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Hope Gay Straight Alliance voted down C a m p u s Life B o a r d votes 5-3 against awareness group Matt Cook C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

T h e Hope College C a m p u s Life Board voted 5-3 yesterday morning against the recommendation of the E x t r a - C u r r i c u l a r Activities C o m mittee to approve the G a y Straight Alliance f o r Awareness as an offi-

cial student organization. Jamie Raabe ('02), co-leader and " T h e m e m b e r s of the C a m p u s founder of the Alliance, w a s disapLife Board pointed with did not find k the decision. t4 was in the best I don't interest of the Student reactions: think 1 was ^college to expecting Seen and Heard p.2 have that anything group right e l s e , but I now," said Riwas hoping," chard Frost, Raabe said. dean of students, and member of the " T h a t ' s just the nature of this colC a m p u s Life Board. lege."

A c c o r d i n g to Frost, b e f o r e the voting, there was a question and answer period with m e m b e r s of the Gay Straight Alliance. R a a b e said that o n e of the concerns brought up was the Reformed Church in America stance on homosexuality. R a a b e did not feel her group was inconsistent with that. ' T h e R e f o r m e d Church calls for open dialogue and that's something that w e ' r e all about," Raabe said. A n o t h e r c o n c e r n , a c c o r d i n g to

R a a b e was whether a student group was an appropriate forum for approaching the issue of homosexuality. "I disagree with that because as students, we can relate to other students better than faculty and administration can," Raabe said. E v e n t h o u g h the C a m p u s Life Board voted against it, R a a b e feels like the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y would have been in support of the group.

more GSA on 2

Hope vans a danger 1 5 - p a s s e n g e r v a n s c a n roll o v e r w h e n filled to capacity, says NHSTA Matt Cook C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

T h e National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ( N H T S A ) issued a cautionary warning on April 9, concerning the 15-passenger vans that are used for transporting students at many college, including Hope. According to the results of a N H T S A test, when the vans contain m o r e than 10 passengers, the risk of a rollover is three times as

high as normal vans or light trucks. T h e Chicago Tribune reported that a 15passenger van f r o m the Salvation Army was involved in an accident in January that killed 11 people. Hope College is planning on replacing or reducing the passenger capacity of its fleet of 12 fifteen-passenger vans by May 7 , 2 0 0 1 , said Tom Renner, director of Public Relations. According to Renner, H o p e ' s plan was not set in motion because of the warning. " L o n g b e f o r e this advisory c a m e out, the

m o r e VANS o n 7

Student Congress elections start Thursday Megan Krlgbaum I N Focus EDTTOR

This Thursday and Friday H o p e College students will have the opportunity to voice their opinion and elect S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s members for the 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 academic year at various poll locations around campus. There are 16 candidates for the eight positions which include president, vice-president, and t w o representatives each for the senior, junior and sophomore classes. This year there are two candidates for president, Rand Arwady ( ' 0 3 ) and Matt Scogin

( ' 0 2 ) . There are also two students running f o r vice-pr e si d e n t , C a r f D a n i e l ( ' 0 2 ) and Colleen Evans ( ' 0 3 ) . Although s o m e candidates are endorsing others, students will be able to vote for president and vice president individually. Current Student Congress president, Louis Canfield noted that "the number of candidates f o r c l a s s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s is g r e a t e r t h a n usual" There are four candidates for senior class representative, including A m y Avery, Jeffrey

more ELECTIONS o n 7

ANCHOR

A RAINBOW-. Acclaimed writer Maya Angelou addressed the campus community Monday, in Dimnent Chapel. Her speech included singing and poetry. She also received an honorary degree.

Maya Angelou speaks to Hope, tickets copied Emily Moellman A R T S EDITOR

ANCHOR

P H O T O S BY MATT COOK

THE CANDIDATES-. Matt Scogin ('02) and Rand Arwady ('03) address Cook Hall Cafeteria, Tuesday during dinner. Both are running for Student Congress President.

P H O T O BY A R I A N N A BAKER

Maya Angelou began her speech on Monday evening with a song. " W h e n it looked like the sun ain't g o n n a shine no more, you b e c a m e my rainbow in the c l o u d s " Angelou sang to an audience of over 1100 students, faculty, staff and community members, in Dimnent Chapel. T h e bestselling author, poet, actress, playwright, p r o d u c e r and director received a warm w e l c o m e f r o m the Hope c o m m u n i t y w h e n she arrived on M o n d a y evening to speak to H o p e ' s campus. Angelou's visit was sponsored by Student Congress Speaker Series with assistance from many other organizations and departments on campus. W h i l e on H o p e ' s campus, Angelou was presented with a honorary doctor of letters degree, listened to a performance of "23rd P s a l m , " composed by Duke Ellington, per-

f o r m e d by H o p e ' s Jazz E n s e m b l e 1 and faculty soloist Margaret Kennedy-Dygas, spoke to the c a m p u s for approximately thirty minutes, and gave a brief poetry reading. Angelou w a s particularly honored by the presentation of the degree of letters. " T h e finest thing that o n e can receive is an honor f r o m o n e ' s peers," Angelou said. "Since I am an educator, it is a wonderful gesture to give m e a token of your appreciation. I am excited, it is w o n d e r f u l . " T h e response from the c a m p u s was positive. A m y Avery, comptroller of Student Congress and chairperson of the Speaker Series was pleased with h o w smoothly the evening ran. " W e w e r e really b l e s s e d , " said Avery. "Everything went wonderfully and 1 believe everyone had an o v e r w h e l m i n g positive experience."

m o r e MAYA o n 2

Inside A n c h o r ® Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

A Midsummer Night's Dream Arts, Page 3.

Meet the candidates InFocus, Page 5.

What do we eat? Spotlight, Page 6.

Good season for Ultimate Sports, Page 8.


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A p r i l 18, 2001

Hope recognizes four with honorary degrees Danielle Koski STAFF REPORTER

T h i s past M o n d a y n i g h t . Dr. Maya Angelou was the first of four people to be presented with an honorary degree from Hope College for this academic year. The other recipients of degrees, who will receive t h e i r s later o n in t h e year, a r e Leonard and Marjorie Maas, and Dr. Jacob Nyenhuis, retiring provost of Hope College. "I am excited, honored, and even humbled because receiving an hon-

orary degree from Hope College is a great distinction," Nyenhuis said. " M y wife and daughters have all completed their degrees during my tenure at Hope and it is an honor to join them in that category." Nyenhuis also feels honored to be put in the same group as a person of Angelou stature. "Obviously s o m e o n e like Angelou has achieved much greater distinction [then me]," N y e n h u i s said. A c c o r d i n g to J a m e s B u l t m a n ,

president of Hope College, there are usually three categories that a person receiving an honorary degree fall under. "We use the honorary degree to make a statement about the values of the college," Bultman said. The first category that recipients fall under is that the college would like to honor them for their financial contributions to Hope College. " L e o n a r d and M a r j o r i e M a a s have shown great benevolence to Hope College," Bultman said.

Recipients can also be someone of international or national achievement that would also have sympathy towards the Hope College mission statement. " M a y a Angelou is a person of international achievement," Bultman said. T h e last category that recipients may fall under would be if the college would like to honor them for their service to Hope College. "[Nyenhuis] is receiving an honorary degree because of his extraor-

dinary service," Bultman said. Nyenhuis also feels that is the reason he is being given an honorary degree. " I ' v e invested myself heart and soul into H o p e C o l l e g e for 2 6 years," Nyenhuis said. "I have a deep and abiding affection for Hope College and it's people." According to Bultman, the college is very cautious about giving out honorary degrees and prefers to k e e p to the three c a t e g o r i e s approved by the trustees.

