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Environmental Teach-in to be held Wednesday The Environmental Teach-in will be marked at H o p e College by a series of s e m i n a r s , pres e n t a t i o n s , and f i l m s o n Wednesd a y , April 22. T O P I C S T O BE c o n s i d e r e d in the m o r n i n g sessions include t h e College's role in p o l l u t i o n control, p o p u l a t i o n c o n t r o l , policies of e x p l o i t a t i o n , and t h e economics of pollution control. These sessions will be led by faculty m e m b e r s . Local p o l l u t i o n and t h e role of t h e local citizen and government in p o l l u t i o n c o n t r o l will be t h e t o p i c of a p r e s e n t a t i o n at 1 : 3 0 by Mrs. Kingsley of the Holland G a r d e n C l u b . TWO REPRESENTATIVES of G e n e r a l M o t o r s C o r p o r a t i o n will give a film and discussion in W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m at 2 : 3 0 . T h e y will describe the a t t e m p t s of a u t o m o b i l e m a n u f a c t u r e s t o curb pollution. Research in water p o l l u t i o n and public health will be t h e t o p i c of a s e m i n a r p r e s e n t e d by Dr. Walter M. Mack, p r o f e s s o r of microbiology and public health at Michigan S t a t e University. T h e s e m i n a r will be at 3 : 3 0 p . m . and is s p o n s o r e d by Tri Beta, t h e biology honor society. THROUGHOUT THE day two f i l m s will be s h o w n alter-

nately in the C o f f e e G r o u n d s . T h e y are The River Must Live and The Challenge of Urban Renewal.

"We h o p e t o allert t h e comm u n i t y t o the local and worldwide d i m e n s i o n s of t h e environm e n t a l crisis. T h e p r o g r a m s of the day are m e a n t t o be meaningful and i n f o r m a t i v e to the citizen with little or n o technical b a c k g r o u n d , " V a n d e r Byl said. "WE ESPECIALLY intend to suggest practical a c t i o n s for t h e private citizen to t a k e in o r d e r t o help solve t h e p o p u l a t i o n and p o l l u t i o n p r o b l e m s , " s t a t e d Paulsen. T h e c o m m i t t e e is e n c o u r a g ing s t u d e n t s to b u y the Environmental Handbook now being d i s t r i b u t e d by S t u d e n t s for l nvironmental Action. The book provides b a c k g r o u n d for s t u d y of the crisis. It is o n sale daily in Van Raalte Hall for

Hope to seek extension of science hall loan The College will ask for a n o t h e r e x t e n s i o n o n t h e use of Federal m o n i e s for c o n s t r u c t i o n of an a c a d e m i c science c e n t e r . A C C O R D I N G T O Dr. William DeMeester, Special Assistant t o the President for Planning and Development, approximately 30 p e r c e n t of t h e necessary $1 million in m a t c h i n g f u n d s has b e e n pledged by d o n o r s . T h e College must m a t c h a $1 million grant from the Federal Government, and receipt of a $2 million lowinterest loan will c o m p l e t e f i n a n cing of the $4 million s t r u c t u r e . T h e D e p a r t m e n t of H e a l t h , Edu c a t i o n and Welfare will be contacted by DeMeester and Hugh DePree, c h a i r m a n of t h e Board of T r u s t e e s , in an a t t e m p t t o e x t e n d the April d e a d l i n e f o r t h e m a t c h ing f u n d s . "We w o u l d like a n o t h e r six m o n t h s t o a y e a r t o talk with m o r e f o u n d a t i o n s and p r o s p e c t i v e d o n o r s , " DeMeester said. D E M E E S T E R N O T E D that a n u m b e r of f o u n d a t i o n s have been r e q u e s t e d t o give specific a m o u n t s for t h e b u i l d i n g . He e x p l a i n e d that s o m e f o u n d a t i o n s will m e e t this m o n t h t o discuss t h e r e q u e s t s , and t h a t so f a r no negative responses have b e e n received f r o m any f o u n d a t i o n .

Van Raalte Hall b o m b scare empties building A b o m b t h r e a t f o r c e d t h e evacu a t i o n of Van R a a l t e Hall last Friday a f t e r n o o n . F o l l o w i n g police and fire dep a r t m e n t investigation, no e x p l o sives w e r e f o u n d . T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n was notified of t h e t h r e a t w h e n a n o t e was f o u n d late T h u r s d a y night on t h e d o o r of head r e s i d e n t Dave VanderWel in Kollen Hall. Written by h a n d , t h e n o t e said, " B o m b . Van Raalte. 4 p . m . " VanderWel reported the note t o Dean of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t DeY o u n g . U p o n c o n s u l t a t i o n with Treasurer and Business Manager Clarence H a n d l o g t e n , D e Y o u n g called the H o l l a n d police. T h e building was e v a c u a t e d at a p p r o x i m a t e l y 3 : 1 5 p . m . , and t h e police r e p o r t e d t h a t t h e building was safe f o r o c c u p a t i o n by 4 p . m . T h e police r e p o r t t h e y have n o clues c o n c e r n i n g t h e p e r s o n w h o sent t h e n o t e . A b o m b t h r e a t is a f e l o n y p u n i s h a b l e by imprisonment.

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"Basic Pollution C o n t r o l " is the title of a s h o r t c o u r s e in p o l l u t i o n c o n t r o l for t h e l a y m a n to be presented Wednesday evening in Phelps c a f e t e r i a . Practical individual tactics will be the t h e m e of this p r o g r a m . THE MEMBERS OF the steering committee for the T e a c h - i n arc Ken P a u l s e n , Mary L u c k e y and W a y n e V a n d e r Byl.

" D u r i n g the fall we were talking with HEW a b o u t f u n d s for t h r e e buildings, and all t h r e e were o n l y in the p l a n n i n g s t a g e s , " DeMeester said. " N o w t w o of t h o s e buildings are u n d e r c o n s t r u c t i o n . We are s h o w i n g progress, and t h a t is w h a t t h e g o v e r n m e n t is interested in. Also in t h e fall, we had only 10 percent of the necessary funds pledged." D E M E E S T E R S T A T E D that the r e q u e s t s w h i c h are n o w being c o n s i d e r e d by f o u n d a t i o n s and individuals are s u f f i c i e n t t o raise the needed $ 1 million. DeMeester a d d e d t h a t work o n t h e DeWitt S t u d e n t C u l t u r a l and Social C e n t e r and t h e Wichers Music addition is progressing a c c o r d i n g to s c h e d u l e .

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F O U N D INSIDE a transformer near t h e Calvin c a m p u s w h e r e C o r n e l i u s D e k k e r , 19, and R o n a l d V o o g t , 19, b o t h Calvin s o p h o m o re s . A Grand Rapids resident found the t w o b o y s w h e n he w e n t t o check t h e t r a n s f o r m e r a f t e r his h o u s e lights d i m m e d . O n e b o y was m o t i o n l e s s a n d t h e o t h e r m o v i n g slightly w h e n the police were called. When t h e police and t h e fire d e p a r t m e n t rescue squad arrived, D e k k e r was still but V o o g t was m o a n i n g and t h r a s h i n g around. A F T E R R E M O V I N G the t w o b o y s f r o m the t r a n s f o r m e r , nearby b o y s were q u e s t i o n e d a b o u t t h e i n c i d e n t . T h e y t o o k t h e police t o N o o r d e w i e r Hall o n Calvin's Knollcrest c a m p u s w h e r e t h e y t a l k e d with B o u w e I p e m a , 24.

H o p e College, H o l l a n d , Michigan 4 9 4 2 3

April 17, 1970

Ho| )e prof undecided

Curry may run for Congress by G a r r e t t DeGraff a n c h o r Assistant E d i t o r It's not so m u c h w h e t h e r you win or lose; it's h o w y o u play the g a m e . T h a t ' s h o w Earl C u r r y , assistant p r o f e s s o r of h i s t o r y , is a p p r o a c h i n g his possible candidacy for the U n i t e d S t a t e s House of R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s as a D e m o c r a t in Michigan's n i n t h district. T h a t is, of c o u r s e , if he decides to run. Righf n o w it l o o k s as if he will n o t . C U R R Y , A Y O U N G m a n of m e d i u m height and w i d t h whose clean shaven r o u n d face and med i u m length hair s e e m s conservative e n o u g h to run f o r o f f i c e , e x p l a i n e d in a r e c e n t interview h o w he b e c a m e involved in ninth district D e m o c r a t i c politics. "I was asked by local party o f f i c i a l s a c o u p l e of m o n t h s ago if 1 w o u l d be i n t e r e s t e d in r u n n i n g for C o n g r e s s o n the D e m o c r a t i c t i c k e t . I was a m e m b e r of the D e m o c r a t i c P a r t y and had att e n d e d the D e m o c r a t i c P a r t y ' s political r e f o r m c o n v e n t i o n in J a n u a r y . So s o m e p e o p l e k n e w me and this is h o w they got in contact w i t h m e , " he said. " A T T H E TIME I told t h e m that c e r t a i n d i f f i c u l t i e s seemed to stand in the way of r u n n i n g for

O n e Calvin student killed, another injured in 'prank' What began as a college prank e n d e d in t r a g e d y last S u n d a y night w h e n o n e Calvin College s t u d e n t was e l e c t r o c u t e d and a second was in s a t i s f a c t o r y c o n d i t i o n in intensive care M o n d a y with third-degree b u r n s over ten p e r c e n t of his b o d y .

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t o u c h e d the b o t t o m of the box with his left h a n d . V o o g t s u d d e n l y s t a r t e d screaming and sparks were s h o o t i n g off D e k k e r ' s left arm. I p e m a said he kicked D e k k e r ' s arm f r e e , then e x t i n g u i s h e d t h e f l a m e s in Dekker's hand. IPE M A S A I D BOTH b o y s fell t o t h e floor of the t r a n s f o r m e r b o x . He t h e n t h r e w away a pair of wire c u t t e r s and r e t u r n e d to Knollcrest C a m p u s w h e r e he told some o t h e r s w h a t had h a p p e n e d . When t h e y w e n t back t o t h e scene t o help, police arrived. T h e t r a n s f o r m e r belongs to Calvin College, which c o n t r a c t s with an electrical o u t f i t for servicing and m a i n t e n a n c e . T h e elect r o c u t i o n k n o c k e d o u t s o m e of the p o w e r t o the c a m p u s for a time. ACCORDING TO a spokesman from Consumer's Power Comp a n y , t h e box has lines c o m i n g in with 1 2 , 5 0 0 volts " p h a s e to p h a s e " and 7 , 2 0 0 " p h a s e to ground."

I p e m a , w h o was highly u p s e t , r e p o r t e d that he, D e k k e r and V o o g t had p l a n n e d t o s h u t off t h e p o w e r t o Knollcrest c a m p u s at m i d n i g h t . T h e y w e n t t o t h e transf o r m e r box w h e r e t h e y pried and cut the lock o f f .

Dr. G.A. M u l d e r said D e k k e r ' s left a r m and back a p p a r e n t l y t o u c h e d certain p a r t s of t h e transf o r m e r and b e c a m e part of the circuit. Mulder said D e k k e r was killed o u t r i g h t . T h e p o w e r came o u t his back, leaving a hole big e n o u g h t o insert a fist.

ACCORDING TO Ipema, V o o g t went inside first. D e k k e r s t a r t e d t o get in b u t still had o n e f o o t o n the g r o u n d w h e n he

Calvin held a m e m o r i a l service for D e k k e r at 7 p.m. M o n d a y at the F i n e A r t s A u d i t o r i u m o n the Knollcrest c a m p u s .

d i s t r a c t i o n , s o m e t h i n g y o u have to be t h i n k i n g a b o u t , " he said. " S O I ' V E C O N C L U D E D that unless s o m e h o w 1 can get a leave of absense in the fall, 1 will not be able to r u n , " he said. " A n d this d o e s not look likely b e c a u s e it w o u l d require that s o m e h o w that m o n e y be raised to pay for my o w n personal e x p e n s e s . " " U n l e s s s o m e h o w in t h e next week or t w o the D e m o c r a t i c party can come up with this kind of m o n e y , 1 think I'm going to have to say n o , " he said.

