r , to a t t r i b u t e u n i v e r s a l v a l i d i t y to a few s y m b o l s a n d c a t e g o r i e s which a r e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of o u r o w n lang u a g e ( o r p e r h a p s of L a t i n ) , witho u t r e c o g n i z i n g that t h e y , too, a r e p a r t of the s y s t e m of a r b i t r a r y s y m b o l s that constitutes just one particular language.

by Dykstrn,

O U R ERROR is r e i n f o r c e d b y the fact t h a t we find s i m i l a r s y m b o l s a n d c a t e g o r i e s in the f o r e i g n l a n g u a g e s we m o s t c o m m o n l y stud y -- all of w h i c h a r e , after all, f a i r l y closely r e l a t e d to o u r o w n . In English -- a n d in S p a n i s h , F r e n c h , Dutch, G e r m a n , a n d Russ i a n -- a " y e s - o r - n o " q u e s t i o n is typically m a r k e d by an intonation w h i c h includes a r i s i n g pitch t o w a r d the end. It c o m e s a s a j o l t i n g s u r p r i s e to m o s t s t u d e n t s t h a t " r a i s i n g the v o i c e " to a s k a q u e s t i o n is n o t a u n i v e r s a l hum a n characteristic. In m a n y l a n g u a g e s , q u e s t i o n s m u s t end with a low pitch, like E n g l i s h s t a t e m e n t s ; in even m o r e languages, questions are marked b y a d d i n g a p a r t i c l e , a n d n o int o n a t i o n of a n y k i n d is i n v o l v e d . S T U D E N T S readily recognize t h a t a new l a n g u a g e m e a n s new words, but many obviously a s s u m e t h a t the w h o l e c o m p l e x i n t o n a t i o n a l s y s t e m of E n g l i s h s i m p l y m u s t be v a l i d f o r all o t h e r l a n g u a g e s . It is n o t ; like e v e r y -

Niebuhr

Essays by Muste Published Editor's note: "Selected Ess a y s " by A..I. Muste, p u b l i s h e d in March by Bobbs-Merrill, w a s recently reviewed in the New York T i m e s B o o k Review by Dr. Reinhold N i e b u h r , p r o f e s s o r emeritus at U n i o n T h e o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y , and by Dr. I). I v a n D y k s t r a in H o p e C o l l e g e ' s Alumni M a g a z i n e . E x c e r p t s f r o m both reviews are g i v e n b e l o w to highlight two q u o t e s f r o m Rev. Muste's " E s s a y s . " A l s o included are excerpts from "A Tribute to A.J. Muste" which a p p e a r e d in S a t u r d a y Review on April 8. It w a s written by Nat Hentoff w h o a l s o edited the "Essays." Mr. Hentoff w a s Muste's c o n s t a n t c o m p a n i o n for s e v e r a l y e a r s prior to the latter's death in F e b r u a r y . " W e c a n n o t h a v e p e a c e if we a r e c o n c e r n e d o n l y with p e a c e . W a r is n o t a n a c c i d e n t . It is the l o g i c a l o u t c o m e of a c e r t a i n w a y of life. If we w a n t to a t t a c k w a r , we h a v e to a t t a c k t h a t w a y of life."—A.J. Muste "HOWEVER M U S T E got that w a y , his s o c i a l a n a l y s i s is s i m p l y

Readers

Speak

m o t i v a t e d . F o r o n e t h i n g he sees e v e r y t h i n g in t e r m s of w h a t it d o e s to people. But a l s o , he is p e r c e p t i v e in his u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the d y n a m i c s of society, a n d sees t h a t these a r e t a i n t e d with forever p o w e r f u l i m p u l s e s to p o w e r a n d o p p r e s s i o n . So his is the h a r d s e a r c h f o r a n a l t e r n a t i v e t h a t will not b e s o t a i n t e d . " — D r . 1). I v a n Dykstra. " T h e r e w a s n o o n e else s o o p e n and expert in k e e p i n g o p e n b r i d g e s of c o m m u n i c a t i o n , in enc o u r a g i n g a n d a d v i s i n g o n all m a n n e r of i d e a s a n d p r o j e c t s . T h e r e w a s n o o n e else w h o , o n the o n e h a n d , w a s s o incisively a n a l y t i c a l a b o u t w h a t he used to term ' t h e o b j e c t i v e s i t u a t i o n , ' a n d yet o n the o t h e r h a n d s o resiliently c o m m i t t e d to p o s s i b i l i t y . N a t Hentoff. " M u s t e w a s interested in r e d r e s s i n g all b a l a n c e s of justice, of c h a m p i o n i n g the interests of w o r k ers a g a i n s t e m p l o y e r s , of N e g r o e s a g a i n s t the white m a j o r i t y , of Ind i a a g a i n s t the British E m p i r e . " — Keinhold Niebuhr.

Out

Dear Editor. After r e a d i n g the article in l a s t w e e k ' s a n c h o r c o n c e r n i n g the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s d e c i s i o n to h a v e all f r e s h m e n live in the c o t t a g e s this c o m i n g fall, I w a s f o r c e d to recall s o m e m e m o r i e s w h i c h m i g h t c a s t a d i m light o n this p r o p o s a l . C l a s s u n i t y is i m p o r t a n t , b u t a s o n e of the 10 r e m a i n i n g m e m b e r s of the o r i g i n a l Z w e m e r H a l l Zipp e r s I c a n o n l y see i m p e n d i n g d i s a s t e r f o r a g o o d n u m b e r of next y e a r ' s f r e s h m e n . Three years a g o approximately 5 0 f r e s h m e n were p l a c e d in Z w e m e r Hall with f o u r R . A . ' s a n d a few u p p e r c l a s s m e n . Out of these 5 0 m e n there w e r e s o m e g r e a t l e a d e r s in c l a s s s p i r i t a n d

i

the first s e m e s t e r Z w e m e r Hall w o n r e c o g n i t i o n o n l y f o r the fact t h a t it h a d the lowest g r a d e p o i n t a v e r a g e on c a m p u s . By the e n d of the y e a r Z w e m e r h a d b e c o m e notorious for m a n y things besides a low g r a d e p o i n t . It m a y not seem right to b l a m e all these t h i n g s o n the fact t h a t it w a s an all f r e s h m a n d o r m . Hut a s o n e of its m e m b e r s I feel t h e r e is a s t r o n g f a c t o r of inf l u e n c e which m a k e s the 8 0 p e r cent d r o p o u t r a t e s i g n i f i c a n t . I p r o p o s e t h a t the A d m i n i s t r a tion s h o u l d r e c o n s i d e r this p r o p o s a l b e f o r e it is p u t into effect. It j u s t m i g h t s o l v e a lot of p r o b l e m s b e f o r e they b e g i n . D a v i d R. V o g e l