Earth Jam outside EIG holds Outdoor Concert Matt C o o k CAWPUS BEAT EDITOR

This Saturday, the Hope College Environmental Issues Group (EIG) will sponsor an event that will bring the campus together to support the health of our planet. The annual Earth Jam will be in VanRaalte C o m m o n s (between the chapel and the pine grove) from 12 to 6 p.m. on Saturday. The event will feature the music of the bands Lupida, Azrian. Gino Scare, as well as the brotherly duo of Adam ('01) and Lee Heerspink ('04). There will also be a poetry reading by Andy Buchner ('03) and a speaker will be on hand to discuss environmental issues. Due to a late cancellation, EIG has not yet finalized who will be the speaker. The Alpha G a m m a Phi sorority will be selling clothing made from

hemp and other natural fibers, and there will be informational tables about the environment. "We are having the concert to promote environmental awareness to the Hope College campus," said Dave Willeumier ( 4 0 l ) . "We want to keep the campus more informed on the issues." H o w e v e r , the concert is about more than just the ejivironment. "We want to bring the c a m p u s together for a cultural, community event," Willeumier said. Earth Jam has been held at Hope College for the past several years. Willeumier feels that it has always been well attended. " L a s t y e a r w e had o v e r 2 0 0 people show up," Willeumier said. In case of rain, the event will be held in the Kletz. EIG encourages everyone to attend. "Earth Jam is a great opportunity to be outside, listen to good music and hang out on a Saturday afternoon on H o p e ' s campus," Willeumier said.

GSA from 1 "1 think the student body would have been very receptive," Raabe said. "If nothing else, the |gay/ lesbian film series] showed us that we are willing to sit around and talk about this." According to Raabe, the Alliance will continue activities, beginning with the Gay Encounters event next Wednesday. They will not immediately again

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pursue becoming an official organization. They plan on waiting a f e w years and then reassessing the need for it to be official. " W e ' r e still going to go forward as planned. We just w o n ' t have the support of the school behind us," Raabe said. " W e have a large enough group of members that we recognize that this is something that needs to be dealt with."

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P H O T O BY A R I A N N A B A K E R

A GIFT OF SHOES: Maya Angelou receives the traditional Hope College gift of a pair of wooden shoes from Amy Avery (*02), a member of Student Congress. MAYA f r o m 1 Angelou left immediately after her presentation was over, and aud i e n c e m e m b e r s gathered at the M a a s C o n f e r e n c e C e n t e r for ref r e s h m e n t s and to d i s c u s s Angelou's appearance. "I thought Angelou was personable and f u n , " said Rachel Peckenpaugh ('04), who attended the event. "She related to the audience well and made me realize that besides what you may think, you really can make an impact on some-

Heard • O

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one . 1050 tickets were made for the event and quickly sold out. Because not every student could get a ticket, some resorted to counterfeiting. "I made a couple because I heard people saying that they couldn't get them, including faculty, and I was really torn about the whole thing," said an a n o n y m o u s s t u d e n t . "I thought it was unfortunate that the school was bringing such a well-

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known and influential speaker to the academic community. The tickets were easy to copy and I didn't sell them. And I know other people did it too." Despite the fact that counterfeit tickets were distributed, students and faculty found Angelou's visit exciting and uplifting. " O n e of the reasons I ' m so glad to be at Hope is because it is one of t h o s e r a i n b o w s in t h e c l o u d s , " Angelou said in conclusion.

Heard

The Campus Life Board voted against the Gay Straight Alliance yesterday morning. How would you have voted, an^pfeyf fa HcCLTd

&

Heard

•'1' mk "I don't know. I'm not a supporter of gay issues. I think it's against what the Bible says." - H o p e Reese ('03)

"In favor of it, because Hope claims to b6 a Christian college in favor of open discussion... and here you have a group that is trying to bring discussion to the c a m p u s community and it gets shot down. That's hypocrisy." - J i m Plasman ('03)

"I could have voted yes because I think that Hope has a lot of work in front of it to promote diversity and tolerance. T - D a n i e l Ebeling ( ' 0 4 )

"I d e f i n i t e l y w o u l d h a v e voted for it. I think this campus needs more awareness of the diversity in it." - E r i c a Krolik ('03)

"I would have voted for it. We have the Phelps scholar program that promotes diversity and awareness of other cultures. I find it funny that we don't promote awareness of other minorities. - S a m Sandro ('02)


T h

'Anchor

A p r i l 18, 2001

Arts

Midsummer Night is a feast for the eyes Beth Lomasney STAFF REPORTER

H o p e C o l l e g e T h e a t r e ' s final production of the season. " A Mids u m m e r Night's D r e a m " by William Shakespeare, will open this Friday. April 2 0 , 2 0 0 1 . Additional performances are at 8 pm Saturday. April 21, and April 25-28. T h e Thursday p e r f o r m a n c e will be at 9 pm. All shows take place at the Dewitt Center main theatre. T h e cast of the play represents all f o u r classes at H o p e , and all designs are by m e m b e r s of the theatre faculty. Richard Smith created the s c e n e r y and p r o p e r t i e s , Michelle B o m b e crafted c o s t u m e a n d m a k e u p , and P e r r y L a n d e s d e s i g n e d t h e l i g h t and s o u n d . Daina Robins, chair of theater department, is director of the play. "The cast has been f u n to work with," Robins said. "They have a good spirit and are very playful. T h e play asks actors to trust each other, which they are very able to

do." T h e text of the play is true to Shakespeare. T h e set design uses the colors gray and white which a l l o w f o r easy light p r o j e c t i o n . Fairy c o s t u m e s are grays and purples, and the mechanics are in browns and grays. While characters reside in the woods, the colors are toned d o w n . As the four lovers make their way deeper into the woods, clothing is lost and their c o s t u m e s b e c o m e neutral, which is also traditional to Shakepeare. Patrick Glaub ( 4 02), w h o plays the part of Peter Q u i n c e , e n j o y s acting in Shakepearean dramas. "I like working with S h a k e s p e a r e because of its timelessness." G l a u b said, " T h e language is the best part. |Shakespeare) meant every word of it. Shakespeare is challenging theatre because everything has significance- otherwise, he wouldn't have put it in." Robins e n j o y s the bard's univer-

sality. " W e need to find a c o n n e c t i o n , " Robins said. "Especially since the language is no longer ours. This play is about y o u n g love and the imagination, which are p r e s e n t at a n y t i m e and forever will b e . " Why should a H o p e student go and see " A M i d s u m m e r Night's D r e a m " ? ANCHOR P H O T O BY EMILY M O E L L M A N " T h e a c t i n g is fabulous, but the cosTOADSTOOL, STAGE RIGHT: David Ovies ( 03) as tumes, setting, and Lysander, and Mathew T Bondy ('OS) as Demetrius, rehearse a scene music are to die for," here from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. said A n n e Pott ( 4 01), who plays the part of Hippolyta. " And it's Shakespeare. Robins said. "It is known to be college campus. And on an extreme funny, and our version should be level, it's f u n to watch." T h e whole play is eye c a n d y ! " Tickets are $7 for adults and $4 for Robins advocates seeing the play funny. On some level, all of us senior citizens and students. O f f i c e can identify with getting carried on a different note. hours are M o n d a y through Friday, 10 away with feelings about others, "Compared to other Shakespeare am to 5 pm, and Saturday, noon to 5 especially j e a l o u s y and desire. plays, this o n e is easier to understand.

T h e r e is a lot of action,"

Young, fickle love is fitting for a

pm.

Jack Ridl receives prestigious poetry award Emily Moellman A R T S EDITOR

Jack Ridl, Professor of English, was recently awarded a prestigious award from T h e Center f o r B o o k s and Arts, a p u b l i s h i n g h o u s e in N e w York City. In a blind j u d g i n g against 5 0 0 o t h e r entries, poet Billy C o l l i n s chose Ridl's c h a p b o o k of poetry tilled "Against Elegies" as the winning collection f o r 2001. T h e winning manuscript will be published in a letterhead designed and printed by artists at T h e Center for Book Arts. Ridl will receive $ 1,000 and in the fall will be flown

to N e w York for a celebration, dinner, and a reading with Collins and Sharon Dolin, poet and coordinator of the chapbook competition. Ridl received a phone call f r o m Dolin on March 2 9 informing him that he had won the competition. " I ' m still in happy shock," Ridl said. " A f t e r all those years, after writing all those p o e m s , to have this happen, well, I just never thought it could happen. I ' m glad, feel very encouraged, grateful, silly and honored." With the prize money, Ridl plans on making sure all of his family will be present at the reading.

