047 board of foreign missions rca 1879

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F O R T Y -S E V E N T H ANNUAL R E P O R T OF THE

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FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF T H E

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R E F O R M E D C H U R C H I N A ME R I C A , AND

T w e n ty -S e c o n d o f S e p a ra te A ction, ■WITH THE

For the Year ending April 30th, 1870.

N EW PRINTED

YORK:

FOR

34 V e s e v S t .,

THE

cor. o f

1 879.

BOARD.

Chu rch .



REPORT. T h e Board of Foreign Missions respectfully presents to the Gen­ eral Synod the Report of the forty-seventh year of its organization and twenty-second year of separate and independent action. The Board comes to the Synod and the Church with such thank­ fulness for and joy in the success of our representatives in the lauds of the heathen, as it has never before experienced. God lias blessed us beyond our expectations. A year ago .we had to say with regret and sadness, “ For the first time in many years the additions to the membership of the Churches of the Amoy and Arcot Missions are very small,” and that the aggregate mem­ bership had diminished during the year. Now it is our privilege to announce that the addition to the membership of our Churches in India is the largest ever received, that the accession by profession of faith in Christ to our churches in China is equal to that of the best years of what was long one of the most prosperous Missions in that Empire, and the increase in Japan continues the steady pro. gression of a Christian work distinguished by its success. Such a report as will be found on the succeeding pages it has never before been our satisfaction to offer. It is given in the very words adopt­ ed by the Missions, with no comments of ours, for none are neces­ sary. ' I t will be found that the Churches of the Amoy Mission have re­ ceived 69 souls on confession, those of the Arcot Mission 348, and those of the Japan Mission 56, during the year, bringing the total membership of the Churches of the Missions, after deducting the losses by death and removals, up to 2,045 souls. • Besides, the organization of the Missions has been carried many steps further toward completeness and perfection, and by the inade­ quacy of the means we have been able to supply, this organization has been put to severe tests. Defeats and'deficiencies have been made manifest, and have been removed wisely and as far as pos-


sible. No permanent progress is possible without organization. This gathers in the results, puts them in their proper place, makes them members of the living, active bod3r, and wields them as forces to attain further progress. Our Missions have advanced in organi­ zation, and enjoy new life and power in every department. Their chief need to-day, under God, is additional heads of departments, who shall make one line of work respectively their specialty. There is need now of a division of labor, and this cannot be supplied ex­ cept by an increase of the Missionary force. There should be men on the ground to take up what the men now there ought to lay down. ' But while there has been success, and enlargement, and progress on the Mission fields, the Board has never before been so perplexed by the inadequacy of its pecuniary resources. The revenue from the Churches has fallen much below the average of the last ten years. The income has gone back to that of the years when the work and its needs were much smaller than at present. The in­ creasing necessities of the Missions, arising from the opening of new territory,oor rather as we ought to say, from the importunate requests of new villages for regular instruction, have been made known to the Church again and again during the year, and the reply has been a falling off in contributions: It should also be mentioned in connection with these unanswered entreaties from new territory, that they arise from the influence of the Spirit of God. Touring excursions into the outlying heathenism were abandoned years ago. Our brethren abroad for some years have visited only the places to which they have been invited, and only a part of these, while their visits have been irregular and at long intervals. Instead of en­ couraging, our Missionaries are now compelled to assume an atti­ tude which discourages invitations from the regions beyond. Consider in addition to this, that never belbre have the outlying regions, with their thousands of villages and millions of'people, been as open, as willing to receive the preacher respectfully and cour­ teously as at-present. There has never been a time when it was so important to carry on touring with energy as at present in India. Wo are compelled to leave it alone absolutely. In China hundreds of villages^ around Amoy are disposed to listen thoughtfully to the message of the Christian herald. As to Japan it may be said that if our entire Missionary force should leave the stations behind


them and go out into the country, if the Government should not stop their progress, they could go on from village to town and from town to village, by invitation, for a year to come, preaching in a new locality every day, being everywhere courteously received, and finding everywhere earnest inquirers. If the attempt were made, the Government would probably interpose the restrictions of the treaty limitations ; but the restrictions put upon native preach­ ers are trifling. Before this vast open field we sit down powerless through lack of money—money to support additional Missionaries and' native preachers. And now the Board is confronted with a new difficult}^. Younsr men are fonnd ready to join the Missions, and there is no money with which to send and maintain them. Theological students about to graduate are actually to-day turning away with reluctance from these Missions," for they say, “ The Church will not take us up and send us, and will not assume the success God may give us>on the field.” ’ . Consider the necessity for an addition to our band of Missionaries not only as demanded by the increased calls from the providence and grace of God, but^as well by the smallness of our force. Every ' man is at work to the full extent of his strength. Every man is overloaded with work and responsibility. We have no margin; all our treasure of talent and power is not only invested but at a risk that sometimes frightens us. The question sounds in our ears, we cannot shut it out, it breaks in upon and destroys our rest, “ What •if one man or two men should be disabled or die in India, or at Amoy, or at Yokohama? What th en ?” W e close our eyes against the what then ? we cannot bear to look at it. If the hands of one man are paralyzed, we know that the hands of other men will go down, must go down under the added burden which would come upon them. And what then ? In these circumstances the Board cannot go on without a deci­ sion from the Church. It must not be inferred from what has been said that the Board accuses the Church of doing nothing. Such an accusation would be unfounded, and would justly bring upon us the censure of the Synod. The remainder of this report would disprove it. But the Board respectfully represents that it is in great need of the advice, indeed, as we have just said, of a decision of the General Synod as representing the Church. Will the Church em


gage to supply a larger income, or must the work be restricted to the present revenue ? We are not properly cultivating the field now occupied by us. Shall we pass over a part of it to others, who will supply its wants, if other societies can be found willing to assume the responsibility ? 'M ust we restrict our operations to a more limited territory ? The -Board is also compelled to say that its endurance has been tried to the uttermost. It can hear the pressure no longer. It hasbeen a pleasure to the members of the Board to carry the grave re­ sponsibilities of a Christian enterprise so important and so blessed and glorious, but these responsibilities have so increased, the anxi­ eties caused by entreaties on one side, repeated until they have be­ come painful, and declining revenues on the other, have become so great that they can no longer be endured.' The Board pleads for relief, and with the greatest respect but with a plainness of speech no longer to be deferred, declares that its burdens must be dimin­ ished'. The attention of the General Synod is respectfully solicited to the details of that which has been entrusted to our superintendence. MEMBERS A N n OFFICERS OF THE BOARD.

The only change in the membership has been the election of the Rev. C. P. Masden, of Philadelphia, in place of Rev. Prof. C. D. Hartranft, D.D., resigned. The officers of the previous year were re-elected at the regular meeting for organization for the past year. AGENCIES EMPLOYED.

[t'i The returned Missionaries, Rev. James H. Ballagh and Rev. John Scudder, M.D., have visited the Churches on the Sabbath and often during the week, since the middle of September. Immediately after the adjournment of the last General Synod, the Rev. Jacob Chamberlain, M.D., D.D., visited the churches of Michigan, ’Wis­ consin, Illinois and Iowa, on his way to India. All the intelligence from the Missions has been published in T he M i s s i o n M o n t h l y , of which for some months 7,318 copies have been mailed to paying subscribers, and 2,300 copies have been distributed gratuitously, making the monthly circulation 9,718.


The Family Missionary Boxes are frequently ordered. Between three and four hundred have been sent out during the year. The whole number issued thus far is about 4,700. RE-ENFORCEMENTS.

'

Mrs. Alice Rapalje was appointed an Assistant Missionary dur­ ing the summer of 1S78, and accompanied her husband, Rev. Dan­ iel Ra palje, to Amoy, China, in the fall of the same year. A. proper performance of the work committed to the Church calls for one additional Missionary in India, one in China, and two in Japan. Without them much is lost every year from inability to look after it. Every Missionary now dependent upon us is over­ taxed, not so much ly the amount as by the variety of work he must perform. The need of a re-enforcement having been already presented, it is only necessary to mention here the number of ad­ ditional ordained Missionaries called for at present.

S U R V E Y OF T H E M I S S I O N S .

.

THE AMOY MISSION, CHINA.

.

(Organized in 1844.)

The Mission occupies the following cities: Amoy, population 200,000; Chio-be, 60,000; Chinng-Chiu, 100,000; and Tong-an, 60,000. The territory assigned to the Mission, being about 60 miles from East to West, and 7 to 14 miles from North to South, has a population of more than three millions of souls, including that of the cities already mentioned. The Kev, John V. N. Talmage, D.D., reports as follows, in behalf of the Mission. ^ A moy , Feb. 6 ,1S79. The following is the report of the Amoy Mission for the year 1S7S: 0 Missionaries.—Revs. J. Y. N. Talmage, D.D., Daniel Rapalje, Leonard W. Kip, David M. Talmage. Rev. D. Rapalje was absent, in the United States, the greater part of the year. He arrived back at Amoy on the 2d of November. Rev. D. M. Talmage of course has not yet been able to do much Missionary work. He has been occupied mainly in the study of the language, and during the hot season his health was not very good. The burden of the country work during the year was borne by Mr. Kip, who is now about to leave on fur­ lough for a visit to the United States. Assistant Missionaries.—Mrs. Mary E. Talmage. Mrs. Helen C. Kip, Miss Helen M. Van Doren, Miss Mary E. Talmage, and Mrs. Alice Rapalje. Miss Yon Doren, in consequence of ill health, was compelled to return to the United States in 1S76, and her connection with the Board ceased during the past year. Mrs. Rapaljfi joined the Mission during the year, arriv­ ing at Amoy with her husband, on his return as above. Her Mission work thus far has been the study of the language. The woman’s department of the work has thus been carried on by Mrs. Talmage, Mrs. Kip, and Miss Maiy E. Talmage. Miss C. M. Talmage, though not fo rm a lly connected with the Mission, has as formerly given her whole time to the work. The ladies of the Mission have been enabled during the whole year to render considerable as­ sistance in the department of woman’s work to both the other Missions at Amoy. Both of


these Missions, in consequence of the absence or ill-health of their female members, have been feeble-handed in this department of their work. • JVaW-ce 8, to w itR e v s , Tap Ilan-chlong (of Secou l Church at Amoy); Ghhoa Thian Kbit (of First Church at Amoy); and Tiong lu-li (of Church at Chioh-be). Pastor lap has continued to give much assistance in the country work, we supplying his pulpit during his absence. . Organized Churches, 7. Native preachers (not ordained), 14. Regular preaching places, IS. Theological School 1; Students, 8; native tutor, 1. Parochial Schools (including Girl’s School), 7. Christian School Teachers, 5 male, 1 fe­ male. Heathen School Teacher, 1. The churches of the English Presbyterian Mission arc still united with ours in one Classis or Tai-hoey. We therefore append the total of their statistics for the year so far as we have received them, at the end of our Tabular statement. (In this Total of the English Presby­ terian Mission, if compared with the Report of last year, there will be found some slight dis-crepancy. This is owing partly to the reducing the form of their Report to correspond with ours, and partly, I suppose, to some corrections they have made in the lists of their church, members.) moy

M is s io n

1878.

for

Contributions for Chinese year ending Ecb. 1, 1878.

A

Members Dec. 31, 1878.

* CHURCHES.

or

| Under Suspension. | Infants Baptized. | Boys in School. | Girls in School.

Sta tem en t

| Received on Confession. | Received on Certificate. | Dismissed. | Excommunicated. | Died. .

abular

Members Jan. 1, 1878.

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1 93 4 15 17 3 $250 21 91 3 3 3 298 734 131 9 12 20 30 127 8 105 53 4 81 7 0 12 flhioh-Tir*1 1 ............... : .. . 81 4 104 0$ 1 SO 3 2 39 i O-kang 2................................ 7.0 10 1 44 12 .1 54 0 0 10 Tong-an1. ?........................... 48 12 122 50 3 142 4 1 • Chiang-chiu3. ....................... 113 29 3 103 72 5 70 73 3 Hong-san 1............................

First Amoy............... ...........

Total Am. Ref. Ch. Mission. 598 G9 7 3 1 13 057 33 47 98 34 $1,154 95 Total Eng. Fresh. Mission*. GG4 54

1 8 10 099 59 30

Total Tai-Hoey 6 ................. 1202 123 7 4 9 23 1350 92 77

$1,318 57 $2,473 52

- 1 Has two preaching places. 2 Has three preaching places. . 0 Has seven preaching places. 4 Several of the pupils in Girls’ school at the 2nd Church, Amoy, are

from other Churches. 6 There are eight organized Churches under the care of the Eng. Pres. Mission, so that the Classis or Tai-hoey is composed of fifteen Churches.


Native Pastors.—It will be seen by comparison with former Re­ ports, that we have had no incrgase of the'number of native pastors since the year 1872. W e hope the time is not far distant when two or three more of the organized Churches will seethe importance of the duty and privilege of having pastors set over them, and sup­ ported by them. To bring them to this point we only need the re­ viving influence of the Holy Spirit on the hearts of their members. Organized Churches.— No increase since 1871. Perhaps the •congregation worshiping at Sio-khe should soon have a church or­ ganization. Native Preachers (not ordained.)—An increase of two over the previous year, and that was an increase over former years. Regular Preaching Places.— W e have one more than the previous year, and that was an increase over former years. There are other important points in the field properly belonging to our Mission, which ought to be occupied. They are open to us, but we have not the men to occupy them. Our present force of preachers is not sufficient for the places already occupied. It will be seen that the number of preaching places is one more than the number of native preachers (including the pastors). If one of them falls sick, dr is allowed to return for a short visit to his family, two stations must be left destitute. Besides this some of the more important stations should have two preachers for daily preaching at the chapels and evangelistic work in the surrounding villages. Some of our preach­ ers also are only what we call second-class. Their education is not sufficient for them to be put in charge ol important stations. They are qualified to be assistants at such stations, of those who are bet­ ter educated. The work at some of our stations suffers greatly be­ cause they cannot be properly supplied with preachers. Theological School.—The increase of the number of preachers has come out of bur school, and we have not found suitable young men to take their place, so that our number of Theological students has dwindled down to three. This is the smallest number we have reported for many years, and is greatly to be deplored because of its bearing on the future of our work. Theological Instruction and Examinations.—In our last Report and in other letters, we spoke of the new system of examinations which had been decided on by the three Missions unitedly. The experiment promises well. Besides the instruction given by each


Mission to its own students, the students of the three schools meet together to listen to the public lectures of the several Missionaries in their respective halls; and the students and unordained preach­ er’s meet together for examination. The examination is conducted by all the Missionaries, assisted by the ordained pastors. During the last year we had four such examinations, dividing the whole number ofstudents and preachers into four sections, and giving one section each an examination. Besides the advantage to the stu­ dents and preachers of increased instruction, and the additional stimulus thus given them, the influence of this union and har­ mony can only be for good on the native Churches. It is also another illustration of the essential unit}7 of the various branch­ es of the one Church of Christ. • In treating of the Theological school, I ought to have added that the native tutor might also be termed a Theological student, as the study of theology is an important part of his work. He is a young man of much promise, so that we have given him the position of tutor (which was once partly occupied by Pastor lap.) In our deficiency of preachers he goes out to preach perhaps every other Sabbath. One or two of the three students are also out for this purpose almost every Sabbath day. Parochial (Sc/tooZs.—During the past year we adopted a plan to harmonize the B ay School at Amoy under the care of the three Mis­ sions, approximating a little towards the plan adopted with refer.ence to the Theological schools. Besides the schools mentioned in the former part of this report, tliere is a Union school on the island of Kolongsu, sustained by the three Missions, the English Presby­ terian Mission furnishing the building. The pupils in all the Chris­ tian schools in Amoy and on Kolongsu, have the same studies and are graded alike. A committee chosen from the different Churches and Missions, was appointed to visit and hold examina­ tions in the various schools as often as seemed desirable during the year; and at the close of the year the children of all the schools met together for united examination. This united examination lasted two days, the first day in one of the churches of the London Mission, the second in one of our churches. The standing of the pupils was decided on, and prizes were distributed to.the more worthy. This arrangement has given much stimulus to the schools


in Amo}'. W e hope to extend the system as far as we can to some of the schools at the out-stations. It is sad that we cannot report an increase in the number of schools connected with our Mission. W e have not as many schools as we had some years ago. There is, however, a slight increase in the number of pupils over the highest number of any preceding year. There ought to be schools in connection with all our important sta­ tions. The future welfare of the Church ' must depend greatty on the proper education of her children. But the congregations are usually so scattered that it is difficult to get children together in one place in sufficient numbers to sustain schools. The most of our i members are poor, and besides this do not properly estimate the importance of education for their children. In such circumstances the only way to have schools in many places would be for the Mis­ sion to bear most of the expense. If this were thought advisable in itself, the state of the Treasury at home would still forbid it. A separate Report of the Girl’s School has been forwarded by Miss M. E. Talmage to Mrs. Duryee, Cor. Sec. of the Woman’s Board. • Woman’s Work —Besides the Girls’ School, meetings for women have been continued by Mrs. Talmage in the First Church and Mrs. Kip in the Second Church at Amoy. Mrs. Kip has also conducted a meeting for women in one of the churches of the London Mission. The meeting for women formerly conducted by Mrs. Talmage at our house on Kolongsu, she has removed to the new school build­ ing of the Girls’ School of th.e English Presbyterian Mission, which is .in a more central position. She is thus able to give instruction to a larger number of women as well as to the pupils in said school. Miss C. M. Talmage, besides assisting in the Girls’ School of our Mission, has given instruction once a week in the Girls’ School of the English Presbyterian Mission. Towards the latter part of the year she began weekly visits to the Chinese hospital, to give in­ struction to the female patients there. A few visits have been made by the ladies of the Mission to several of our out-stations. The importance of efforts to instruct the women, and especially the women and girls connected with our Churches, can hardly be overrated. The experiment is about to be made of employing one or more Bible women to visit some of our ouUstations and labor among the women there. Of the extreme ignorance of the women


we have written in former letters. Near the close of the year, one of the women connected with the First Church was sent for a few weeks to some villages on the island of Am 03', in which reside some of the women connected with the O-Kang Church. She is a woman of earnest Christian character, has always been a regular attendant of the woman’s meeting in her church, and is well in­ structed in Christian facts and doctrines. She volunteered her ser­ vices, (when the matter was suggested to her,) but is too far advanced in years to do much walking. W e paid her chair hire and other necessary expenses. She was cordially received not only ; by the Christian families, but by the women of several other fam­ ilies, who listened to her message with much interest. Some of them have expressed their determination to become Christians. Some of them have since walked a long distance to attend the preaching in the Kang-tau chapel on the Sabbath day. The former matron of the Girls’ School will probably be employed this )rcar as Bible-woman. The small feet of the women is a great drawback to their efficiency in this kind of work. W e have been making special efforts for a few years past to create a public opinion in all the Churches, against this custom of binding girls’ feet, and we trust our efforts have not been in vain. . Romanized Colloquial.—W e have too much other work to do to give as much time to this as we would like. During the year I prepared and had printed four small volumes, of 32 pages each, called Sin-bun-chap-liok, which ma}r be translated “ Selections from Periodicals.” The}7 are translations of. articles in various religious publications connected with Missionary and evangelistic work. .1 think they have been read with a good deal of interest and profit. I have been man}7 years engaged in preparing' a dictionary in the colloquial of all the more common Chinese characters, and all that are found in our Chinese Bibles. I think if will be of great value to the Christians in learning to read their own written language, and especially in learning to read the Scriptures. At present a Chinaman cannot learn to read without a teacher to tell him the sound and meaning of every new word. They have dictionaries, but only the educated can make use of them. I think it will be of great assistance also to the Missionaries. If my health is spared I hope to finish it diming this year. But where shall the money come from to publish it? Until we get much more literature in this