EARL CURRY o f f i c e . " T h e first of t h e s e . C u r r y said, was his obligation t o t h e College. T h e historian was n o t sure H o p e w o u l d let him run f o r o f f i c e . O n l y a f t e r receiving t h e a p p r o v a l of Dean f o r A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s M o r r e t t e Rider and Presid e n t Calvin A. V a n d e r W e r f , w i t h t h e s t i p u l a t i o n that he fulfill his classroom o b l i g a t i o n , did C u r r y seriously c o n s i d e r seeking t h e Democratic nomination. The second consideration was m o n e y . " T h e D e m o c r a t i c P a r t y in this district d o e s not have a lot of m o n e y . T h e y have not w o n an e l e c t i o n in so long t h a t it's difficult t o get p e o p l e to c o n t r i b u t e , " he n o t e d . C U R R Y W E N T ON to e x p l a i n that t h o u g h he had t h e a p p r o v a l of the College to run for o f f i c e and t e a c h at the same t i m e , he had d e c i d e d t h a t this w o u l d be impossible. "I have f o u n d in t h e little bit of work I have d o n e this S p r i n g , which h a s consisted largely of going t o v a r i o u s c o u n t y c o m m i t tee m e e t i n g s , it does cut in t o t h e time I can give t o my c o u r s e w o r k . It is n o t just a m a t t e r of t h e h o u r s I give to it, but i t ' s a

I F T H E P R O F E S S O R d o e s decide he can seek the n o m i n a t i o n , he is sure he can win it. " T h e r e was one o t h e r m a n f r o m the n o r t h e r n part of the s t a t e w h o was interested in the n o m i n a t i o n and w h o had d o n e some w o r k for it, but a c o u p l e weeks ago he w i t h d r e w in my favor. I t ' s clear sailing a h e a d as far as 1 k n o w , " he said. Curry would run in Michigan's n i n t h district, which e x t e n d s f r o m T h i r t y - s e c o n d St., the s o u t h e r n b o r d e r of O t t a w a C o u n t y , n o r t h a l o n g Lake Michigan to t h e northern tip of the L o w e r Peninsula. It is heavily R e p u b l i c a n . " O T T A W A C O U N T Y was in the f i f t h district, which includes G r a n d Rapids, until 1 9 6 6 , " Curry e x p l a i n e d . " T h i s is G e r r y F o r d ' s district. T h e r e must have been a D e m o c r a t elected at o n e time. In the ninth district 1 c a n ' t t h i n k of a t i m e this c e n t u r y w h e n a D e m o crat has w o n , " he s t a t e d . T o e m p h a s i z e the s t r e n g t h of the R e p u b l i c a n vote in this area C u r r y talked of H o l l a n d . " H o l l a n d , I'm t o l d , has never voted against a R e p u b l i c a n since I 8 6 0 . A n d 1 s u p p o s e in 1860 Lincoln l o o k e d like a r a d i c a l , " t h e y o u n g Democrat noted. With t h i s k n o w l e d g e of the R e p u b l i c a n strength in his district, C u r r y does not t h i n k he c o u l d win if h e a c c e p t s the D e m o c r a t i c n o m i n a t i o n n o m a t t e r h o w m u c h campaigning he did. (Continued on page 3, column I )

Raft debate to be held at Illumination Service T h e I l l u m i n a t i o n Service tonight at 6 : 3 0 in D i m n e n t M e m o r ial C h a p e l will f e a t u r e a d e b a t e , the a n n o u n c e m e n t of new S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s o f f i c e r s and t h e t a p p i n g of new m e m b e r s t o Blue Key h o n o r society. T o begin the p r o g r a m . Dr. A r t h u r J e n t z , R o b e r t V i c k e r s and Dr. D.H. Williams will t a k e part in a R a f t D e b a t e t o replace t h e traditional Last C h a n c e T a l k . Each p r o f e s s o r will speak for e i g h t m i n u t e s a t t e m p t i n g t o prove t h a t his discipline is the best f o r hum a n i t y . J e n t z will r e p r e s e n t philos o p h y , V i c k e r s will speak f o r art and Williams f o r science. H y p o t h e t i c a l l y , the three will be s t r a n d e d o n a r a f t , and e a c h p r o f e s s o r will try t o c o n v i n c e t h e a u d i e n c e and his fellow s t r a n d e e s

t h a t he and his discipline s h o u l d be the o n e to survive. F o l l o w i n g t h e speeches t h e r e will be an informal ten-minute debate, after w h i c h the a u d i e n c e will d e c i d e by v o t e w h o is the w i n n e r - o r survivor. F o l l o w i n g t h e d e b a t e , Brian C l a p h a m , p r e s i d e n t of Blue Key, will i n t r o d u c e t h e t a p p i n g of the n e w m e m b e r s of the h o n o r society. Student Congress president T i m Liggett will then begin the t h i r d part of t h e p r o g r a m with a s h o r t speech o n the p u r p o s e of the Congress. F o l l o w i n g this he will a n n o u n c e t h e new p r e s i d e n t and his c a b i n e t . T h e service will close with the acceptance s p e e c h e s of the new o f f i c e r s .


Page 2

April 17, 1970

Hope C o l l e g e anchor

Chemistry prof Williams is student of creativity by Ken Janda a n c h o r Reporter Dr. D. H. Williams, a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , o p e n e d his m o u t h at t h e w r o n g t i m e at a p a r t y several years ago a n d ended up teaching a six-hour c o u r s e o n t h e " O r i g i n of I d e a s . " Williams t h o u g h t t h a t t h e o r i g i n of s c i e n t i f i c i d e a s s h o u l d n o t b e a p h i l o s o p h y class t a u g h t by a teacher with little scientific background. W I L L I A M S G O T his c h a n c e to create a better course, and a c c o r d i n g t o his s t u d e n t s , his class did s u c c e e d . As a result of his " O r i g i n of I d e a s " class at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of K e n t u c k y Williams is still s t u d y i n g t h e role of creativity in education as a hobby. The search for m e a n i n g f u l e d u c a t i o n has c o v e r e d a b r o a d spectrum. ranging from the Berkeley free speech m o v e m e n t to the recent Indian riots to p r o t e c t t h e s t u d e n t s ' right t o cheat. Probably the most widespread a c a d e m i c m e t h o d is t h e "scientific m e t h o d " w h i c h all H o p e s t u d e n t s learn a b o u t in freshman philosophy. WILLIAMS BELIEVES that t h e s c i e n t i f i c m e t h o d is o f t e n after the fact. The scientific m e t h o d is u s e f u l as a m e a n s t o e x p l a i n s c i e n t i f i c p r o g r e s s , b u t it has s e l d o m b e e n used to develop n e w ideas.

Williams t h i n k s t h a t s t u d e n t s s h o u l d be striving t o w a r d a high level of creativity. Unfortuna t e l y , c r e a t i v i t y , like r e l e v a n c y , is n o t easy t o d e f i n e . O f t e n o n e sees c r e a t i v i t y as t h e p r o c e s s of linking old i d e a s t o f i n d new ideas, Williams believes. T H E R E A R E several s t e p s in t h e d e v e l o p m e n t of c r e a t i v i t y , according to the chemistry teacher. First, the student must learn t h e l a n g u a g e used in his field. T o many students this type of l e a r n i n g s e e m s u n d e s i r a b l e , as it i m p l i e s r o t e m e m o r i z a t i o n and a c e r t a i n a m o u n t of c o n f o r m i t y . H o w e v e r , if t w o m a t h e m a t i c i a n s know t w o different multiplication t a b l e s , t h e n any c r e a t i v i t y in the field of m u l t i p l i c a t i o n b y o n e w o u l d p r o b a b l y be m e a n i n g less t o t h e o t h e r . E V E R Y O N E IS c r e a t i v e every d a y , Williams believes, even if o n l y in t h e w a y he gets u p in the m o r n i n g . In o r d e r t o be meaningfully creative, however, the s t u d e n t m u s t d e v e l o p his intellect so t h a t he is a b l e t o d i s t i n g u i s h b e t w e e n t h e socially novel a n d t h e i n d i v i d u a l l y novel. P r e s s u r e has a great i n f l u e n c e on t h e a m o u n t of creative w o r k a s t u d e n t will p e r f o r m , Williams says. Most students do their work under external pressure. The student pays the teacher to put u p d e a d l i n e s w h i c h t h e student keeps.

Organist Wilson to play in Chapel Sunday at 4 William Wilson, a 1 9 6 9 H o p e g r a d u a t e , will p r e s e n t an o r g a n recital S u n d a y at 4 p . m . in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. T h e p r o g r a m will i n c l u d e t w o works by Johann Sebastian B a c h : Pastorale in F Major a n d Prelude and Fugue in A Minor; as well as Chorale Variations on Ich ruf zu dir by J a n P i e t e r Sweelinck, Dreifaltigkeit sTriptychon by A u g u s t i n u s K r o p f r e i t e r , Mcnuet Scherzo, Op. 53, No. 2 b y J o s e p h J o n g e n , Volumina by G y o r g y Ligeti, a n d Prelude and Fugue in G Minor by Marcel D u p r e . Wilson is a s t u d e n t of David Craighead at the Eastman S c h o o l of Music in R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . , w h e r e h e is w o r k i n g o n a M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e in m u s i c . While at H o p e , he was a s t u d e n t of R o g e r Davis.

F t WILLIAM WILSON

UNCLAIMED FREIGHT ...FOR THE LOWEST P R I C E S ! Shampoo

Q-tips

Deodorant

Alka Selzer

Aftershave

Cough Medicine

Hair T o n i c

Gift Items

Flair S p r a y

Typing Paper

Hand Lotion

N o t e b o o k Paper

C r e m e Rinse

Candy

Hair Color

Small Tables

Cosmetics

and many miscellaneous items

LINCOLN AVENUE SALVAGE 13th and Lincoln (one block from the College)

A MORE DESIRABLE type of pressure w o u l d c o m e d i r e c t l y from the student, Williams t h i n k s . He w o u l d learn b e c a u s e he w a n t e d t o . A l o n g w i t h this t y p e of p r e s s u r e goes a c e r t a i n t y p e of t e n s i o n similar t o t h e t e n s i o n of a b a s k e t b a l l p l a y e r b e f o r e a g a m e o r an a c t o r bef o r e a p e r f o r m a n c e . If t h e stud e n t can e m o t i o n a l l y get " u p " t o solve a p r o b l e m , he will attack it w i t h m o r e c r e a t i v e f o r c e t h a n is p o s s i b l e w h e n he is o n l y under external pressure. If i n t u i t i o n is t o have an active part in t h e creative process. t h e n t h e c o n s c i o u s m i n d s h o u l d have a c e r t a i n t i m e t o relax every d a y so t h a t the subc o n s c i o u s c a n s o r t o u t the f a c t s . Williams feels. H e sees i n t u i t i o n as a sort of s u b c o n s c i o u s logic. T H E R E A R E several g i m i c k s w h i c h can h e l p t h e s t u d e n t initiate t h e c r e a t i v e p r o c e s s . O n e g i m m i c k is t h e idea m a t r i x . This m a t r i x is like a m u l t i p l i c a t i o n t a b l e in w h i c h t h e n u m b e r s are r e p l a c e d by w o r d s . O n e p r o d u c t might be m u f f l e r X lipstick. This product presumably would

help s t a r t t h e s t u d e n t t h i n k i n g about everything from colored m u f f l e r s to t o n e d - d o w n s h a d e s of lipstick. A n o t h e r g i m m i c k i s the process of b r a i n s t o r m i n g . T h e v a l u e of t h i s g i m m i c k is t h a t it a l l o w s t h e s t u d e n t t o d r o p his i n h i b i t i o n s . F o r i n s t a n c e , if a m u s i c i a n and an e n g i n e e r brainstorm about engineering the musician does n o t k n o w t h e e n g i n e e r i n g taboos. The engineer is thus f o r c e d t o t h i n k a b o u t a larger s p e c t r a of ideas t h a n he w o u l d normally consider. T H E D E V E L O P M E N T of real c r e a t i v i t y is largely up t o t h e student, s a y s Williams. The school can. however, do much to encourage the development of t h e i n t e r n a l p r e s s u r e necessary for real creativity to e m e r g e . Williams feels t h a t t h e s t u d e n t s h o u l d get a w i d e b a c k g r o u n d on w h i c h to base his thinking. At t h e s a m e t i m e t h e s t u d e n t s h o u l d be a l l o w e d t o t a s t e t h e frontiers of knowledge. He s h o u l d be a s k e d t o use e s t a b -