" [ T h e m o n e y ] is a prize and a payment f o r reading in N Y C , " Ridl said. "Poets certainly are not getting any big b u c k s for their work. T h i s likely breaks d o w n to about a penny and a half for all those hours

"Dogwood," "FIELD," "The Texas Observer," and "Gulf

I put in." R i d l d e s c r i b e s t h e w o r k in "Against Elegies" as a quiet, cheerful struggle against the "big deals". H e h o p e s that the p o e t r y is like c o m f o r t food f o r the mind. Poems in "Against Elegies" have been published in " T h e G e o r g i a Review," "Poetry," "The Journal of

cation. " M a n y people have helped m e with these p o e m s and with the spirit that informs them; my wife, family, my writing c o l l e a g u e s , faculty, friends, students, and my two d o g s , " Ridl sad. " M y r a Kohsel has given them countless hours of attention, preparing them for sending out. T h e r e ain't no words to express my gratitude."

Ohio Stale," " A n t h o l o g y from the University of Southern California,"

Coast". Ridl is currently teaching poetry courses at H o p e and continually working on poems for publi-

J . RIDL

Anonymous 4 to sing at local church Emily Moellman

A R T S EDITOR

Travel to a different place, be in a different time, and hear a different sound. When Anonymous 4 brings their astonishing vocal musical blend and technical virtuosity to Holland, audience m e m b e r s will be swept away to a world of medieval melodies, and there will be nothing ordinary about it. T h e m e m b e r s of the highly acclaimed quartet are slated to perform at St. Francis D e Sales Church through H o p e ' s Great Performance Series on TuesdayTApril 24 at 8 pm. T h e a capella group will be performing songs f r o m their latest recording, "1000: A Mass for the End of T i m e . " Marsha Genernsky, Susan Hellauer, J a c q u e l i n e H o r n e r and J o h a n n a Maria R o s e present this mass in part because it includes thousand-year-old chants in celebration of the new

ANCHOR

PHOTO COURTESY OF P U B L I C

RELATIONS

TAKE FOUR : Marsha Genernsky, Susan Hellauer, Jaqueline Horner, and Joanna Maria Rose of Anonymous 4 will perform at St. Francis de Sales on Tuesday, April 24 at 8 pm.

millennium. T h e music of the mass in based on a wide variety of texts including Ovid's " M e t a m o r p h e s e s " and W.B. Yeat's "The Second Coming".* " W h e n w e chose the location, w e did not know what they would be performing, but it certainly has worked out well," said Derek Emerson, coordinator of the G P S . " What is even more timely is that the program also ties into Jesus' Ascension, which takes place forty days after Easter."

T h e concert will be performed at St. Francis de Sales Church for numerous reasons. According to Emerson, the G P S c o m m i t t e e decided on the church for acoustical reasons. "These four women are incredibly talented and the music faculty said that the chapel would not do justice to their voices, and r e c o m m e n d e d St. Francis," Emerson said. 1 4 W h e n the church was rebuilt after the fire, they paid special attention to enhancing the acoustics. It is also in walking distance to Hope, so w e ' r e not sending the students too far." A n o n y m o u s 4 lake music seriously, but they also are entertaining: Emerson explains that since the group is so serious about their music and also is enjoyable to watch, critics and audiences alike have responded well to them. T h e " N e w York T i m e s " says the group has "a union so precise thai it sounds positively supernatural," and ten of the quartet's recordings have reached Billboard's classical top 10 chart. "Its a great opportunity to hear music not typically heard any m o r e , " E m e r s o n said. "This will a moving experience, and those looking for a n e w religious experience will not want to miss this concert." Tickets for A n o n y m o u s 4 will be available at the theater lobby ticket office in the DeWitt Center. Tickets cost $ 1 2 . 5 0 for regular adults, $ 1 0 . 5 0 for senior citizens, and $5 for students.


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T h e Gay Straight Alliance was deni ed status as an official student

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activity by the C a m p u s L i f e board yesterday morning. W h i l e there are

Professor remembers the life of Workman

valid reasons for a n d against the g r o u p b e c o m i n g an official activity, it

To the Editor:

s e e m s that o n e e x p r e s s e d by the C a m p u s L i f e board is not quite wellthought. A c o n c e r n was raised at t h e meeting that a student g r o u p may

w h o took our class in C o u n t r y Lit-

c o u r a g e there c a n b e no truth, and without truth there is n o o t h e r vir-

I a m p r o f o u n d l y grateful to the

e r a t u r e is not likely to forget his

t u e . " H e cherished an old-fashioned

not b e the appropriate f o r u m for a p p r o a c h i n g the issue of h o m o s e x u a l -

Anchor editors and particularly to

respectful m e m o i r of writer L o u i s

v i s i o n of s c h o l a r s h i p t h a t t r a n -

ity. Well then, w h a t is o n e of these " s o - c a l l e d " appropriate f o r u m s ?

c a r r i e A r n o l d f o r t h e story last

scended petty c o n s i d e r a t i o n s of per-

Should h o m o s e x u a l issues b e t h e d o m a i n of s o m e caste of pre-ordained intellectuals d e e m e d " w o r t h y " of considering and d i s c u s s i n g

w e e k on m y h u s b a n d , L e s l i e

B r o m f i e l d ) . It c o m f o r t s me to rem e m b e r that at least a f e w students s u m m o n e d the courage to cross the

a n h y t h i n g h e d e s p i s e d , it w s t h e trend of self-seeking and self-protec-

the i s s u e ? Or is it an issue on c a m p u s that should only b e discussed by the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ? Are we to u n d e r s t a n d that the C a m p u s L i f e board feels that students should not d i s c u s s the issue on their o w n , p e r h a p s gaspwithout s o m e c o m m a n d i n g v o i c e on the issue? T h e students of H o p e C o l l e g e are the exact p e o p l e w h o should undertake the discussion of h o m o s e x u a l i t y and h o m o s e x u a l issues. To not trust students to u n d e r t a k e such discussions is to discount their opin-

T h o m a s , for e x a m p l e , and a n y o n e

Workman. A l t h o u g h L e s l i e w a s never o f ficially a m e m b e r of t h e H o p e faculty, H o p e g a v e him and intellectual and social c o m m u n i t y h e c a m e to value m o r e and m o r e as the years went by: and without the s u p p o r t of that c o m m u n i t y h e

threshold of Leslie's o f f i c e in L u b bers and stayed o n g e n o u g h to dis-

sonal a d v a n c e m e n t , and if there w a s

tion h e observed in the academic pro-

cover (as I myself had d o n e m a n y y e a r s ago) that the m a s s i v e white-

fession (and for that matter throughout c o m t e m p o r a r y culture). N o one

h a i r e d m a n with t h e f o r b i d d i n g

k n e w better than he what a colorful and eccentric figure he cut as he

expression was in fact a patient listener and a wise and c o m p a s s i o n -

stalked a r o u n d c a m p u s brandishing his cane, a n d his quick a n d salty wit

ions and voices on the issues. H o m o s e x u a l i t y is an e m e r g i n g issue-not

c o u l d not h a v e a c c o m p l i s h e d as

only on H o p e ' s c a m p u s , but in the entire world. H o p e should encour-

m u c h as he did. I tis especially

ate counselor. L e s l i e was a m a n w h o b e l o n g e d

age g r o u p s of students w h o a r e looking to discuss these issues. Stu-

g r a t i f y i n g to m e that s t u d e n t s

to himself: h e permitted n o o n e to

wil b e h o n o r e d best by respect for

w e r e a w a r e of his p r e s e n c e . I had

threaten or inhibit him, he was con-

the ideals that i n f o r m e d and enlarged

a g e this than to h a v e the c o l l e g e support a g r o u p of students w h o are

not realized until quite recently

stitutionally incapable of f a w n i n g ,

his character.

dedicated to open a n d frank d i s c u s s i o n of the s u b j e c t ? T h e r e should b e

how much he missed teaching,

a n d he s p o k e his mind bluntly re-

no fear of student g r o u p s d i s c u s s i n g issues, even sensitive issues.