"THE O N L Y T R U E G o d is n o t the God of i m p e r s o n a l hist o r i c a l o r e c o n o m i c f o r c e s which ' a u t o m a t i c a l l y ' . . . r e d e e m society . . . . T h e true G o d is the G o d of love who can a n d does redeem m e n . This ( i o d is r e v e a l e d in J e s u s Christ. T h e t r u e c h u r c h is the 'ecclesia' of t h o s e r e d e e m e d b y infinite love. It m u s t seek to r e d e e m the w o r l d a n d m u s t assert t h a t it is the c h a n n e l of the g r a c e of God w i t h o u t which t h e r e is n o s a l v a t i o n , a n d t h a t to it a r e e n t r u s t e d 'the keys of the K i n g d o m of H e a v e n . ' But it c a n r i g h t f u l l y d o this o n l y in the deg r e e that it e x e r c i s e s n o v i o l e n c e e x c e p t that of a l o v e which will n o t be g a i n s a i d a n d which is e v e r r e a d y to die f o r s i n n e r s , a n d it is itself a t r u e c o m m u n i t y of l o v e . " — A . J . Muste. " P e r h a p s a n e s t i m a t e of r i g o r o u s , if i n c o n s i s t e n t , idealists is b e y o n d the c a p a c i t y of m e r e a c a d e m i c critics, w h o a r e o b s e s s e d with logical consistency, but who a l s o n e v e r d a r e d a n interview with H o Chi Minh."—Reinhold N i e b u h r . "A.J. C H A N G E D the v e r y n a t u r e of p a c i f i s m in the U n i t e d S t a t e s , a n d he i n v o l v e d m a n y , like myself, w h o a r e not a b s o lute p a c i f i s t s a n d w h o h a v e n o ( i o d . . . .1 r e m e m b e r the a m u s e m e n t s o often in his eyes. L i v i n g it s o fully, he e n j o y e d life e n o r m o u s l y . He w a s s o utterly free a m a n . And t h a t p e r h a p s is w h y m a n y y o u n g p e o p l e c o n t i n u e d to listen to him in these y e a r s of the w i d e n i n g g e n e r a t i o n a l c h a s m . He w a s s o utterly f r e e a m a n . He s h o w e d them it w a s p o s s i b l e to r e m a i n free, to r e m a i n r e a l . " — N a t Hentoff. " He s p o k e a n d t h o u g h t a n d acted out of the deepest a n d m o s t s p o n t a n e o u s c o m m i t m e n t s of his o w n life. T h e s e a r e h a r d l y the c o m m i t m e n t s of his social a n d rel i g i o u s t r a d i t i o n s . But c h u r c h bells w h i c h , f o r m o s t of that t r a d i t i o n , c o u l d r i n g as a u t h e n t i c a l l y f o r w a r a s f o r peace, h a v e a w a y of b e i n g simplified f o r Muste into b e i n g n o t h i n g m o r e t h a n the m e s s e n g e r s of p e a c e . " — D r . 1). I v a n D y k s t r a .

K

i W I L L I A M E. W E L M E R S t h i n g else in l a n g u a g e , it is a set ol c o m p l e t e l v a r b i t r a r y s y m b o l s . in fact, t h e r e is s o m e evidence that the v e r y d i s t i n c t i o n between s t a t e m e n t a n d q u e s t i o n is not univ e r s a l ; in s o m e l a n g u a g e s , the u s u a l w a y of o b t a i n i n g i n f o r m a tion s e e m s to be b y m a k i n g a hypothetical s t a t e m e n t , like " I s u p p o s e he's g o i n g . " A n o t h e r of o u r s a c r e d cows is the d i s t i n c t i o n between s i n g u l a r a n d p l u r a l . It s i m p l y s e e m s unr e a s o n a b l e to us t h a t s o m e languages make no provision-- apart f r o m the use of n u m e r a l s o r w o r d s like " m a n y " — f o r s p e c i f y i n g t h a t you own o n e cow o r m o r e t h a n one. B U T WHY S H O U L D the precise d i s t i n c t i o n between a s i n g l e cow a n d a p l u r a l i t y of cows be s i g n i f i c a n t ? In s o m e l a n g u a g e s , it is e n o u g h to s a y t h a t you a r e

Dr. Mohrig Analyzes Life In Test Tube, Its Implications Editor's note: T h e f o l l o w i n g is the c o n c l u s i o n to Dr. Jerry Mohrig's Faculty F o c u s which w a s inadvertently omitted from the text of his article which appeared last week. The a n c h o r a p o l o g i z e s for its mistake. By Dr. Jerry M o h r i g D o e s the c h e m i c a l c o m p o s i t i o n of s o m e t h i n g tell u s w h a t it is? C e r t a i n l y we a r e m o r e t h a n collections of c e l l u l a r c o m p o n e n t s . T h e o r g a n i z a t i o n of the c o m p o n ents is c r u c i a l to life. In o t h e r w o r d s , the w h o l e i n f l u e n c e s t h e parts and becomes larger t h a n the s u m of the p a r t s . A k n o w l e d g e of the c o m p o s i t i o n of a n o r g a n ism p r o v i d e s a p a r t i c u l a r type of e x t r e m e l y useful i n f o r m a t i o n in t e r m s of a restricted set of c o n cepts. It d o e s not m e a n that w e will be e x p l a i n i n g l o v e a n d g o o d n e s s in t e r m s of bioelectric circuits. R E C O G N I Z I N G T H E LIMIT A T I O N S of o u r k n o w l e d g e , we s h o u l d n e v e r t h e l e s s realize t h a t the a m a z i n g successes of molecu l a r b i o l o g y in u n d e r s t a n d i n g t h e b i o s y n t h e s i s of nucleic acids a n d p r o t e i n s o f f e r s the f u t u r e of medicine t r e m e n d o u s opportunities for i m p r o v i n g the h e a l t h a n d w e l f a r e of m a n . A l r e a d y we h a v e m a d e the d e c i s i o n to use m e d i c a l k n o w l e d g e to i n c r e a s e the s p a n of hum a n life a s m u c h a s p o s s i b l e . Children w h o would not have surv i v e d a few y e a r s a g o , a r e a b l e