Thirteen additions or changes in t h e f a c u l t y have b e e n m a d e for next year, according to D e a n f o r A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Morr e t t e Rider. D R . R O B E R T M E L K A will j o i n the s t a f f of t h e h i s t o r y dep a r t m e n t as a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r . Melka h o l d s t h e P r e m i e r Degree from the University of Gren o b l e , a B.S. d e g r e e in F o r e i g n Service and an M.A. from Georgetown U n i v e r s i t y . He received his P h . D . f r o m t h e University of M i n n e s o t a . F o r the past f o u r y e a r s he h a s b e e n an assistant p r o f e s s o r at Wisconsin S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y at O s h k o s h , and p r i o r t o t h i s p o s i t i o n he was an i n s t r u c t o r in t h e h i s t o r y d e p a r t m e n t at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Minnesota. The o t h e r addition to the h i s t o r y d e p a r t m e n t is G u y H. Miller, w h o will be an i n s t r u c t o r in t h e d e p a r t m e n t . Miller received his B . A . and M.A. degrees f r o m N o r t h Texas State U n i v e r s i t y a n d is c u r r e n t l y c o m p l e t i n g his P h . D . at t h e University of M i c h i g a n . Melka and Miller will t a k e t h e places of visiting assistant professor G. B o n n o V a n D i j k , w h o will be r e t u r n i n g t o t h e N e t h e r l a n d s at t h e end of t h i s y e a r , and Dr. David C l a r k , w h o will be o n s a b b a t i c a l leave d u r i n g 1 9 7 0 - 7 1 . KARL BORSAI, a 1968 H o p e g r a d u a t e w h o has c o m p l e t e d his M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of K a n s a s and has t a u g h t as a m e m b e r of t h e faculty in the Vienna Summer S c h o o l f o r a n u m b e r of y e a r s , has a c c e p t e d a o n e year app o i n t m e n t to H o p e College as

an i n s t r u c t o r in G e r m a n . Borsai will be partially a s s u m i n g the teaching duties of Dr. E.F. G e a r h a r t , who has been granted a s a b b a t i c a l leave f o r n e x t year. A second addition to the f o r e i g n language d e p a r t m e n t is Walter L a g e r w a y , w h o will t e a c h first a n d s e c o n d year D u t c h . L a g e r w e y is a m e m b e r of t h e Calvin College f a c u l t y and h o l d s his M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e f r o m C o l u m bia University and his P h . D . f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n . He will t e a c h part t i m e . D R . J E R R Y D U S S E A U will join t h e b i o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t as an assistant p r o f e s s o r . D u s s e a u is a g r a d u a t e of F a r l h a m and h o l d s a M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e and a P h . D . from Louisiana State University. Robert (J r a n t has been n a m e d h u m a n i t i e s librarian and instructor in library science. G r a n t is p r e s e n t l y o n t h e p r o f e s sional library s t a f f of t h e University of W i n d s o r in O n t a r i o . He e a r n e d his B a c h e l o r ' s d e g r e e f r o m W h e a t o n College a n d h o l d s an M . A . in English f r o m t h e University of Windsor and a M.S. in library science from Case W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n i v e r s i t y . DR. DOUGLAS HEEREMA has b e e n n a m e d a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s sor in e c o n o m i c s and b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d c h a i r m a n of the d e p a r t m e n t , f o r t h e c o m i n g year. H e e r e m a is a g r a d u a t e of C e n t r a l College a n d h o l d s his M a s t e r ' s and P h . D . d e g r e e s f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of I o w a , w h e r e he w a s a m e m b e r of t h e f a c u l t y for f o u r y e a r s . H e is n o w chairm a n of the e c o n o m i c s d e p a r t ment at Florida Presbyterian College.

Those who know...

SAUGATUCK...NOW

OPEN

EVERY SATURDAY f o r O v t r a Q u a r t e r Century

Dr. J a y F. F o l k e r t . c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of m a t h e m a tics, has b e e n e l e c t e d c h a i r m a n of t h e Michigan S e c t i o n of the Mathematical Association of America. F o l k e r t has b e e n a m e m b e r of t h e H o p e f a c u l t y since 1946. A n a t i v e of H o l l a n d , Mich., he is a g r a d u a t e of H o p e College. He h o l d s a M.A. d e g r e e f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan and a P h . D . d e g r e e f r o m Michigan State University.

Faculty changes announced

THE 01D CROW DÂŤpcndoblt

Jay E. Folkert elected chairman of math assoc.

Ten new professors

go to the 'CROW...

J ÂŁ I U U * Y

lished p r i n c i p l e s t o t a c k l e new and v a r i o u s p r o b l e m s . Williams sees t h e c h e m i s t r y s t u d e n t res e a r c h p r o g r a m as o n e excellent e x a m p l e of l e t t i n g t h e s t u d e n t t a s t e t h e f r o n t i e r of k n o w l e d g e . Williams feels t h a t each stud e n t s h o u l d ask of each class. " W h a t d o e s it s a y , h o w can it be u s e d , a n d h o w d o e s it alter my view of o t h e r s u b j e c t s . "

FEATURING THE FABULOUS...THE FLUID OUNCE

6 W m I Eighth Street H O U A N D , MICHIGAN

Coral Gables SAUGATUCK

S a n g 11. Lee has b e e n n a m e d i n s t r u c t o r in t h e d e p a r t m e n t of religion. Lee is a g r a d u a t e of the College of W o o s t e r , e a r n e d his B.D. d e g r e e f r o m t h e Harvard D i v i n i t y S c h o o l a n d is curr e n t l y a d o c t o r a l c a n d i d a t e at H a r v a r d U n i v e r s i t y u n d e r Tillich and N i e b u h r . P r e s e n t l y h e is an instructor on the f a c u l t y of O h i o Wesleyan U n i v e r s i t y . ROBERT REINKING will j o i n t h e staff of t h e g e o l o g y dep a r t m e n t as an assistant p r o f e s sor. Reinking graduated from C o l o r a d o College and h o l d s a M a s t e r ' s and P h . D . d e g r e e f r o m the University of Illinois. He is c u r r e n t l y an assistant p r o f e s s o r at T e x a s T e c h . U n i v e r s i t y . Mrs. R h o n d a Rivera, w h o has b e e n a m e m b e r of t h e p a r t - t i m e s t a f f at H o p e f o r t h e past t w o y e a r s , will b e c o m e a f u l l - t i m e s t a f f m e m b e r in t h e d e p a r t m e n t of e c o n o m i c s a n d b u s i n e s s adm i n i s t r a t i o n . Mrs. Rivera is a g r a d u a t e of R u t g e r s U n i v e r s i t y , h o l d s an M . P . A . d e g r e e f r o m S y r a c u s e U n i v e r s i t y , a D o c t o r of Juris-prudence degree from Wayne State University Law S c h o o l a n d is c u r r e n t l y e n r o l l e d in a d o c t o r a l p r o g r a m t h e r e . G L E N N V A N W I E R E N will c h a n g e his r o l e at H o p e f r o m t h a t of a m e m b e r of t h e admiss i o n s staff t o an i n s t r u c t o r in p h y s i c a l e d u c a t i o n . V a n Wieren graduated from H o p e and holds a Master's degree f r o m Western Michigan U n i v e r s i t y . H e will be t a k i n g t h e p l a c e of William V a n d e r b i l t , w h o will be o n leave f o r doctoral study. Lyle V e l d h e e r has b e e n appointed Computer ProgrammerA n a l y s t in t h e H o p e C o m p u t e r Center, replacing Sharon Dean, w h o will be r e t u r n i n g t o t h e U n i v e r s i t y of A l s a k a . V e l d h e e r is a g r a d u a t e of Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y and is n o w e m p l o y e d in i n d u s t r i a l r e s e a r c h . D R . W I L L I A M G I D D I S will j o i n t h e staff of t h e e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t as a p r o f e s s o r of edu c a t i o n . G i d d i s is a g r a d u a t e of W e s t e r n Michigan U n i v e r s i t y and h o l d s his M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e f r o m t h e s a m e i n s t i t u t i o n . H e received a d o c t o r a t e f r o m Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y in e d u c a t i o n a l a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and he h a s had p o s t d o c t o r a l s t u d y at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of C i n c i n n a t i . H e t a u g h t f o r f o u r y e a r s in t h e e d u c a t i o n a l f a c u l t y of Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y a n d was D i r e c t o r of t h e C o n t i n u i n g E d u c a t i o n Service t h e r e . F o r t h e past f o u r y e a r s , h e has b e e n o n t h e g r a d u a t e f a c u l t y of Miami U n i v e r s i t y . While t h e r e he designed a n d e s t a b l i s h e d t h e d o c t o r a l p r o g r a m in e d u c a t i o n a l administration and is c u r r e n t l y h e a d of t h i s d e p a r t m e n t , o n e of t h e largest d o c t o r a l p r o g r a m s in e d u c a t i o n a l a d m i n i s t r a t i o n in t h e United States.


April 17, 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

Page 3

Will aid graduate study

Joint psych-soc major created

D A N I S H D E X T E R I T Y — T h e Danish G y m n a s t i c s T e a m d e m o n s t r a t e s o n e of t h e r o u t i n e s to be presented M o n d a y at 8 p.m. in the Holland Civic C e n t e r .

Danish gymnastics team to perform Monday T h e Danish G y m n a s t i c s T e a m will p e r f o r m M o n d a y at 8 p . m . in the Holland Civic C e n t e r . Monday's repertoire will range f r o m g y m n a s t i c d e m o n s t r a t i o n s t o t r a d i t i o n a l Danish folk dances. T h e widely acclaimed g r o u p , directed by Erik F l e n s t e d - J e n s e n , is c o m p o s e d of 24 y o u n g a d u l t s f r o m b o t h vocational and academic backgrounds who have taken a salary-free y e a r ' s leave t o t o u r . T h e y have been selected f r o m a m o n g t h e finest g y m n a s t s in Denmark. The team participated in the 1968 O l y m p i c s in Mexico. Displays of historic Danish d a n c e , p e r f o r m e d to the t u n e s of t r a d i t i o n a l folk music, will be d o n e in the native c o s t u m e s of

D e n m a r k . O t h e r music a c c o m panying t h e g y m n a s t s will consist of b o t h classic and m o d e r n c o m p o s i t i o n s . S o m e of the c o m positions were w r i t t e n by Ernst R a s m u s s e n , a f o r m e r pianist for the g r o u p . T h e c u r r e n t t o u r of the team is the eighth for director Flensted-Jensen. Beginning in 1939, he has t o u r e d the United States, C a n a d a , Mexico, G r e e c e , Australia and Israel, and has participated in several w o r l d ' s fairs. S p o n s o r e d by t h e W o m e n ' s A t h l e t i c A s s o c i a t i o n , the event will be o p e n to s t u d e n t s at SI for bleacher seats and $ 1 . 7 5 f o r reserved b a l c o n y seats. T i c k e t s are available in Van Raalte and in meal lines.

by Jean DeGraff anchor Reporter A c o m b i n e d m a j o r in p s y c h o logy and sociology was a p p r o v e d by t h e A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Board at its m e e t i n g W e d n e s d a y . T h e Board also a c c e p t e d D u t c h as a language that can fulfill t h e all-College course r e q u i r e m e n t s . IN O T H E R R E C E N T a c t i o n the Board a p p r o v e d a program in n a t u r a l sciences for e l e m e n t a r y t e a c h e r s and a d d e d several c o u r s e s to t h e c u r r i c u l u m . T h e p r o p o s a l for a c o m b i n e d m a j o r in p s y c h o l o g y and sociology stated that ' ' g r a d u a t e schools require a solid b a c k g r o u n d in b o t h psychology and sociology. With o u r present a r r a n g e m e n t of separate m a j o r s m a n y of H o p e ' s graduates have deficiencies t o m ake u p w h e n t h e y begin their g r a d u a t e training." THE PROPOSAL further stated that " t h e c o m b i n e d m a j o r in psychology and sociology would e q u i p a person with a B.A. degree either t o enter the social work field i m m e d i a t e l y u p o n g r a d u a t i o n or to c o n t i n u e with g r a d u a t e s t u d y in this f i e l d . " Dean f o r A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Morrette R i d e r stated that the c o m b i n e d m a j o r in sociology and p s y c h o l o g y a d d e d a " w h o l e new d i m e n s i o n t o the d e p a r t m e n t s ' o f f e r i n g s w i t h o u t i n t e r f e r i n g with the m a j o r s t u d y program of either department." T H E NEW M A J O R requires a total of 37 h o u r s in t h e fields of psychology and sociology. T h e proposal was passed. Rider moved t h a t Dutch be accepted as fulfilling t h e language requirement. He said t h a t D u t c h has been o f f e r e d as an elective f o r t h e past t w o years b e c a u s e it has not been taught by a m a n trained in language, but by G. B o n n o Van D i j k , visiting assistant p r o t e s s o r of hist o r y . Rider said that t h e College has hired a m a n for n e x t s e m e s t e r w h o is trained t o t e a c h D u t c h . Rider a d d e d t h a t t h e r e has been great interest s h o w n in the present course. T h e m o t i o n was passed.