a n d I am glad f o r t h e courses w e

gardless of the c o n s e q u e n c e s . H e

taught t o g e t h e r and for the o c c a sional lectures he presented in m y

was especially f o n d of q u o t i n g t h e w o r d s of Sir Walter Scott, o n e of

c l a s e s (students in m y c o u r s e on

his (completely u n f a s h i o n a b l e )

t w e n t i e t h - c e n t u r y literature will recall L e s l i e ' s r e m a r k s on D y l a n

heroes: " C o u r a g e is t h e most important thing, because without

dents need outlets for their d i s c u s s i o n , a n d w h a t better way to encour-

T h e administration, faculty, and m e m b e r s of t h e Holland and world c o m m u n i t y a r e not e x c u s e d f r o m this discussion. All these g r o u p s play a role in it. But to think that a student g r o u p is an i nappr o p r i at e f o r u m for these issues is not a g o o d sentiment for a n y o n e to have. T h e r e m a y b e legitimate r e a s o n s f o r the s c h o o l to not m a k e the G a y Straight Alliance an official student organization. P e r h a p s it can b e s h o w n that there i s n ' t the d e m a n d on c a m p u s for a g r o u p that deals with h o m o s e x u a l issues-the creationist c l u b was deni ed student o r g a -

is already l e g e n d a r y : but his m e m o r

Kathleen Verduin P r o f e s s o r of English A s s o c i a t e Editor, Studies in Medievalism

Angelou autographs available through mail T o the Editor:

nization status in part b e c a u s e of that very reason. T h e r e is also the

willing to allow m e to publish her

T h a n k you all o n c e again for all

address in N o r t h C a r o l i n a . A n y -

y o u r help and support of the 2001 S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s S p e a k e r Series. It went f a r better than I e v e r culd h a v e

question of f u n d i n g . C o m p e t i t i o n for student activity f u n d i n g can b e

As m a n y of y o u might know,

thing that y o u send to her, she will

tight, a n d t w o new o r g a n i z a t i o n s h a v e been a d d e d this year already.

we w e r e certainly blessed to h a v e

But saying that a reason to not support the o r g a n i z a t i o n is that student groups are an inappropriate f o r u m for h o m o s e x u a l issues simply d o e s n ' t

Dr. M a y a A n g e l o u on our c a m pus this past M o n d a y , April 16.

sign and return to you, a n d this she h a s guaranteed me. It m a y take a

work. It's d e m e a n i n g to the students, to those h e a d i n g the G a y Straight

S h e was indeed an inspiration to

asked

or

imagined.

May

Dr.

f e w w e e k s ( s h e ' s quite busy), but

A n g e l o u ' s c h a l l e n g i n g and inspiring

she will sign w h a t e v e r y o u wish.

w o r d s of b e i n g a " r a i n b o w in the c l o u d s " r e m a i n in o u r h e a r t s f o r

Alliance, and to the ethic of learning at this c o l l e g e . It's h e a r t e n i n g to see that the c o l l e g e ' s r e f u s a l to support the organi-

u s all a n d w e w e r e h o n o r e d to

F o r w a r d all requests to:

h a v e such a f i n e individual address us. Dr. A n g e l o u w a s not a b l e to

Dr. M a y a A n g e l o u W ak e Forest University

m a n y y e a r s to c o m e .

zation will not stop t h e Gay Straight Alliance f r o m c o n t i n u i n g their conversation on h o m o s e x u a l i t y . T h e y s e e m willing to provide a struc-

P.O. B o x 7 3 1 4

ture f o r the discussion of h o m o s e x u a l issues on c a m p u s , even if m e m bers of the C a m p u s L i f e board feel that they a r e " i n a p p r o p r i a t e " for

sign a u t o g r a p h s a f t e r the speech

A m y Avery ( ' 0 2 ) Student Congress Speaker Series

such activity. P e r h a p s , as the c o l l e g e c o m e s to u n d e r s t a n d that student discussion is the p r i m a r y v e n u e for discussion of issues on a c o l l e g e c a m p u s , they will b e ready to s u p p o r t the G a y Straight Alliance o f f i cially.

Anchor Stc A

i TT

C

U All JlS Anchor Start

Staff

r

S t a

Anchor Staff

editor-in-chief campus beat editor sports editor spotlight editor infocus editor arts editor production editor photo editor copy editor distribution manager business manager production assistant faculty advisor

f f

Anchor

Andrew Lotz Matt Cook Rand Arwady Carrie Arnold Megan Krigbaum Emily Moellman Chad Sampson Arianna Baker Tyler Danstrom Nick Denis Sarah Wilkinson Rachael Pridgeon Tim Boudreau

at t h e r e c e p t i o n , but w a s v e r y

The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee, letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right lo edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the Anchor

0509

Chair

Apache mission work is greatly appreciated To the Editor:

A p a c h e a r e a to r e c o v e r f r o m a

W h e n t h e y w e r e not involved in

m a j o r flood which hit our town last

s e r v i c e p r o j e c t s or m i n i s t r y p r o g r a m s , the g r o u p was able to tour the area and to learn a litle a b o u t this

I a m writing to e x p r e s s the ap-

October. Your team did dry-wall

preciation of the c o n g r e g a t i o n of

m u d d i n g , sheet metal and regular

A p a c h e R e f o r m e d Church and

r o o f i n g , exterior siding and other r e n o v a t i o n project. T h e y w o r k e d

r e g i o n ' s N a t i v e A m e r i c a n and south-

under a p a r t n e r s h i p b e t w e e n the

w e s t e r n heritage. T h i s y e a r ' s g r o u p w a s a b l e t o v i s i t art g a l e r i e s in

H o p e College team who spent

R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a and

A n a d a r k o , tour the tribal h e a d q u a r -

S p r i n g Break here on a C h a p e l -

t e r s f o r t h e C o m a n c h e T r i b e of

s p o n s o r e d mission trip in M a r c h .

M e n n o n i t e Disaster Services, the fist partnership b e t w e e n these two

M a n y thanks to: D a w n Devries,

d e n o m i n a t i o n s in disaster recov-

Rachel Hoffman, Jerry Rademaker, A m y Wakerly,

ery. T h e i r assistance significantly

preparations for the p o w - w o w for the election of the K i o w a princess, be

a d v a n c e d A p a c h e ' s flod recovery

g u e s t s of h o n o r at an Indian h y m n

Ross Dieleman,

efforts. T h e groups was also involved in

sing, and go to cattle s t o c k y a r d s the

the c o m m u n i t y of A p a c h e , O k l a h o m a , f o r t h e m e m b e r s of t h e

Johnville,

Lindsay

David

Rye,

David Yang, Lori Geuder, H a l e y M a r t i n , Kieu T r a n , T o m

individual and g r o u p ministry e f -

Hoesch, Kelly Nitz, and M a t t h e w

the college and did a skit for our c h i l d r e n ' s s e r m o n in our m o r n i n g

Vanderhyde. W e k n o w that there are m a n y

forts. T h e y brought greetings f r o m

O k l a h o m e , attend a p o w - w o w , watch

night b e f o r e t h e big auction. T h e y w e r e also able to hike through the nearby Wichita Mountain Wildlife R e f u g e , with c l o s e u p opportunities to s e e b u f f a l o a n d prairie d o g s and

w o r s h i p service; they also led our

with breath-taking p a n o r a m i c views

o t h e r s b e h i n d this team of people h w o helped to a r r a n g e for their

e v e n i n g w o r s h i p service with individual and g r o u p singing, d r a m a

f r o m t h e top of Elk M o u n t a i n . T h a n k you for the g r o u p you sent

trip here. W e ex t en d our t h a n k s

a n d personal sharing. Half of the

to us. Their cheerfulnes, good humor,

also to the C h a p l a i n ' s o f f i c e a n d

g r o u p was able to lead our G E N E S I S c h i l d r e n ' s ministry, and the

hard work and tender spirits h a v e left

to all other s u p p o r t i n g p r o g r a m s

Staff Reporters: Meredith Ter Haar, Beth Lomasney, Abby Rogers, and Danielle Koski Photo and Graphical S u p p o r t Staff: Rob Ondra and Jennifer Troke

Winston-Salem, NC 27109-

and personnel w h o h a v e h el p ed to m a k e this and all of the 21 other

o t h e r half led our 7th-12th g r a d e

trips possible for the participants.

youth group ministry. T h e g r o u p also had a s p o n t a n e o u s ministry

W h i l e they were here, your team w o r k e d hard on h o m e reno-

o p p o r t u n i t y by s i n g i n g d u r i n g l u n c h t i m e at our local senior citi-

v a t i o n s to assist c i t i z e n s in the

zen nutrition site.

a positive w i t n e s for Christ in our c o m m u n i t y and a legacy of H o p e for t h o s e r e c o v e r i n g f r o m last f a l l ' s flood.