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a cow-owner. The s a m e l a n g u a g e s m a y , in fact, d i f f e r e n t i a t e between such " n u m e r i c a l n e u t r a l i t y " a n d " s e l e c t i v e p l u r a l i t y " ; it m a y be q u i t e p o s s i b l e to s a y " T h e s e c o w s ( n o t a h e r d , but c o w s A, B, 1), and G from a larger g r o u p ) are mine." A l a n g u a g e that lacks a singul a r - p l u r a l d i s t i n c t i o n like t h a t of E n g l i s h is in n o w a y " i m p o v e r i s h e d " ; it m a y well h a v e s i m p l e devices l o r m a r k i n g o t h e r semanticd i s t i n c t i o n s t h a t we r a r e l y think of, o r t h a t we e x p r e s s b y a w k w a r d circumlocutions. Singularity and p l u r a l i t y a r e a l s o a r b i t r a r y elem e n t s in (Mir - but not e v e r y l a n g u a g e structure. T H E " H A N D " m a y be, in s o m e l a n g u a g e s , only an undifferentiated p a r t of the u p p e r or f r o n t l i m b a n d the s a m e w o r d m a y be used for a n a n i m a l ' s f r o n t leg a n d a bird's wing. We s p e a k of a " h e a r t " that is b r o k e n , p u r e , o r o v e r f l o w i n g with love; b u t to a s p e a k e r of s o m e o t h e r l a n g u a g e it m a y be the "live r " t h a t is fallen, white, o r o u t - g o ing; the H e b r e w p s a l m i s t a s k s G o d to check o n his k i d n e y s ( " r e i n s " ) . At the p r e s e n t state of o u r k n o w ledge, it is p r o b a b l y s a f e to s a y that n o t h i n g in the r e a l m of linguistic s e m a n t i c s -- either in v o c a b u l a r y o r in g r a m m a t i c a l categ o r i e s - is d e m o n s t r a b l y u n i v e r sal. S p e a k e r s of different lang u a g e s react to r e m a r k a b l y different sets of t o t a l l y a r b i t r a r y symbols. A N A P P R E C I A T I O N of their enormous variety provides a b a c k g r o u n d for our investigation of the w i d e r field of g e n e r a l sem antics.

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n o w to lead full p r o d u c t i v e lives, w h i c h often result in the t r a n s f e r of defective g e n e s to a new generation. N o w t h a t we a r e b e g i n n i n g to u n d e r s t a n d m o l e c u l a r genetics, a n o b v i o u s step s e e m s to be a n att e m p t to d e c r e a s e the p r e v a l e n c e of u n d e s i r a b l e g e n e s ; to a t t e m p t to t u r n t h e m off. T h e t r a n s f e r of i s o l a t e d D N A f r o m o n e cell to a n o t h e r in m i c r o - o r g a n i s m s h a s been s u c c e s s f u l . It is n o w b e i n g tried with m a m m a l i a n s y s t e m s . Genetic e n g i n e e r i n g w o u l d a t t e m p t to a l t e r selectively the e x i s t i n g g e n e s of a n i n d i v i d u a l m u t a t i o n or r e p l a c e m e n t b y d o n o r genes, either f r o m a n o t h e r i n d i v i d u a l o r o b t a i n e d b y s y n t h e s i s . T h e genetic b a s e s f o r m a n y c r i p p l i n g illnesses s u c h a s p h e n y l k e t o n u r i a , sickle cell a n e m i a , a n d g a l a c t o s e m i a h a v e been identified. T h e introd u c t i o n of new genetic m a t e r i a l into the defective cells of p a r t i c u l a r o r g a n s c o u l d lead to c u r e s f o r these d i s o r d e r s . TAMPERING WITH LIFEwill r e q u i r e a n exercise of r e s p o n s i bility f a r g r e a t e r t h a n we now h a v e with the c o n t r o l of a t o m i c e n e r g y . We m u s t be v e r y c a r e f u l not to e x a g g e r a t e o u r p o w e r to c o n t r o l the t r e m e n d o u s forces t h a t m a y b e set l o o s e . It is the r e s p o n s i bility ol us all to be i n f o r m e d a n d to c o n s i d e r the a l t e r n a t i v e s a m o n g a n d the i m p l i c a t i o n s of o u r newf o u n d p o w e r s to c h a n g e a n d h o p e fully i m p r o v e o u r s e l v e s .

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May S, 1967

Hope College anchor

The Fifth Column

That Certain Something By G o r d y KorstanKc " D e a r P r o s p e c t i v e Hope-ite: " S o y o u a r e c o m i n g to H o p e College! As a H o p e s e n i o r , let m e s a y that y o u h a v e m a d e a wise choice. You'll l o v e H o p e College! it h a s a ' c e r t a i n s o m e t h i n g ' a b o u t it that c a p t i v a t e s the h e a r t s of all its a s s o c i a t e s — b o t h students a n d f a c u l t y . " My sister received this letter recently a n d p a s s e d it o n to m e with the c o m m e n t , " 1 t h o u g h t y o u ' d find this a m u s i n g . " A m u s i n g , yes, but 1 w o n d e r w h y the A d m i n i s tration's hearts aren't captivated.

N y k e r k , fraternities, sororities, athletics, a n d c h a p e l ( w h i c h h a s been the most active of all this year). T h e c l o s i n g p a r a g r a p h is a real g e m : " T h e s e a r e s o m e of the activities in which y o u c a n e n g a g e . If y o u a r e interested, y o u ' l l find tjiat y o u c a n l e a r n a n d e n j o y m a n y worthwhile things"( what a n o b l e t r u t h ! ) . " Y o u ' l l find a l s o that Hope's faculty a n d students a r e friendly people who a r e p r o u d to be a p a r t of Mope College—its w o r k , its p l a y , a n d its t r a d i t i o n s . Y o u h a v e n ' t m a d e a m i s t a k e to c h o o s e H o p e C o l l e g e a s y o u r Alm a M a t e r . Vou see, I k n o w . It's m i n e ; a n d I, too, l o v e it!" ( A n i r r e f u t a b l e piece of l o g i c ) .

T H E L E T T E R g o e s o n to recite the v a r i o u s activities which " H o p e - i t e s " a r e offered: P u b l i c a tions, theater, c h o i r , h o m e c o m i n g .

Review of the News Vietnam Vietnam ground fighting shifted to a battlefield f a r to the n o r t h of S a i g o n a n d built t o w a r d a new p e a k . Scene of the f i g h t i n g w a s j u s t s o u t h of the Demilitarized Z o n e . U.S. m a r i n e s , s p r e a d thin, blocked i n v a s i o n r o u t e s a n d awaited a n expected i n v a s i o n . Five d i v i s i o n s of H a n o i ' s finest t r o o p s t a n g l e d with a n d a r e still b a t t l i n g U.S. t r o o p s . General William C. Westm o r e l a n d , c o m m a n d e r of L ! .S. forces in V i e t n a m , w a s b r o u g h t b a c k to the U.S. to testify before C o n g r e s s o n the w a r effort. O b s e r v e r s g e n e r a l l y feel that he w a s here to a s k f o r more men, more a r m s and more spending. Plans n o w call f o r a n i n c r e a s e

of 3 0 , 0 0 0 U.S. t r o o p s to Vietn a m b r i n g i n g the t o t a l U.S. c o m m i t m e n t t h e r e to 4 7 0 , 0 0 0 troops. Humors indicate that Westmoreland wants about 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 t r o o p s there b y y e a r end. Senator J o h n Stennis b a c k s him. Washington T h e S e n a t e a p p r o v e d a n int e r n a t i o n a l t r e a t y l i m i t i n g the use of o u t e r s p a c e to p e a c e f u l purposes. The treaty, a l r e a d y signed by 79 nations, prohibits weapons of m a s s d e s t r u c t i o n f r o m o u t e r s p a c e , m i l i t a r y b a s e s o n the m o o n a n d o t h e r celestial b o d ies, c l a i m s of n a t i o n a l s o v e reignty, and further stipulates t h a t the e x p l o r a t i o n a n d use of s p a c e b e for the c o m m o n g o o d of the w o r l d .