May contest Vander Jagt

Curry may toss hat in ring (Continued

from

page I )

"A D E M O C R A T would have t o be hopelessly deluded to believe that he could win in this district. G u y V a n d e r J a g t , the Republican in C o n g r e s s f r o m this district n o w , k n o w s that he is going to win. He doesn't really even have to c a m p a i g n . And app a r e n t l y he d o e s n ' t c a m p a i g n , " C urry said. " A D e m o c r a t has only the rem o t e s t possibility of w i n n i n g , " he c o n t i n u e d . " B u t in any c a m p a i g n , if y o u ' r e going to place y o u r n ame in n o m i n a t i o n , y o u ' v e got to run to win. No, 1 d o n ' t think there would be any c h a n c e of winning. It's not a thing y o u keep in m i n d , so y o u set o t h e r goals for yourself." O N E O F T H E S E goals is running a c a m p a i g n s t r o n g e n o u g h to f o r c e V a n d e r J a g t to declare himself on issues b e f o r e the election. At p r e s e n t t h e i n c u m b a n t d o e s not have to d o this. Curry n o t e d . " H e delivers a few very general kind of s t a t e m e n t s and relies on

History major's paper to he read at regional forum A p a p e r by h i s t o r y m a j o r Allen Pedersen will be read at t h e regional c o n f e r e n c e of Phi A l p h a T h e t a t o m o r r o w m o r n i n g . Phi Alpha T h e t a is an h o n o r a r y society f o r h i s t o r i a n s . Pedersen's paper, "The Impact of t h e C u b a n R e v o l u t i o n on t h e H e m i s p h e r i c Policy of the U n i t e d S t a t e s , " w o n t h e $ 5 0 R o l f e Itaaliander Prize f o r a c o n t r i b u t i o n t o greater i n t e r n a t i o n a l u n d e r s t a n d ing. P e d e r s e n , a senior, is c u r r e n t l y president of t h e E m e r s o n i a n frat e r n i t y and business m a n a g e r of t h e anchor.

the loyalty ot the R e p u b l i c a n s to their ticket to r e t u r n him. " I ' v e been told that V a n d e r J a g t was so c o n f i d e n t of winning in 1966, when he ran for election for the first t i m e , that even b e f o r e the R e p u b l i c a n p r i m a r y , he w e n t t o W a s h i n g t o n and b o u g h t a house. T h i s was three m o n t h s b e f o r e the e l e c t i o n , " Curry said. C U R R Y A D M I T T E D that the story might be a p o c r y p h a l , but t h o u g h t it was s y m b o l i c of t h e t r u t h a b o u t t h e n i n t h district. A s e c o n d c o n s i d e r a t i o n that p r o m p t e d C u r r y ' s interest in t h e c a n d i d a c y was t h e aid a s t r o n g D e m o c r a t i c c a m p a i g n in the ninth district w o u l d provide the D e m o cratic p a r t y in s t a t e w i d e elections. He referred in particular t o the reelection bid of Senior Phillip Hart.

" E V E R Y R E P U B L I C A N vote y o u can negate is going to have an i m p a c t on the s t a t e w i d e elections. S e n a t o r Hart is up for re-election this year. 1 here aren't very m a n y just men left in the world, and he is one of t h e m , I t h i n k , " C u r r y said. " H e certainly is w o r t h a s t r o n g e f f o r t to gain r e - e l e c t i o n . " Curry also n o t e d that S e n a t o r H a r t ' s c a m p a i g n would help the D e m o c r a t i c Party at the local level. The third reason C u r r y is t h i n k i n g of seeking election against impossible o d d s is that it would be "hell-raising good f u n . " R e f e r r i n g t o this reason C u r r y said, "I almost find as m u c h att r a c t i o n in this as the o t h e r things I have m e n t i o n e d . It is an education in i t s e l f . "

Physics dept. to sponor lecturer Lyle Tiffany Dr. O . Lyle T i f f a n y of t h e Systems Division at Bendix Aerospace, Ann Arbor, will serve as a visiting lecturer s p o n sored by the Hope College physics d e p a r t m e n t M o n d a y and Tuesday. T I F F A N Y W I L L visit u n d e r the auspices of t h e A s s o c i a t i o n of Physics T e a c h e r s and the A m e r i c a n I n s t i t u t e of Physics as part of a n a t i o n w i d e p r o g r a m t o stimulate interest in physics. T h e p r o g r a m is in its t h i r t e e n t h year and is s u p p o r t e d by t h e N a t i o n a l Science F o u n d a t i o n . Tiffany will give lectures, hold i n f o r m a l meetings w i t h stud e n t s and assist f a c u l t y m e m b e r s with curriculum and research problems. TIFFANY RECEIVED a B S degree in 1 9 4 3 , an M.S. in 1 9 4 6

and the Ph.D. in 1950 in physics f r o m the University of Michigan. He was at Massachusetts I n s t i t u t e of T e c h n o l o g y in the R a d i a t i o n L a b o r a t o r y f r o m 1 9 4 2 - 1 9 4 5 . F r o m 1 9 4 5 - 1 9 5 0 , he was a T e a c h i n g Fellow and Research F e l l o w in t h e Physics Dep a r t m e n t at the University of Michigan. Also there he was Head of S y s t e m Design G r o u p in the Engineering Research Institute from 1949-54, remaining in the Engineering I n s t i t u t e until 1958. T i f f a n y is Chief Scientist at the Bendix A e r o s p a c e S y s t e m s Division, w h i c h he j o i n e d in 1958. He is the a u t h o r of n u m e r o u s articles published in professional scientific j o u r n a l s and has been a m e m b e r or C h a i r m a n of m a n y c o m m i t t e e s of I E E E and A I A A .

D R . J. C O T T E R T h a r i n , associate professor of geology and chairman of t h e d e p a r t m e n t , introduced a p r o p o s a l f o r a new science s e q u e n c e for e l e m e n t a r y t e a c h e r s that w o u l d fulfill t h e general science r e q u i r e m e n t f o r non-majors. T h e p r o p o s a l establishes t h r e e science courses with t h r e e h o u r s ot credit. " T h e courses w o u l d e m p h a s i z e l a b o r a t o r y and classr o o m e x p e r i m e n t s t h a t can be applied in a t e a c h i n g s i t u a t i o n , " Tharin said. L A M O N T D I R K S E , associate professor and acting c h a i r m a n of the d e p a r t m e n t , said that 20 percent of the senior class is in t h e elementary teacher program. The proposal passed. Dirkse f u r t h e r said that t h e program might be m o r e acceptable for o t h e r s t u d e n t s . These c o u r s e s could be given t o fit t h e needs of any n o n - s c i e n c e m a j o r if separate l a b o r a t o r y sessions could be w o r k e d o u t for t h e e l e m e n t a r y teacher, he a d d e d . DIRKSE M O V E D that t h e Board " c h a r g e t h e C o m m i t t e e o n Science for E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l T e a c h e r s to s t u d y t h e possibility of a d a p t i n g t h e new science program for any n o n - s c i e n c e m a j o r in a d d i t i o n t o p r o s p e c t i v e elementary t e a c h e r s . " T h e m o t i o n was passed.

At its m e e t i n g March 25 the Board approved a three-hour interdisciplinary studies course, " S c i e n c e and H u m a n V a l u e s , " which would fulfill t h e senior seminar r e q u i r e m e n t . A C C O R D I N G TO its descript i o n , the course will e m p h a s i z e " a w a r e n e s s of m a n ' s involvement in n a t u r e , and detail t h e role science and t e c h n o l o g y play in creating p r o b l e m s and e f f e c t i n g s o l u t i o n s . The m e a n i n g and ramifications to his t o t a l e n v i r o n m e n t of all m a n ' s a c t i o n s will be explored." In f u r t h e r a c t i o n t h e Board a p p r o v e d t h e a d d i t i o n t o the curriculum of t w o e c o n o m i c s courses of three h o u r s of credit e a c h . THE COURSES added are "Comparative Economic Syst e m s " and " T h e History of Western C a p i t a l i s m . " T h e Board also a p p r o v e d a two credit hour c h e m i s t r y course for n o n - m a j o r s . A c c o r d i n g t o its description the course " O f Molecules and M e n " will " e m p h a s i z e specific aspects of c h e m i s t r y as t h e y affect mankind, including pollution, drugs, c o n s u m e r p r o d u c t s , nuclear c h e m i s t r y , laser t e c h n o l o g y and chemical w a r f a r e . " In f u r t h e r a c t i o n Wednesday the Board a p p r o v e d a p r o p o s a l of the English d e p a r t m e n t for a course in Black l i t e r a t u r e .

Student Congress eabinet applications due today A p p l i c a t i o n s are d u e today f o r the nine c a b i n e t p o s t s in t h e S t u d e n t Congress. M E M B E R S O F T H E cabinet are all m e m b e r s of o n e of t h e three policy-making Boards, t h e C a m p u s Life B o a r d , t h e A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Board and t h e A d m i n i s t r a tive Affairs B o a r d . In the c u r r e n t elections, five positions are o p e n on t h e C a m p u s Life Board and f o u r o n the Acad e m i c A f f a i r s Boar d. The presid e n t and t r e a s u r e r of t h e S t u d e n t Congress will fill o p e n p o s i t i o n s on the A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s Board. V O T I N G IS TO take place April 29. Before t h e elections, a p p l i c a n t s will be screened if necessary by t h e present m e m b e r s of the cabinet t o reduce t h e n u m b e r of c a n d i d a t e s .

A p p l i c a t i o n s for seats o n standing c o m m i t t e e s of e a c h of the policy-making Boards are d u e May 1, a f t e r which t h e newly-elected cabinet will screen t h e a p p l i c a n t s and s u b m i t a c o m p l e t e list of the twenty-nine students recomm e n d e d for t h e c o m m i t t e e positions. THE STANDING committees are as follows: u n d e r t h e Administrative Affairs Board, c o m m i t t e e s of E d u c a t i o n a l G r a n t s , S t u d e n t S t a n d i n g and Appeals, and Athletic; under the C a m p u s Life Board, E x t r a c u r r i c u l a r Affairs, Religious Life, C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media, and S t u d e n t , . C o n d u c t ; u n d e r t h e Acad e m i c y^ffairs Board, I n t e r n a t i o n a l Education, Teacher Education, Cultural A f f a i r s , and C u r r i c u l u m . A n y s t u d e n t w h o disagrees with the c h o i c e of t h e c a b i n e t may write in the n a m e of his c a n d i d a t e at the t i m e of the final election.