Romanized colloquial, we cannot expect the people to take very much interest in it. State o f the Churches.—Our Statistical Table last year called forth some sad reflections. Only one Church had made an increase of membership, two remained stationary, and four had decreased^ In all the Churches only thirty-four persons had been received on confession, and the net increase (after deducting losses of all kinds) was only seven. Compared with this, our Table this year calls for gratitude. The Church at Chioh-be is the only one which appears stationary. To this Church there were four additions on confession, but there were also four deaths. The pastor reports a slight in­ crease of inquirers at the end of the year. In each of the other Churches there has been at least a little increase. Altogether 69 persons were received on confession, twice the number of the pre­ vious y ear; and the net increase has been fifty-nine, equal to the whole net increase of the preceding four years. Surely for this we should give hearty thanks to the God of all grace. It is a notable fact that this increase of converts here corresponds in time with the increase of the Missionary spirit manifested in our Church at home last year; (Isa. 65:24.) In our more sad Report, for 1875. we pointed out a fact just the converse of this, that the year 1871 (when the Board cautioned us not to enlarge, but if pos­ sible retrench our expenses, because of the falling off in the contri­ butions of the Churches,) was the year when the constant and regu­ lar growth in all departments of our work was checked. Now the number of additions on confession this last year has risen again to exactly the same number as in that year, 1871. In some impor­ tant particulars we are far in advance of that year, but in some others we have not yet come up to it. If the last year’s revival of interest be maintained in the Church at home, and greatly in­ creased, as it ought to be, all your Mission stations will partake of the blessing, and I doubt not, repay the increasing interest by in­ crease of cheering reports; (Mai. 3:10.) Though we are permitted thus to rejoice when we make compari­ son with the previous year, yet we find enough in our present con­ dition to keep us from over-elation of spirit. No increase of native pastors since 1872, no new Churches organized since 1871, no in­ crease in the number of Parochial schools since 1872, and the number of our Theological students dwindled down to three. In


14

KEPOKT 02T

the condition of the older Churches, which have so long been sickly, there is a little improvement, but we hardly dare yet pronounce them convalescent. The net increase in both ot the Amoy Churches is only six, that in the Church at Tong-An is partly at the'new sta­ tion at Poa-tau, and the large increase in the Church at Chiang-chiu, is almost all at the stations beyond. Will not God;s people at home help us by their prayers in behalf of these older Churches, that the Lord may again grant us revival and enlargement such as, and greater than we were permitted to see in years long gone by? In a former Eeport, for the sake of stirring up ourselves and our Church, we made comparison of our status at that time with that of the English Presbyterian Mission. They had overtaken and gone beyond us in all particulars except three, viz.: Native pastors, concontributions, and Girls’ school. Now they have a Girls’ school also, and in contributions their Churches exceed ours. Only in the mat­ ter of native pastors are we still in the advance of them; and even in this particular we may not expect to continue very long in the van. They have one more organized Church than we, and far out­ number us in preaching places, in preachers, and in students. W e may not wonder at this, for their Mission is always better manned and they are never straitened for funds. Plans fo r the future.—Our attention thus far has been confined chiefly to the present with an occasional glance at the past. Let ns give a few thoughts to the future. Mr. Kip and family are about to leave us for a season, leaving us but little stronger than we have been for years past. To cultivate the field properly belonging to us, we should have at least two Mission families residing in the in­ terior in the neighborhood of Sio-khe, lor the evangelizing of that populous region and the region beyond. This would require some additional outlay at the first; and if God gives His blessing, as we have reason to expect, some additional expenses afterwards, in order to take advantage of that blessing. If one of these Missionaries could be a physician of earnest pietj1-, so much the better. In case a part of the Mission was thus removed to the interior, the force at Amoy might be decreased a little. But even then we ought not to have less than two Missionaries at Amoy to take charge of the nearer stations and the stations to the north. If we can have no enlarge­ ment perhaps the stations at the north should be handed over to the English Presbyterians, though their hands now are more than full.


But Amoy must probably remain the head-quarters of the literary and educational departments of our work for a long time to come. Missionary Hospital.—An event sincelhe close of the year brings this as a subject of contemplation for the near future. Medical Missionary work has always been conducted at Amoy almost from the commencement of Missionary operations here, under the auspices of one society or other. In the year 1802 the Hospital was sustained by all the Missions conjointly. Toward the close of that year the foreign residents at Amoy offered to relieve the Mis­ sions of this part of their pecuniary outlay, promising to support the Hospital “ on its (then) present basis.” This promise was faithfully carried out for many years. During a few years past the character of the Hospital has become more and more secularized. Since the close of the 3rear, through the influence of a few persons not in sympathy with Missionary work, it has been decided to change the old Chinese name of the institution by cutting out the word Chris­ tian. -The three Missions have therefore withdrawn from all formal connection with the hospital. W e now need a Missionary physi­ cian and hospital at Amoy. If one of the Missions will guarantee the salary of the phj’sician, the fees we now pay for medical attend­ ance on ourselves and families, will nearly cover the other expenses. A fuller and separate paper will be sent to the Board on this whole subject. ' When we look to the future we naturally think of enlargement, but recent newspapers tell us that there is fear at home, not only that there can be no enlargement, but that possibly even one of the Missions must be given up. Is this so? If so, which Mission must first go ? Perhaps the most natural answer would be, The most expensive. But methinks our Church will be slow in laying violent hands on her first-born, the Mission in India. To say noth­ ing of the importance of that field in itself, too much money has been consecrated to the work there, too many prayers have been offered up for its success, too many answers have been given to those prayers, and the name Scudder is yet too precious in the mem­ ory of the Church for such an act to be consummated, till at least .the present generation have passed away. Besides this, the pres­ ent deficiency in contributions is not sufficient to demand so large a reduction of expenses in the first instance. The step would be


entirely too large for the first step in a retrograde movement, for such a step, we fear, would only be the first step. Shall it then be the least expensive Mission, her Mission in the largest Missionary field in the world? It seems to us that the Church has too long had her heart set also on her work at Amoy, and has received too much evidence of the Divine favor in connec­ tion therewith, to allow the stroke to fall here. Shall it then be her youngest child, her Mission to that Island Empire, now so ear­ nestly struggling alter the civilization of the W est ? God has also set His seal too manifestly on the work of our Church in Japan to allow her to harbor such a thought for a moment. Aye, when it comes to the sacrificing of one’s own offspring it is hard to choose between them. But we will not believe that our Church is at all ready to take such a step ; and our prayer and hope is that God will grant her .grace to do much more for the advancement of the Saviour’s kingdom in the future, than He has enabled her to do in the past, and His name shall have all the glory. »Miss Mary E. Talmage writes in regard to the Girls’ School: “ Through the year we have had a full school. The average num­ ber of scholars has been thirty, of whom the great majority were boarders. We are happy to report that two of the number made a public confession of their faith in Christ last summer.” W e give only this brief notice of this important institution. A more particu­ lar account will be. found in the Annual Report of the Woman’s Board. • THE ARCOT MISSION, INDIA.

(Organized in 1854.) The Mission occupies: The North Arcot Area, 5,017 square miles ; population, 1,737.184. The South Arcot D istrict— 4,076 square miles ; population, 1,261,346. The force engaged consists of 6 Missionaries.—Revs. *1. W. Scudder, M.D., Vellore] Jacob Chamberlain, M.D., D.D., M udnapilly; John H. AVyckoif, Tindetan um; John Scudder, M. D.#, in this country, and H. M. Scudder, M.D., Arcot. Assistant Missionaries.—Mrs. J. W. Scudder, Mrs. Chamberlain, Mrs. H. M. Scudder, Mrs. Wyckoff, Miss Martha J. Mandevillc, Chittoor, and Mrs. John Scudder, now in this country. Native Pastors.—"Revs. Andrew Sawyer, Chittoor Zechariah John, Arcot. . Native ffelpers.—CalechXsts, 16: Assistant Catechists, 12; Readers, 25; Teachers in Sem­ inaries and Schoolmasters, 25 ; Schoolmistresses, 9 : Assistants in Dispensary and Hospital, 7; total, 94. Rev. and Mrs. E. J. Ileereu died during the year in this country, and Miss Josephine Chapin resigned.


A rc o t............. A rnee............. Chittoor......... Coonoor......... Aliandal.......... Gnaodiam. . . . K ondipatur... K ottupadi. . . . Kolapokam . . . Kottapelli........ .Maruturambadi Narasinganur . Mudnapilly . . . Jr’alamanair . . . •Orattur............ Sattambodi . . . ■Sekadu............ Tindevanum.. Vellore............ V cllam bi........ Vorikkal.........

8 58 1 17 86 2 0

3 7 2 8

i 8

5 6

2

05 2

41 57 45 23 10 2 4G 49 4 39 105 4 37 218 37 28 ' ’ '4 34 31 04 18 21 9 31 31 1 20 14 15 16 10 15 08 73 13 38 45 4 27 97 8

3 07 8 20

G 19

20

76 32

33

11

47 42

11

47 279 18 12 G9j 7 3 8° 20 99 00 142 08 00 179 71 10 53 71 322 38 45 00 28 78 19 7 77 177 50 157 00 78

22

o

215 4 107 11 30 ia 3 55 51 103 24 00 77 42 157 42 20 270 103 04

21

20 1 1

132 4

121

60

A

90 100

82

Contributions of Con­ gregations.

Total of Congregations ' in 1877. Total of Congregations in 1878.

Scholars in Schools.

Children of Catechu­ mens. Suspended. •

Catechumens.

Baptized Children.

Communicants in 1878. 55 13 80 59

Baptized Adults not Communicants.

C hurches .

| Out Stations. | Communicants in 1877.

STATISTICAL TABLE.

It. A. P. 443 005 63 2 .. 73 50 8 1 .. 101

77 138 265 514 105 427 93 128 116 32 321 250 315

192 304 297 510 143 758 68

207 161 59 470 377 309

0 .. .. 24 10 .. 34 2 .. 3 5 ........ 10 12 .. 21 13 ..

2

29 2 7

10 1a 8 4 6 11

55 0 .. 24 10 .. 10 10 ..

27 52 47 1 325 195 289 97 30 172 128 3 23 237 413 9 52 100 78 43 197 274 28 66

11 7 4 11 11 .. 8 ..

T otal........ 76 704 1112 407 1129 1941 1481 13 1545 4398 0083 059 3 11

A Rupee is equal to 50 cts. gold. . The Arcot Seminary for boys, at Vellore, has'33 pupils. The Girls' Seminary, at Chittoor, has 33 pupils.


1

ARCOT.

H. M. Scudder, M.D., Missionary in charge ; Mrs. H. M. Scud­ der, Assistant Missionary ■ Rev. Zachariah John, Native Pastor; Isaac Henry, Simon, Abraham Muni, P. Royal, Catechists; John Peter, Z. lyakim, Assistant Catechists; Elias Isaiah, David Muni, Samuel Zachariah,- J. Moses, Readers; Arulandu, John Simon, Sunthrasagararo, C. Nathaniel, School Teachers; Guanam, Maria, Magdeline, Schoolmistresses. ■ The Out Stations in connection with Arcot are 13. , Dr. Henry M. Scudder reports: • I am thankful to be able to report that, through the blessing of our Lord, there has been a large increase in the numbers of the vil-' lage congregations during the year. The total of the congregations last year was 680 ; this year it amounts to 897. The people, as a rule, have shown commendable diligence in acquainting themselves with the doctrines of Christianity, and have made considerable pro­ gress in many ways. I have had the pleasure of erecting four new church buildings this year, and of seeing them filled with attentive and inquiring audiences of Christians. In each case the villagers contributed materially, either by personal labor or contributions of money, toward the erection of their church. In three instances they erected the entire walls themselves. ' I am greatly encouraged by the way in which the majority of those who joined us during the famine have remained firm and shown a desire to lead a new life. The improvement has been most marked in the high caste converts. This, indeed, we expected, as they are a better educated and much higher class of people than the Pariahs. All the inhabitants of the caste-village of Chermatoor, including the manager or headman, the barber, the washerman, etc., are now Christians; also, quite a number of families in the neigh­ boring caste-villages of Ladaporum and Kanachalupy. This is the first time in the history of the Mission, that high caste people have come over to us in any numbers with their families : and we pray and hope that it may only be the beginning of .a great work among the better classes in this district. . Churches.—Belonging to this station are two Churches: the Arcot Church and the V'ellambi Church, concerning which, Pastor John reports as follows :


“ The number of communicants in the Arcot Church in 1877, was 58. W e received during the year, on certificate from other Churches, 1 0 ; on confession of faith, 1. Of these, 16 were dis­ missed to other Churches, which leaves our present number of com­ municants 53. In 1877 the number of baptized adults, not com­ municants, was 44, and of Catechumens 147. This year the bap­ tized adults, not communicants, number 65, and the Catechumens 278. Five children have been baptized, and four suspended mem­ bers are not yet restored. ‘‘ The Yellambi Church had 20 communicants in 1877. During * the }rear 3 were received on certificate from other Churches; 1 died, and 2 were dismissed to other Churches, leaving the number the same as last year, 20. The number of baptized adults, not com­ municants, in 1877 was 6, and of Catechumens 36. This year the baptized adults, not communicants, number 30, and the Catechu­ mens 96. Eight children have been baptized during the year. “ Morning and evening services on the Lord’s day have been regu­ larly conducted in these Churches, either by myself or our Cate­ chists. Week-day Prayer meetings have also been maintained; and the Sabbath-school in Arcot has been carried on as usual. Sunday services, and daily morning and evening prayers have been regularly conducted in all the out-stations by the Mission Cate­ chists or Readers.” Evangelistic Work.—Rev. Zachariah John has spent most-of his time in preaching to the heathen in the villages lying around our outstations, and in instructing the village communities that have lately joined us. Daily preaching has also been systematically maintained by the Catechists in the principal out-stations. Owing to the extent and the importance of the medical work in the station, it is very difficult for me to find time for touring. I was out, however, for several weeks with the Rev. J. H. Wyckoff, hav­ ing a well-equipped traveling dispensary along with me. Mr. Wyckoff did the preaching, while I devoted myself to medical • work. The crowds that flocked to us for medical aid and surgical treatment, proved how important and efficient a Missionary agency this could be made if we only had a sufficient force of men. ° '

GNAODIAM.

Rev. J. H. Wyckoff, Missionary in charge; Mrs. Wyckoff, Assistant Missionary; Moses Nathaniel, Samuel Sawyer, H. R .