T h e letter is a n o n y m o u s l y s i g n ed, " S i n c e r e l y , A S e n i o r C o e d , " a n d I w a n t to k n o w w h o this chick is. It h a s been m a n y m o o n s since 1 h a v e h e a r d a n y o n e mention H o p e C o l l e g e a n d l o v e in the s a m e breath. C O U L D IT B E p o s s i b l e t h a t t h e r e exists a secret g r o u p of " c o e d s , " h i d i n g o n the third f l o o r of s o m e d o r m i t o r y , w h o a c t u a l l y love our fair institution? Unfort u n a t e l y they d i d n ' t h a v e the c o u r a g e to b a c k u p their l o v e with signatures. How would you, dear gentle r e a d e r , feel if y o u received this letter which e x p l a i n s to y o u h o w y o u r heart will be c a p t i v a t e d in a few m o n t h s ? And w h y a r e y o u g o i n g to l o v e ? Well, b e c a u s e H o p e h a s s o m a n y activities a n d j u s t o o d l e s of f r i e n d l y p e o p l e to e m b r a c e y o u . Of c o u r s e , if y o u ' r e interested in the intellectual side of the college ( a d m i t t e d l y a m i n o r m a t t e r ) y o u w o n ' t k n o w w h a t is waiting for you. " F o u r y e a r s a n d t h e r e he is, being a cynic," I hear you say. N o t entirely, b e c a u s e the p h r a s e of the letter which I a m m o s t interested in is, " I t h a s a c e r t a i n something!" The question o f w h a t this " c e r t a i n s o m e t h i n g " is h a s b e e n o n m y m i n d lately a s I a t t e m p t to f i g u r e out w h y I h a v e s p e n t f o u r y e a r s here. WHAT IS Hope College's " t h i n g " which s u p p o s e d l y m a k e s it u n i q u e ? It is p r o b a b l y u n d e f i n a b l e , b u t c o u l d the a n s w e r lie in the i d e a s b e h i n d the letter? T h i s s t r a n g e m i x t u r e of n a i v e t e a n d the g e n u i n e d e s i r e to w e l c o m e i n c o m i n g f r e s h m e n is n o t u n u s u a l , f o r the a p p e a r a n c e of m u c h t h a t h a p p e n s h e r e often belies the orig i n a l i n t e n s i o n . In the end, I a m n o t c e r t a i n w h e t h e r t h a t is r e a l l y such a bad " t h i n g . "

SUMMER JOBS FOR STUDENTS Applications now being accepted for summer jobs with major corporation. Students 18 yrs. of age & over wanted to learn marketing, sales promotion, & brand identification techniques during summer period. High level e x e c u t i v e m a n a g e m e n t training courses given to qualified a p p l i c a n t s . Salary$105 per wk. for first 3 wks. $130 per wk. plus bonuses starting 4th week. SCHOLARSHIPS

HIGH PAY

win one of 15 $1,000

earn at least $1,500 for the summer student — make $3,000 and more.

scholarships

TRAVEL

SEE EUROPE

Work anywhere in U.S. or Canada. Qualified students may work overseas.

W i n all expense paid holiday in Europefor an entire week.

REQUIEM PERFORMANCE—Roger Davis directs the College Chorus in a rehearsal of Durufle's Requiem, to be performed Sunday at 8:33 p.m. The choir will be accomn: nied by organ and instrumental ensemble, and will be aided by three soloists and the Hope Church Jr. Choir.

Durufle's Requiem Sung This Sunday in Dimnent The H o p e College music department will p r e s e n t a p e r f o r m a n c e of the R e q u i e m b y the c o n t e m p o rary French c o m p o s e r Maurice D u r u f l e next S u n d a y at 8 : 3 0 p . m . in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C h a p el. P a r t i c i p a t i n g in the p e r f o r m a n c e will be the 1 2 0 - v o i c e H o p e College C h o r u s u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n of R o g e r D a v i s , the H o p e C h u r c h J u n i o r C h o i r u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n of Mrs. . l o a n T a l l i s a n d s o l o i s t s Jennie Brown, mezzo-soprano, and Jon Dykema, tenor. T H E WORK will be a c c o m panied by o r g a n a n d an instrum e n t a l e n s e m b l e c o n s i s t i n g of strings, brass, h a r p , t y m p a n i a n d percussion instruments.

O r g a n i s t s will be William Wilson, Carl V a n N o o r d , Gloria Langstraat, Kenneth Bruggers a n d ( i l o r i a Renkes. M e m b e r s of the i n s t r u m e n t a l ens e m b l e will be D a v i d T u b e r g e n , ( i l e n y s D a v i d s o n a n d S u s a n Bosman, violin; V i r g i n i a Y o u n g , h a r p ; J o h n Ren wick, cello; K a t h leen B u u r m a , s t r i n g b a s s ; Michael Berry, t y m p a n i ; Bruce F o r m s m a a n d Kenneth Austin, trumpets and Thorn Working, french horn. LIKE GABRIEL FAURK, D u r u f l e h a s been influenced b y Gregorian plainchant, and has d r a w n his t h e m a t i c m a t e r i a l f r o m the G r e g o r i a n c h a n t s in the Req u i e m M a s s , c o m b i n i n g this with contemporary harmonics.

Taylor Presents History Paper at Conference In a r e g i o n a l m e e t i n g of Phi A l p h a T h e t a , the n a t i o n a l h i s t o r y f r a t e r n i t y , j u n i o r Keith T a y l o r r e a d his o w n p a p e r entitled " T h e Decembrist Failure: Strategic Blunder or Romantic M a r t r y d o m . The paper was originally written f o r a s e m i n a r in F u r o p e a n h i s t o r y u n d e r Dr. D a v i d C l a r k . T a y l o r w a s a s k e d to r e a d the p a p e r b y the H o p e C o l l e g e c h a p t e r of Phi A l p h a T h e t a at the m e e t i n g t h a t w a s held last S a t u r d a y at A q u i n a s College. T h e p a p e r d e a l s with the Russ i a n Revolt in 1 8 2 5 a n d is a n entirely new i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the

event. A c c o r d i n g to T a y l o r , his i n t e r p r e t a t i o n is a m u c h m o r e s u b j e c t i v e o n e f h a n p r e v i o u s interpretations. He also said that he d e l v e d d e e p l y into the literature of the p e r i o d which w a s p a r t ly r e s p o n s i b l e f o r his u n i q u e interpretation. P a p e r s r e a d b y f o u r o t h e r stud e n t s c o n s t i t u t e d the rest of the p r o g r a m a l o n g with s p e e c h e s b y the c h a i r m e n of the h i s t o r y dep a r t m e n t s of Western M i c h i g a n University and Kentucky I'niversity. A l s o a t t e n d i n g the m e e t i n g f r o m H o p e were Dr. C l a r k , Dr. W a r r e n V a n d e r h i l l a n d Mr. J a m e s D u r a m .