Committee proposes end to compulsory worship by R o b Benchley anchor Reporter T h e Religious Life C o m m i t t e e has p r o p o s e d t h a t the present plan of c o m p u l s o r y w o r s h i p for freshmen and s o p h o m o r e s be discontinued at t h e end of this s c h o o l year. IN P L A C E O F c o m p u l s o r y worship t h e R L C ' s p r o p o s a l s t a t e s that "a series of c o n v o c a t i o n s be planned f o r the school year 1970-71, and that t h e s t u d e n t s be required to a t t e n d a given n u m b e r of these c o n v o c a t i o n s . " I n c l u d e d in the p r o p o s a l is a s t a t e m e n t t h a t t h e C h a p l a i n s be i n s t r u c t e d t o provide daily worship during t h e 1970-71 s c h o o l year for s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y . T H E P R O P O S A L states t h a t " t h e r e are m a n y w a y s in w h i c h t h e Christian faith t o u c h e s t h e lives of t h e s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y at H o p e College. A g e n u i n e a t t e m p t is m a d e in several areas to verbalize the m e a n i n g of G o d ' s love and t h e Christian u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e p u r p o s e of l i f e . " T h e C o m m i t t e e ' s proposal r e c o m m e n d s that this effort, which "has always been a part of H o p e . " b e c o n t i n u e d through non-compulsory daily worship and a series of religiously-oriented c o n v o c a t i o n s . T h e p r o p o s a l will go b e f o r e t h e C a m p u s Life B o a r d , but b e f o r e it d o e s so, t h e R L C m u s t solve t h e p r o b l e m of f i n a n c i n g t h e cost of speakers f o r t h e c o n v o c a t i o n s . This p r o b l e m is t h e m a j o r cause

for delay in moving t h e proposal t o the CLB. T H E RLC VIEWS w o r s h i p as a c o m i n g t o g e t h e r of s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y to e x p r e s s praise and gratit u d e t o G o d , c o n f e s s belief in His role in history and c o m m i t t h e m selves to serve Him. T h e proposal justifies that " w o r s h i p at H o p e , seen as the f r e e r e s p o n s e t o a God w h o has freely given Himself t o m e n in Jesus Christ, should be non-compulsory." T h e R L C believes it is t h e responsibility of H o p e t o e x p o s e s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y t o t h e teachings of t h e c h u r c h and c o n t e m p o r ary t r e n d s in theological t h i n k i n g and religious p r a c t i c e . T h e classr o o m is not ordinarily t h e place t o d o this f o r m a l l y , and daily worship does not give this e x p o s u r e t o t h e whole c a m p u s ; h e n c e t h e C o m m i t t e e has p r o p o s e d that a series of t h e s e c o n v o c a t i o n s be planned each y e a r , t o be a p p r o x i mately an h o u r in l e n g t h . "IT IS E X P E C T E D , " states t h e p r o p o s a l , " t h a t a r t i c u l a t e spokesmen and o t h e r c o m m u n i c a t o r s of t h e Christian f a i t h will be b r o u g h t t o t h e c a m p u s for f o r m a l and i n f o r m a l a p p e a r a n c e s so that t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y will be m a d e aware of t h e c u r r e n t t h i n k i n g of outstanding Christian scholars, s t a t e s m e n and a r t i s t s . " T h e n e x t m e e t i n g of t h e R L C will be M o n d a y at 9 : 3 0 a . m . in t h e P r e s i d e n t ' s R o o m of Graves Hall. G u e s t s will be w e l c o m e d t o discuss t h e p r o p o s a l .


Page 4

April 17, 1970

H o p e College a n c h o r

Dear Mr. President... When you assume the post of president of the Student Congress this evening, you w i l l be stepping i n t o a j o b that o f f e r s many o p p o r t u n i t i e s for constructive leadership. The area in w h i c h the o p p o r t u n i t i e s are most obvious remains Hope's social rules. In the past several years a m u l t i t u d e of restrictive rules has been abolished, f r o m rules p r o h i b i t i n g dancing t o a rule prohibi-

anchor editorials ting j u n i o r and senior w o m e n f r o m being out past d o r m closing hours. More changes are in the w i n d . T h i s spring the Board of Trustees w i l l consider a plan for l i m i t e d parietal hours, and o n l y a few weeks after a key plan was approved for juniors b o t h students and administrators are t a l k i n g of extending the priviledge to sophomore coeds. As in the past, the changes now being made are initiated by students and pushed into effect most o f t e n against a hesistant faculty and a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . Also as in the past a great m a j o r i t y of the rules still in effect are w i l l f u l l y violated by a large and growing number of students w h o f i n d the rules foolish and a n n o y i n g . Very o f t e n these rules are b r o k e n w i t h the f u l l k n o w ledge of a resident advisor w h o finds the rules equally unnecessary. This, as y o u are p r o b a b l y well aware, is not a healthy s i t u a t i o n , and one that w i l l demand much of y o u r t i m e next year as you w o r k f o r f u r t h e r r e f o r m s in the social system. W o r k i n g for r e f o r m by one step at a t i m e is a long, tedious process, one that w i l l lead to extensive and most o f t e n worthless debate. If y o u pursue this course you w i l l be involved in seeking meager reform for the m a j o r i t y of the time, and w i l l guarantee that y o u r successor w i l l have to face the same t r o u b l e s o m e situation. Further, you w i l l waste y o u r energy o n these trivial matters w h e n it c o u l d be m u c h better used in leading student action in areas of greater concern and importance. T o avoid this sorry state of affairs in the f u t u r e w o u l d involve d o i n g away w i t h all (or at least all that are superfluous) of Hope's social regulations. Y o u r best course of action w o u l d be t o suggest that civil law become the law of the land on Hope's campus as it is o f f . This is not nihilist iconoclasticism. Ab o l i t i o n of campus regulations w o u l d have many positive effects. First, as indicated, it w o u l d free campus leaders f r o m continually pushing t o have o u t d a t e d and antiquated rules overturned and free t h e m to bring to Hope's students the issues of m o r e than local concern, issues t h a t w i l l be most pertinent in the seventies, eighties and nineties. Secondly, the needless d u p l i c a t i o n of rules at the College and the governmental level w o u l d be terminated. A t present civil law and the social regulations at Hope overlap in several areas, including the use of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, p r o p e r t y damage and assault. Students w o u l d thus be free f r o m being punished by b o t h the College and civil authorities.

T h i r d l y , the u n f r u i t f u l role of the Resident Advisor as p o l i c m a n w o u l d be ended. The R . A . w o u l d be free t o advise rather than coerce. He w o u l d be free of enforcing rules he does n o t believe in, or, qs is t h e case in many instances, t u r n i n g his back on violations regardless of his contractual bond w i t h the College to enforce its rules. F o u r t h l y , students w o u l d be b r o u g h t under the system of law that they w i l l have t o cope w i t h for the rest of their lives, a system t h a t has been designed for c o m p l e t e p r o t e c t i o n of the individual w i t h m a x i m u m freedom.

This last p o i n t should n o t be taken lightly by those w h o fear abuses of the law on campus if the College's regulations are done away w i t h . Though the individual w o u l d gain freedoms w i t h the a b o l i t i o n of campus rules, he w o u l d be subject t o punishment by t h e civil authorities in all cases. O f f e n d e d parties w o u l d have recourse t o the entire weight o f the law. A fear of many f a c u l t y members is that if the campus d r i n k i n g regulation were removed d e s t r u c t i o n of t h e College's p r o p e r t y by students w o u l d be extensive and expensive to the College. However, there is no reason w h y the school should be responsible for the maintenance of his living quarters. If he damages this p r o p e r t y he can be responsible under law f o r the damage. The same law that w o r k s for the landlord c o u l d w o r k for the College. A n o t h e r argument of those w h o w o r r y about social r e f o r m is that it w o u l d lead to c o n d i t i o n s not conducive t o academic pursuits. They cite that noise w o u l d increase t o the d e t r i m e n t of students w h o might w a n t to study or sleep.

Though the v a l i d i t y of t h i s supposit i o n can be questioned, even if noise w o u l d increase students w o u l d not be helpless t o counteract this noise. For one, students w o u l d in many cases simply have t o ask their neighbor t o be quiet t o gain t h e silence desired. T h i s w o r k s t o a great extent in the men's d o r m i t o r i e s at t h e present. However, if courtesy was not p r o d enough, any student w o u l d have the recourse to the civil authorities. D i s t u r b i n g the peace applies t o d o r m i t o r y living as it does elsewhere. These objections, Mr. President, are ones you w i l l be sure to hear if you push for any k i n d of extensive social r e f o r m . A n d they are objections that should be answered. But, t h e y seem to be skirting a m u c h larger issue, the moral issue involved w h i c h men have t r o u b l e overcoming rationally. A p a r t f r o m t h e e f f o r t s of students t o w i n changes motivated by a desire for m o r e convenient living conditions, the recent drives on campus and on many others f o r the total social revision are t h e o u t w a r d manifestation of y o u t h ' s o u t l o o k t o w a r d moral questions. T h e more erudite of t o d a y ' s y o u t h see moral standards as societ y ' s means of maintaining order. Thus, f o r these youths, morals should change w i t h society. These y o u t h s f i n d the concept of in loco parentis o u t m o d e d , an anachronism f r o m an era when the maintenance of society demanded rigid codes of c o n d u c t . No longer is this rigid code needed; the era of laissez faire m o r a l i t y has come. These are the changes that are occurring at the core of the social r e v o l u t i o n and the cause of the changes that must come at Hope.

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I w o u l d n ' t e v e n b o t h e r if I w e r e y o u . T h e b e a c h isn't t h a t great this y e a r . "

art buchwald

Women's Liberation by Art B u c h w a l d

O n e of t h e m a n y r e v o l u t i o n s t h a t has to be dealt with this y e a r is t h e Women's Liberation Movement. Some m e n are t r e a t i n g it as a j o k e , b u t m a n y m e n are t a k i n g it s e r i o u s l y . MY F R I E N D R O W L A N D said t o m e t h e o t h e r e v e n i n g at a bar in N e w Y o r k C i t y , "I d o n ' t k n o w w h a t t o d o . " " W h y ? " I asked. love m y w i f e , b u t 1 believe in t h e W o m e n ' s Liberation M o v e m e n t . " "What do you mean?" "WELL, THE WOMEN are right. T h e y say t h a t m a r r i a g e is w r o n g and t h a t n o w o m a n s h o u l d be tied t o any one man." "Is that what they say?" " O f c o u r s e , and if y o u see it f r o m t h e i r p o i n t of v i e w , w h y s h o u l d o n l y o n e w o m a n have a c c e s s t o m e , w h e n t h e r e are so m a n y o t h e r s t h a t are j u s t as deserving?" " R O W L A N D , " I s a i d , " a r e y o u sure that the Women's Liberation Movement was f o r m e d t o share h u s b a n d s ? " "Certainly. Most of us have b e e n t r e a t i n g o t h e r w o m e n with ' b e n i g n neglect' for years, and now w e ' r e paying t h e p e n a l t y . By m a i n t a i n i n g t h e s t a t u s q u o at h o m e , we h a v e e n c o u r a g e d less f o r t u n a t e w o m e n to radicalize and try to win, through revolution, what they couldn't win through elections. You c a n ' t b l a m e t h e m f o r w a n t i n g a p i e c e of the a c t i o n . " " Y o u ' r e a t r u e l i b e r a l , R o w l y , " 1 said. " I ' V E B E C O M E A r e a l i s t , " he said, "l-'or y e a r s , like m o s t m a r r i e d m e n , 1 was b l i n d e d t o t h e o p p r e s s i o n of w o m e n a r o u n d me. 1 k n e w t h e y w e r e in c h a i n s .

OPf

b u t I was a f r a i d t o s p e a k u p a n d t o act on their behalf. I rationalized by saying, 'If I can k e e p m y w i f e h a p p y , I ' m d o i n g e n o u g h . ' B u t I w a s living a lie. T h e o n l y r o a d t o t r u e e q u a l i t y is t o m a k e e v e r y w o m a n h a p p y , r e g a r d l e s s of t h e s a c r i f i c e s it e n t a i l s . " " T h a t ' s b e a u t i f u l , " I said. " W H E N W O M E N A S K t o be liberat e d , " R o w l a n d s a i d , " t h e y are a s k i n g t o be t r e a t e d as h u m a n b e i n g s , n o m o r e , n o less. T h e y w a n t d i g n i t y , u n d e r s t a n d i n g and s o m e o n e w h o cares. If t h a t d e m a n d s a r e v o l u t i o n , t h e n I say 1 will b e c o m e part of their r e v o l u t i o n . " " Y o u ' r e n o t a d v o c a t i n g v i o l e n c e , are you?" " I ' m n o t f o r v i o l e n c e per s e , " R o w l y said. " B u t if a w o m a n b e c o m e s v i o l e n t over m e , I ' m n o t g o i n g t o t u r n h e r over to the authorities." "I SHOULD HOPE not," 1 said. " H o w many w o m e n do you h o p e to liberate?" " I ' m n o t as y o u n g as I used t o b e , " R o w l a n d said, " b u t I'll l i b e r a t e as m a n y as t h e good L o r d will let m e . " " Y o u ' r e a saint, R o w l a n d . A saint." " I ' M O N L Y D O I N G w h a t is r i g h t , " he said m o d e s t l y . " T h e r e c o m e s a t i m e in a m a n ' s life w h e n he m u s t s t a n d u p and b e c o u n t e d . " " H a v e y o u d i s c u s s e d this w i t h y o u r wife?" " T h a t ' s w h a t I've b e e n t r y i n g t o tell y o u . I ' m s t a y i n g in t o w n by myself tonight." Copyright Co.