Joseph, Catechists; Nithian, John Abraham, Souriappon, John 'Zachariah, Christian Daniel, C. Jacob, K. Zechariah, Readers; ‘ Selvam, Sourimuttu, Manuel, Chackkarai, Teachers. ” Rev. Mr. Wyckoff writes: This station, with its dependencies, was put under my charge 'a t the beginning of the year. I have not been able to visit it as often as the work demanded, and the congregations have suffered in consequence. The Romanists, who have stationed themselves in Chetpett, (2 miles from Gnaodiam), have given us a great deal of trouble in their persistent attempts to draw away our people. As if jealous of our successes, they have directed their efforts chiefly upon the villages where we have congregations, and have done us no little injury. Two villages which joined us last year, have gone over to them in a body, and in Sattampady, and Alliendal, where Churches have been long established, some of our oldest Christians have been enticed away by promises of worldly assistance. Not­ withstanding this defection, however, our statistics show an increase of 11 villages connected with this station, and 532 adherents over last year. Many of these have been asking for baptism, but I have declined administering the rite until I have made a more thorough examination of their motives than I have yet done. As I have been relieved of considerable of the work which has been upon me, I hope to have time to give this field the attention it deserves in the coming year. MUDNAPILLY.

Rev. J. Chamberlain, M.D., D.D., Missionary ; Mrs. Chamber­ lain, Assistant Missionary; P. Souri, Catechist; Rebekah, Bible Reader. Out-Stations.—Timmareddipalle,Tipparazupalle, Nalcheruvupalle, Boipalle, Gollapalle, Chintorapalle, Nalaporapalle, Podalorapalle. Dr. Chamberlain reports: There has been no resident Missionary in this station the most of the time for the past five years, and during the last year and a half the central station received only one visit from a Missionary, and that but for a few days, and the out-stations were not .visited at all. The necessities of the Mission in caring for the many vil­ lages which came over to Christianity in the Tamil portion of the Mission, and the lack of funds to employ mure native assistants,


compelled the moving down of the native assistants from the Mud­ napilly out-stations to the Tamil field, so that for the last year there has been hut one native assistant left here to care for the station and all the out-stations twenty miles away. The people in the vil­ lages have been left as sheep without a shepherd, and it is not to be wondered at that they have been scattered. In the fearful famine of the past two years, which raged in this region with its greatest severity, several of our staunchest Chris-" tian villages beesme deserted, the starving people going away in search of work and food, and in two of the villages where our sincerest men were, not a house has been re-built of re-occupied, and I fear never will be, as so large .a proportion of the people died. Those of the villagers who survived are scattered, some at a great distance, and we have not been able to ascertain their whereabouts or their condition. It is but a few weeks since we returned from our long exile in America on account of ill health, and I can hardly yet speak ac­ curately of the condition and the prospects of the field. I have, however, been out through the villages, raking over the ashes to see if there were live coals left, and have been much gratified to find so much evidence of Christian desire and aspiration. I am now endeavoring to secure a corps of native assistants, and shall hope to work the field with vigor, and expect, at the end of the year, to be able to give a more definite and cheering report of both the station and the villages. PALAMANAtH.

Rev. J. Chamberlain, M.D., D.D., J/m ionory in charge ; John Souri, Catechist. Dr. Chamberlain writes: Palamanair has been without a Missionary and without a single­ visit from a Missionary during the past year, until my very recent return from America. John Souri, the Catechist, however, has been steadily and hopefully at work, though all alone, and the con­ gregation has decidedly increased. The statistics of the Church and congregation as well as of the Catechist’s preaching, will be found in the Statistical Tables of the Mission in the report.


'

TINDEVANUlf.

Rev. J. H. Wyckoff, Missionary in Charge; Mrs. Wyckoff Assistant Missionary ; S. A. Sebastian, Head Master Anglo Vernac School; Paul Bailey, John Hill, Catechists; Z. Bashyam, Jacob Babu, Prakasam Mailiappen, Assistant Catechists; Solomon Arunachellum, T. Shadrach, Yesadian Israel, Lazarus Christian, An­ drew, G. Daniel, Sooban David, Tychicus Paul, Readers; Fran­ cis, Sourimuttu, Yencoba Row, lakan, Abraham, Teachers. Rev. Mr. Wyckoff writes : Owing to my removal to Vellore in April to take temporary charge of that station, Tindevanum has been without a resident Missionary six months of the year. The work has been carried on as usual during my absence by the native assistants, and I am glad to be able to report so much that is hopeful and encouraging. , Station.—The Christian congregation remains about the same in point of numbers as last year. Several families have left the sta­ tion, but their places having been supplied by new comers we have not suffered much from their departure. The Sabbath services have been remarkably well attended, nearly every Christian in the place being’present both morning and evening. After the morning service the adults remain to be catechised by me while the children recite the smaller catechism to Mrs. Wyckoff on the verandah of the bungalow. I regret that the Wednesday evening prayer-meeting has not been attended so well as usual. This though partly owing to my absence from the station, is, I fear, due in too great a measure to indifference on the part of some of the Christians, and shows how much we need the Spirit’s power amongst us. In all the church work I have been greatly assisted by Mr. S. A. Sebastian, Head Master of the Mission school, who, with the exception of preaching in the (Villages, has voluntarily done the full work of a Catechist in connection with his school duties. By di­ rection of the Classis of Arcot, Pastor John Zechariah and I or­ ganized the communicants residing here into a Church on the 18th of September. This supplies a long felt need, as the nearest church organization hitherto was Orattur, 20 miles distant, to which all applications for admission as well as cases of appeal had to be referred. May the Good Shepherd watch over this little flock and make its members a power for good.


Evangelistic Work about the station has received as much atten­ tion as was possible. I have been in the .habit of devoting while at home four mornings in a week to visiting the adjacent villages, and have reached nearly all within a radius of four or five miles. I have met with no opposition; on the contrary have been received kindly in every village. The cause of my kind reception is doubt­ less due to my work in connection with the Famine Relief Com­ mittee, which has made me known and greatly increased my in­ fluence. . Evening services have been held in the town by aid of the magic lantern, and have in every case been well attended. To prevent the same persons coming often we have adopted the plan of giving tickets and thus secured different audiences. Mr. Sebastian held a lyrical preaching service in November, which drew together a greater number of educated Hindus than any service we have yet held. Written invitations were sent to the government officials as well as other respectable native gentlemen, and a large audience was secured tvho listened to the Gospel sung and explained for nearly two hours. W e hope to hold meetings of a similar nature during the coming year. The Book Depot, to which reference was made in last year’s re­ port, although not yet fulfilling all my hopes regarding it, does not give unfavorable returns. Books to the amount of rupees 1851 have been sold, and although the majority of these have beer, school books, they have been mainly the publications of the Chris­ tian Vernacular Education Society. Rupees 8-10-6 in tracts, and rupees 12-14-0 in Bibles and portions have likewise been sold. The book depot being directly opposite the Talug Cutcherry, I have used the same room for the deposit of papers and periodicals for perusal by the natives and as a place for preaching the Gospel. The Boys’ School has taken a step forward during the year, and is now established on a firm footing. In April last the Govern­ ment Inspector visited tHe school, and was so much pleased with its management that he recommended to the Director of Public In­ struction the abolishment of the Government institution which had hitherto existed in Tindevanum and the loan of the school building to me. The Director seconded the proposal, and I came into pos­ session on the first of July. It is a fine large building, located very near the Mission bungalow, and a very valuable acquisition


for school purposes. The number of boys in attendance during the year has averaged 125 ; of these but a very small portion are free scholars. I have secured the services of an excellent Christian man as Head Master, so that under its present administration the school is doing well. The Bible lessons,' to which the first hour in the morning is devoted, continue to be studied with interest by theboys, and I have experienced much pleasure in examining them from week to week. T/ie Girls’ School, which was established two years ago, con­ tinues to improve, and is exerting a silent but effective influence amongst the female population of the ftown. A decided advancehas been made in the substitution of a Christian for the heathen Head Master. This brings the girls under a better influence, and although the attendance may be slightly affected, yet the fact that :l Christian is at the head of the school more than compensates for the loss. The Scriptures have been systematically taught, and even the youngest girls have a lesson in the Catechism. W e rejoice that our schools are becoming more and more Chris­ tian in their influence, and that that influence is being felt so widely. It is impossible in the short space allotted us in this re­ port to say all that we would wish about this branch of our work. Of its importance and value we are firmly convinced, and we trust, that in our efforts to carry it on we shall not be impeded. Village Congregations.—These have increased by ten, and the total number of adults and children connected with them is 1137. There are other villages which I have received under instruction^ some of which have resident Teachers, but which I delay entering in the Statistical Table until they have been longer tested. Those which I have reported have been under instruction more than a year and a half, and have during this period walked in a manner becoming Christians. It has been my privilege to baptize 47 adults and 52 children during the year in these villages. Owing to the prevailing distress which continued the greater part of the year under review, the congregations have not done as much in the way of self-support as I had hoped. A beginning has how­ ever been made, the amount contributed being rupees 133-10-2 for all objects. First on the list is the congregation at Orattur, which gave rupees 30-0-0 towards the support of the pastor. This amount does not include what was given by the Catechist and .Teacher of the


place. In two or three villages the Christians have repaired their churches, and I think the majority of our older Christians show more of a disposition to help themselves than they have hitherto done. We hope next year to be able to report a further advance in this direction. ’ Evangelistic Work.—Owing to the large ingathering from hea­ thenism the time of the helpers has been so much taken up with the work of instructing the Catechumens that they have not done so much preaching to the heathen as in former years. It has not been entirely neglected, however, and I am convinced that some of the Native Assistants never allow anything to interfere with this part of their work. In December I with twelve of my Helpers attended the great Trenomelay feast to preach to the crowds which assembled there. It is estimated, and I think fairly, that 100,000 people were present. Near the temple where the crowds are the largest I had a panetial erected in which there was preaching all day, and at night the magic lantern was exhibited, which attracted great numbers. We made in all 223 different addresses, listened to by 22,979 people. I had never attended a feast of this kind before, and was much struck with the manner in which the Gospel was received. I had expected opposition and abuse, but met with neither, and whatever discussion there was was carried on in a friendly spirit. Village Schools.—Of these I have scarcely anything to report. They were nearly all broken up during the famine, and were not reorganized until near the close of the year. The only one worthy of mention is that at Athanur, which has been kept up during the whole of tire famine, and received a grant from Government of rupees 4S in March last. ' VELLORE.

>': Rev. J. W . Scudder, M.D., Missionary in charge o f the Station and Seminary; Mrs. Scudder, Assistant Missionary; J. Nallatambi, Head Master o f the Seminary; Martin Luther, Second Master o f the Seminary; Sami Sastri, Teacher o f Teluga and Sanscrit; Jaganathan, Abraham William, Catechists; Edward Bedford, Reader and Schoolmaster; Rebekah, Santhai, School-mistresses. The following Native Assistants are employed in the out-stations : Catechists, A. Masillamani, V. Thomas, Jacob R aji; Assistant


Catechists, Israel Andrew, Christian Samuel; Readers, Ponnan David, Samuel Yedamanikkam, David Daniel, lyavu David, C. Solomon, A. Solomon, Anthony; Teachers, S. Treadwell, S. Isaiah, M. Paramanandan, Reuben, Barnabas, Nathaniel; School-mistresses, F. Masillamani, Martha, Santhai, Mary. Rev.,J. W. Scudder writes: Having had charge of this station during only about two months of the year, I am not in a position to make any detailed report con­ cerning it. Affairs have been conducted as best they could in the absence of a superintending Missionary, and were found to be in a fairly healthy condition. I have, since my arrival here, made a tour through the out-stations, in which, while I found some faults to correct, I found a good deal to encourage as well. I trust that the coming year will prove successful in bringing things within the lines of healthy discipline and order. . Three preaching services are held in the Mission church every Sabbath, two in Tamil and one in English; and an English service is conducted every Thursday evening, in the same building, by Doctor Parker, Civil Surgeon of Vellore. These English services are remarkably well attended, and are, we trust, doing much good. The usual Sunday schools have been continued, with the addition of one in English, conducted by Mrs. Parker, with the assistance of Miss Dixie Scudder. The Statistics of the station and out-stations will be found in the General Table embodied in the Report. I will only say. in this connection, that, during my recent tour among the out-stations, it was my privilege to baptize, on the 24th of November, 307 persons; and, on the 8 th of December, 227 more—a total of 534 souls, a large proportion of whom were adults. We hope and pray that they may prove worthy members of the Christian Church. Ih e Hindu Girls’ Schools, or Caste Girls’ Schools, as they are sometimes called, have deteriorated in some degree, owing to the lack of proper superintendence. Mrs. and Miss Scudder are now giving them full attention, and hope to be able to make a good report at the close of the coming year. These schools have, on the whole, done well, notwithstanding the unavoidable neglect from which they have been suffering. The examinations held at the end of the year by the Deputy Inspector of Schools, were pronounced satisfactory, and resulted in the award of a Government grant of


Rs. 379-2-0 to one school, and of Rs. 209-8-0 to the other. These schools are carrying enlightenment and a knowledge of Chris­ tianity into many Hindu homes, which could be reached by no other means within our power. , . The returns of station and out-station Evangelistic w-ork are in­ complete. 1 give w’hat I have received. The reports of the Native Assistants state that they have preached 2,882 times, to 61,481 heathen. ' Accounts of the sales of Bibles, Tracts, and educational works have reached me only in part. I cannot therefore make any definite report on this point. The sales in the Vellore Reading Room alone amounted to 1,278 books, which realized Rs. 80-13-5.THE PREPARANDI SCHOOL.

Henry M. Scudder, M.D., reports: ' This school is designed for the reception and instruction of those who come directly from heathenism, and who in many instances are for this reason left helpless and destitute by friends and relations. Here they are thoroughly tested, and if found worthy as to ability and morals, are admitted into the Seminary at Vellore, or otherwise made use of as circumstances demand. Some bright lights have come forth from this institution, and are doing good service for the Master. The number of scholars during the year has averaged 35, several of whom are famine orphans. The teacher has been faith­ ful in the discharge of his duties, and the boys have made good progress in their studies. They are examined weekly by Mrs. H. M. Scudder. ' Four lads have been transferred to the Seminary at Vellore, five have been sent back to their villages, having shown themselves incapable of learning properly, and one young man has been taken into Mission employ as a school-teacher. ' '

THE ARGOT SEMINARY.

Mr. J. Nallatambi, the (Head Master, writes : I have again the pleasure at the close of another year of pre­ senting to our benefactors and friends the state of our Seminary, and' the progress of the pupils in their studies. On reviewing the past }■ear we have much reason to be thankful to God. The Seminary is under the charge of the resident Missionary, Rev. Dr. J. W. Scudder. Mrs. Scudder attends to its secular


affairs. W e opened the Seminary in January with twenty-nine lads ; of these one has been dismissed on account of disobedience, and another has been honorably discharged on account of continued ill health. Three were received into Mission employment. W e have had nine new admissions, and the number of the lads is now thirty-three. ’ At the beginning of last year a change was made in the teaching staff of the Seminary. lyakan Zechariah, the Assistant Teacher, was transferred to the Preparandi School in Arcot, where an effi­ cient teacher was much neeeded, and Mr. Martin Luther, the Teacher of the Female Seminary in Chittoor, was transferred to this institution. He teaches all the classes skillfully in mathematics and in the English branches. Other secular studies of the inferior classes are sustained by three senior boys alternately, under mv supervision. This plainly shows that the Seminary needs a third teacher, and I hope, therefore, that our Superintendent and the Mission will grant us this favor as soon as they can. However, I have much pleasure in acknowledging that the new arrangement enables me better than before to teach the lads of all classes sys­ tematically in all branches of their Bible studies. And I am glad also to report that Moonshee Sami-Sastry has faithfully discharged his duties in instructing the pupils in Telugu and Sanscrit, As Telugu is the prevailing language of the northern part of this Mis­ sion field, I have not neglected to urge the boys to attend dili­ gently to their Telugu studies. < It is hardly necessary to say that I have endeavored to keep the pupils fully occupied with their studies. That they have advanced in knowledge will, I hope, appear from the report of the committee who examined them at the close of the year. The school has also passed a satisfactory examination by the Government Inspector of Schools. ' With the many means and opportunities of spiritual improve­ ment which the youth have enjoyed, they have in a great measure grown in Divine knowledge, and some of them we trust in grace. Four of the lads have in the course of the year been received to the full communion of the Church, and one other has been baptized. I am able to report that the conduct of the students has been gen­ erally satisfactory. I have appointed monitors among the stu­ dents,; two of them act as monitors for a week, and most of the


larger boys perform this duty alternately. They are responsible for the good conduct, etc., of the pupils at all times except during school hours. They not only admonish their fellow pupils to ob­ serve the rules promotive of sound health, of courtesy, and of morals and piety, but also bring to my notice without delay every case of fault or disobedience. I therefore venture to say that they are forming worthy habits which will stand them in good stead both in their private and public life. The scholars have, by deny­ ing themselves a part of their food every day, collected and con­ tributed to charitable objects. Thus learn they gradually to re­ member and appreciate the words of the Lord Jesus, “ It is more blessed to give than to receive.” In conclusion I commend this Seminary to the sympathy and prayers of all God’s people. As its object is to train up an effi­ cient corps of Catechists, Preachers, and Teachers, the teaching of the Holy Spirit is more essential than any instraction we can be­ stow upon the lads. I humbly beg of our benefactors and friends to pray that they may have that Spirit granted in rich measure. the

g ir l s ’ s e m in a r y

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c h it t o o r .