SHIRTS 25c Each For 4 Or More With Dry Cleaning Order. Folded Or On Hangers Cash & Carry

Best Positions Going Fast! Call Today For Appointment 9:00 A.M. — 1:00 P.M. SHIRT LAUNDRY

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. & IND. . . . Mr. Schmht . . . A.C. 616 459-5079 MILWAUKEE, WIS. & IOWA Mr. Bergman A.C. 414 276-4119 CHICAGO LOOP & SO. ILL Mr. Vass A.C. 312 346-6108 CHICAGO LOOP & NO. ILL Mr. Anderson A.C. 312 782-4362 W e have offices located in most cities, however, please contact our district offices listed above for a n appointment.

College at 6th

LtANERS HOLLAND, MICH.


May 5, 1967

Page 7

Hope College anchor

Senate in Review

Actions Affect Entire Campus By T o m Hildebrant a n c h o r Editor-eject T h e Student S e n a t e h a s v i r t u a l l y c o m p l e t e d its w o r k f o r the y e a r a n d looks back on a session that h a s affected all a r e a s of c a m p u s life. T h e w o m e n ' s r u l e s , s t u d e n t f a c u l t y c o m m i t t e e s a n d the b u d g e t were the m a i n o b j e c t s of S e n a t e action The Senate b e g a n by r e v a m p i n g its s t r u c t u r e . F o u r c o m m i t t e e s c o v e r i n g the a r e a s of S e n a t e c o n c e r n K'ampus improvements, student outreach, student information and student activities) were created, a n d J e r r y P o o r t i n g a , D i a n e Kinsey. Barb Timmer and Bob T h o m p s o n w e r e a p p o i n t e d a s the respective cha irmen. T H E N T H E S E N A T O R S beg a n to l o o k o u t w a r d . T h e i r first m o v e w a s to win the right f o r s e n i o r w o m e n to eat off c a m p u s . Bob Donia, senior class president, s t a r t e d the d r i v e with a m o t i o n a s k i n g that student teachers be r e i m b u r s e d f o r the m e a l s t h e y a r e f o r c e d to m i s s . T h i s w a s foll o w e d b y a p l a n to h a v e a trial g r o u p of s e n i o r w o m e n eat off c a m p u s f o r o n e s e m e s t e r to test the p r o g r a m . T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n h a s recently g o n e o n e step f a r ther b y g r a n t i n g p e r m i s s i o n f o r all s e n i o r a n d j u n i o r w o m e n to c h o o s e o n o r off c a m p u s d i n i n g . L a t e r in the y e a r w o m e n ' s p r i v ileges were a g a i n the subject of

d e b a t e . At the initiative of a n i n d e p e n d e n t c o m m i t t e e of w o m e n , the AWS p a s s e d o n to the S e n a t e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s to p e r m i t s m o k ing in w o m e n ' s d o r m s w h e r e fire r e g u l a t i o n s p e r m i t a n d a series of p r o p o s a l s d e a l i n g with dress. T hese i n c l u d e d p e r m i s s i o n to w e a r b e r m u d a s a n d s l a c k s o n weekd a y s o u t s i d e of a d m i n i s t r a t i v e a n d c l a s s r o o m b u i l d i n g s , all d a y S a t u r d a y , a f t e r 4 p . m . a n d all d a y S a t u r d a y in the l i b r a r y a n d residence l o u n g e s , r e q u i r i n g Sund a y o r s c h o o l d r e s s o n l y until 1 p . m . o n S u n d a y , a n d discont i n u i n g the p r a c t i c e of d r e s s i n g u p for the F r i d a y e v e n i n g meal. All but the m o t i o n r e g a r d i n g d r e s s in the l i b r a r y a n d r e s i d e n c e l o u n g e s w e r e p a s s e d b y the Student Life C o m m i t t e e . C l o s e r ties between the S e n a t e a n d the AWS w e r e e s t a b l i s h e d . A c c o r d i n g to the new p l a n , the p r e s i d e n t s of the AWS c o u n c i l a n d activities b o a r d h a v e a v o t e in the S e n a t e , the S e n a t e elects a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e to e a c h of these bodies, a n d a mechanism was set u p f o r m o t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g w o m e n s t u d e n t s to be e x c h a n g e d b y the S e n a t e a n d AWS. T H E S E N A T E f o r w a r d e d two p l a n s d e a l i n g with the e d u c a t i o n a l s y s t e m at H o p e to the K d u c a t i o n a l Policies C o m m i t t e e . T h e first is a r e q u e s t f o r a p r o g r a m of v o l u n tary course evaluation, using a

q u e s t i o n n a i r e p r e p a r e d by the Senate student-faculty relations c o m m i t t e e . T h e s e c o n d is a prop o s a l to p u t elective c o u r s e s outside a s t u d e n t ' s m a j o r o n a p a s s fail g r a d i n g s y s t e m . Student rep r e s e n t a t i o n o n the K d u c a t i o n a l Policies C o m m i t t e e h a s a l s o been requested. A m a j o r step w a s the p a s s a g e of a p l a n a i m e d at s p e e d i n g u p the d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g p r o c e s s at H o p e b y m e a n s of a C o m m u n i t y A s s e m b l y . T h i s c o m m i t t e e , consisting of eight f a c u l t y m e m b e r s and seven students, would have final a u t h o r i t y o n all steps t a k e n by s t u d e n t - f a c u l t y c o m m i t t e e s subject to a p p r o v a l b y the President of the c o l l e g e a n d the B o a r d of Trustees. In its m o s t recent a c t i o n , the b u d g e t s of all s t u d e n t o r g a n i z a tions were united u n d e r the a u s p i c e s of the S e n a t e . T o effect this, a n a p p r o p r i a t i o n s c o m m i t tee w a s e s t a b l i s h e d t h a t will consist of seven m e m b e r s , one of w h o m w o u l d be the T r e a s u r e r of the Senate. T h i s c o m m i t t e e will c o n s i d e r b u d g e t r e q u e s t s f r o m all s t u d e n t g r o u p s r e c e i v i n g college funds, excluding those organizations u n d e r the j u r i s d i c t i o n of the C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Board, whose b u d g e t s will be p a s s e d o n by t h a t c o m m i t t e e , a n d s e n d a single Student Activities B u d g e t to the College T r e a s u r e r for a p p r o v a l . A new c o n s t i t u t i o n w a s d r a w n up a n d ratified. T h e new d o c u ment r e q u i r e s t h a t elections of S e n a t o r s - a t - l a r g e b e held in the s p r i n g i n s t e a d of the fall a n d t h a t r e s i d e n t s of c o t t a g e s elect Senat o r s collectively. It a l s o a l l o w s the e n t i r e s t u d e n t b o d y to elect the S e n a t e T r e a s u r e r a n d establishes a p r o c e d u r e for appealing d e c i s i o n s of the S t u d e n t C o u r t . T H E S E N A T E p u t its s u p p o r t b e h i n d a p r o g r a m of f o r u m s dealing with c o n t r o v e r s i a l c a m p u s i s s u e s to i n c r e a s e c o m m u n i c a t i o n between s t u d e n t s a n d A d m i n i s t r a tion. It a l s o a s k e d t h a t the President of the S e n a t e be given a s a l a r y f o r his service. A m o t i o n a s k i n g the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s to c o n f e r a n h o n o r a r y D o c t o r of Divinity d e g r e e o n A. J. M u s t e , r e k n o w n e d pacifist, w a s p a s s e d s h o r t l y a f t e r his d e a t h . Besides all of this, the S e n a t e c a r r i e d o u t its u s u a l f u n c t i o n s of d i r e c t i n g events s u c h a s H o m e c o m i n g , M o m a n d D a d ' s Weekend a n d M a y D a y . It a l s o cont i n u e d the p r a c t i c e of o r g a n i z i n g S p r i n g T r i p s to a r e a s in which the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h is active. T h i s y e a r s t u d e n t s t r a v e l e d to N e w Y o r k City, B r u t o n , A l a . , Anneville, Ky., a n d Chicago.