1970,

The

anchor Published weekly during and f o r t h e s t u d e n t s of C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Board. Subscription;

It started as a practical j o k e - a harmless prank that w o u l d make a good story to brag about to friends. But it ended tragically f o r a 19-year old Calvin College sophomore when he died of e l e c t r o c u t i o n w i t h a hole in his back the size of a fist as a result of thousands of volts passing t h r o u g h his body. The lesson is simple and obvious, b u t it is easily f o r g o t t e n in the heat of sadistic f r a t e r n i t y and s o r o r i t y " f u n " and spring " b l i t z e s . " No s t u d e n t has t h e right to interfere w i t h t h e security of others by d i s t u r b i n g fire f i g h t i n g e q u i p m e n t . N o stud e n t can a f f o r d t o risk his collegues' safety by f o o l i n g w i t h electrical e q u i p m e n t . A n d no individual should be allowed t o destroy others' p r o p e r t y .

Tolerance to such actions should be condemned equally w i t h the act itself, for such tolerance provides an atmosphere w h i c h encourages damaging and degrading " p r a n k s . " I n s t i t u t i o n a l i z e d tolerance, such

PRESS

t h e c o l l e g e y e a r e x c e p t v a c a t i o n , h o l i d a y a n d e x a m i n a t i o n p e r i o d s by H o p e C o l l e g e , H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n , u n d e r t h e a u t h o r i t y of t h e S t u d e n t

$ 5 per y e a r .

Printed:

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Ground

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The o p i n i o n s on this page tion of H o p e College.

as present s o r o r i t y and f r a t e r n i t y pledging activities, must be re-examined.

We are calling f o r an immediate and complete end to all activities w h i c h are in themselves destructive or degrading, or w h i c h lead t o such acts. F r a t e r n i t y pledging is as antiquated as it is sadistic, and " b l i t z e s " are as senseless as they are wastef u l . If we mean w h a t we say at Hope College a b o u t concern f o r others, let's begin showing that concern where we live.

Post

COLLEGE

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

An end to 'pranks'

Washington

are n o t

Phone:

n e c e s s a r i l y t h o s e of t h e s t u d e n t

BOARD OF EDITORS Editor Assistant Editor News Editor Managing Editor Advertising Business Manager

Tom Donia Garrett DeGraff Lynn Jones Clarke Borgeson Dave Dievendorf AI Pedersen

DEPARTMENTS Critiques Col umnist Cartoonists

392-5111, Ext. 2285.

Robert Kieft Dre w Hinderer, Bob Vanderberg . . . . Greg Phillips, Debbie Yoch

heatares Headlines Photography

b o d y , faculty or Administra-

Sarah Penny Dave Dustirv Rob Benchley, Jeanne Salberg, Louis Schakel and Steve Vander made REPORTERS

Phyllis Accocella, Steve Berry, Rob Benchley, Dave Boersma, Norma Brown, Jean DeGraff, Bill Hoffman, Ken Janda, Sharon Mekjean, Robin Pearce, Pete Struck, Gerry Swierenga, Dave Thomas, Bev Unangst, Rich Van Dor en, Nancy Warner and Gail Werka


April 17, 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

Page 5

anchor review

'Hey, White Girl:' a plea directed toward whites Editor's N o t e ; T h i s week's anchor review is w r i t t e n by senior English major Peter VanWingen. He reviews Hey White Girl by Susan Gregory (W. W. N o r t o n & Co.; $ 4 . 9 5 ) . by Peter VanWingen When S u s a n G r e g o r y s t e p p e d out o n t o t h e s t r e e t s of C h i c a g o ' s west side, she w a s i m m e d i a t e l y greeted w i t h t h e a b u s i v e call, "Hey white girl!" T h e implication of these t h r e e w o r d s f o r w a r n e d her of t h e r e s e n t m e n t a n d h a t r e d she would e x p e r i e n c e in t h e innercity. but t h e y also r e m i n d e d her ol the u n u i u e n e s s and of t h e responsibility involved in h e r situation. SUSAN G R E G O R Y was not a social w o r k e r , or an a l t r u i s t i c liberal, or a well-intentioned teacher. S h e was a high s c h o o l s t u d e n t w h o was just t r y i n g t o a t t e n d s c h o o l a n d exist m e a n i n g fully m her s u r r o u n d i n g s o c i e t y . She was not t h e r e t o see a " r e a l g h e t t o s c h o o l " or t o look at t h e " o t h e r h a l f . " She was o n t h e west side in o r d e r to live. Susan G r e g o r y ' s b o o k . Hcv, \\'lu!c (iir!! is an a c c o u n t , t a k e n f r o m her d i a r y , of her s e n i o r year at J o h n Marshall High S c h o o l . Susan resided o n t h e west side lor one year while her f a m i l y w o r k e d at the l i c u m e n i c a l I n s t i t u t e , a religious o r g a n i z a t i o n c o n c e r n e d with i n n e r - c i t y p r o b l e m s . CHANGING T O a new school always p u t s a p e r s o n o n t h e defensive, b u t S u s a n ' s arrival at allblack Marshall High did m o r e t h a n that -it p u t her o n trial. Since she was t h e o n l y w h i t e s t u d e n t in the s c h o o l , she b e c a m e t h e r e p r e sentative of all w h i t e s to t h e black students around her. She felt t h a t if she c o u l d be t h e one w h i t e p e r s o n w h o m t h e black s t u d e n t s c o u l d t r u s t and c o n f i d e in. the e n t i r e y e a r at M a r s h a l l would have b e e n w o r t h w h i l e . Receiving t h i s trust a n d c o n f i d e n c e

was not easy n o r was it c o m pletely p o s s i b l e . B e f o r e a n y t h i n g c o u l d be a c c o m p l i s h e d she had t o learn a n e w l a n g u a g e , a new social s t r u c t u r e , a n d new w a y s of m e e t ing and k e e p i n g f r i e n d s . S U S A N R E C O R D S t h e s e learning e x p e r i e n c e s with ama/.ing honesty. Undoubtedly, it was t h r o u g h t h e s a m e t y p e of h o n e s t y t h a t she b e c a m e a c c e p t e d as part ot t h e Marshall High s t u d e n t b o d y and e v e n t u a l l y g a i n e d a love f o r t h e v i b r a n t life of t h e west s i d e .

THE CLOSE friendships which S u s a n m a d e b r o u g h t h e r hope for j o y f u l intimacy into reality, although her s i n c e r i t y was c o n t i n u a l l y b e i n g t e s t e d a n d her i n t e r e s t in her f e l l o w - s t u dents was o f t e n m i s u n d e r s t o o d . O n e of h e r close g i r l - f r i e n d s a d m i t t e d to her that "we f o u g h t y o u f o r a w h i l e , b u t finally we realized y o u w e r e a part of Marshall. A n d you arc! " Another friend, Rudy, helped Susan t o b e c o m e involved in Marshall High activities. S h e saw that through R u d y ' s leadership and e n t h u s i a s m t h e s t u d e n t s initiated or continued many school activities a f t e r the teachers and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s e i t h e r had q u i t or d i d n ' t c a r e t o p a r t i c i p a t e any longer. (Susan mentions t h a t R u d y H o w a r d is n o w att e n d i n g H o p e Colle ge .) T H E A U T H O R has d e v o t e d o n e c h a p t e r t o e a c h m o n t h of t h e s c h o o l ye a r . T h i s t e c h n i q u e , coupled with her simple, firstperson approach, involves t h e r e a d e r d e e p l y in t h e very personal e x p e r i e n c e s of a p a r t i c u l a r

in faculty reeital Tuesday T h e H o p e College m u s i c dep a r t m e n t will p r e s e n t a f a c u l t y recital b y N o r m a n J e n n i n g s , baritone, a c c o m p a n i e d by pianist Joan C o n w a y T u e s d a y at 8 : 1 5 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel.

A f t e r a brief i n t e r m i s s i o n , t h e recital will c o n t i n u e w i t h Pari Siamo, from Rigolctto b y Giuseppi V e r d i , Amelia Cara, f r o m Amelia (iocs to the Ball b y G i a n -

•MLI u

li

I he s p o n t a n e o u s , u n i n h i b i t e d b e h a v i o r d i s p l a y e d by t h e s t u dents brought Susan increasing awareness of the beauty of b l a c k n e s s . She f o u n d t h e m t o possess inexhaustible energy w h e t h e r t h e y w e r e singing in t h e halls o r d o d g i n g t h e b u l l e t s t h a t w h i z z e d t h r o u g h t h e wind o w s of t h e s c h o o l a u d i t o r i u m .

Jennings will perform

The program will include Recitative: I Rage, I Melt, I Burn, by G e o r g e F r e d e r i c H a n d e l ; Air: O Ruddier Than 'The Cherry; Air: Tears Such as Tender Fathers Shed; Air: False, Destructive Ways o f Pleasure, Wie MeIodicn Zeiht es Mir (op. 105, No. I), by J o h a n n e s Brahms; Lie he und I'ru filing / (Op. J No. 2), Leibe und Fruhling II (Op. No. 3), 0 Wiisst ich doch den W'eg Zuriick (Op. 63, No. S), Meine Lie he is I Griin (Op. 63, No. 5); Jai pi cure en reve, by George H i r e ; llyme au Soldi, by Alex G e o r g e s ; Nell (Op. IS, No. 7), by G a b r i e l Faure"; L'lcur jetec (Op. 39, No. 2) and Autonine (Op. 18, No. 30, b o t h b y G a b r i e l Faure'.

suspicion, and f e a r , " involves the r e a d e r , also, in t h e general p i c t u r e of the current racial crisis in this c o u n t r y . By t h e b o o k ' s c o n c l u s i o n , t h e e x p r e s s i o n " H e y , White G i r l ! " has c h a n g e d drastically in m e a n ing. it is n o longer a d e r o g a t o r y t a u n t f r o m t h e g h e t t o , but it is the plea of o n e w h i t e girl directed t o all w h i t e girls and t h e w h i t e p e o p l e of A m e r i c a .

high s c h o o l s t u d e n t . Y e t , this direct a n d sensitive r e n d e r i n g of her o w n e x p e r i e n c e s a n d her i n t i m a t e u n d e r s t a n d i n g of " t h e barrier between black and w h i t e caused by ignorance.

ULTIMATELY, Hey. White dirl' is t h e plea of o n e w h i t e w h o has b e e n f o r t u n a t e e n o u g h to e x p e r i e n c e t h e b e a u t y of blackness, for a new unders t a n d i n g of t h e black man in A m e r i c a by all w h i t e s a n d f o r a re-examination of their own "whiteness." As whites, "We must try h a r d e r , " she says, " t o u n d e r s t a n d black anger a n d frust r a t i o n . We m u s t stop being afraid b e c a u s e w e are i g n o r a n t . " This new understanding m e a n s t h a t " t h e ideas of p a t e r nalistic w e l l - i n t e n t i o n e d whites can no longer be i m p o s e d o n the black man " he m u s t d i r e c t the c h a n g e s he w a n t s . He m u s t

Carlo M e n o t t i , a n d Credo, f r o m Otello, also by V e r d i . T h e f i n a l part of the r e c i t a l will consist of f o u r works; High Plight, by J o h n S a c c o ; 'The While Swan, by E r n e s t C h a r l e s ; Sailor Men, by J a c q u e s Wolf, a n d Hangmen, Hangmen by Harvey F n d e r s .

THE PASSING OF three y e a r s has given new m e a n i n g t o Hey, White (lirlf because time has m o r e rigidly d e f i n e d t h a n ever b e f o r e t h e b a r r i e r b e t w e e n black and w h i t e . T h e c h a p t e r s dealing with Susan G r e g o r y ' s r e s i d e n c e o n t h e west side talk a b o u t a s i t u a t i o n t h a t m a y not even be possible t o d a y . T h e r e f o r e , if A m e r i c a is ever to reach the point where blacks and w h i t e s c a n m e e t e q u a l l y , Miss G r e g o r y ' s message t o w h i t e A m e r i c a a b o u t its part in the a c h i e v e m e n t of that goal is n o w m o r e i m p e r a t i v e t h a n ever bef o r e . She is telling w h i t e Americ a n s t o listen and t o h e e d t h e w o r d s of M a l c o l m X; " L e t sincere w h i t e i n d i v i d u a l s find all other white p e o p l e t h e y can w h o feel as t h e y d o - a n d let t h e m f o r m t h e i r o w n all-white g r o u p s , t o w o r k t r y i n g t o convert o t h e r w h i t e p e o p l e w h o are t h i n k i n g and a c t i n g so racist. Let sincere w h i t e s go a n d teach non-violence to white people!"