Miss Martha J. Mandeville reports: Another year has passed, and it becomes again our duty to pre­ sent our friends with a brief history of events as they have trans­ pired in the little world which constitutes our school. Last year we had to tell of uninterrupted work and progress, of health and prosperity. This 3rear we have to tell of trials and afflictions, of sickness and death. In February last intermittent fever made its appearance in the school, and the unwelcome visitor has been our constant guest to the close of the year. Two of our pupils were at death’s door. One has been restored to health, while the other has passed through to the other side, and is we doubt not numbered with the redeemed. She was the one of all our number best pre­ pared to go, and the one whose influence could least be spared. Our Matron also has been suddenly removed from our midst. A few hours of intense suffering, and all was over—the weary body at rest, and the burdened spirit free. Thus unexpectedly ended a long and useful life, leaving a vacant place that we fear will not soon be filled. In the face of these severe afflictions our friends will not be surprised to hear that our work has been interrupted


and our progress hindered. When the fever was at its worst there were not less than a dozen names on the sick list, and it was diffi­ cult to keep up the usual routine of the .school. The conduct of the girls has given me great satisfaction, especially since the death of the Matron. Burdened with the extra duty of looking after even the smallest details of the school, nothing has given me greater pleasure than the universal expression of a desire to be helpful and prevent unnecessary trouble. The pupil teachers have relieved me of a great deal of care, and have given unmistakable evidence that they are capable of putting into practice the’ principles and methods in which they have been trained. Last year we had a second Master for two hours a day only. This year the pupil teachers have done all the work, enabling us to dispense with his services entirely. Our number is considerably diminished since our last report. Of the forty .then on the roll, seven have married, two have gone to' their homes, one has been removed by death, and two pupil teach­ ers have gone out-unmarried and are maintaining themselves as teachers, one in a boarding-school and the other in a day-school. "While so many have left us, only five of the vacant places have been filled by new pupils, and our present number is thirty-three. The custom of demanding fees from those of the pupils who can afford to pay them is continued, and we are convinced that the prin­ ciple involved is having a: good effect. Parents are beginning to understand that they are not conferring a great favor on us by send­ ing their children to our school. During the year especial attention has been given to the study of the Bible, and a class has been formed which we propose to call The Bible woman’s training class.” "We have long felt the need of this, having frequently observed how incapable most of our pupil teachers are of making a practical application of Bible truths when called upon to give a Bible lesson to some of the lower classes. After much prayerful consideration and preparation, five of the pupils were admitted to the Lord’s Supper at our last communion, and they have since shown that they desire to walk consistently with the profession they have made. A habit of prayer prevails in the school, and there are frequent meetings for prayer aside from


the regular weekly prayer-meeting, which is also attended by the women of the congregation. 1 Ever}' year brings us fresh proof of the importance of our work, and gives us more convincing evidence of the truth of the remark, that “ the future success of our Mission depends mainly on the careful and efficient management of our boarding-schools.” HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARY.

Henry Martyn Scudder, M.D., Medical Missionary; Mapillamoney Pillay, First Class Hospital Assistant; Mahomed Moorthasau, Compounder; Summugum Moodely, Canocapillay; Miss Chomedley, Certified Midwife. B r a n c h D i s p e n s a r y a t W a l l a j a h p e t t .— Samuel Veerarabgoo, First Class Dresser; David Muni, Compounder; Najama, Midwife. . With grateful and encouraged hearts we lay before our friends another annual medical report. The year has been of great in­ terest to us. W e have been blessed in our work and have been enabled to extend and enlarge it. H o s p i t a l a n d D i s p e n s a r y a t R a n e p e t t .—This institution was established in 1866, and has therefore been in operation more than twelve years. It has always been in the charge and under the management of the Doctor of the Mission. When the dispen­ sary was first opened the people approached us cautiously and timidly, in numbers very few, and usually from the lower castes. Now all is changed. The highest classes, both Hindus and Ma. homedans, come to us without the shadow of a fear, well assured that they will not see, hear, nor receive anything that can injure them in any respect. From a small and insignificant beginning the institution has grown to be one of the largest and most popular dispensaries in the district. When, a few years ago, the Mission found that they could not command the funds to enlarge and extend the scope of the institu­ tion, our Local Fund Board came forward and generously supplied the means, so that the dispensary has gone oil steadily increasing in capacity and usefulness. Three years ago a Lying-in Hospital was opened in connection with the institution. As a rule lying-in hospitals have been unsuccessful in this Presidency. Many there­ fore said we would fail in establishing one. W e are happy to say, however, that it has been a complete success. The first year the


number of cases was 36. the second year 206, and the past year 215. The work in the dispensaiy and hospital has been conducted very much in the same manner as in former years, save that it has been on a larger scale, owing to the famine and its effects. Large numbers of very bad cases were continually sent in to us from the district, and such cases as needed special care and treatment were transferred by me from the Relief Camp to the hospital. The number of new outpatients has been 8,289. The number of new in-patients 1,346. The average daily attendance has been 87. The total daily attendance throughout the year amounts to 31,938, The whole cost of the dispensary and hospital for the year has been rupees 9,524-14-3, exclusive of the salary of the surgeon in charge. Of this sum rupees 4,151-8-7 were expended on the diet, etc., of the hospital patients; rupees 2,512-14-10 in the purchase of medicines, surgical instruments, etc.; and rupees 2,860-6-10 for the salaries of medical subordinates, midwife, and pay of establishment. ' • There have been 197 surgical operations performed during the year. The number is not as large as usual owing to the absence of the medical officer who was on the Hills for two months. Evangelistic WorTc.—The Gospel is preached daily at the dis­ pensary. As the patients arrive, they are seated upon benches in the large verandah of the building. When a goodly number is gathered, a portion of Scripture is read, and the truth made known as simply and clearly as possible. The in-patients lying in their beds in the adjoining wards are able to hear perfectly all that is said. Portions of Scripture, tracts, and books are sold or distrib­ uted gratuitously. It may be asked whether this method of evangelization is success­ ful ? Most assuredly it is, though we may perhaps never know how much good is accomplished until the last great day. Many cases of conversion have occurred within the walls of the hospital, and numbers of others who have come over to us have affirmed that the preaching they- heard on the dispensary verandah first led them to inquire after the truth. New Dispensary at Wallajahpett.—W e have had the pleasure this year of completing the erection, of the new branch dispensary at Wallajahpett. This building consists of four rooms, with a long, spacious, terraced verandah eighteen feet wide, and is


situated on a large open piece of ground lying on the right side of the main street. "Wallajahpett may be termed a model native town, and has often been called the *•' Gem of North Arcot.” It is a municipal town of about twelve thousand inhabitants, without a single European resident, and heretofore without a dispensary or medical institution of any kind. The streets are wide, straight, well kept and wonderfully clean, and the houses along the principal streets are uniformly built, so that the effect is very pleasing. Every effort has been made to make the new dispensary building ornamental as well as useful. The compound is bounded on three sides by a high turfed embankment, and in front by a handsome ■wall with wide gateways. A smooth, semi circular, well metaled road leads up to the dispensary, which is itself a fine, airy, and at­ tractive looking building. THE JA PA N MISSION.

(Organized in 1859.) NAGASAKI STATION. Missionaries.'— H. Stout. Assistant Missionaries.— Stout, Miss E. T. Farrington, Miss M. J. Farrington. Native Licentiate.—Hr. A. Segawa. Native Unlicensed P a id Helpers.—Mr. J. Tonegawa, Mr. T. Tsuge. One organized Church with 22 baptized members. One out>station at Kagoshima about 100 miles south. YOKOHAMA STATION.

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Missionaries.—Revs. S. It. Brown, D.D., J. H. Ballagh, E. R. Miller. Assistant Missionaries.—Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Ballagh, Mrs. Miller, Miss E. C. Witbeck, Miss H. Brown, Miss H. L. Winn. Native Licentiates.—A. Inagaki, N. Amenomorl, T. Ito, M. Uyemura, H. Yamamoto (Theological student). One organized Church with 16S baptized members. Two out-stations—Mishima and Nagoya. TOKIYO STATION. Missionaries.—Revs. G. F. Verbeck, D.D. (in America), Jas. L. Amerman. Assistant Missionaries.—Mrs. Verbeck (in America), Mrs. Amerman. Native Ordained Minister.—'Rev. M. Okuno. Licentiates.—S. Maki, K. Ibuka, Mr. Fujiu (student). Three organized Churches with 110 baptized members. .


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Nagasaki Station.—^One organized Church with 22 baptized members. One preaching place. One Sunday-school of 12 scholars. One Mission out-station at Kagoshima, 100 miles to the south, opened in the fall, where are a licensed Helper and his wife and one other paid Helper. _ 1. W o r k D o n e D u r i n g t h e Y e a r . — 1. Teaching.—On account of many inquiries for instruction in English having been made, after the close of the Government school last year, an attempt was made to meet the want by opening a school for young men, but so few availed themselves of the opportunity that it was given up at the end of the year. Two young men are under regular theological instruction, however, and occasionally exercise their gifts in preaching. Since the summer Miss Farrington has been teaching a class, such as she was able to get together, so that it might form a nucleus of a school. 2. Preaching.—The regular services have been attended as usual by the church members and strangers in the city. For some reason Missionary effort fails for the most part to reach the resi­ dents, and those who identify themselves with the Churches are quite cut oft' from association and live in the place almost literally as “ pilgrims and strangers.” And yet the field is in many respects a very encouraging one, for visitors are constantly in the city, a natural centre of communication, and come to hear the preaching, and so though those who sow the seed are stationary, it is scattered far and wide. The fruit will doubtless be found, perhaps, at no very distant day. Five new names have been added to the Church during the year, two by baptism, and three from other Churches. One member has been dismissed by letter. , The two baptized were widows, one sixty-one and the other sixty-seven years old. The latter is a marked example of the power of the Spirit to change, and of Christ to save even despisers of God and His Word. A Sunday-school was commenced in the autumn by two young women connected with the Church. About a dozen children have attended, though not very regularly. However, it promises to suc­ ceed well. The fact that these children are allowed to come, is a hopeful sign that old prejudices are probably beginning to wear away. .


3. Tcurs and Out-stations.—Mr. Segawa, one of the Nagasaki students, after a year's course in the Theological School in Tokiyo, was licensed at the spring meeting of the Chiu Kuwai, and passed part of his examination for ordination. He returned in the sum­ mer, and was, married to Tsuya Fujiyama, who had had the advan­ tage of three years of study and discipline in the “ Ferris Seminary.” In the autumn he went down with another of the students to open work in Kagoshima, the principal city of the country of Satsuma, and some hundred miles south of Nagasaki. They were so much encouraged, that towards the end of the year Mr. Segawa returned to Nagasaki for his wife, and they have since been living in Kago­ shima. They are very hopeful of their work. The people are eager to hear Christianity and are indeed in quite a state of ferment over the rival claims of Buddhism, Hinduism, Greek and Protestant Christianity. Mrs. Segawa brought down with her a little organ, and her play­ ing and singing add much to thevattractiveness of the meetings, to which generally 60 or 70 persons come. Of these there are some 5 or 6 school-teachers who are interested, and asked to have a Sunday-school for their children, which has since been started.^ II. T h e P h e s e n -t A s p e c t o f t h e N a g a s a k i S t a t i o n is not very bright. It is one of the two oldest stations in Japan, having been established in 1859; a station where much work and money have been expended, and yet which we feared would be left to die out, since the Churches at home did not send the men necessary to carry on the work. Mr. and Mrs. Stout have been left in that field too long alone. ~We had hoped, when the Woman’s Board determin­ ed to send out the Miss Farringtons to establish a school, that the Churches would soon follow up this, and send another Missionary to assist Mr. Stout. H I. F u t u r e P r o s p e c t s .—There are causes, however, for thank­ fulness and hope. W e are happy to know that the Woman’s Board is determined to carry on to success the Nagasaki school in spite of some disheartening circumstances connected with its estab­ lishment. It will require not only faith and vigorous efforts, ' but also wisdom in planning and carrying on the work. W e hope and pray that all may be given by the Father of Lights, from whom cometh every good and perfect gift, and that which has been begun in faith may be carried on to a glorious completion.


There is one feature of tne Nagasaki work which is entirely bright, and we take especial pleasure in calling the attention of the Churches at home to it. It is the planting of an out-station in Ka­ goshima, the principal town of the country of Satsuma. The great hope during all the past years of darkness has been to find an en­ trance into the south of the island. Nagasaki is the key to Kiushiu, and we have been watching and praying that the door so long kept locked might be opened to the entrance of the truth. This has been at last accomplished, and an out-station has been es­ tablished in Satsuma, with every prospect of success. Mr. and Mrs. Segawa, who have charge of it, are earnest and. diligent, and if natural abilities, training and piety are qualifications from which good results may be expected, there is reason to look for favorable reports from them. YOKOHAMA STATION.

There is one organized Church, with a baptized membership of 168. Connected with it directly or indirectly are six or seven Sunday-schools, with 248 scholars, and four regular preaching places. There are two Mission out-stations. One at Mishima and its vicinity, some fifty miles from Yokohama, where are 28 baptized persons besides the regular licensed Helper, Mr. Ito, who has been stationed there since the spring, though the place has been visited by Missionaries and native Helpers as an out-station for some years. The other station is Nagoya, a large town about half way to Kujoto on the Tokaido. This was opened in the fall with a licensed Helper, Mr. Uyemura, and a licensed student, Mr. Yama­ moto, who will probably return and finish his course in the Theo­ logical School. There is here also the “ Ferris Seminary,” a boarding-school for girls, with 25 pupils in charge of Mrs. Miller and Miss Whitbeck, and the “ Senshi Gakko,” a preparatory school for boys and young men, opened in the fall by Miss Brown and Miss 'Winn, with at present 10 day and 12 boarding pupils. I . W o r k D o n e d u r i n g t h e Y e a r .— 1. Translation Work.— Dr. Brown’s time has been chiefly occupied in the translation of the New Testament Scriptures, which probably has advanced as rapidly as was compatible with its faithful execution. The books translated within the last twelve months are I.’ II. III. Epp. John; I. II. Epp.


Corinthians; Ep. Ephesians; I. II. Epp. Thessalonians; Ep. Phile­ mon and Ep. Philippians. 01 these the Epistles of John and those to the Corinthians have been published, and the rest will soon be ready for the press, as they require only a final revision, chiefly to guard against mistakes of the copyists. The books of the New Testament already published, are the Gospels, Acts, Romans, Galatians, Hebrews, and Corinthians. The Committee hope to finish the translation of the New Testament dur­ ing the present year. Dr. Brown has also been engaged with Mr. Miller two mornings of the week during the year, but with many interruptions, in re­ vising the translation of the Heidelberg Catechism made 'by Mr. Stout. This revision was begun more than a year ago, and has taken much more time than had at first been expected. It is now well on toward completion, and after a careful re-reading will, we hope, be published in the spring. The translation of the “ Child’s Catechism,” made some years ago by Mr. Ballagh, has been revised and a new edition struck off.. This was undertaken at the instance of a native publisher in Tokiyo, who asked permission of the Mission to print a new edition of the Catechism with a few corrections. It was thought better for the Mission itself to publish it, as then'the books could be sold for cost price. 2. Teaching—Schools.—(1.) Ferris Seminary.—The regular work of the Seminary has continued without interruption during the year, Mrs. Miller teaching the morning Bible lesson and under­ taking the general housekeeping and care of the scholars’ health. Miss ’Whitbeck has sole charge of the school-roonis. The whole number of pupils during the year has been thirtyseven; the average number is twenty-eight, of which’ four were day scholars. Of the whole number twenty-six were entirely self­ supporting. Of the remainder six were assistant pupils ; of these but two remained at the close of the year. Three pupils received help to the extent of their board, that is three dollars per month, themselves furnishing their books, bedding, and clothing. One pupil received board and two dollars per month for clothing and books. One pupil received half board, viz : one dollar and a half per month, her brother furnishing the rest. These are all who have received any assistance. The average of the


school is below that of last year, which may give the impression that the school is not in a prosperous condition. W e hope, how­ ever, that this is not the case. The class of older girls who left us could hardly be expected to remain much longer. Five of the pupils have married during the year; three of these who were Chris­ tians have married heathen; one, a Christian, has married a Chris­ tian, and is doing effective work with her husband in the Nagasaki field ; the fifth had not been in school long and was still a heathen when she left. Of the six assistant pupils, all of whom were Christians, two left to be married to heathen, as stated above, and two to live in To­ kiyo. One of these latter is now teaching in a private school in Tokiyo, and the other, Hiza Okuno, who was not able to return in the fall on account of her health, is now with us as teacher of Japanese etiquette to the little girls, something very important in the eyes of the Japanese. The other two assistants are still with us, earnest, faithful workers for our Master. They have established a Sunday-school in the native town, or rather gotten permission to teach on Sunday in a private school owned and taught by a Japan­ ese during the week. While we have been so tried in regard to our older pupils this year, we have had great cause for rejoicing over our dear little ones. Nine of them were received into the full communion of the Church the first Sabbath of June. One of these, Kaku Ishii, was baptized with her parents some years since, and is the first Protes­ tant child in Japan who has taken upon herself the vows assumed for her in childhood by her parents. She is now eleven years old, and her Christian character is most beautifully developed. From the beginning of the year until 'the summer vacation, Mrs. Miller was engaged in some outside work also. She had been invited to teach the Bible twice a week in a private Japanese school of sixty poor children near us. A t first nearly all the children remained after their school hour and gladly listened to the teaching, but gradually a feeling of opposition grew up, coming probably from the teacher, and the number of children diminished to about thirty. When they asked to have the Bible taught they really did not know what they were asking, and when they found out, they could hardly refuse to hear one whom they had invited. Since the sum­ mer vacation Mrs. Miller has made repeated efforts to teach in the