Rev. G e o r g e M o n t a n a r i

WTHS 89.9 The new voice of Hope College


Ik

A p r i l 18, 2001

Anchor

Infocias

2 001

Election Candidates for Student Congress President Rand A r w a d y (*03) S t u d e n t s at H o p e h a v e ( H A

the c h a n c e t o c h o o s e the P r e s i d e n t w h o is the t o p r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of e v e r y

A n c h o r , p r o m o t e d diversity by participating in the P h e l p s Scholars p r o g r a m , yelled myself h o a r s e n u m e r o u s t i m e s with the D e w C r e w , p l a y e d a l m o s t all i n t r a m u r a l s , a n d O k l a h o m a and T e n n e s s e e . I ' v e e v e n spent a s u m m e r c l e a n i n g d o r m r o o m s at H o p e o n t h e

candidate. Students de-

c l e a n i n g crew. If elected, I will w o r k to ex-

serve s o m e o n e c o n n e c t e d to the college, liv-

p a n d student p a r k i n g b y taking over the h u g e

ing o n c a m p u s w h o is easily a c c e s s i b l e a n d

visitor lot behind L i n c o l n S c h o o l , and g i v e it to the students w h o a r e p a y i n g s o m u c h t o go

s o m e o n e you know. 1 will be all of those. 1 a m r u n n i n g for P r e s i d e n t b e c a u s e I really u n d e r s t a n d H o p e s t u d e n t s and I w a n t to b e their voice at H o p e C o l l e g e . A s a s o p h o m o r e communications major from Kalamazoo who lives in D u r f e e , 1 h a v e e n j o y e d the full r a n g e

to H o p e . We deserve closer parking spots than p e o p l e visiting the c a m p u s . I ' d i m p r o v e the ridiculous o n e - s i t e p r e - p a y system for d o i n g c a m p u s laundry, and get m o r e card m a c h i n e s

of c o l l e g e life and spent e v e r y s e m e s t e r o n

o n c a m p u s , preferably in e v e r y b u i l d i n g next t o the laundry m a c h i n e s . I ' d w o r k with ad-

c a m p u s . I ' v e s u n g in C h r i s t m a s Vespers with

ministration to k e e p f u t u r e increases in col-

college chorus, played football freshmen year, s u p p o r t e d the N y k e r k w o m e n as a M o -

lege tuition p a y m e n t s to n o greater than in-

rale G u y , w o r k e d as S p o r t s E d i t o r f o r t h e

you vote for R a n d !

flation. S o r e m e m b e r , H o p e Ml b e G r a n d if

ing one year as Vice-President. T h i s has given m e the o p p o r t u n i t y t o w a t c h and learn f r o m

dent b e c a u s e I w a n t to eng a g e m o r e p e o p l e in o u r

other p r e s i d e n t s . I w a n t to build o n L o u i s C a n f i e l d ' s e f f o r t s to o p e n n e w c h a n n e l s of c o m m u n i a t i o n b e t w e e n the students and the

WnM

S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s . As s o m e o n e w h o has particip a t e d in m a n y o r g a n i z a -

participated in spring-break m i s s i o n trips t o

student. 1 feel that I am that candidate, the students'

Matt scogin ( 4 02 ) I a m r u n n i n g for Presi-

Student C o n g r e s s . I w a n t to e n c o u r a g e participation by h a v i n g S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s elec-

tions suc h as F.C.S., O r i e n -

tions online. I will w o r k to e n s u r e that stu-

tation, N y k e r k , and M o d e l U N , 1 am sensitive t o the needs of students. T h e fact that

d e n t s are a w a r e of t h e c u r r e n t issues a n d k n o w h o w t o v o i c e their o p i n i o n s by utiliz-

recent Student C o n g r e s s elections h a v e seen

ing the s ys t em of e m a i l u p d a t e s established

l o w s t u d e n t t u r n o u t and a lack of interest a m o n g candidates to seek o f f i c e indicates that

t w o years a g o . I a m proud of this school and very loyal to

Student C o n g r e s s has not a l w a y s d o n e a g o o d j o b of c o m m u n i c a t i n g the i m p o r t a n c e of your

it. C o l l e e n E v a n s a n d I h a v e a vision to m a k e

o p i n i o n in C o n g r e s s b u s i n e s s . If students a

this an e v e n better place for students. As y o u r president, I will m a k e it my highest priority

y e a r f r o m n o w a r e n o b e t t e r o f f t h a n at p r e s e n t . Student C o n g r e s s has failed its pur-

t o i m p r o v e student facilities on c a m p u s . W e need a better student union. W e need a place

pose. I h a v e had the privilege of s e r v i n g in S t u dent C o n g r e s s for the past three years, includ-

o n c a m p u s that is o p e n 2 4 hours for s t u d y i n g a n d m o s t importantly, w e d e s p e r a t e l y need n e w e q u i p m e n t in the D o w C e n t e r .

Candidates for Student Congress Vice-President Carl

Daniel

('02)

A twenty-one year old Philosophy and Classical S t u d i e s (Latin) d o u b l e m a j o r with p r e - m e d on the s i d e , is r u n n i n g f o r V i c e

mittees, task forces, and has chaired the Student O r g a n i z a t i o n s Task F o r c e . Currently, h e sits on the Student M e d i a C o m m i t t e e , which c h o o s e s the students w h o are in c h a r g e of W T H S , the A n c h o r , and O p u s a s well as the C a m p u s L i f e B o a r d , w h e r e he w o r k e d with other S t u d e n t C o n -

ÂŤ

Colleen Evans ('03) Through Student Con-

tive to the n e e d s of the student b o d y and connect with m a n y different student groups. I a m

gress, H o p e College students h a v e a lot of p o w e r to

h o n e s t , r e s p o n s i b l e , and hard w o r k i n g . T h i s , I w a s abl e to participate in the Student

m a k e c h a n g e . T h i s is o n e of

C o n g r e s s as the G i l m o r e Hall Representative. I h a v e also participated in the N y k e r k s o n g

the issues that Scogin and I are passionate about. Our

gress m e m b e r s to g i v e s t u d e n t s m o r e o f a

vision is t o increase student

c o m p e t i t i o n and the O d d Year Pull. I ' m a DJ o n 89.9 W T H S , involved in a Bible study.

awareness so that m o r e

G o s p e l Choir, Silent Praise, R e l i g i o u s L i f e

c h a n g e can take place. We w a n t m o r e stu-

C o m m i t t e e , Student S t a n d i n g s and A p p e a l s

the position, he has served a y e a r a s d o r m

say in t h e rules that a f f e c t their living situations and t o g i v e o r g a n i z a t i o n s the right to disclose information. H e is also currently a L a n c e C o r p o r a l in

d e n t s to attend our m e e t i n g s and v o i c e the

C o m m i t t e e , and the D a n c e M a r a t h o n .

r e p ( C o l l e g e East A p a r t m e n t s ) , a year as a C a b i n e t m e m b e r (Class R e p r e s e n t a t i v e ) , and

ideas that they h a v e to m a k e H o p e C o l l e g e a

Matt S c o g i n and I r e p r e s e n t a vast cross-

is very f a m i l i a r with the Student C o n g r e s s

the M a r i n e C o r p s (A C o . , 1/24), w h e r e h e feels his e x p e r i e n c e s h a v e contributed greatly

s e c t i o n o f t h e s t u d e n t body. Vote C o l l e e n E v a n s forVice-President and Malt Scogin for

Constitution. He has b e e n a m e m b e r of f i v e boards, c o m -

better place. T h e w i d e range of my i n v o l v e m e n t a l l o w s

t o his l e a d e r s h i p ability.

m e to be a m o r e e f f e c t i v e leader. I a m sensi-

President.