The peripheral and more by D r e w H i n d e r e r

T h e l e a d e r s h i p of n e x t y e a r ' s S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s will b y n o w have b e e n p a r t i a l l y d e t e r m i n e d , p r e s u m a b l y on t h e basis of t h e candidates' approaches to the issues t h e y c o n s i d e r i m p o r t a n t f o r the College's a t t e n t i o n . A cursary r e a d i n g of t h e anchor Election Issue i n t e r v i e w s w i t h f o u r of t h e s e c a n d i d a t e s has given me t h e i m pression t h a t t h e y are very largely concerned with functional problems and rule changes. This emphasis, w h i l e l e g i t i m a t e , s e e m s incomplete to me. W I T H I N T H E c o n t e x t of an a c a d e m i c c o m m u n i t y , social issues are u n f o r t u n a t e if n e c e s s a r y diversions f r o m t h e i m p o r t a n t b u s i n e s s of i n t e l l e c t u a l e x c e l l e n c e . T o t h e e x t e n t t h a t e x i s t i n g rules i n f r i n g e u p o n t h e f r e e d o m of s t u d e n t s t o e x c h a n g e ideas a n d d e v e l o p intellectual m a t u r i t y , t h e y o u g h t t o b e changed. As l o n g as restrictive social policy e x i s t s , it is u n q u e s t i o n a b l y t h e b u s i n e s s of t h e s t u d e n t gov-

e r n m e n t t o call t h a t p o l i c y i n t o q u e s t i o n , a n d liberalize rules t h a t strangle t h e f r e e e x c h a n g e of ideas. BUT I S S U E S L I K E parietal h o u r s a n d k e y s f o r w o m e n stud e n t s are p e r i p h e r a l , a n d w h e n t h e y a s s u m e t h e s t a t u s of crucial e n d s in t h e m s e l v e s , o c c u p y i n g t h e creative e n e r g i e s of large p o r t i o n s of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , t h e y b e c o m e absurd. The student government c e r t a i n l y o u g h t t o act as s w i f t l y a n d e x p e d i e n t l y as possible t o alleviate t h e s e p r o b l e m s , and get on to more i m p o r t a n t and w o r t h y concerns. All of t h e c a n d i d a t e s interviewed w e r e a g r e e d u p o n t h e n e e d for increased " d i a l o g u e " between m e m b e r s of t h e College c o m m u n i t y , a n d it is a f a c t of H o p e College i n t e l l e c t u a l life t h a t t h e r e is little i n t e r - d i s c i p l i n a r y interc h a n g e of ideas a n d p e r s p e c t i v e s . E a c h d i s c i p l i n e s u f f e r s f r o m this i n t e l l e c t u a l i s o l a t i o n ; w i d e r perspectives on inter-disciplinary

Dr. D o n a l d 11. Williams, associate p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , has b e e n a w a r d e d a P e t r o l e u m Research Foundation project grant of SI 2 , 0 0 0 f o r r e s e a r c h in inorganic chemistry. T h e f u n d s are a d m i n i s t e r e d by the American Chemical S o c i e t y a n d are f o r f u n d a m e n t a l research over a t w o - y e a r p e r i o d . T h e w o r k of Williams will center on stereo chemical study of multidentate c o m p l e x e s of cobalt (III). I n v e s t i g a t i o n s of this sort have e n a b l e d s c i e n t i s t s t o p r o p o s e m o d e l s of e n z y m e and c a t a l y t i c s y s t e m s .

"It is h o p e d that these studies can c o n t r i b u t e t o k n o w l e d g e of this same sort and that a b e t t e r u n d e r s t a n d i n g of imp o r t a n t b o d y p r o c e s s e s will be g a i n e d , " said Williams. A m a j o r p o r t i o n of the g r a n t will be used t o p r o v i d e s t i p e n d s f o r H o p e College s t u d e n t s w h o c h o o s e t o w o r k u n d e r Williams' direction. Presently junior Steve Van Pelt and s o p h o m o r e C h a r l e s Den Hart are involved in r e s e a r c h with Williams.

levels can o n l y p r o d u c e m o r e o p e n n e s s and c r e a t i v e t h o u g h t . INDEED, SUCH interdisciplinary c r o s s - f e r t i l i z a t i o n is o n e of t h e p r i m a r y t e n e t s of t h e liberal e d u c a t i o n c o n c e p t . P e r h a p s it is t h e b u s i n e s s , t h e n , of t h e student government to find ways of p r o m o t i n g such i n t e r c h a n g e . H o p e College has an a l a r m i n g l y high r a t e of d r o p o u t s f r o m its i n t e l l e c t u a l l e a d e r s . M a n y of t h e s e w h o n o w s t u d y e l s e w h e r e say t h a t t h e y felt s t i f l e d at H o p e by t h e rigid c o u r s e s t r u c t u r e s m o s t stud e n t s m u s t c o n f o r m t o . Y e t I have nearly a l w a y s f o u n d t h a t m e m b e r s of t h e f a c u l t y are q u i t e willing and even e a g e r t o design special p r o g r a m s of s t u d y f o r s t u d e n t s w h o are dissatisfied w i t h i n traditional f r a m e w o r k s . A N D M O S T of t h e s t u d e n t s w h o have d e p a r t e d f r o m n o r m a l p a t t e r n s of c o u r s e s t r u c t u r e s have f o u n d their w o r k increasingly beneficial and exciting. But t h e m a j o r i t y of H o p e Stud e n t s are u n a w a r e of t h e o p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r special s t u d y o p e n t o t h e m ; I w o u l d suggest t h a t it is t h e b u s i n e s s of t h e s t u d e n t gove r n m e n t t o m a k e c r e a t i v e alternatives t o c o u r s e s t r u c t u r e s available t o t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , t o e s t a b l i s h g u i d e l i n e s f o r special c o u r s e s of s t u d y , a n d t o a c q u a i n t t h e s t u d e n t b o d y w i t h t h e special o p p o r t u n i t i e s o p e n t o it. O f f camp u s s t u d y p r o g r a m s are n o w virtually unknown apart from V i e n n a ; t h e s e , t o o , o u g h t to be emphasized. Student g o v e r n m e n t leaders, t h e n , o u g h t t o be a w a r e of their obligation n o t o n l y t o social issues, b u t t o a c a d e m i c issues. F a r t o o m u c h c r e a t i v e e n e r g y and far t o o m a n y g o o d i d e a s are wasted by t h e g o v e r n m e n t in its p u r s u i t of p e r i p h e r a l goals. P e r h a p s t h e g o v e r n m e n t is now r e a d y t o direct its a t t e n t i o n t o t h e real p o i n t of b e i n g an a c a d e m i c c o m m u n i t y .

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

t h r o u g h his

declamation of know

Williams wins grant for chemical research

NORMAN JENNINGS

c o m e i n t o his o w n own leadership.

OJMAT IN T H E L J O R L P 1 $ T H E M A T T E R WITH V 0 0 ? !

ALL

M A MEOJ F E M I N I S T


Page 6

A p r i l 17, 1 9 7 0

H o p e College anchor

Will work abroad

Symphonettc to present annual Spring Concert The Hope College Symp h o n e t t e will p r e s e n t its a n n u a l Spring Concert t o m o r r o w night at 8 : 1 5 in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel. T H E G R O U P , c o n d u c t e d by Harrison Ryker and accomp a n i e d by Mrs. P a m e l a B u t l e r R y k e r , f l u t e s o l o i s t , has j u s t rec e n t l y r e t u r n e d f r o m its s p r i n g t o u r of t h e M i d w e s t . Selections p e r f o r m e d on the t o u r and t o be p r e s e n t e d t o m o r row night will i n c l u d e Screnada (With the Night Watchman's Cry), d e p i c t i n g s e v e n t e e n t h cent u r y city life. It is t h e a t r i c a l in n a t u r e , using b o t h o f f s t a g e eff e c t s and tone painting. The piece is c o m p o s e d by H e i n r i c h I F . von B i b e r , t h e G e r m a n f o r e r u n n e r of Bach. A L S O T O BE p e r f o r m e d are In the Steppes of Central Asia, a tone poem by Alexander B o r o d i n , a n d Serenade No. 12 m C Minor a n d Concerto No. I in C Major for Flute and Or-

ENVIRONMENTAL TEACH-IN

Clark awarded research grant

chestra by W o l f g a n g A m a d e u s Mozart. Following these selections, the S y m p h o n e t t e will p e r f o r m ...between..., an experimental piece of music c o m p o s e d in 1968 s p e c i f i c a l l y f o r the H o p e College S y m p h o n e t t e by R o g e r Reynolds, one of America's foremost modern composers. N e x t o n t h e p r o g r a m is Two (iymnopedies by F.ric Satie. It is an o r c h e s t r a l a r r a n g e m e n t of t h e piece m a d e f a m o u s by t h e rock g r o u p Blood, Sweat and Tears. T H E C O N C E R T will c o n t i n u e w i t h Tlinit, the result of c o m poser G e r o g e F r e d r i c k M c K a y ' s A l a s k a n and British C o l u m b i a n summer work with the C o m o x , K w a k i u t i and Tlingit Indians. He arranged this work for orchestra from traditional tribal folk music. Last will be Pelleas and Melisande Suite, the i n c i d e n t a l m u s i c w r i t t e n by J e a n Sibe lius for t h e play Pelleas and Melisande by Maurice Maeterlinck. Traditional E a s t e r m u s i c is also in t h e repertory.

The National E n d o w m e n t for the H u m a n i t i e s has a w a r d e d a Fellowship for Y o u n g e r H u m a n ists t o Dr. David Clark of the history d e p a r t m e n t . T h e National E n d o w m e n t for the H u m a n i t i e s w a s c r e a t e d by an Act of C o n g r e s s d u r i n g t h e K e n n e d y a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . Its origin was in t h e c o n c e r n of President Kennedy and o t h e r national leaders t h a t f e d e r a l f u n d ing f o r the National Science F o u n d a t i o n s h o u l d be b a l a n c e d by f e d e r a l f u n d i n g f o r t h e hum a n i t i e s and t h e arts. The f e l l o w s h i p s are a m o n g t h e most c o v e t e d a w a r d s that can be w o n by a s c h o l a r in t h e humanities who is u n d e r 40 y e a r s of age. E a c h i n s t i t u t i o n of higher e d u c a t i o n in the U n i t e d States can n o m i n a t e one faculty m e m b e r to be considered for this a w a r d . T h e a m o u n t of t h e award m a k e s it possible f o r a r e c i p i e n t t o have a leave f r o m t e a c h i n g f o r a year in o r d e r t o d e v o t e full t i m e t o r e s e a r c h . T h i s is the t h i r d f o u n d a t i o n grant Clark h a s received t o support a year of research a b r o a d d u r i n g t h e n e x t a c a d e m i c year. Earlier C l a r k received conf i r m a t i o n of b e i n g a w a r d e d a L e v e r h u l m e Visiting F e l l o w s h i p t o t h e U n i v e r s i t y of K e n t , Cant e r b u r y , E n g l a n d . H e has b e e n n o m i n a t e d f o r L e v e r h u l m e Visiting F e l l o w s h i p s by the h i s t o r y d e p a r t m e n t of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of E d i n b u r g h , S c o t l a n d and English Universities in Birmingham, N e w c a s t l e - U p o n - T y n e and Norwich. F i f t e e n Leverhulme awards are given e a c h y e a r t o s c h o l a r s coming from the United States or C o m m o n w e a l t h c o u n t r i e s t o

Hope receives chem scholarship from Lubrizol

Wednesday, A p r i l 22

H o p e College has b e e n presented a $ 5 0 0 scholarship award f o r a s t u d e n t of c h e m i s t r y by the Lubrizol Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio. The Lubrizol F o u n d a t i o n has regularly made a scholarship award t o a H o p e College stud e n t of c h e m i s t r y since 1 9 5 7 .