Boone's Offers Informal Atmosphere for Eating By Pat Canfield " O n one, h a l f - n - h a l f a n d splito n e " a r e all f a m i l i a r p h r a s e s to the college p a t r o n s of V e u r i n k ' s City Kitchen, f o r m e r l y B o o n e ' s , o n 8th Street. O p e n f r o m 6 a . m . till 7 p . m . , Boone's serves everything f r o m a n e g g s a n d w i c h ( s p l i t - o n e ) to the special of the d a y a n d a g l a s s of c h o c o l a t e m i l k m i x e d with white m i l k ( o n - o n e with a h a l f - n - h a l f ) . Even though the n a m e w a s c h a n g e d l a s t y e a r , to all the offc a m p u s d i n e r s , it's still B o o n e ' s . B O O N E ' S C A T E R S to c o l l e g e appetites a n d wallets by offering a c c o r d i n g to o n e r e g u l a r d i n e r , " t h e m o s t c o m p l e t e m e a l s f o r the least a m o u n t of m o n e y . " (Jerry P o o r t i n g a commented, " B o o n e ' s is a g r e a t place. T h e r e is n o p r e s s u r e there, the f o o d is g o o d , a n d y o u d o n ' t h a v e to worry about what you wear. Grubbies are good enough." Another felt that Boone's homey, informal atmosphere drew a s m a n y c a m p u s c u s t o m e r s a s the i n e x p e n s i v e food. Richard T i m m e r said, "I wouldn't take a

girl o r m y p a r e n t s there, but it's a p r e t t y decent p l a c e . " J O A N N E HASPER, a senior girl e a t i n g off c a m p u s , d e s c r i b e d her o n e a n d o n l y trip to B o o n e ' s , " A few f r i e n d s a n d I ate there bec a u s e w e ' d h e a r d the f o o d w a s c h e a p . But we got s o m a n y d i r t y l o o k s f r o m the g u y s we decided to stick with the W a r m F r i e n d . " B o o n e ' s s e e m s destined to rem a i n the p r i v a t e d o m a i n of H o p e m a l e s . " I w o u l d n ' t w a n t to see a lot of g i r l s there. T h e p l a c e s e r v e s a u n i q u e purpose—it's not a locker r o o m — b u t a l m o s t . It's the o n l y m e e t i n g p l a c e f o r g u y s f r o m all fraternities where n o b o d y cares which f r a t is better o r a n y t h i n g , " said a n avid Booneite. N o t e v e r y o n e f i n d s B o o n e ' s this a p p e a l i n g . Al Q u a l m a n , a recent Boone's d r o p - o u t , said, " 1 got tired of the s a m e t h i n g all the time. T h e f o o d is r e a l l y not t h a t g r e a t . I j u s t d o n ' t like a s t e a d y diet of m a c a r o n i o r f r a n k s a n d beans." F I N D I N G A N all-encompassing d e s c r i p t i o n of B o o n e ' s is virtually impossible because as one H o p e s c h o l a r p u t it, " B o o n e ' s is Boone's."

Film Based Upon Mann's Novel

CHERYL D E F E N D O R F

The Hope College music departm e n t will p r e s e n t a s e n i o r recital next T u e s d a y at 8 : 1 5 p . m . in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C h a p e l . Feat u r e d p e r f o r m e r s will be C h e r y l D e f e n d o r f . p i a n i s t ; M a r c i a De Graaf, contralto; and Floyd, F a r m e r , percussionist. MISS D E F E N D O R F , who has been p l a y i n g the p i a n o since s h e was five years old, has studied with Hope instructor C h a r l e s C. A s c h b r e n n e r . A m o n g the w o r k s t h a t she will p l a y a r e the first m o v e m e n t f r o m M o z a r t ' s S o n a t a in F M a j o r , D e b u s s y ' s Passepied f r o m 'Suite Bergamasque', a n d selections f r o m B r a h m s ' F a n t a s i e s , Op. 116. Miss De G r a a f , w h o h a s s t u d i e d h e r e with Miss M o r r i s o n f o r f o u r y e a r s , will s i n g b o t h c l a s s i c melodies a n d l i g h t e r c o m p o s i t i o n s .

R e t u r n , () G o d ol H o s t s " f r o m H a n d e l ' s ' S a m s o n ' a n d the a r i a " V o c e di d o n n a " f r o m Ponchielli's ' L a G i o c o n d a ' a r e a m o n g the m o r e s e r i o u s selections. H e r perf o r m a n c e will be r o u n d e d o u t with such s o n g s as J o h n Alden Carp e n t e r ' s " T h e Green R i v e r " a n d David Diamond's "Let Nothing Disturb Thee." FARMER HAS studied percuss i o n i n s t r u m e n t s f o r eight y e a r s u n d e r C a l v i n L a n g e j a n s , West Ottawa High School b a n d director. A m o n g the selections F a r m e r will p l a y a r e two t r a d i t i o n a l s n a r e d r u m s o l o s , " T h e D o w n l a l l of Paris" and " T h e Connecticut H a l f t i m e . " He will a l s o p l a y the P i z z a c a t o f r o m Delibes' ' S y l v i a ' o n the m a r i m b a . His o w n c o m position, V a r i a t i o n s on "Greens l e e v e s , " will be p l a y e d o n the vibraphone.