President. Undoubtedly the most e x p e r i e n c e d c a n d i d a t e for

Candidates for Student Senior Class Representative Jeffrey

Amy Avery I h a v e b e e n blessed to b e a

I

Over the past few years, 1

part of the Student C o n g r e s s for the past t w o years as the sophomore and j u n i o r class representatives. I h a v e b e e n heavily in-

given

Nathaniel Tripp I h a v e b e e n very involved in

iTanner Smith I ' v e b e e n i n v o l v e d in m a n y

Howard

activities o n c a m p u s a n d I ' m in t o u c h with t h e n e e d s and

c a m p u s life during my time

h a v e s e e n m a n y c h a n g e s at H o p e C o l l e g e . I h a v e seen both the c o o p e r a t i o n and the divi-

wants of o u r community. I h a v e

u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the w a y

b e e n an R A for t w o years now,

things work in this c o m m u n i t y . I h a v e held multiple positions

sions b e t w e e n the administra-

volved in C o n g r e s s activities,

tion and the students. H a v i n g

i n c l u d i n g h e l p i n g to i m p l e -

b e e n involved with several g r o u p s and ac-

m e n t the first student survey t w o y e a r s a g o

tivities, such as student produced theater pro-

that p u s h e d the c o l l e g e t o m a k e i m p r o v e -

d u c t i o n s , R I S E , the M i l e s t o n e .

m e n t s in the DeWitt C e n t e r and other c a m pus areas. T h i s year, I h a v e d e v o t e d m u c h

h e r e at H o p e and h a v e a g o o d

which has p r o v i d e d m e with s o m e good leadership skills

within the C e n t u r i a n Fraternity

a n d has i n f o r m e d m e o f s o m e issues on c a m -

and h a v e b e e n a m e m b e r o f the Interfrater-

pus that I think need to b e a d d r e s s e d . I am

nity C o u n c i l , m o s t recently sitting as Vice-

the c o m m u n i c a t i o n b e t w e e n the students and

currently the J u n i o r C l a s s R e p r e s e n t a t i v e . I w a s a voting m e m b e r o n the Residential L i f e

P r e s i d e n t this past year. 1 w a s a m e m b e r of

C o m m i t t e e and o n the Administrative A f f a i r s

the 2 0 0 2 Pull t e a m my s o p h o m o r e year. T h e past t w o y e a r s , I ' v e participated in the H o p e

time and energy into b r i n g i n g M a y a A n g e l o u

the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n m u s t be i m p r o v e d to c o n t i n u e the tradition a n d a c a d e m i c e x c e l l e n c e

to o u r c a m p u s . T h r o u g h S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s , I h a v e also played roles in the A c a d e m i c A f -

at H o p e . I also feel that the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n m u s t listen t o w h a t c o n c e r n s s t u d e n t s b r i n g

B o a r d , which provided m e with a g o o d opportunity to get to k n o w , and create a rap-

C o l l e g e m i s s i o n trips and h a v e tutored tor C A S A . I feel that I h a v e the ability to play a

up. I feel that with m y various e x p e r i e n c e s ,

port, with m a n y of the s c h o o l ' s administrators. I feel that I am q u a l i f i e d to o n c e again

p o s i t i v e role as a m e m b e r of Student C o n -

fairs C o m m i t t e e and the Religious L i f e C o m mittee. Student C o n g r e s s m e a n s a great deal

b e your c l a s s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e and I would re-

g r e s s and that 1 c o u l d b e a g o o d representative not only for the s e n i o r class, but for the

to m e and 1 would w o r k hard again to s u p -

I will b e able to r e p r e s e n t the s e n i o r class well, and work hard t o i m p r o v e c o n d i t i o n s

ally e n j o y s e r v i n g you next year.

student b o d y as a w h o l e .

port the entire student body.

at H o p e C o l l e g e .

I feel that

Candidates for Sophomore Class Rep

Candidates for Junior Class Rep Amber Beeson H o w w o u l d you like to h a v e 'better e q u i p m e n t in the D o w ? j W o u l d y o u like t o h a v e o n e single card act as your ID, access card, food and laundry card instead of a b u n c h of different c a r d s ? Did you ever w o n d e r w h y C a l v i n gets f r e e l a u n d r y and

we need a voice, and I a m prepared t o d o w h a t e v e r necessary to e x p r e s s m y o p i n i o n

talented and is no stranger to hard w o r k and leadership. R h o n d a f i r m l y believes in b e i n g

year a s Kollen Hall r epr es entative, I am running for

understanding, fair, honest, hardworking, and

representation in Student C o n g r e s s to provide a n alternative voice.

S o p h o m o r e C l a s s representa-

b e l i e v e that t h e r e n e e d s t o b e s o m e G r e e k

chad

sampson

F o r the p a s t t w o y e a r s I h a v e s e r v e d on the S t u d e n t

a line? A v o t e for m e is a v o t e toward all of these goals. I am very i n v o l v e d o n c a m p u s

C o n g r e s s , o n e y e a r as t h e

and t h e r e f o r e feel c a p a b l e o f r e p r e s e n t i n g a

and the other as the S o p h o more Class Representative.

your vote for m e . A m b e r B e e s o n . Joshua Egedy 1 feel that 1 w o u l d b e a g o o d representative b e c a u s e I would be as ruthless as possible in a n attempt to prove that the c l a s s jof *03 is far superior to all other o n this c a m p u s . To be honest, classes there are a lot of things that b o t h e r m e about the way students are not represented on c a m pus. We pay m o n e y to g o here, and I feel that

C u r r i c u l u m C o m m i t t e e s . R h o n d a is multi-

b o d y for the past a c a d e m i c

a n d the o p i n i o n s of m y c l a s s m a t e s . I a l s o

H o p e d o e s n o t ? H o w w o u l d you like to register for classes online instead of w a i t i n g in

m a j o r i t y of you, the student body. 1 w a n t to b e your J u n i o r C l a s s R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , s o cast

Stephen Adair H a v i n g served the student

D u r f e e Hall r e p r e s e n t a t i v e

IWhile s e r v i n g t h e s e t e r m s , I p r o d u c e d the S t u d e n t C o n gress Newsletter, fought against the n e w Student D e v e l o p m e n t h o u s i n g policies and des i g n e d the p o s t e r s for M a y a A n g e l o u . If

I

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tive so I c a n take o n m o r e responsibility and

T h e Million Dollar Candi-

lead task f o r c e s , which tackle the t o u g h iss u e s o n c a m p u s . I h a v e p r e v i o u s l y served as

date. R e g i s is staring at y o u r

a m e m b e r of the A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e ,

s w e a t y b r o w and r e p e a t s t h e q u e s t i o n , 4tFor o n e million

the E x t r a - C u r r i c u l a r C o m m i t t e e , the A d m i s sions and Financial Aid C o m m i t t e e , the C o r e

! d o l l a r s . . . w h a t is t h e n a m e of the H o p e C o l l e g e S o p h o m o r e

C u r r i c u l u m Task Force, and the Spring S t u dent S u r v e y task force. O n T h u r s d a y and Friday I invite you to v o t e for m e so I can s e r v e

R e p r e s e n t a t i v e ? " O n e f a c e p o p s into y o u r m e m o r y . "Well...," you say hesitantly, "...she

you for a n o t h e r year.

side activities like Nykerk and C A S A . " (Your m i n d frantically s e a r c h e s for the n a m e while you c o n t i n u e talking.) " S h e ' s very r e s p o n -

Rhonda

Armstrong

In her first year, she has al-

elected as J u n i o r C l a s s R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , I will c o n t i n u e to w o r k for m o r e unity, a c c e p t a n c e

ready b e c o m e active on c a m j p u s . R h o n d a is a part of t h e 1 P h e l p s Scholar P r o g r a m . Black

and discussion o n the H o p e ' s c a m p u s . T h e D o w facilities and b a r e f o o t e d n e s s will also

Student Union, and Student ICongress. On Congress she

be a r e a s o f f o c u s .