school, but thus far has been put off with various excuses though never positively refused. She was able also with the help of Hiza Okuno to hold meetings in two other places every week, and her efforts there have been blessed in the conversion of some of those whom she taught. Miss Whitbeck has devoted herself earnestly to study and teaching in the school. . Teaching.— (2'.) Senshi Gak'ko, or Preparatory School.—W e are happy to announce the opening of this school, which we hope will soon grow into a known and valued institution. I t was nominally begun in June by Miss Winn and Miss Brown with only five or six pupils. After the summer vacation it was opened again in the fall with an entirely new set of scholars. For several weeks the pupils were very few until after advertising in the papers of Tokiyo and Yokohama. A t the close of the year there were fifteen names on the roll, but since the opening of the new year the number has steadily increased till now there are twelve boarders and ten dayscholars, and new pupils are coming every week, some even from the Tokiyo schools. After the morning Bible lesson" by Mr. Miller, Miss Brown and Miss Winn have the English classes from 9 to 12:30, in reading, writing, conversation in English, arithmetic, and algebra, which studies mark the advancement of the present pupils. A course of five years has been laid out, however, and it will be followed as far as practicable. Mr. Kumano, a celebrated Chinese scholar, father of one of our native Elders, has been engaged to take the classes, from 2 to 5 p . m ., in Chinese and Japanese literature. He is assisted by Mr. Yamazaki, who teaches the younger boys and has general oversight of the school, and whose wife has care of the boarders’ meals. Mr. Amenomori, who is at present the translator in the Ferris Seminary, has also been engaged for-the same office here. W e hope the Churches at home will not think us importunate because we have so repeatedly urged the importance of beginning and maintaining this school. I t must be to a great extent, if not entirely, the nursery of our theological students., And what we have lost during the time in which there was no school connected will! the Mission, can be seen by glancing at the statistical tables sent home by the Council of the three Missions. In these it is shown that while we have.seven licensed Helpers, compared with


three of the Presbyterian Mission, (we do not speak of the Scotch Mission as they have been so short a time in the field,) we have only six students in the Theological School to their eleven or twelve. And this difference will be much more apparent next year, because none of the students in the preparatory school now could enter the Theological School for more than a year, even should they become Christians within that time. Then again, out of the eight persons taken under the care of the Chiu Kuwai last fall, with a view to their becoming ministers of the Gospel, only one was connected with our Churches, and he should have joined the Chiu Kuwai long before, as he was one of our oldest workers. With this in view we would continue to urge on the Church the vital importance of putting this school on a firm foundation, and of sending some one who can take charge of it. W e do hope that in time the funds may be raised to enable us to build a Boys’ Seminary, but at present we do not feel as if we ought to urge this point upon the home Churches that are suffering so much in so many ways. 3. Preaching.—Mr. Ballagh resigned his post of acting pastor to the Church late in the spring, from which time Mr. Akira Inagaki has succeeded him, though he had been receiving a regular salary from the Church and working for them since the year before. He was licensed at the spring meeting of the Chiu Kuwai, and in the fall passed all his examinations for ordination, but this was deferred till next spring because the call of the Church had not been made out. A t a church meeting held at the end of the year he was elected as acting pastor for another six months. The statistics of the Church are given in the accompanying table. The total number of baptized persons on the roll is 163. This includes the names of many who are traveling or residing in other parts of the country, and of, some mere nominal Christians, whose names swell the roll, but whose faces are rarely, if ever, seen in church. One of these lately called before the Consistory has promised amendment of life. • There are now some ten candidates for baptism who are regularly instructed by the church officers. At the Annual Meeting of the Mission it was determined to light and open the chapel for service on Sunday evenings, for the benefit of the townspeople or strangers of Yokohama. This has been done, and since the first of December, services have been


held there in the evening as well as the morning. But on account of there being two other services at the same time which church members attend, the audiences at all have been very slim, those at the chapel being from 20 to 40. '■ Besides the regular morning and evening services in the church, preaching is kept up in four other places, v iz : A t Kanagawa on Sunday afternoon; this is very poorly attended. At Chojamachi on Sunday evening; and at-Kotobukicho on Thursday even­ ing; both of these places are in the Japanese quarter of Yokoha­ ma, and on Sunday evening the service at the c: American Mission Home,” No. 212 Bluff, is still kept up, and the church prayer­ meeting is held there on Wednesday evening. There are besides, six or seven Sunday-schools connected directly or indirectly with the Church. Dr. Brown is Superintendent of that at the church, where there are 30 scholars. The native Elders have charge of two others of 51 scholars. Then there are two in con­ nection with the two Girls’ Schools of the “ Home ” and the “ Ferris Seminary,” of 100 and 37 scholars respectively. Two of the elder girls in the “ Ferris Seminary” have started another in the native town, where are some 30 scholars. There is also a prayer-meeting held on Friday afternoons, by the girls of the “ Home ” and “ Ferris Seminary.” Besides these, the ladies and scholars of the “ Home ” hold meetings for prayer and instruction among the Japanese, which should be mentioned here because their results are all gathered into our Church. 4. Tours and Out-stations.— The most important station at pres­ ent is in Mishima, under the charge of one of our licensed Helpers, Mr. Ito Tokichi, who has been located there since spring. Two tours were made there during the summer by Dr. Brown and Mr. Miller, besides which, there were three of the students from the Seminary laboring in that region during the summer. Mishima is a large town just at the foot of the Hakone range of mountains, about fifty, miles from Yokohama, and the centre or market town of a great many villages. No Church has yet been organized in that region, and so all the believers are members of the Yokohama Church. There are in all 28 baptized persons : six at Hakone, the village at the top of the pass; nine at Yamanaka, a small village half way down the other side ; two at Daiba, a small place a few miles beyond Mishima, and eleven at Numadzu, the principal town


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/

in that part of the country, but not so central as Mishima, though at this latter there are no baptized believers. The Christians at Numadzu and Hakone applied to the Chiu Kuwai to have Churches organized in their respective towns, but as through some mis足 take they expected to have chapels built at the same time, it was thought best to defer their requests. Besides these places of regular services, occasional meetings are held at Orniya, a village at the foot of Fujinoyama, and a great rendezvous of pilgrims during the summer, and Mr. Ito has made preaching excursions into different parts of the neighboring country. There are also Sunday-schools started at Mishima, Daiba, and Yamanaka. The Christians at the different towns have not been very earnest or active, but for some time the work at Mishima was very encouraging, and we had hoped that a Church would be built up there to which all the Christians could belong. During the sum足 mer, however, a Buddhist priest gave lectures there to prove that the sun turns round the earth,, and with such- success that he preju足 diced the people against Christianity, so that the audiences at the preaching services greatly diminished, and now only the regular Sunday meetings are kept up. To compensate for this the interest in Yamanaka and Numadzu has greatly increased. A t the former the head man of the village has become interested, and called from Mishima a believer, who has not yet been baptized, to take charge of the village school. A Sunday-school has also been started, and the people generally are interested in Christianity. A t Numadzu Mr. Ito has been trying to get a suitable preaching place because the believers there are not very ardent, either in their faith or works, and without regular meetings are growing colder perceptibly, and even those who wished to learn lost interest since they did not know where or when the next meeting would be. A t first they met in the house of a relative, of one of the believers, but this person, not being a Christian himself, found it inconvenient to lend his house regularly, and they were obliged to seek a place of worship elsewhere, but until the opening of the new year, were unable to obtain one. Mr. Ito writes that he opened the new preaching place on Sunday, the 19th of January, and since then has had as many as one hundred hearers at one time. He has written also very joyfully of a visit he had made to Hakone. It was during the Week of Prayer, one of the meetings of which had


been appointed for that place. He says, he had thought that the faith of the Hakone people was as cold as ice or snow, which is plenty there, but he had been rejoiced to find three inquirers after the truth. This is truly refreshing, because we all thought the Hakone people were Gospel hardened. They are too much taken up with money-making from the foreigners during the summer to care for their souls. W e have to report the abandonment of one of our out-stations, Uraga, some ten miles down the bay. Mr. Naka was staying there as a regular Helper, but he became discouraged and was also troubled with his head, and so left about the first of November, and is now living at his home in Tokiyo. W e had hoped to be able to carry on the work there from Yokohama,by sending down one of the young' men once or twice a month, as there was no one we could spare to send there permanently. This, however, we have not been able to accomplish. New Work at Out-stations.—The new work that has been under­ taken under this head, has been the opening of a station at Nagoya, a large city, said to be the third or fourth largest in the empire, and about half way to Kiyoto, on the Tokaido, within two days of Yoko­ hama by steamer. The Methodist Episcopal Mission is the only one that has opened work there at present besides ourselves, though some of our church members live there and have been working privately for some time past, and were very anxious to have regular preaching there. So towards the end of the year we sent down one of our licensed Helpers, Masahisa Uyemura, and a licensed student, Hideteru Yamamoto, who is in the senior class of the Theological School. The latter will probably return to finish his studies after a while. They report the work doing well, though there is no partic­ ular eagerness to hear the Gospel. Besides the place opened in Nagoya they hold services also at Arimatsumura, a little village near by where one of the church members from Yokohama lives, and where he has held meetings for instruction in the Bible. They have been asked to go to other towns some ten or twelve miles dis­ tant, where there are several persons desirous of hearing the truth. It has been extremely difficult to get a suitably furnished house for preaching purposes. They have at last succeeded in getting one, however. Among those who come regularly to the preaching there are some five or six who seem to be sincere in their inquiries, and of these two arq^certainly sincere Christians.


II. The Present Aspect of the Yokohama Station is very cheer足 ing. The work is growing as fast as we are able to keep pace with it. The Church is growing in numbers and we hope in efficiency, and though there are some whose faith is cold and well nigh dead, we must remember that a great part of the membership is composed of the scholars in the schools or poor people, neither class of which can do much church work. Most of our workers were taken away when the Theological School was removed to. Tokiyo, and we point with pride to their work there, knowing that what is the loss of the Yokohama Church is the gain of the Church in Tokijm. The Pre足 paratory School has been opened, and since the opening of the year has advanced so rapidly in numbers and we hope in reputation, that before long we may expect to have more than we can accommodate. 'What we need in order to make this school what it was intended to be, that is, a nursery for the Theological School, is some one to have oversight of the students and bring them under Christian home in足 fluences. The morning Bible lessons and Sabbath instruction can足 not do all that is needed to make the scholars willing to devote their lives to the Christian ministry. We hope that during the year we may be permitted to welcome another earnest worker to our Missionary circle, who has come to take the oversight of this school. The great advance*the work has taken in Mishima since we were able to send a permanent Helper there, is full of encouragement and makes us eager for the time when we shall have many such young men to send, and the means to send them wherever they are needed. W e are hoping for great results from the'new work opened in Nagoya. It is a very important place, and one where the Gospel has not yet been preached, but at the same time a great centre of Buddhist influence. The work there will be trying to our young men's patience and faith. W e commend it earnestly to your prayers. TOKIYO STATION.

In this station there are three organized Churches, with a baptized membership of 129. Connected with the Churches are three Sunday-schools, with 58 scholars, and six regular preaching places. There are no Mission out-stations. Here also is the Union Theological School, in which the Rev. James L. Amerman is one of the Permanent Instructors, and Rev.


E. R. Miller, Assistant Instructor. In the Theological School are six students under the care of our Mission, two of whom have been licensed by the Chiu Kuwai. I. Work done during the year.—W hat is now the Tokiyo sta­ tion, included at the beginning of the year our Mission’s share in the work of the Union Theological School, the Kojimachi Church, and the Church at Ueda. I.' Teaching.— The Union Theological School completed its first year’s session June 25. The advantages anticipated from its or­ ganization have been largely realized. Our students from their con­ tact with others, who like them are looking forward to the ministry, have been benefited in their manner of thinking and in their diligence in study. The instructors also have been able to direct their work in fewer channels and with greater effect. I t is with great regret that we parted with Rev. Dr. Yerbeck early in the year, and we earnestly look for his return in vigorous health to resume his work with us. His lectures on Christian Evi­ dences were discontinued, and those on Homiletics were taken by Mr. Miller. , Seven of the young men under the care of our Mission were licensed to preach by the Chiu Kuwai at the April meeting, and of these, four have been withdrawn from the school to do evangelistic work, and one to assist in teaching and translating at Yokohama. We expect, however, that all of these will return by-and-by to continue their studies. Our Mission is now represented on the roll of students by only six men. Their improvement and"diligence are highly commendable. During, the last summer vacation all of our students were engaged in evangelistic work under the direction of the Mission. In reference to the school, as a whole, we are happy to say that it is no longer to be regarded in the light of an experi­ ment, but as an institution which has fully established its claim to existence, and which furnishes great cause for thankfulness and hope. The total number of students is now twenty-four, classified as, eight Seniors, nine Middlers, and seven Juniors. The new building has not yet been begun, owing to a difficulty on the part of one Mission in securing the necessary funds, but we hope to build during the year, and already have secured a lot on the site of the hotel in Tsukiji, which burned down, a short time ago. For further particulars we would refer to the Annual Report of the


Union Theological School, embodied in the Annual Eeport of the Council of the Three Missions, which this is not intended to su­ persede. In addition to the classes in the Theological School, Mr. Amer­ man has continued to meet a small class of Helpers once a week for general Biblical instruction. Mr. Miller has been enabled to give his lectures once a week in the Theological School through the convenience of the trains run­ ning between Yokohama and Tokiyo. 2. Preaching.—The attendance at the Kojimachi Church contin­ ued to increase during the first half of the year, and will probably increase no more till it can be provided with a chapel. An increase of twenty-seven during the year, on confession of their faith in Christ, tells of the Master’s blessing. There is a good interest among the peo­ ple and a disposition to contribute to their own maintenance as far as possible. They cannot give largely, but have made a beginning by paying a little more than half their rent and all the incidental expenses of their place of meeting. There are preaching services twice on the Sabbath and once through the week; also, a Sabbathschool and prayer-meeting, and a woman’s meeting which was be­ gun about November. (Jeda.—Mr. Miller made a trip here in the spring. He found the work which had been begun so favorably atTakasaki, a large castle­ town, about halfway to Ueda, was not in a flourishing condition, and although we sent two Helpers there during the summer, it has been since abandoned. Of the five who had been baptized there, only two remained firm in the faith, an old woman and a young man. This latter has since entered the Theological School with a view of studying, so as to become a Missionary to Corea, should the way be open when he graduates, otherwise he will preach in Japan. The Church at Ueda is flourishing and filled with zeal, and good works. While there, Mr. Miller baptized nine adults and lour infants, and preached in all the out-stations in the neighboring villages. • Towards the end of the year Mr. Maki, the acting pastor, who was licensed at the fall meeting of the Chiu Kuwai, and whom we hope to ordain next spring, writes that the services are kept up as follows, viz: Preaching services at Yazawa four times a month, also at a vil­


lage called Nishiwaki. They were obliged to give up one of the preaching places in town and have'.been looking for another. There are services also at Tanaka once a week. Some of these are con­ ducted by the pastor and the others by the church officers. The Sunday services are the same as formerly, being two preaching ser­ vices, three Bible-class services, and one Sunday-school. The evening service, however, is now undertaken by one of the church officers, so as to give Mr. Maki more time for pastoral work. The attendance on the meetings is good and the condition of the people hopeful. The women of the Church also hold two meetings a month for prayer and study of the Bible. This was induced by a sermon preached by Mr. Maki, on John 5:39, “ Search the Scrip­ tures.” The whole of these services and the support of their pastor are entirelv undertaken by the Church, and does not cost the Mission anything. There are eleven persons wishing to be baptized who receive special instruction every Thursday. Among them is the wife of the Chief Judge of that court, who himself often comes with the rest and is not far from the Kingdom of God. ' . In conclusion Mr. Maki writes : “ Some of the church members are hot and some are lukewarm, and some are tares. But after all the Church is advancing in every respect. Please remember all of us in your prayer to God.” During the summer we sent up one of the theological students who took Mr. Maki’s place while he visited his old home in Nagaoka near Niigata. Mr. Miller found on his return through Komoro, a large town about the size of Udea, some 12 miles this side of it, such an eagerness to hear tl'ie Gospel preached, that he tried to have some come from Ueda to teach the people regularly, but the Church had too much on its hands to undertake this new work. Possibly there may be arrangements made this year by which a preaching place can be opened in Komoro. • New Wor/fe.—Early in the year Mr. Amerman opened a preach­ ing place at Neribecho in a section of Tokiyo called Shitaya, threefourths of a mile distant from the scene of any Protestant Mission­ ary effort. There was great difficulty in finding a room, and the best that could be found was small. For some weeks there was


very little encouragement to labor in the place, but since then the attendance has increased, and now from 20 to 40 hear the Gospel there twice on Sundays and once in the week. There have been ;as many as 60 there, but this does not often happen. The first Ini its of this work were gathered on the third Sabbath of Novem­ ber, when two converts were baptized. In this place the Rev. Mr. Okuno usually preaches on Sabbath afternoons, and one of the students in the evening, and half the .audience stand outside and listen through the lattice which extends ■across the house front. During the spring several believers living at Wadsmura and Su:gito, about thirty-five miles north from Tokiyo, sent to us asking for some provision by which they could be’ further instructed, and the knowledge of the Gospel be extended about them. As one or .two of these were connected with a Church under the care of the .American Presbyterian Mission, and the others with our Church at Yokohama, and as both that Mission and ours had in the past done •some work in these places, a conference was held with our Presby­ terian brethren resident here, in which they very cordially made ■over to us any claim they might have on the places as a field of ■work. Arrangements were therefore made to send one of our theo­ logical students every Saturday, who should stay till Monday and render all possible service. During the vacation a licensed Helper was stationed there for two months, .and then the former arrange­ ments resumed. In consequence of the place being beyond treaty limits, Mr. Amerman did not visit the work there till October, when he was .able to spend two days there with Rev. Mr. Okuno, and to gather .these believers with others, who were the fruits of our short labors, into a Church. There are now 14 members, and there is an attend­ ance of from 40 to 60 at- the services from the beginning. They are doing something for their own support, defraying all their ex­ penses except the traveling expenses of their Sabbath supplies. Preaching in the Prisons.—Several of our Christian workers^ among whom is our ordained Evangelist, have united in maintaining a weekly service in two of the Tokiyo prisons; i.e., at Tsukudajima and Ichigaya. In the former of these there is much interest and sometimes large congregations, including some of the prison officials and some of the newspaper editors, and others who are imprisoned ■ 4


for political offenses. In this way it is. quite possible that some"who will be eminent in the future history of Japan, hear the Word o f f o d where otherwise they would not. ” In, Conclusion.—It seems to be useless to appeal for more Mis­ sionaries, but if the Church at home could but know the amount of work which the Lord enables a man to do here, and appreciate the speedy and large results of that work, which are not by any meansentirely shut up in the figures which represent the additions to the communion of the church, we fully belieye the needed men would soon be found and Sent. It is hard to measure the1necessities of one field with those of another and say which are the greater. Each’ has its own advantages and difficulties and prospects, but if there are young men in our Church who have capacity for work and are willing to work, and who are full of love to the Saviour and wish toaid the Church in obeying the great command, it is hard to believe that they can find a more inviting field on earth than this of Japan. THE IN D IA N AGENCIES.