Golf Team Performs Poorly In Recent Match, Tournament T h e H o p e College golf t e a m lost to A l m a College 13-2 last T u e s d a y at the A m e r i c a n L e g i o n C o u n t r y C l u b . T h e f i v e - m a n Alm a t e a m w a s c o n s i s t e n t in scoring a s their s c o r e s r a n g e d f r o m 79-83. G e o r g e C o o k , the F l y i n g Dutchm a n ' s c a p t a i n , was top m a n for Hope shooting a respectable 80 f o r the c o u r s e . Other s c o r i n g went a s follows: C h u ck Leider 8 4 , D e n n y B o b e l d y k 8 7 , F r e d Mtiller 8 8 , . a n d Willy J a c k s o n 9 6 . L a s t week the H o p e t e a m tied f o r 15th p l a c e with K a l a m a z o o C o l l e g e in the A l m a I n v i t a t i o n a l T o u r n a m e n t held at Pine River

C o u n t r y C l u b , eighteen t e a m s c o m p e t e d . T h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michi g a n w o n the t o u r n a m e n t a s their top medalist shot an impressive 75. The only MIAA team placing lower than Hope and K a l a m a z o o w a s Olivet. Muller s h o t a n 8 1 to lead the Dutch t e a m , Leider w a s next with 8 6 f o l l o w e d by C o o k with 88, J a c k s o n 9 1 a n d B o b e l d y k 95. T o d a y H o p e will t r a v e l to Alb i o n l o o k i n g f o r their first M I A A win a g a i n s t the B r i t o n s . H o p e ' s c h a n c e s l o o k d i m h o w e v e r , as the A l b i o n t e a m is s t r o n g a n d h a s g r e a t d e p t h a s seen b y their 13-? victory over Calvin.

THE STUDENTS OF HOPE TAKE THE COLLEGE TO THE CLEANERS MAY 11-12

"The Confessions of Felix K r u l l , " a G e r m a n film with English subtitles, will be s h o w n in S n o w A u d i t o r i u m next T u e s d a y at 7 p . m . T h e m o v i e is b a s e d o n the novel of the s a m e n a m e b y T h o m a s M a n n . T h e plot c o n c e r n s Felix K r u l l , " s w i n d l e r p a r excellence," p l a y e d b y H o r s t B u c h h o l z . It ret r a c e s his life, s t a r t i n g a s a " s w e e t but h a r d l y innocent child" a n d r e a c h i n g m a n h o o d as one w h o lived a life of theft, i m p e r s o n a tion a n d s e n s u a l a d v e n t u r e . T h e film h a s been a c c l a i m e d for its t r a n s f o r m a t i o n of a s e r i o u s w o r k into high comedy. T h e film is b e i n g b r o u g h t to the c a m p u s b y the G e r m a n Club.

9:00 P.M.

CASTLE PARK AMPHITHEATRE Tickets — Van Raalte Basement

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Round Trip Buses for Every Performance


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May 5, 11*7

10 Firsts in Meet

Hope Passes By Alma, 87-49 With 10 first place finishes, the H o p e track team rolled o v e r A l m a 8 7 - 4 9 a n d picked u p its fourth s t r a i g h t MIAA victory. Hope finished first and second in the mile run with D o u g F o r m s m a and Rick B r u g g e r s h a v i n g times of 4 : 2 3 and 4 : 2 4 . 6 respectively. H o p e ' s 4 4 0 yd. m a n , Mike Paliatsos, c a p t u r e d the first place h o n o r s with a 5 1 . 6 time. Paul Steketee r a n it in 5 3 . 2 to take third place. T H E TIMES in the 100 yd. s p r i n t were separated by only onetenth of a second. A l m a ' s sprinter b r o k e the s t r i n g first with a 10.2 time. Walt Reed w a s not far behind with his 10.3. The mile relay, r u n b y Hope's P a l i a t s o s , Bill C o o k , Steketee, a n d Dan C o l e n b r a n d e r , took a first with 3 : 3 0 . 1 . Hope fared well in the h u r d l e competition. In the high hurdles, a 15.6 by Jeff Hollentpach was

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SAFE!—Albion's Tim Cooper slides across the plate with the third Briton run in the second game of Monday's doubleheader as Hope catcher Tom Pelon awaits the relay. The game ended in a 3-3 tie. but the Dutch won the opener, 9-3.

g o o d e n o u g h to win. Dennis Alexa n d e r , r u n n i n g at 16.9, w a s third in competition. Undefeated Dave T h o m a s t o o k a first with a 4 0 . 6 time in the 3 3 0 yd. hurdles. Hollenbach w a s not f a r behind, a s his 4 1 . 8 e a r n e d him a third place. FIRST, S E C O N D a n d third places were e a s y wins for H o p e in the two mile run. F o l l o w i n g F o r m s m % with a 9 : 3 4 . 5 , c a m e B r u g g e r s a n d Dick Bisson. The 2 2 0 , however, was a second place finish for H o p e . Walt Reed, second in the 100, r a n it in 23.1. Five lentha of a second s e p a r a t e d H o p e ' s time f r o m A l m a ' s in the 4 4 0 yd. relay. However, Alma's 44.1 w a s e n o u g h to d u m p H o p e ' s 4 4 . 6 . T h e field events were the m a i n strength of H o p e ' s victory. F o u r firsts were taken in the meet's five field events. The climax of the field competition was a 186 ft. h e a v e by D o u g Nichols, which

Dutch Nine Defeat Albion, 9-3, Tennis Team Wins Three To Strengthen League Lead The league-leading H o p e Flying Dutchmen b a s e b a l l team whipped second-place Albion 9 - 3 Monday to extend their MIAA record to 5 - 0 a n d to give them a two and one-half g a m e lead over the Britons. The second g a m e was washed out by rain in the eighth inning with the teams tied, 3 - 3. IN A S U R P R I S E m o v e , lefthander Gary Krens started both games for C o a c h Glenn V a n Wieren, and the s t r o n g s o u t h p a w did a fine job. F r e n s g a v e up two runs in the opener, and then pitched four shut-out innings in the nightcap before tiring and yielding to Don K r o o d s m a in the fifth. Hope got its offense rolling in the very first inning of g a m e one after two outs. Charlie L a n g e l a n d drew a walk a n d catcher T o m Pelon followed with a l o n g h o m e run, his fifth of the s e a s o n a n d sixteenth and seventeenth RBI's. DON TROOST then singled, and Bruce Van Huis d o u b l e d him to third. Rightfielder Don K r u e g e r came through with a clutch single, sending Hope's third a n d f o u r t h runs across the plate. Albion c a m e up with a run in the second a n d one in the third, but the Dutch stretched the lead to 5 - 2 in their half of the third on the strength of V a n Huis' second homer of the c a m p a i g n . IN THE LAST of the f o u r t h , the Dutch scored three times on hits by left-fielder Nels B e r g m a r k , Langeland and Pelon IN GAME TWO, Albion a n a Hope failed to score in the first three frames. In the b o t t o m of the fourth, the Dutch tallied twice a s Pelon singled home F r e n s , and 1 roost d r o v e in L a n g e l a n d with a sacrifice fly.

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Straight in MIAA Matches

The Britons k n o c k e d out F r e n s in the fifth with a three-run outburst to g a i n the lead. H o p e struck back in the sixth when W a y n e C otts led off with a hit, m o v e d to second on F r e n s ' sacrifice, a n d scored on L a n g e l a n d ' s clutch double to tie the contest at 3-all.