m o s t of all e f f e c t i v e ! Jill DeVries

r e p r e s e n t s Scott Hall, is a part of the S p e a k e r Series Task Force, and the Appropriations and

w a s a very a c t i v e her f r e s h m a n year in out-

sible..." Your m i n d tries to put the n a m e with the f a c e you see. "I also k n o w that she w a n t s to i m p r o v e the school a t m o s p h e r e and is willing t o seek out t h o s e u p c o m i n g s o p h o m o r e s w h o h a v e c o n c e r n s for H o p e College. Well, R e g i s , " you finally c o m e to an a n s w e r , "Jill DeVries, m y final a n s w e r ! "


"Anchor

Tk

Spotlight

A p r i l 18, 2001

Chow time at Hope

Carrie Arnold

d Bolts f T4.1 S* *

N U T S AND BOLTS

Students examine own eating habits Carrie A r n o l d S P O T U G H T EDITOR

For Heidi Osmundson ('02), the decision to remain on meal plan was a no-brainer. 4 T m have no lime to cook for myself," Osmundson said. Hope students make decisions every day about what they are going to eat. While most students make good deci s i ons , c o l l e g e can begin or amplify negative eating patterns. "Choosing the right portion size is the largest problem most students have," said Christal Saffee, nurse practitioner at the Health Clinic. This is especially difficult in the buffet-style layout of both Phelps and Cook Dining Halls, Saffee said, where portions are essentially unlimited. To Katie Veldman ( ' 0 3 ) , however, this buffet-style is o p t i m a l f o r her vegetarian diet. "Phelps does a good j o b of trying to c o m e up with good dishes," Veldman said. "But it becomes repetitive after a while." Since Veldman's most difficult task is finding enough protein in her diet, she relies u p o n garbanzo and pinto beans and rice for many meals. "Sometimes I chop up tofu and put it in my salad," Veldman said. Osmundson, too, found variety to be an advantage of remaining on meal plan. "If I were to shop for myself, I w o u l d n ' t h a v e n e a r l y as m a n y things to choose from," Osmundson said. Osmundson sometimes finds

meals disappointing when she has a craving for a dish that is not being served. if, "If you really feel like meatloaf, they might not be serving it that night." Osmundson said. The main issue for Brennan H u g h e y ( ' 0 1 ) w a s not t h e V quantity of food, but the quality of food. "There's a little less variety when I cook for myself, but the food tastes better," Hughey said. "And I ' m not that good of a cook." Especially during ng uu:>y busy times, Hughey relies on p r e p a c k a g e d f o o d s , such as m a c a r o n i and cheese, sandwiches, Ramen noodles, and salads, but he also enj o y s making French toast. "I o n l y set of the f i r e alarm once," Hughey said. Hughey also has a commuter pass for the dining halls, but doesn't use it that often. "It takes just as long to wait in line as it does to cook for myself," Hughey said. "The experience has just reinforced my decision to leave the m e a l plan." Hughey has not found cooking on his o w n to be without annoyances. "I don't like having go s h o p p i n g w h e n you need just a few things that don't quite j u s t i f y a trip to t h e grocery store," Hughey said. Trying to eat healthy on meal plan does not come without an effort. "The hardest part is the planning and thinking ahead that it requires,"

Saffee said. "And the stress of being a student interferes. T h e problems caused by unhealthy eating are nothing y o u ' r e going to see next week, and J when whe y o u ' r e stressed o u t , y' o u ' r e n o t r e a l l y thinking long term." Although Osmundson attempts to eat healthy as much as possible, she tries not to get carried away with it. " S o m e nights, I just don't care," O s m u n d s o n said. " B u t even j u s t having i the option of salad is good." Veldman urges simplicity in cooking for dining hall cuisine. " I n s t e a d of f r y i n g something, or putting it in butler, j u s t s t e a m t h e v e g e t a b l e s , " Veldman said. "I commend them on trying, but simpler is better." For numerous students at Hope, particularly female ones, the choice i s n ' t s o m u c h w h a t to e a t but whether to eat. Saffee estim a t e s that 10% of t h e college population have some type of eating disorder, and that m a n y more fall under the c a t e g o r y of "restrictive eater." "The Health Clinic only gets the tip of the iceberg," Saffee said. "It's a much bigger issue that what we see." In the end, however. S a f f e e sees bad eating habits as something that can students can change. "The bad habits that start now can last for a lifetime." Saffee said. "But every day is a new day. and you can change today."

r f *

i f

S p o t l i g h t Editor

'id

Plaid

I have aged 20 years thus far, an event which, I think, has given me a certain amount of life wisdom. After all. when the music you listened to as a child is sold on TV alongside such stand alone classics as "Polish Polka Party" and "Making Out to the Oldies." one cannot help but notice the knowledge that may (or may not) have arrived with the passing of the years. So what have I learned in these past 2 0 years that warrants me rambling on for several hundred words? Through trial and error. I have discovered that the combination of vats of coffee and pounds of Skittles helps you stay up all night. I have learned to avoid M e i j e r ' s on a Saturday afternoon. I have also uncovered the joy of wearing stripes and plaids at the same time. Gasp. Why is this so incomprehensible? W h o invented the rule that our clothing must match? Why, for that matter, must everything we do always follow the rules? We are told what to do essentially from day one. What to wear, how to act, what to eat, even what brand of running shoes to buy. By now, most of us are so programmed, we can operate without even thinking. Far too many of us do.

Have you ever stopped to ask yourself why you are doing something? Better yet. try and answer that question. Can you? Unlikely. In the end. most of us know what w e ' r e "supposed" to be doing, and many times, this advice isn't half bad. But give me a little credit here. Let me decide for myself whether stripes and plaids make suitable attire. We all get so caught up in these grand life-and-death struggles over what we should and should not do in our lives. You know what? It's not that important. In the grand scheme of things, whether my clothing assaults the eyes or whether I decide to eat a bucket of ice cream for dinner really doesn't matter. I still haven't figured out what does matter, but I know that doesn't. None of us are perfect. Although w e ' r e expected to be, w e ' r e not. To this day, I still have issues accepting this simple fact. We need to stop trying to be a hollow ideal and just be. G o ahead, break the rules. I give you permission. W h o knows? More plaid just might make this world a happier place.

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wash y o u r car P l e S s ยง b r i n g

ANCHOR

P H O T O BY A R I A N N A

2 d 2 n S t i 2 n

depree parking lot april 21 12:00-3;00 pm

BAKER

WHAT'S FOR DINNER?-. Students in Phelps Dining Hall examine the choices at the deli bar before making their final selection. Phelps offers several specialty bars for students on meal plan, including a salad bar and a vegetarian bar. Many people who eat in the cafeteria cite the variety of food options as a reason for remaining on meal plan. s

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T h

Anchor

A p r i l 18, 2001

7/ ELECTIONS from 1

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and C i n d y Reichert. C a n d i d a t e s t h i s year h a v e expressed interest in issues of c o m m u nication between the students and college administration, the quality of D o w C e n t e r f a c i l i t i e s as well as other student facilities and services. Poll times and locations for Student C o n g r e s s elections are available on K n o w h o p e .

S m i t h , and

Nathaniel Tripp. A m b e r Beeson, Joshua Egedy, and C h a d Sampson are the three students running for junior class representative. T h e five candidates for sophomore class representative are S t e p h e n R. A d a i r , II, R h o n d a Armstrong, Ben Byl, Jill DeVries,

Here's your chance to get involved: T h e A n c h o r is looking f o r people to fill several editorial positions.