'

Mr. John H. Stout has continued as the agent of the Pimoand Maricopa Reserve, including 4,500 Indians, and of the PapagoReservation, inhabited by upwards of 6,000 Indians. The Colo­ rado River and the San Carlos, or White Mountain Reservation,, are still under the care of the Board. There are upon them more than 5,000 Indians. There is no school, no chapel, and no church on or near any of these Reservations. The Board exceedingly regrets its inability to make any provision for the secular or relig­ ious education' of these bodies aggregating over 16,000 souls, placed’ in our hands under specially favorable conditions and very desirousto have schools«and to attain the civilization of the white man as Car­ as possible. THE WOMAN’S BOARD. The receipts of the Woman’s Board during the year have been$8,454.55, an increase of nearly $1,400 upon the income of the previous year. Ten local Auxiliaries and five Mission circles have been added to its roll, making the number of Auxiliaries sixty-four. One of the most attractive features of the year has been the col­ lection in a few weeks of upwards of $2,000 to put up a building


on the island of Kolongsu for the Girls’ Boarding-school of the Amoy Mission, of which sum the President of the Woman’s Board generously contributed one thousand dollars. The gifts for this pur­ pose were checked when in full flow, because enough had been received. If it had been proper or necessary to allow them to con­ tinue, it is certain that a much larger amount would have been con­ tributed with alacrity and pleasure. , Of the invaluable services of the Woman’s Board in diffusing Missionary intelligence, in securing the attention of the family circle, in increasing a spirit of self-denying and prayerful liberality, the Board has the highest appreciation, and can only again repeat its great and constant indebtedness to this indispensable assistant. THE FINANCES. The receipts of the year have been: From Churches, $24,837,­ 06; Sabbath-schools, $5,469,87; Individuals through Churches, $6,673,63; Individuals not through Churches, $1,955,30 : miscel­ laneous sources, $4,382,31; Legacies, $15,125,32; making a total of $58,443,49, or $10,642,38 less than that of the last year. The income from Sabbath-schools has increased $552,86, and that from legacies $8,825,32, and from miscellaneous sources $366,50, while the contributions from Churches have declined $6,751,60; from individuals through the Churches, $9,470,55; from individ­ uals not through Churches, $4,164,91, making a total of decrease from these sources of $20,387,06. One reason for this decline is that no such appeals as those for the relief of the famine-stricken in India, and those for the return of beloved Missionaries, which were prominent last year and had an effect on all, the collections, have been made during the present year. If the legacy of the late Miss JDanser had not been received, the Treasury and the work of the Missions would have been- involved in embarrassments of the most serious character. » If from the total of receipts ($58,443,49) we deduct the receipts from legacies ($15,125,32), from interest on the Security Funds ($1,677,09), from the American Tract Society ($100), from two Congregational Sabbath schools ($90), in all $16,992,41, there are $41,451,08 remaining as the sum of the gifts of the 79,000 living members, the Sabbath-school children, and the non-professing mem­ bers of the congregations of our branch of the Reformed Church.


52

KEPORT'ON

'

If this sum be divided by the number of members only (79,000) the result is an average gift of a trifle over 52 cents from each member. This is beyond doubt much below the ability of the Church. The indebtedness of the Treasury at the bank which at the be足 ginning of the year was $26,500, has become $30,500. There are also due to the Missions for money.expended by them, $7,061,30, making a total indebtedness of $37,561,30. For the year ending on April 30th, 1880, the Treasury will need for the Amoy Mission, $10,022; for the Arcot Mission, $18,105; for the Japan Mission, $20,787; possibly for exchange, $1,500; for home expenses, including $1,800 of interest on loans, $6,675, or a total of $57,089. To this must be added whatever may be necessary to send out a re-enforcement to maintain or strengthen our Missionary force. The wants of the year and the debt amount to $94,650, a sum which 79,000 Christians, 50,000 Sabbath-school scholars, with the help of thousands of non-professing members of the congregations who are well affected toward the work, can easily contribute if they are so disposed. CONCLUSION.

A review of the varied contents of this report, leads the Board to put in juxtaposition two facts, viz: the God of all grace has given an addition to the membership of the Mission Churches larger than any ever before received. The same God put it into the heart of a pious woman, a member not of our communion, but of the Metho足 dist Episcopal Church, to make a bequest to this treasury of $10,000. W e see the Spirit of God blessing the work abroad, and at home making provision for its support. Are not these indica足 tions of what the Head of the Church would have us to do ? Do not these blessings commend this Christian enterprise to our hearts, and call us to maintain it .with more faith and zeal, and prayer, and liberality ? If we disregard such Divine commendation, if we are unwilling to follow where our Lord leads, can we wonder if He should turn from us and seek for other and more sympathetic and responsive agents to accomplish His will ? But we are certain that if these most impressive facts are fairly made known to the Churches, a reply in gifts will be received, which will not only re-


move all burdens and provide amply for the work now in hand, but also enable your servants to remit wbat may be necessary to fur­ nish instruction in the Word of Life to the thousands who are now pleading in vain at our doors. The term of service of the following members of the Board ex­ pires with this session of the General Synod : Rev. J. P. Mesick, D.D., Rev. Jas. Demarest, Jr., D.D., “ C. P. Masden, Theodore L. Mason, M.D., “ Philip Peltz, D.D., Mr. D. J. Steward, “ C. L. Wells, D.D.. “ W. R. Janeway. Adopted May 14, 1879. JO H N M. PERRIS, Corresponding Secretary.

GKENJERAL S U M M A R Y . CHINA.

INDIA.

JAPAN. TOTAL.

Stations............................ .................. ii i 7 3 Out-Stations............................ ........... 105 76 11 18 Missionaries......................................... 4 5 15 6 19 Assistant Missionaries........................ 4 6 9 2 0 Native Ministers.................................. 3 1 Catechists or P reachers.................... 37 14 16 7 12 Assistant Catechists............................ 12 Readers................................r............... 25 25 Schoolmasters and Teachers............. 6 25 31 .1 School mistresses................................. 9 10 Colporteurs.......................................... Churches............. \ .............................. 7 21 33 5 Communicants.................................... 657 1112 2045 276 1 2 3 Academies............................................ Academies, Scholars in..................... 66 25 91 Day Schools........................................ 1 7 40 48 133 Day Schools, Scholars in ................... 1545 6 1083 * Theological Students......................... 4 10 6 1 1 Dispensaries, with beds..................... Number of patients treated............... 9635 9G3o Contributions of Native Churches.. $1154 95 $329 50 $440 02 $1924 47 * The whole body of Native Helpers.


T A B U L A R V IE W OF R E C E IP T S 1

PROM

'

.

^ a w d gMivMnak FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES.

^

FROM

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS INDIVID’LS

.

Classis of Albany.

Third Albany.......................

$91 2G GO 80 392 25

$37 27 $187

10

New Salem...........................

TOTAL

$128 53 GO 80 579 25 10

2G 14 43 200 44 17 7 31

G 50

7

8 04

3 05 42 25 2 38

'

20 14 43 200 44 17 20 81 8 04 3 05 42 25 1 2 38

K n o x ..................................... Classis of Bergen.

F irst Hackensack.................

5 48 12 79 2 G 82 225 85 74

1

(14 75 75

54 82 50 74

10 22

10 22

12 98 5

12 98 5

Palisades............................... Central Ave., J. City Plei’s. F ort Lee................................ Cherry H ill...........................

353 50 15

6

48 27 26 G53 100

,


FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS INDIVID’l.S

TOTAL

'.South Classis of Bergen.

Lafayette, Jersey City B ergen................... . :Second Jersey City... South Bergen......... First Bayonne............. G reenville................... 'Second Hudson C ity .. First Jersey City........ Bergen Point............... Free, Jersey City........ 'T hird Bayonne............

$197 258 78 70 79 45 37

$44 GO 1 25 30 59

$99 273 75 96 10

10 12 25

$296 577 19 168 04 75 96 10 10

12 25

Classis of Cayuga.

U tica................. Chittenango___ Syracuse........... 'Thousand Isles. •Owasco............. West Leyden... Canastota......... -.Cicero............... N a u m b u rg ---New Bremen. . . •Owasco Outlet.

599

100

15 34 52 72 10 14 15 4

112 50

729 15 34 165 22 10 14 15 4

Classis of Geneva.

' T y re .................... ............ Cato................................. Pultneyville..................... Fair H aven..................... R ochester........................ 'M arion............................. •Clymer............................ East Williamson,........... •Geneva ........................... Lodi............... .................. Farmer Village............... Mina................................. Abbe Church................. A rcadia___, .............. . .. Buffalo............................ ‘Caroline........................... D unkirk..........................

19 27 10 40 8 40 26 95 15 71 14 17 30 12 50 59 85 37 34 4 40

SO 5 60

22

3 5 75

10 48 6 89 5 2

61 27 19 14 15 26 105 48 22 60 14 17 30 17 50 59 85 37 34 6 40

■Classis of Grand River.

Muskegon ...................... . :Second Grand Rapids.........

74 79 93

10 40

85 19 141


CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM FROM FROM CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS individ ’ls

TOTAL

C la ssis o f G ra n d R iv e r CONTINUED. First Grand Haven.............. Kalamazoo............................. Third Grand Raipids.......... (rrandvillo.............................. Spring Lake.......................... Fourth Grand Rapids.......... Fremont Centre.................... Polkton................................... Detroit........ •........................... Montague.............................. South Haven.......................... Twin Lakes............................

$40 40 •5 13 99 73

$2 18

$1 90 60 91 50 4

7 17 7 18 15 4 14

50 48

10 34

10 50

$44 54 65 13191 23 11 17 7 50" 28 82 ' 15' -C 4 16 „ 14 50-

C la ssis o f Greene* First Athens.......... ............... First Catskill........................ Second Coxsackie ................. Kiskatom................................ First Coxsackie...................... Second A thens...................... Leeds.......................................

54 90 51 60 13 7 7

' 82

• 5 *

10

54 90" 133 66 13'12 • 17

C la ssis o f H olland* Ebenezer................................. First Holland........................ Third Holland....................... Vriesland................................ Overyssel................................ Zeeland.......................•...........

Graafschap............................ Saugatuck............................. North Holland..................... F ynaart.................................. Jamestown............................ Beaverdam............................ Cleveland, Ohio................... Drenthe.................................. East Overyssel..................... Rotterdam.............................

7 15 19 39 83 70 34

82 37 25 30 50 00

76 68 52 95 10 50

102 10 71 5 88

5 „12 20 5 13 9 20

7 194 19 110 142 81 34

GO''’ 37 2513 06;

5 42 50 95 77 70

11

8 60 30 22 12

21 50 27 24 21 20

02; 50' 95

77 70-

Classis of Hndson.

First Hudson........................ Gallatin..................................

440 78 03

70 83

181 64

692 47' 78 08-'


FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS

FROM i n d i v i d ’l s

TOTAL

Classis of Hudson CONTINUED.

First Claverack.............. Greenport........................ Germantown.: ............... Upper Red H ook........... Linlithgow...................... Taghkanic....................... Second Claverack.......... Livingston.......................

$107 GG 88 25 . 38 17 110 93 25 10 22

42

$30 8 63 41 65 72

$64 55 5

$107 118 46 217 25 27 114

66 25 80 13 10

Classis of Illinois!

Spring Lake........... Fairview................. . Second P ekin......... Parkersburg, Iowa. Peoria................... N orris...................... Irving P ark ............ First Pella, Io w a .. Fourth Pella, Iowa Bushnell................. Second Pella, Iowa Norwood P a rk ___ First P ekin............ R aritan.................... H avana................... Bethel, P ella......... Leyden Centre....... Third Pella. Otley............ Orange City. H artsbnrg... East Orange, West Branch,

5 65 44 71 5 57 G 15 •7 28 11 29 125 9 35 8 50

5 65 112 06 5 57

67 35

6

20 '

4

15 7 11 125 9 8

28 29 35 50

20

4

Classis of Kingston.

New P altz................. Bloomingdale........... Clove.......................... St. Remy................ Marbletown............... Second Kingston___ H urley....................... Guilford..................... North M arbletow n.. Rochester, Ulster Co Dashville Falls..........

176 17. 4 62 01 2 34 17 31 137 31 50 26 12 50 23 08 20

51 84

112

19 34

,

28 24 4 52

60

340 01 4 81 35 2 34 17 31 225 55 50 26 12 50 27 60 20


FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS INDIVID’LS

TOTAL

Classis of Kingston CONTINUED.

Krumville Xiyonsville Rosendale. North Classis of Xj>I.

Newtown....................... Sayville...................... .. Greenpoint.................... Flushing........................ East W illiam sburg.... Queens........................... Oyster Bay.................. . First Astoria................. Locust Valley............... Second Astoria............ St. Peter’s.................... College P oint............. Jam aica........................ N orth Hempstead___ South B ushw ick.. .•— W illiamsburgh............ Second Newtown....... Laurel H ill.................. First. Long 'Island City B ushw ick.................... German Ev., Jamaica

$15 3 147 65 12 35 37 83 21

$55

$37 13 84 08 72 99

" ’5 50 41 11 5

GO 14 16 59

80

10 7 44 15 13

10 • 16 25

10

26 04

$107 3 152 115 53 100 52 142 21 10 36 7 70 15 13

13 84 • 69 72 15 80 25 33

South Classis of Xu I.

Flatbush.-.............. . ... Flatbuslr Mission............... Twelfth S t.,.................. ... Church on.the H eights.. . . Bethany Chapel................. F irst Brooklyn................... New U trecht...................... East New Y ork................. New Brooklyn................... New L o ts ......I ................. F latlands............................ Gravesend........................... B edford............................. South Brooklyn................ Middle Brooklyn.............. N orth Brooklyn............... Second Flatbush.............. Canarsie .............................

1,021 18 29 1,087 198 1,153 127 36 33 150 63 53 15 36

97 06 61 28 10 78 15 40 38 18 61

185

360 46 50 40 ' 10

00

142 285 25 50

20 71 10 5

1,566 18 136 1,269 198 1,438 162 36 33 150 83 124 15 41

97 • 06 11 28 10 78 65 40 38 18 71


FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

n

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS

FROM i n d i v i d ’l s

TOTAL

Classis of Michigan.

H ope....................... . Hirst Grand Rapids, Centreville............ Macon............. ...... South Macon......... Constantine............ South Bend............ P ittsfo rd ................. P o rte r......................

$34 25

$12 04

$15

12 16 4 25 4 09 20

$01 25 32 10 4 29 4 20

64 75

100 20 07 45 12 43 10 3

76

50 09

Classis of Monmonth.

F irst Freehold.................. . M iddletow n....................... Holmdel.............................. ■Colt’s N eck........................ K eyport............................. . Second Freehold............. F irst Long Branch............. Second Long B ranch.. . . , Spotswood.......................... Highlands............................ Asbury P ark........... ...........

50 20 67 45 12 33 10 3

70

50

90 75 90 11 57

10

90 75 90 11 57

Classis of Montgomery.