The H o p e College tennis team c a m e out of this week's action with a 3-1 record a s it defeated C a l v i n 7-1 in M o n d a y ' s m a k e u p match a n d shut out Albion a n d A l m a on T u e s d a y and Wednesday. At Calvin Doug Barrowd r o p p e d two sets to Burt Leeuw 6-1, 6-2 for the o n l y setback of the meet, which h a d been postp o n e d since April 22. Rain cut the first d o u b l e s competition short a g a i n M o n d a y , but not before Barrow and Craig Workman had won a set 6-2 a n d worked the second to a 6-6 tie to score a m a t c h point. T H E MATC H h a d a l r e a d y been clinched, however, as W o r k m a n , Ron Visscher, C r a i g H o l l e m a n , J o h n Schadler a n d T i b o r S a f a r

T H E BAD NEWS, however, c a m e when Cotts, the t e a m ' s s e c o n d - l e a d i n g hitter, collided in short right-center with centerfielder 'I roost as both were g o i n g after a p o p fly. Cotts' j a w w a s b r o k e n in two places a n d it is feared that he will be lost to the team f o r the r e m a i n d e r of the season.

Hope Splits Two Games With Alma; Win 6-3; Lose 3-0 H o p e split a d o u b l e h e a d e r with Alma W e d n e s d a y a f t e r n o o n . In the first g a m e Hope won 6 - 3 and in the second, w a s shut out 3 - 0. 1 he first g a m e was highlighted by Don K r o o d s m a ' s strike out pitching. He went all the way to win the g a m e . The Dutchmen scored l o u r r u n s the first inning. The big blows were Tom Pelon's three bagger and Harry Rumohr's bases-loaded single which d r o v e in two runs. The second g a m e s a w H o p e get one hit, a single by Bruce V a n Huis. In the second g a m e the A l m a pitcher Terwilliger struck out 16 Dutch. Pitcher M a r k J o h n s o n ' s loss of this g a m e b r o u g h t H o p e ' s record to six wins a n d one loss in MIAA competition.

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d o w n e d their singles o p p o n e n t s . The d o u b l e s t e a m s of Jeff GreenVisscher a n d H o l l e m a n - S c h a d l e r a l s o posted victories for the Dutch. The Albion m a t c h was a n easy H o p e v i c t o r y as n o m o r e t h a n two sets were needed to defeat a n y Briton o p p o n e n t . The closest Albion c a m e to w i n n i n g a set w a s the 7-5, 6 - 3 doubles duel between B r i t o n s BUI Smith a n d Joe Reed a n d Dutchmen Green a n d Visscher. COACH LARRY G R E E N ' S netmen c o n t i n u e d their w i n n i n g w a y s by p o s t i n g t h e i r second shutout in two d a y s a g a i n s t A l m a on W e d n e s d a y . Here a g a i n Green a n d Visscher met the only t o u g h g o i n g in their d o u b l e s m a t c h when they lost a t o u g h set 11-13, but c a m e back to win 6-2, 6-2.

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Growth. Change. These arc bywords at C o n s u m e r s Power. We offer the challenge of harnessing the c o m p u t e r and the atom. Of developing better ways to d o our job. A b o v e all, of providing the

F r e s h m a n D a v e T h o m a s was a second place winner in a new event for MIAA competition. With a 5 6 . 8 in the 4 4 0 y a r d hurdles, T h o m a s w a s able to a d d f o u r points to H o p e ' s totals. E x h a u s t e d after his r e m a r k a b l e mile run, F o r m s m a c a p t u r e d fourth place with a 9 : 4 6 in the two mile competition, f o u r s e c o n d s off his school and M I A A record of 9:42.

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HOPE'S W I N N I N G time in the mile relay w a s 3:30, seven seconds off the MIAA record. The field events were not quite as p r o d u c t i v e as H o p e ' s r u n n i n g events. E q u a l in excitement to F o r m s m a ' s mile was Bill Bekkering's vault of 13' Bekkering w a s a s t r o n g f a v o r i t e to b r e a k H o p e ' s record of 12' 8 ^ ". This he did easily with his s u p e r b perf o r m a n c e at the meet. Other field events f o r H o p e included a third place in the j a v e l i n with a h e a v e of 171 feet by D o u g Nichols. A 1 1 8 foot t h r o w w a s e n o u g h for T a i b i K a h l e r to t a k e fifth in the discus competition.

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ANOTHER W I N - D o u g Formsma breaks the tape as he speeds across the finish line in the mile race at the track meet with Alma Wednesday.

YOUR NEXT CHALLENGE...

Formsma Breaks Record At GLCA Track Meet Last S a t u r d a y the F l y i n g Dutchmen traveled to W a b a s h , Ind., for the Great L a k e s Colleges Assn. track meet a n d placed fifth out of the 10 p a r t i c i p a t i n g schools. Ahead of H o p e ' s 30-point total were Earlham (66 points), Wabash ( 5 0 points), Oberlin ( 3 5 points), and Ohio Wesleyan ( 3 3 Points). An o u t s t a n d i n g event for H o p e in this meet was the mile run between Doug F o r m s m a a n d Rick Bruggers. Veteran co-captain f o r m s m a b r o k e his own record of 4:23.8 with a fantastic time of 4:20.1. Rick B r u g g e r s , a sophomore, has developed a m a z i n g skill this s e a s o n , .lust behind f o r m s m a at every meet, B r u g g e r s also broke F o r m s m a ' s old record w i t h a time of 4:21.8. T H E 8 8 0 a n d 4 4 0 competition was quite stiff. Steve Reynen a n d Dick F r a n k , H o p e ' s 8 8 0 m e n . Were neck a n d neck in the event. J k y n e r ' s time of 1:50.8 a n d ^ r a n k ' s 2:00.1 were fast e n o u g h to e a r n a place in the meet. Mike l^allatsos took third in the 4 4 0 with a fine time of 51.2.

bettered his school record by m o r e t h a n I'/a feet. H o p e ' s N o r m Klein a n d Paul S l o a n t o o k first a n d third in b r o a d j u m p competition with l e a p s of 20" SV*" and 2 0 ' 2 3 / 4 " respectively. T h i r d place winner Les Cole fired the shot 4 2 ' 2 " in the shot put event. IN T H E A B S E N C E of F l o y d B r a d y , Terry Childs a n d Ken Feit were able to hold d o w n the responsibilities in the high j u m p . Childs a n d Feit b o t h cleared 5 ' 8 " , but Feit t o o k second place because he had missed m o r e times t h a n Childs at lower heights. Pole vaulter Bill B e k k e r i n g cleared 12 feet which w a s e n o u g h for H o p e to take a first in the event. On S a t u r d a y t h e c i n d e r m e n meet Olivet in competition at Van Raalte filed. They will be l o o k i n g for their fifth league victory.


05-05-1967