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VANS from 1 college was taking steps," R e n n e r said. "It is a topic that has been discussed for a period of time before that." A c c o r d i n g to Renner, although Hope has not had any accidents involving rollovers, the v a n ' s manufacturers h a v e been voicing their

decision, H o p e is looking at how often vans are used to m a x i m u m capacity. " T h e y ' r e trying to analyze this before just running out and buying a whole bunch of vans to replace [the 15-passenger v a n s , ] "

concerns to their customers. T h e N H T S A press release states that, when full, a 15-passenger van's center of gravity shifts rearward and u p w a r d , increasing the likelihood of rollover. T h e shift in the center of gravity will also increase the potential for loss of control in panic maneuvers. Because the vans are m u c h less dangerous with f e w e r people, the first step for the college will be the removal of seats in the 15-passenger vans so that they can only contain eight passengers. t4 The vans are safe. T h e question is when they are filled to capacity. T h e solution is reducing the number of passengers," R e n n e r said. "If that is accomplished, and seat belts are worn, and if drivers h a v e the appropriate skills, then the vans are very, very safe vehicles." A c c o r d i n g to R e n n e r , H o p e is currently looking at t w o options for replacing the vans. O n e o p t i o n is to r e p l a c e them with e i g h t - p a s s e n g e r v a n s . T h e other option is for the college to purchase vehicles sized between a van and a bus that could hold around 24 people. H o w e v e r , because of its size, a vehicle like that would have new problems f o r the college to confront. A n y o n e driving a vehicle with over 16 passengers is required to h a v e a C o m m e r c i a l D r i v e r ' s License. A Commercial Driver's Lic e n s e has stricter s t a n d a r d s than regular licenses, including a drug lest. " T h e college would need to look at h o w they are going to go about that, as far as getting people licenses and training them," Renner said. According to Renner, the biggest p r o b l e m the s c h o o l w o u l d h a v e with the l a r g e r v e h i c l e s , w h i c h would cost approximately twice as much as H o p e ' s current vans, would be the reduction in the pool of drivers available. Currently, any H o p e student w h o can p a ss the d r i v i n g test can be qualified to drive a 15 or eight passenger van. R e n n e r said that the c o l l e g e is still deciding which of the t w o options to go with. B e f o r e making a

I FEEL LIKE

professional experience

Renner said. Whatever choice Hope makes, a lot of safety will still rely on the

W I T H NO W A T E R . "

a w a r e n e s s of the p a s s e n g e r s and drivers. " A lot of it comes down to the skill of the driver and the willingness of the passenger to wear seat belts," Renner said. "Even after the vans are reduced to eight seats, [safety is) still going to be dependant on people taking seriously the need to be seat belted as you would in any vehicle."

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Anchor

A T D r i l

1 8 ,

2 0 0 1

Hope Ultimate having successful season Rand Arwady S P O R T S EDJTOR

Two years ago in ihe fall of 1999, Mall Goupell ('01) and Dave Kuhrl ('01) decided lo lake over ihe Hope College Ullimale Frisbee Club team as c o - c a p lains. This would be ihe slarl of i w o successful s e a s o n s for ihe club leam. The Hope College Ullimale Frisbee Club leam was started b a c k in t h e mid 1 9 8 0 ^ . In 1989 t h e leam was

ranked eighly-ninth in the nation.

Between 1990 and 1996 there were only a few games played, but in 1996-1997 the team was restarted and has been built up lo the full practices which started in 1999. " M a l t and. I picked it up, and started from scratch," Kuhrl said.

"It was the first lime in forever we had practices again, and we started going lo more tournaments." The leam practices three days a week on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday. O n Sunday it is a f u n pick-up game for t h e t e a m with no practice. The team invites anyo n e in t h e Hope community lo p l a y in t h i s relaxed game. It starts at 3 pm on the field behind Holland Municipal Stadium. "It's a good outlet for anyone with athletic ability, and a fun way to meet people and do something different from school work," Kuhrl said. Ullimale frisbee is a sport similar to soccer with a team of seven participants who work the frisbee down the field with passes, however not r u n n i n g with it. W h e n t h e

frisbee is knocked down or intercepted by the other leam, that leam lakes over control. Every time you score (catching the frisbee in the goal area) you get one point. In a tournament, the teams play games to 13 or 15 points with a time cap of one hour. In regular matches with just two teams the game lasts two hours, or until one team reaches 21 points. As a club sport, Ultimate frisbee has no advantages for the smaller s c h o o l s . D i v i s i o n 1, II, and 111 schools will all play against each other during the season. Last year's leam finished the year ranked 108 in the country in the Ultimate Players Association (UPA) rankings. The team's season c a m e to an end in the sectionals with close losses to Michigan and Michigan Slate. This year's team is consisted of 26 guys, and the only seniors are Goupell and Kuhrl. " T h e team has been great, we have some really great guys who are a lot of fun to play with," Kuhrl said. Two w e e k s a g o the l e a m was ranked 36 in the UPA rankings, but n o w they a r e r a n k e d 6 6 . T h e i r record is 12-5. S o m e of the big victories on the season h a v e c o m e against P u r d u e University, O h i o

PHOTOS

University, Ball Slate University, Miami of Ohio University, and ihe University of Toledo. In tournaments Hope has won the B pool at the Big Chill tournament in Cincinnati, OH, runner up at the East Grand Rapids Huck Fest, and runner up in the Dope C a b b a g e T o u r n a m e n t , hosted by Hope. The leam lost in the finals to The Hope College Ultimate alumni team. S e c t i o n a l s a r e b e i n g held this weekend in Ann Arbor. Competing

Hope student kickin it Hope woman places second in the state for Tae Kwon Do, will compete in Nationals this May. Rand Arwady SPORTS EDITOR

When you first see Alicia Arnold ('02) walking on campus you may think of her as a cute dark haired 120 lb. girl that wouldn't hurt a fly. However, most Hope students do not k n o w t h a t this 5'4 M y o u n g w o m a n is a second degree black bell in Tae Kwon Do, and shouldn't be messed with. "I could take anyone down, even if their on the football team, it's not w e i g h t , i t ' s all t e c h n i q u e , " said Arnold. Arnold got started in Tae Kwon Do back in 1992 when she injured her knee and was told by doctors to find a sport that would work her knee and something she would slick with. Arnold found Tae Kwon Do, and has been doing it ever since. Tae Kwon Do is based on self defense, but it's different from Karate. In Tae Kwon Do you use your feel more, but in Karate you use your hands primarily. After spending her first two years of college at K a l a m a z o o Valley Community College as a business major, Arnold decided she was in the wrong field. "I realized whal I can do with a kinesiology major, and apply it to

Tae Kwon Do," Arnold said. She transferred to Hope this past school year and plans to use her kinesiology major lo train kids for the Junior Olympics in Tae Kwon Do. On February 24 at the Slate of Michigan Qualifying Tournament in Tae Kwon Do. Arnold placed second in the slate in both Forms and Sparring. "In Forms y o u ' r e doing all the motions, and y o u ' r e applying it to the form that they want. Sparring is just fighting," Arnold said. By placing second. Arnold qualified for Nationals in both Forms and Sparring, which will be held May 2 4 - 2 7 in C l e v e l a n d , O H . If she places in the top three at Nationals she will be able to tryout for the United Stales Tae Kwon Do team. T r a i n i n g t a k e s up a lot o f Arnold's time. Over Christmas break she practiced f i v e d a y s a week, five classes a day. At Hope, she runs every other day, and she's starting lo lift every other day as well. Arnold goes home every w e e k e n d to train at her gym in K a l a m a z o o on F r i d a y ' s and Saturday's. Next year, in Arnold's senior year she hopes to slarl a Tae Kwon Do club here at Hope College for both men and woman. The club would be for anyone, beginners on up. Arnold's favorite person in the martial artisl is Jackie Chan. "Jackie C h a n is my favorite. 1 love his movies and the way he inc o r p o r a t e s t h e h u m o r with his moves," Arnold said.

COURTESY

OF MATT G O U P E L L

GUARDING THE PROFz Ken Diekema ('03) guards Hope professor JoelToppen in an Ultimate tournament earlier this year. Hope's record is 12-5. teams are Hope, Calvin, Michigan, Michigan State, Western Michigan, and Grand Valley. T h e lop three teams move on lo Regionals the following weekend. The future looks bright for this club team with only the co-captains graduating. "We have a really strong core, and a lot of younger guys," Kuhrt said. "We have strong leadership coming up behind us, so we will be good for the future."

E-Mail the Anchor

anchorŠ hope.edu

PHOTO

COURTESY

OF ALICIA A R N O L D

â&#x20AC;˘R NINJA: Alicia Arnold ('02) shows off her second degree black belt. Arnold finished second in the state in Tae Kwon Do, and will move on to Nationals in May.

Hope will be grand if you. .Recycle the Anchor


04-18-2001