F onda................ . F ort Plain.......... C urrytow n......... Fultonville......... Herkimer............ Florida................ Canajoharie........ Hagaman’s Mills Mohawk.............. Glen.................... Ephratah........... St. Johnsville... Mapletown........ Stone Arabia .. Auriesville........ ■Columbia........... F o rt H erkim er.. Henderson......... Indian Castle__ Manheim............ P o rt Jackson___ Spraker’s Basin..

105

212 10 100

47 10

100 20 48 77 44 17 27 21 31 12 20

67 83 71 50 83 18 30 40 81

15 15 10

5 __ 5 3

10 25

20 48 92 57 32 27 21 36 12 20 3 10

67 83 71 50 83 18 30 40 81 25


FROM FROM FROM CLASSES AND CHUKCHES CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS ind ivid 'ls

TOTAL

C la ssis o f N ew ark* $1,333 41 ’ 291 03 287 99 Clinton Avenue. N ew ark... Franklin.................................. Irvington.................... ............ West Newark......................... East Newark.......................... Linden..................................... Woodside................................ Stone House Plains..............

121 43 89 52 . . 24 35

$50 256 27 100 30 55

$25

..........

51

$1,383 ' 547 287 131 151 140 24

41 30 99

817 171 554 102 71 152 41 24 15 50

82 73 02 61 67 33 20 27 29 35

98 52 35

* - '

C la ssis o f N . B r u n sw ic k . Second N ew B runsw ick.... Middlelmsh.............. .............. First N ew Brunswick.......... Millstone................................. Griggstown............................ Franklin Park........................ East Millstone........................ Bound Brook............. Metucken...............................

488 133 159 40 05 152 41 24 15 38

82 19 02 61 38 20 27 29 35

329 38 54 128 6 6 67

207 50

12

C lassis o f N e w Y o rk . Sixth Avenue, N ew Y o r k .. Collegiate, “ .. Twenty-ninth St. M ission..

De W itt Chapel, 29th S t ... Knox Memorial............... Brookfield, Conn................. Harlem, N. Y....................... South Church, N. Y........... Fourth German, “ .......... Mott Haven “ .......... Prospect Hill, “ .......... Madison Avenue, “ .......... Houston Street, “ .......... Bloomingdale, “ .......... Thirty-fourth St., “ .......... Ave. B and 25th St., N. Y. P ort Richmond, S. I. Holland, New Y ork............ Richmond, S. I .................... Huguenots, “ .................... Union, High Bridge, N. Y .

41 68 1,920 20

10 32 10 31 31 05

59 111 62

45 175

16 32 116 31 31 65

100

21

21

35 58 942 42 20

14 90 57 50 5 34 7 34 5

50

95 58 942 42

10

20

,

14 11 115 62 58''

11 25 58

100 10

50 5

33 .

50 60

145 68 2,206 82

"

34 33 7 34 50 5 60


PROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS

FROM i n d i v i d ’l s

TOTAL

Classis of New York CONTINUED.

Brighton Heights, S. I ........ German, Norfolk St., N. Y. Mattoax and Amelia C. H. Classis of Orange.

$56 37 7 89 51 33 38 82 14 65 13 17

O CO 00

Wnllkill Vallfiy................ .

$16 25 14 72 5 25 50 19 40 3 12 142 93 18 105 17 10 7 65 5 6 50 3 74 4 78 675 60

100

$16 25 151 09 8

33 39 70 73 3 12 281 75 32 65 118 17 17 10 7 65 5 6 50 3 74 • 4 78 675 60

Classis of Paramus. 17 96

63 78 39 36

190 45 78 11 West New H em pstead........ First Holland, Paterson---P aram us................................

2 0 68 33 70 2 7 no

2 50 80 85 103 91

79 43 08 11 45 200

34 50 10 10

' 84 10 12 50 25

17 96 177 28 92 44 21 45 390 45 162 21 33 IS 33 70 27 90 2 50 105 85 103 91


FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES

FROM

FROM

CHURCHES S. SCHOOLS INDIVID’LS

TOTA L

Classis of Paramus [CONTINUED.

Second Paterson.. First Ridgewood. Saddle River........ Union, P aterson.. W arwick.............. Holland, Hohokus Holland, Lodi___ Ramapo Ramsey’s.........................

$110 30

$57 25

$170 55

3 50

53 50

04 90 .................

04 90-

(i

50 11

.............

0

..............

11

Classis of Passaic*

Preakness........... Fairfield............. Sixth Paterson... Pompton P lains.. Boonton.............. Pom pton.............. W yckofl.............. Ponds................... Montville............. Little Falls.......... Board ville............ First Paterson__ Franklin Furnace

14 12 50

117 10

0 80 49 88 92

74 28 30 5 30 80

$0

1

100 85 10 20 •10

'

10

21 17' 23 50' 0 80' 150 73­ 92 84 48 30­ 5 40 80' 10

Classis of Philadelphia.

Neshanic................................ Fourth Philadelphia............ First Philadelphia............ Clover H ill........................... Addisville............................ North and Southam pton... Third Philadelphia............. Second Philadelphia........... Rocky H ill............................ Blawenburgh........................ Harlingen.............................. Stanton.................................. F ifth Philadelphia............... Three Bridges....................

52 04

10

48 32 13 98 30 80 01 20 50 114 24 47 10 81 49 89

10

54 280 98 75

5

10

14 03 17 50

18 05

Ill 290 147 13 40 75 50 114 83

81

, 7 50

04 07 98 80' 83 24 25­

57 SO­ lO

Classis of Poughkeepsie.

Glenham................................ Hopewell............................... M illbrook.............................

20 105 40 03 45

80 " 44’83 13 '12

20 121

100

170 29­ 197 5T


FR O M CLASSES A ND C H U R C H E S

FROM

rU R C H E S S. SCHOOLS

FR O M i n d i v i d ’l s

TO T A L

5

C lassis of PoughJkeepsi C O N T IN U E D .

Hyde P ark .......................... Fislikill................................ Rhinebeck........................... Second Poughkeepsie___ Fishkill Landing................ New Hackensack............... First Poughkeepsie........... Cold Spring........................

$52 82 '43 45 103 90 57 43 150 05 250 4 10

$41 53 10 $10

100 25 40

82 98 90 07

200

05 250 4 10'

\

C lassis of R a r i ta n . Bedminster.......................... Branchville........................ Third Raritan..................... North Branch..................... Rockaway........................... Lebanon.............................. First R aritan...................... Easton.................................. W ilcox................................. Pottersville......................... Peapaek............................... High Bridge........................ Second R aritan.................. Readington ....................... Clinton Station...................

$52 '84 119 223

40 03 30 51 120

30 43 43 10 8 33 50 88 83 39

18 34 01 90 92 09 52

132 74 10 10

8 08

1 85 15

197 92 222 82 53 18 05 82

10 41 09 43 10 25 88 ’

39

10

10

5 50 4 70 34 109 28

5

10 50 4 70 24 109 28

C lassis of R e n sse la e r. Stuyvesant.......................... Chatham.............................. Kinderhook......................... East Greenbush................. Second Ghent..................... Schodack Landing............. Schodack............................. First Ghent......................... Blooming Grove................. Castleton............................. Nassau............................. .. New Concord..................... Stuyvesant F a lls...............

04 95 495 70

33 80 48 52

120

187 03

100 13 220 80

732.51 70 52 10 10

10 10

29 40 7 30 52

95 80' 5 . 50

85

0 50 25

28 25 21

10

30 05 7 30 52

35 28 25 21

10

C lassis o f S a ra to g a . Northumberland................ South West Troy............... Buskirk’s ............................

29 70 110 59 15

00

29 70 170 59 15


FR O M CLASSES A N D C H U R C H E S

FR O M

FR O M

C H U R C H E S S. SCHOOLS IN D IV ID ’l.S

TO TA L

Classis of Saratoga C O N T IN U E D .

North West Troy................. Union Village....................... Boght..................................... Cohoes................................... Easton.................................... F ort Miller............................ Gansevoort............................ Kensselaer............................. S aratoga............................... Schaghticoke.............. ......... W ynantskill.......................... MV

$111 50 28 07

• $10

$111 50 38 07

*1

Classis of Schenectady.

Niskaynna............................ Lisha’s K ill........................... Am ity.................................... First Rotterdam................... First Glenville..................... H elderbergh......................... Second Rotterdam........: .. . First Schenectady............... Princetown........................... Second Schenectady........... Second Glenville................. Cranesviile...........................

30 31 24 13 129

79 54 58

$5- • •

10

51 31 24 13 129

20

20 10

o

47 10

30 08 2 72 0 59 20

45 • 0 28

10

5

79 54 58 47

. 91 08 14 6 59 20

Classis of Schoharie.

Sharon................................... Prattsville............................. Berne..................................... Beaverdam............................ M iddleburgh........................ Schoharie.............................. ' Gallupville............................ Lawyerville.......................... Schoharie Mountain............ North Blenheim................... Breakabin.............................. G ilboa................................... Eminence .............................. Central Bridge..................... Moresville and Gilboa.........

5

8 38 IS 15 24 .

13 38 18 15 24 11

11

0 09

0 09

10 22

10 22

Classis of Ulster.

Caatsban................................ Saugerties............................

110 25 141 08

57 25

5 170 31

172 25 ' 330 39


FROM

FROM

FROM CLASSES AND CHURCHES.

CHUKCHES 8. SCHOOLS

in d iv id 'l s

TOTAL.

Classis of Ulster. v.: CONTINUED.

Ohurch of the Comforter..

$39 12 3 33

$8 95

27 15 41 30

75 fi3

1 89

10 0

19 50 75 4 5 31

85 38 80

141 14 34 09 02 77

00 71 81 90 47

$20 10

25

22 15 79 04 60 19 10

O

. . ..................... ........................ ...

129 95

$68 22

137 14

20 58

5 19 56 ’ 342 4 5 31

85 38 95 20 58

Classis of Westchester.

100

50 75 25

238

141 114 84 69 375

60 71 81 90 47

102

0

Classis of Wisconsin.

Oostburg...............................

110 109 91 46 28 25 23 19 34 93 31 30 7

65 69

11 35 2 50

64 50

15 04

3 30 17

30

8 20 10

16 55

88

15 51 07 27

122

112 95 78 28 25 31 45 34 144 31 30 7

IE 18 68

5C 50 55 15 Ol 27


FR O M CLA SSES A N D C H U R C H E S .

FR O M

FliO.Ni

C H U R C H E S S. SCHOOLS IN D IV ID ’l.S

TO TA L.

C la s s is o f W is c o n s in . ■

C O N T IN U E D .

D anfortk............................... F ulton............ .............. .... Second Holland, N e b ............. High P ra irie........................ Lansing.......... ...................... New Amsterdam............... Peoria.................................... South Holland...................... Sheboygan F a lls............ .

-

o

\

l


INDIVIDUALS NOT THROUGH CHURCHES. For Catechist, in In d ia ........ $100- • Individuals by Rev. J. W. A Friend of the cause............ 2 • Scudder, M .D......................$G0 Simon Shindler, Elizabeth, Rev. J I . Schnellendreussler .. 9 50 N. J . . . . . . . ' ............. A Friend. Boston, Mass . . , . . 5 Mrs. 'L. S. Ferris, Poughkeep­ A Stranger............................... 10 sie, N. Y ............................... 5 W. S. N , New York............. 25 J. E., Hudson, N. Yr .............. 20 L. J. F .......................................100 James B. Hedges......................100 ' S. B. F ............................................ 150 Wm. C. Melis, Holland, Mich. 5 Rev. and Mrs AY. L. Johnson, Orangeburgh, S. C.............. 50 John Ball, Grand Haven, Mich........: ............................ 2 H ............................................... 35 A Friend of Missions, New­ Members of Church Kingston, ark, N. J .............................. GO New Y ork............................. 232 Mrs. A. Hasbrouck and Rev. J. M. Van Buren . . . . . '. 50 daughter............................... ,3 5 ■E. Hendrickson....................... 4 K. A. K ......................................... 250 D. L. Blauvelt, East Orange, Mrs. S. M. Martin, Brooklyn, N. J ....................................... 25 E. D., L. 1........................... 5 Mrs. J. H.Sandham............... 5 A Friend................................... 100 Miss J. Arander B elt................. 5 Elizabeth Geertruida, Hol­ Mrs. Catharine Duryee, N. Y . . land, Mich........................... '. 5 5 City................................. Miss Alida Van Schaick, Mrs. Hanna G. Earle.............. 1 N. Y . City............................ 50 H. A. AY., Goshen, N. Y . .. . 5 Cash for Rev. J. L. Amerman. 15 Miss Mary Cooper, Upper W. N. Jennings, N. Y. City. 10 Montclair, N. J .................... 20 [lev. A. H. Mann, D .D ................ 5 Rev. John Scudder, M.D. .. . 25 Mrs. H. Righter, Brooklyn, Rev. \\ illiam Brush, Morris­ L. 1 ........................................ 10 town, N. J ............................ 5 Thomas Jessup, Newburgh, A Friend of Missions............. 20 N. Y ...................................... 10 Two Friends............................ 100 Little Emma’s Missionary J. Perrine, Troy. N. Y ......... 2 Box........................................ 2 75 AY. B., Nyaek, N. Y ............. 5 M S .......................................... 2 A Friend to the cause............ 2 From a friend, Brooklyn, L. I. 7 35 Mrs. Matthew Jansen. Dwaarskill, N. Yr ............................. 1 50 Four Hopers, Holland, Mich. 40 Two members of Church, A Friend, through Christian Hackensack, N. J ............... 2 Intelligencer......................... 5 P rivilege.................................. 2 50 A. C. Van Duyne, Pine Brook, N. J ............................25 Rev. Wm. H. Steele, D.D., Mrs. H. A. Bertholf, N., Y. Newark,N. J ....................... 200 City....................................... 1 A Widow, for the Arcot Mis­ Up River Pastor’s, “ New sion........................................ 10 Impetus” ............................... 5 In memoriam, S. C................. 25 G. Tillema. Randolph Centre, Mrs. K ...................................... 3 AVis........................................ 3 Rev. T. Romeyn Beck, Hol­ T. J. Isommers, Holland, 5 land, Mich.......................... Mich...................................... 2 Rev. A. C. Frissell, N. Y. A friend of Foreign Missions. 20 City....................................... 5 Another Alinister..................... 5 C. A. Vermilye, N. Y. C ity .. 10 An old friend, Hillside, N. Y. 5 T. E. Annis, M.D., Holland, A. E. M.................................... 1 Mich...................................... 20


Family Missionary Box, E. R. A ..........'..................... $31 Miss. J. Van Dyke................. 5 Edo Kipp, Passaic, N. J ........ 10 A Baptist lady................ 5 G. J. K ............ .................. 10 Mrs. Anna C. Kip................... 50 William W. Kip, E s q .......... 50 Mrs Anna Maria Fox, Danube,

W. Ackley, Iowa........... ... $7 10 O. D., Holland, Mich...... 1 Tillema, Randolph, W is.. 8 25 friend, Rotterdam’, Ran­ som s.. . ................... 4 Y. M. C. A., Danforth, I lls .. 15 C. J. F. A

T otal............................$1,955 30


Misoellaneons. Sabbath School, Mine Brook, N . J ....................................... • • • • $60 Missionary Box.................................................................................. IQ Musical and Literary Society, Auburn, N. Y ............................... 20 3 Woman’s Missionary Association, Orangeburgh, S. C.............. . On account of Rev. J. W. Scudder, M.D..................................... 5 40 For Mission Monthly.......................... . . . . . ' ............................. 400 84 Interest on Security Funds................. ............................................. 1,077 09 0 Pastoral Association of the Reformed Church............................. Woman’s Board..............................'. .............................................. .. 1,750 2 40 For Missionary Boxes................. ...................................................... For Sabbath School Certificates...................................................... 25 Home Sabbath School, Holland, Mich ............................ ............ 2 33 150 Young Ladies’ Missionary Circle, New Centre, N. J ................... Sabbath School, New Centre, N. J ................................................. 3 75 Infant Class, Tompkins Av. Congregat’l Church, Brooklyn, L.I. 30 American Tract Society, for the Amoy Mission................. ......... 100 , Bergen Ave. Sabbath School, Jersey City, N. J ........................... 22 65 Little Girls’ Mission Band, Central Cong. Church, Brooklyn, L.I. CO ^ Total................... ................................................................. $4,383 81 Legacies, H. S. Ditmas, Jr., Flatbush, L. I ............. ................................... $100 48 Mary M. Danser, N. Y. City..................................................... • 10,000 00 Abram Storms, Tarrytown, N. Y . ............................................... 2,000 M. H. Y. D .................................................................. ................... 300 200 Rev. Abel T. Stewart, D.D., Holland, M ich.............................. Henry S. Terhunc, Blawenburgh, N. J ........................................ 2,474 89 Total............................ ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 5 , 1 2 5 33

j


RECEIPTS FROM CLASSES. Classes op S ynod OF N e w Y o rk .

CHURCH CONTUIBUTIONS.

Hudson.................................... K ingston................................ North Long Islan d .............. South Long Island................ N ew Y o rk ............................. Orange.................................... Poughkeepsie........................ W estchester....................... .... * '

$952 504 511 4,023 3,343 1,143 921 400

14 98 35 52 28 55 00 49

FROM FROM SABBATH TNDIVTDU* ALS. SCHOOLS. $223 11 103 94 271 27 547 00 395 02 182 23 147 95 100_

$251 172 117 702 240 183 404 388

TOTAL.

19 $1,420 780 899 29 50 5,273 3,978 1,508 78 1,474 888

44 92 91 03 90 78 39 49

$11,800 97 $1,971 72 $2,458 70 $10,231 45

A lb a n y .

A lbany.................................... Cayuga.................................... Geneva.................................... G reene.................................... Montgomery.......................... Rensselaer.............................. Saratoga................................. Schenectady.......................... U lster......................................

$895 197 333 • 180 597 921 301 300 77 547

88 20 04 03 48 78 58 77 84 33

$4,358 93

$51 30 44 5 85 338 00 00

81 97 10 53 28

298 42

$194 711 „ 35 92 13 150 10 51 5 307

$1,141 50 938 75 ■ 413 283 095 80 1,411 371 4L8 82 45 1.213

09 70 76‘ 03 58 11 58 05 84 20

$980 11 $1,030 50 $0,909 54

C h ica g o . i

Grand River.......................... Holland................................... Illin o is.................................... M ichigan............ ................. W isconsin..............................

$357 350 242 141 050

09 04 35 94 15

$1,748 77

$82 151 07 32 80

09 13 35 04 74

$420 55

$107 80 251 58 20 19 48 20

$008 759 329 193 785

183570 58 09

$500 58 $2,075 90

N e w B r u n sw ic k . B ergen .................................... South Bergen........................ Monmouth.............................. Newark.................................... N ew Brunswick.................... Param us................................ P assaic.................................... Philadelphia.......................... R aritan...................................

$453 584 249 2,147 1,164 955 174 509 565

33 19 99 73 08 01 00 17 13

’ $75 70 50 442 191 490 159 482 233

82 21 88 85 38 01

$384 488 00 76 040 79 153 23 174

25 75

50 85 05 59

$912 1,149 309 2,000 2,001 1,525 488 1,075 972

58 44 99 55 29 39 30 20 73

$0,863 23 $2,151 65 $2,086 59 $11,101 47 Grand total.................... $24,771 90 $5,524 03 $0,082 43 $36,978 36


*

A N N U A L REPORT OP THE

'T r e a s u r e r o f th e W o m a n ’s B o a r d o f F o r e ig n M is s io n s o f th e R e fo r m e d C h u r c h i n A m e r ic a , M a y ,

1879.

BECEIPTS. Prom last year’s cash balance....................................................... $5,695 62 First Reformed Church, Aquackanonk, Passaic, for Nagasaki 160 :Second Reformed Church, Albany, including $25 to make Mrs. R. H. Pruyn a life member........................................................ 108 50 Auxiliary, First Reformed Church, Astoria, for Nagasaki........ 56 20 22' Auxiliary, Reformed Church, Athens, for Amoy....................... :Sand Beach Church, Auburn, N. Y., $20 ; from Musical and Literary Society of Sand Beach Church, Auburn, toward support of girl in school at Amoy, $20.................................... 40 Belleville. Auxiliary, N. J ............................................................... 37 .Auxiliary of Bergen, .Jersey City Heights Reformed Church, for Yokohama, Chittoor, Yellore, and Nagasaki................... 299 45 Nellie Amerman Mission Circle, Bergen, J. C., for Kolongsu. 43 15 Hushnell, Illinois, auxiliary, for general use of the Board........ 25 South Reformed Church, Brooklyn, auxiliary, for Emily at Chittoor.......................................................................................... 27 42 South Reformed Church, Brooklyn, for Nagasaki..................... 31 52 ■Church on the Heights, Brooklyn, toward the salary of Miss Emma C. W hithcck...................................................................... 142 Auxiliary of First Reformed Church, Brooklyn, E. D., for Kolongsu and Nagasaki, half each........................................... 100 Auxiliary of Bronxville Reformed Church, $65 for Rio, and $10 for Nagasaki........................................................................... 75 Twelfth Street Reformed Church, Brooklyn, for a native Helper in India........................................... 00 Miss E. Griffin, of same church, for the girl Elizabeth in * Chittoor Seminary...........................>............. .............................. 30 Dawning Light Band, First Reformed Church, Brooklyn, to­ ward salary of Miss Witbeck................................... 60 Bouth Bushwick auxiliary............................................................... 50 Caatsban auxiliary, for girl in Ferris Seminary and general use of the Board.................................................................................. 67 86 ■Caatsban Sunday School, for girl in Ferris Seminary................ 57


72

.

REPO RT ON

, Auxiliary, Catskill, for education of girl at Chittoor and other work in- India.............................. . ..... .................... ................... Clover Hill auxiliary for Jonathan Sturges Seminary, Nagasaki, ' and general use of the B oard.................................................... Coxsackie, N. Y. auxiliary for Nagasaki................... — .......... Faith Mission Band, 6th Ave. Reformed Church, for Bible Reader in India....................................... Ferris auxiliary, 6th Avenue Reformed Church,"for^Nagasaki, $75, and Kolongsu, $25....................................................... 5th Ave. and 29th Street, Collegiate Church auxiliary, for Na­ gasaki, Kolongsu, and general use of Board........................... 5th Avenue and 48th Street Sunday School, for Kolongsu and Nagasaki................................ 4th Street Collegiate Church, for Miss M. E. Talmage’s School at Amoy................ North Dutch Collegiate Church, Fulton Street, $60, for a Teacher in one of the villages mentioned by Dr. Chamberlain, and for general use, $17................................................... Fonda, N. Y., auxiliary, for Nagasaki and general use of the Board.................... Auxiliary, Flushing, L . I .................................................... Sunday-school, Flushing, L. I., for girl in Yokohama.............. Freehold, N. J., for girl in Ferris Seminary, Yokohama.......... Fishkill Village auxiliary, for Nagasaki............... ...................... Flatbush, L. I., auxiliary, for Nagasaki...................................... Flatbush, Ulster Co., for In d ia .................... '............................... Glenville 2nd Reformed Church................................................... Gravesend Village S. School, for Kolongsu........................... Red Hill S. School, Greenport, N. Y., for girl at Chittoor, in Miss Mandeville’s School.............. Children’s Missionary Circle, Greenport, for K olongsu.. . . . . . ' Greenport Missionary Society, for Kolongsu........................... Hackensack, 1st Reformed Church, for Dr. Scudder in India, for Girls’ Schools under his care, Miss Talmage, and General use of Board..................................................... Hudson auxiliary, 1st Reformed Church, for supporting na­ tive Helpers in India, and for N agasaki................ ................ Infant Class, S. School Reformed Church, Hudson, N. Y., for general use of Board............... ... v ................................ . Hopewell auxiliary,, for education of girl at Amoy, $28, and for general Fund, $20..........! .................................................. Harlem Reformed Church, for general use................................ Jamaica, L. I., for general use..................................................... 2nd Reformed Church, Jersey City, $75 toward Miss M. E. Talmage’s salary ; $20 toward tuition of girl Ruth ; $40 for Kolongsu, and balance for general use of the Board.............

80 52 28 69' 81 100 396 50' 80 100 ' 77 138 20 50 50 54 50- ^ 240 . 20 8 ' ' 12 30 46 14

250 ■ 61 6412 57' 48 34 96 22 52.

161

1


F O R E IG N M IS S IO N S . Auxiliary of Lafayette Church, Jersey City, for Kolongsu.. $50 ; for Nagasaki, $100, and for general purposes, $62.45.. Auxiliary of Park Reformed Church, Jersey City, all for Kolongsu........................................................................................ Auxiliary 2nd Reformed Church, Kingston, N. Y., $60 for support of Bible'Reader in India ; $13.25 for Kolongsu---- Lodi, Seneca Co., N. Y., for Kolongsu........................................ Millstone, N. J., Mission Band, for two Bible readers in India, named Rebecca and Eliza, under Mrs. E. J. Heeren.............. Millbrook auxiliary, for general use of Board............................. New Paltz, $58 to support a native helper in some new school in Arcot mission ; $45 for general use of Society................... Two Classes, Sunday School, Second Reformed Church, Newark, N. J ................................................................................ Infant School, North Reformed Church, Newark, N. J., for support of two children in Amoy, China....................... ............. Day Spring auxiliary, North Reformed Church, Newark, N. J. Clinton Avenue Sunday-school, Newark, N. J . , for girl in Mrs. Miller’s school, and $30 for Kolongsu............................ Clinton Avenue auxiliary, Newark, N. J., for general u se .. . . Newburgh auxiliary, for support of two girls in Chittoor Seminary............. ............................................ ............................ Auxiliary, New Hackensack, N. J., for Nagasaki................... First Reformed Church, New Brunswick, N. J., for support of girl in Mrs. Scudder’s school, A rcot.................................... Second Reformed Church, New Brunswick, N. J., for support of native teacher at Kandipatur, India, $i20 ; for school at Yellore, $05 ; from Sunday-school, for boy at Vellore and girl at Chittoor, $60 ; special collection for support of native teacher in one of the villages of the Arcot Mission, $04........ Nyaek auxiliary, for school building on Kolongsu..................... East Orange, N. J., for general use of Society........................... Owasco Outlet or Sand Beach Church, for Kolongsu and general use..................................................................................... Pella auxiliary, toward support of native teacher at Arcot Mission, $20 ; Pella Sunday-school, for Nagasaki, $25......... ' North Reformed Church, Passaic, N. J . , for pupil in Miss Mandeville’s school, $30 ; general use of Society, $18 3 0 ... F ourth Reformed Church, Philadelphia, for Kolongsu............. Infant Class, 1st Reformed Church, Phila., Pa., for Kolongsu. Woman’s Missionary Society, Pompton Plains, N. J . . for Nagasaki............................................ S. School Reformed Church, Rhinebeck, for Kolongsu............ Readington auxiliary, for Kolongsu............................................. Raritan auxiliary, $50 to Arcot Mission, and $50 to Kolongsu.. and $1 exchange............................

73=

212 45 156 10'

73 25' 25 50 25 103 0 ' 50 74 0530 50 80 150 50

309 109 01 170 31 20

45 50' 48 30' 10 ' 20 . 8 75' 24 88 ’ ’ 101


Auxiliary, Reformed Church, Saugerties, N. Y., for general purposes, $81 ; from Young Ladies’ Fair, $135 ; from the Sunday School, $25.............................................. ..................... Auxiliary, Syracuse Reformed Church, for the Arcot Mission Auxiliary, 1st Reformed Church, Schenectady, $10.34 for N agasaki; $05.02 for general use of Society......................... Auxiliary, Sayville, L. I., for general use of B oard.. , ............ :2nd Reformed Church, Tarrytown, N. Y., to be used for the Arcot Mission to support a native preacher............................ Utica auxiliary, for Chittoor, Kolongsu, and Nagasaki............. U tica S. School, for Chittoor............: . . . . . ............................. Upper Red Hook, Scudder Memorial auxiliary, for Arcot Mis­ sion, $45 ; Miss Biting for Kolongsu, $25 ; Willing Workers for Yellore and a girl in school at Amoy, $47.55.................... Ladies’ Missionary Society, Wyckolf, N. J ......................... .. Yonkers auxiliary, $73 for Ko. Okado in J a p a n ; $30 for Bible Reader in India, and $15 for K olongsu..........................

■ 241 110 75 96 0 50 75 185 30

117 45 20 118

INDIVIDUAL DONATIONS. ■ Mrs. Jonathan Sturges, for Kolongsu......................................... Mrs. Wm. H. Steele, North Reformed Church, Newark, N. J. Mrs. John Skillman, Brooklyn, L. 1........................................ Rev. John Forsyth, D .D ................................................................ Mrs. Remson B e n n e t t . ................................................................ Mrs. J. H. Van Doren, Magee's Corners, N. Y .......................... Mrs. Jacob Strang, Peekskill......................................................... Mrs. D. P. Ingraham ...................................................................... Mrs. Peter Donald........................................................................... Mrs. James H. Briggs.............................................. Old North Church, Albany, N. Y., “ A good suggestion,” ---Endorser of “ A good suggestion, ” ................. ............................. Miss Anna Van Wagenen................................................................ Mrs. Wm. T. Runk........................................................................... Mrs. Rogers....................................................................................... Mrs. Mary Pruyn, of Albany, N. Y ............................................ Miss M. A. Campbell, Fonda, N. Y .............................................. Miss Mary Colder, Queens, N. Y .................................................. Member of Rev. E. A. Reed’s Church, 57th St. and Madison Av. Miss Caroline R. Schell, for Kolongsu......................................... W. R. Schell “ M. V. L. C., “ Hillside, Tarrytown, N. Y., “ Miss E. M. Talmage, “

1,000 100 50 25 5 15 25 10 10 5 1 1 5 1 3 5 10 5 10 5 5 5 7 2

,


3Iiss Hannah Vander Pioeg....................................... . f ......... Miss Margaret Bergen, contents of mite box................... ........... Aunt Martlia........................................................................... .. .. Mrs. Clias. H. Stitt, Bayonne, N. J ............... ............................. 3Iiss Jtaria Heermance.................................................................... Mrs. A. Page Peake, Rhinebeck, N. Y. . ................................ . . Mrs. E. A. Lyall, Leeds, N. Y.................................................... Albany, for Kolongsu..................... ..................................... ; ......... Three friends from Roxbury; per B ............................................. A Stranger, per Mrs. Patterson, for Kolongsu............................ Miss Pay, 30 cents ; Miss Polhemus, for Kolongsu, 45 cents... Mrs. Charles Van “Wick, $5, 1878 ; $5, 1870............................. .. Mrs. John Scudder.......................................................................... Mrs. Henry Bookstaver................................................................... Miss Cook......................................................................................... Mrs. Alex. H. Young, Greenville, N. J ....................................... Interest on deposit for Nagasaki...................................................

Total

2 2 54 2 68 5 2 2 10 o' 5 60 75 10' o' 10 1

10 101 77 §14,150 17


.DISBURSEMENTS. 1878-9. “ “

By Cash to G. G. Smith, Treas. of Synod’s Board... $4,120 94 “ for Nagasaki..................................... 2,888 46' “ to Rev. Dr. Ferris, by wish of donors.. . . . 55 “ “ " for Treasurer................. ^30 “ “ for 4,000 Fourth Annual Reports.................. 198 95 " “ “ wrappers for Secretary............................. 2 15' “ “ “ p o stag e................. .-.............................. 4 40 << “ “ Certificates of Life Members.............. By Cash of Bill of Credit for the School Building on the Island of Kolongsu...................................................................... 2,228 20 Total disbursements............................................................. Total balance................................................... ................... v

9,573 70 4,576 47 $14,100 1/

Balance to Nagasaki account......................................................... $3,157 05“ General account................................•........................... 1,419 42 May 3, total balance.......................................................... • $ 4>570 47 Auxiliaries’ Subscriptions for the y e a r............. '........................ $6,878 21 Individuals’ “ “ “ .......................................... 1>384; 57 MRS. PET E R DONALD, Treasurer. The undersigned having examined the foregoing account, and com­ pared the vouchers therewith submitted, certifies the same to be conect, and that the balance now in the Treasury is $4,576.47. • . N ew

Y

oke

,

May 10th, 1879.

TALBOT W. CHAMBERS.


TREASURER’S ANNUAL REPORT.

.

T h e B o a r d o f F o r e ig n M is s io n s o f R e fo r m e d C h u rc h i n A m e r ic a , in account w ith

GAMALIEL G. SMITH,

T reasurer.

Dr. A R C O T M ISSIO N.

April 30, 1879. . • To cash disbursements during the year........................................ §28,676 10 •

AMOY M ISSIO N .

‘To cash disbursements during the year........................................ 11,001 18 J A P A N M ISSIO N .

'To cash disbursements during the year........................................ 17,725 18 To cash paid Cor. Secretary’s salary........................... §2,400 “ Bookkeeper’s salary................... 500 “ Postage, Foreign and Home................... 73 72 “ Rent of Office...................................... 400 337 78 '‘ Traveling expenses.................................... " On account of the “ Mission Monthly ”. 1,065 68 • . “ .Incidental expenses................................ 109 66 " Printing and Mailing “ Annual Report,” 318 37 “ Care of office, &c...................................... 49 “ P. O. Box, Fuel, Gas, &c............... 32 37 “ Books and Magazines............................... 38 25 “ Stationery, &c............................................ 33 36' • 5,358 19 " Womans’ Board, Foreign Missions............... .. 25 75 “ Stolen from Secretary’s office.................................... 213 27 “ paid Loans to Banks...................................... §13,000 “ Interest on Loans..................................... 1,705 04 -------------- 14,705 04 “ Balance in Treasury....................................................... 1,093 59

E. & O. E.

-

§78,798 30


78

REPO RT ON FO R EIG N MISSIONS.

Cr. April 30, 1878. By balance in Treasury last rep o rt......---- ----- f ........................ $2,854 8L April 30. 1879. • Cash received from Churches.................................... .$24,837 OG “ Sunday Schools. ................... 5,409 87 “ " Individuals through Churches. 0,073 03 <* “ “ not through Churches. 1,955 30 “ “ Legacies............................... 15,125 32 •* " Miscellaneous sources.............. 4,382 31 -------------- 58,443 49■' borrowed from Banks........................................................... 17,500 $78,798 30 GAMALIEL G. SMITH, Treasurer. New York, April 30th 1879. Examined and found correct. JAMES A. WILLIAMSON, ) F inance ,D. JACKSON STEWARD, j Committee...


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