JO/N THE FIGHT AGAINST POLLUTION

s t u d y in British universities. As a L e v e r h u l m e F e l l o w , Clark will give t h r e e guest l e c t u r e s and will have the rest of his t i m e f r e e for research. The American Philosophical Society has granted f u n d s to Clark t o c o v e r p h o t o g r a p h i c a n d secretarial e x p e n s e s f o r his research. The National E n d o w m e n t for the H u m a n i t i e s has given p e r m i s sion for C l a r k t o a c c e p t t h e i r grant in a d d i t i o n t o t h o s e f r o m the L e v e r h u l m e T r u s t and t h e American Philosophical Society. This June Clark and his f a m i l y will fly t o E u r o p e . As they did in the s u m m e r of 1 9 6 8 , t h e y will live in a c a m p e r while t r a v e l i n g t o d i f f e r e n t p a r t s of E u r o p e . Clark will be t r a c i n g t h e life a n d t h o u g h t of Marcoa n t o n i o de D o m i n i s , a sevent e e n t h c e n t u r y Italian r e f o r m e r T h e w r i t i n g s of de D o m i n i s are

being edited by Clark for public a t i o n . T h e series is p u b l i s h e d by t h e N e w b e r r y L i b r a r y , Chic a g o , in c o n j u n c t i o n with G . Sanzoni Publishers, Florence, Italy. De D o m i n i s w a s b o r n of a n o b l e f a m i l y in D a l m a t i a , n o w part of Y u g o s l a v i a , a n d b e c a m e the highest ranking Roman C a t h o l i c b i s h o p in t h a t area. In 1606 he joined forces with Venetians w h o were o p p o s i n g e n c r o a c h m e n t s of t h e p o p e s . In 1 6 1 6 he left V e n i c e - f o r E ngland, where he joined the Church of England and the c o u r t of K i n g J a m e s 1. Clark will be s e a r c h i n g f o r m a t e r i a l s a b o u t de D o m i n i s in a r c h i v e s in Y u g o s l a v i a , V e n i c e , P a d u a , and Rome. In S e p t e m b e r , t h e Chirks will s e t t l e in C a n t e r b u r y England, w h e r e Clark will c o n t i n u e his research.

Hopkins awarded PhD from Ohio University J a c k H o p k i n s , assistant prof e s s o r of communication, has been awarded a doctoral degree in i n t e r p e r s o n a l c o m m u n i c a t i o n from Ohio Universtity. A M E M B E R O F the H o p e faculty since S e p t e m b e r , Hopk i n s will b e c o m e c h a i r m a n of the College's department of c o m m u n i c a t i o n n e x t fall. H o p k i n s is a n a t i v e of Silver S p r i n g , M d . H e was a w a r d e d a B.A. d e g r e e f r o m M a r i e t t a Col-

lege and an M.A. O h i o University.

degree

HE T A U G H T business, industrial and interpersonal communication at O h i o U n i v e r s i t y before joining the Hope faculty. His dissertation dealt with t h e ethical c o n s i d e r a t i o n s of t h e g h o s t w r i t i n g p r a c t i c e at the Presi d e n t i a l level and c o n c e n t r a t e d o n the s p e e c h w r i t i n g staff and p r o c e s s d u r i n g t h e seven-and-ahalf year administration of H a r r y S. T r u m a n .

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April 17, 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

Page 7

105 accept bids

Sorority pledges announced H o p e ' s six s o r o i t i e s have a d d e d 105 new pledges. ALPHA PHI'S 2 8 pledges are Bonnie Black, Marcia Brande n b u r g , Marcia Burgering, Paula C o l e n b r a n d e r , A n n e D e c k a r d , Pat D e K a m , L a u r a E i c h o r n , Mary F e d e , Pam H e r d a , I r i s h H o e k m a n , R i n k j e H o o g e w e r f , Kristen Kenn e d y , Sue K r o p s c h o t , Sue O t t e , Betsy Phillips, Beth Randall, Sheila S c h u l e r , L o r e e S c h u s t e r , Barb Smalling, C i n d y Smith, Sheryl S m i t h , J a c k i e S t e g e m a n , C o n n i e Stilwell, Bart T o m m l o a , Deb Van D y k , Linda Warnet, Linda Wood and Linda Zerbe. Delta Phi s o r o r i t y has a d d e d Jackie Bigelow, S u e Bos, Sue Bruggink, Barb Darge, D e b b i e D o f f , D o n n a D r a k e , Mary L y n n Dzurina, G i n n i e F o s s , Rita Hayden, Sue H e d r i c k s , Sue J o e l s o n , Mary Jean Kline, Marcia Larson, Kay N o r d s k o g , Louise P f e i f e r , Sue Ponstein, Pam R a u l i n s o n , Katie Scholes, S u e Sinclair, D e b b i e S m i t h , Becky S p i e k h o u t , Chris T r u i s t e d o r f , Gloria V a n d e H o e f , J a n e Van Z o e r e n , Betty J o Viel, Lynn Walschenbach, Linda Weaver and Lynda Wierenga.

NEW D O R I A N PLEDGES are G i n n y B u r t o n , K a t h y Halverson, E u n i c e K o s t e r , Mary T r i p p , E l e a y Van L i e ro p , • Jackie V e n h u i s e n , Gail Werka a n d Jan W o r t e l b o e r . A d d i t i o n s t o K a p p a Chi are Mary D y k e m a , Jan H e p l e r , Karla H o e s c h , Chris L o h m a n , Sally P e n n y , Marna Tellier and Sue White. S1BS H A V E A C C E P T E D Mary Ailes, Denise Baker, Debbie Blough, Chrissy Bush, Molly G a t e s , Sue H a w k i n s , Julie Jankoviak, Pam J u d a y , B o b b i e Marsh,

T h e a u c t i o n , s p o n s o r e d by the Alpha Phi O m e g a service f r a t e r n i t y , will be held in a picnic-type atmosphere, with Saga F o o d Service serving an outdoor meal. N o t only will food f r o m Saga be available, but food (in t h e f o r m of c o o k i e s and cakes) will be o n e of t h e many things o n a u n i q u e list of items to be a u c t i o n e d off t o t h e highest b i d d e r .

A First Class rating was a w a r d e d the H o p e College anchor by t h e Associated Collegiate Press at t h e University of Minnesota in the 8 2 n d All A m e r i c a n Critical Service. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 6 0 0 newspapers from throughout the United States were e v a l u a t e d . Newspapers published from September through December

I t e m s to be sold include a three-hour boat ride for six people, two hamburger cookouts for f o u r p e o p l e , a p a c k e d picnic lunch for t w o , a p a r t y for u p to 12 s t u d e n t s , eight steak dinners, a pizza party for six, a boat with a full tank of gas and skiing equipment for four people and a c h a p e r o n e d weekend for t w o c o u p l e s on Beaver Island. All i t e m s are d o n a t e d by m e m b e r s of t h e f a c u l t y .

Proceeds from the Faculty A u c t i o n will go t o the C o m m u n i t y A c t i o n H o u s e in Holland. Last year t h e p r o c e e d s were sent t o B r e w t o n N o r m a l S c h o o l in B r e w t o n , Ala.

Actress Judith Gick is conducting w o r k s h o p Judith Gick, noted British actress of stage, r a d i o and television, is p r e s e n t l y o n H o p e ' s c a m pus as a visiting artist u n d e r t h e s p o n s o r s h i p of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of theatre. " T h e A c t o r and t h e T e x t " was the subject of a talk given by Miss Gick yesterday afternoon in Winants A u d i t o r i u m . She will continue t o d a y and S a t u r d a y w o r k i n g with acting s t u d e n t s in a w o r k -

IRC to present

New Sorosite pledges are Laurie A n m a n , Diane Bell, K a t h y Cantrell, Margo C r a n d a l l , D o n n a Evans, Diane F u g g i t t , J e a n Klooster, Marianne Meyers, Gina Michel, Sharon Opsahl, Pat P a c k a r d , J o E l l e Presson, Marcy R o s k a m p , Claudia T e b b i n , Maria n n e Van Singel, D e b b y Van T u y nen and J o a n V a n d e r V e l d e .

anchor rcccivcs 'excellent' rating from press service

Annual faculty auction to be held Thursday G o i n g o n c e , going twice,... sold to t h e s t u d e n t s t a n d i n g under the third pine tree on t h e left! Such will be t h e voice of Chaplain William Hillegonds, a u c t i o n e e r at t h e third a n n u a l F a c u l t y A u c t i o n 5 p.m. T h u r s day in t h e Pine G r o v e .

J o A n n e M o n r o e , R o b i n Pearce, J u d y Pillen, Laurie S c h l a n g e n , Dorie Smith, Ginny Smith, G l e n d a Ten Clay and Sue Witka.

s h o p s i t u a t i o n designed to e x p l o r e p r o b l e m s in period style in t h e p e r f o r m a n c e of E l i z a b e t h a n and restoration drama. Miss Gick has been t h e leading actress in a n u m b e r of E n g l a n d ' s r e p e r t o r y c o m p a n i e s , has w r i t t e n and d i r e c t e d for t h e stage and f o r television a n d has t a u g h t English. Since 1954 she has d e v o t e d her t i m e primarily to t e a c h i n g a c t i n g at t h e R o y a l A c a d e m y of Dramatic Art, w h e r e she is a d i r e c t o r t u t o r , t a k i n g t i m e o u t occasionally t o play leading roles in p r o d u c t i o n s at t h e A r t s T h e a t r e , Cambridge.

were judged o n coverage and cont e n t , writing a n d editing, editorial leadership, physical a p p e a r a n c e and p h o t o g r a p h y . Marks of Dist i n c t i o n for super i or a c h i e v e m e n t may be a w a r d e d in each of t h e five categories. T h e H o p e College anchor received Mark of Distinction credit for superior a c c o m p l i s h m e n t in writing and e d i t i n g . Ratings of First Class (excellent), S e c o n d Class (very g o o d ) and Third Class ( g o o d ) are given on t h e basis of t o t a l numerical scores achieved in t h e five classifications. " C o v e r i n g t h e college c a m p u s and relating t o n a t i o n a l e v e n t s o f f e r s an increasing challenge t o the n e w s p a p e r staff w o r k i n g with limited time a n d f u n d s , " O t t o W. Q u a l e , ACP e x e c u t i v e d i r e c t o r s t a t e d . l l A n over-all s t u d y indicates they are doing an o u t s t a n d ing j o b fully aware of b o t h t h e o p p o r t u n i t i e s and o b l i g a t i o n s of a free and responsible p r e s s . "

Senior artist's drawing accepted by art puhlication A charcoal d r a w i n g by H o p e College senior R a l p h S c h r o e d e r has been a c c e p t e d f o r e x h i b i t i o n in New Y o r k by t h e American Artist magazine. T h e d r a w i n g . Grey Lady II, was one of 61 selected f r o m nearly 3 5 0 e n t r i e s in c o m p e t i tion for s t u d e n t s of art at colleges and universities t h r o u g h o u t the United S t a t e s and C a n a d a . M e m b e r s of t h e jury w h i c h selected t h e w o r k s include A. H y a t t Mayor, f o r m e r l y c u r a t o r of prints and d r a w i n g s at t h e Metropolitan M u s e u m of A r t , Henry C. P i t z , a u t h o r of several b o o k s and i l l u s t r a t i o n s , and N o r man K e n t , e d i t o r of t h e American Artist. S c h r o e d e r has b e e n a c c e p t e d by t h e University of N e b r a s k a to complete work toward a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and c o n t i n u e t o a Master of F i n e Arts degree in graphics.

International Night tonight The Hope College International R e l a t i o n s C l u b will present an I n t e r n a t i o n a l Night tonight at 8 : 1 5 in Phelps D i n i n g Hall. T h e p r o g r a m will begin w i t h the p a r a d e of n a t i o n s , f e a t u r i n g m e m b e r s of t h e c l u b m o d e l i n g various i n t e r n a t i o n a l dress. Displays will e n l i g h t e n t h e various aspects of i n t e r n a t i o n a l flavor. R e f r e s h m e n t s will also be provided. Master of ceremonies this year will be s o p h o m o r e Phil Bos, vice-president of the I R C . Additional special p r es en tations include a Turkish candle d a n c e d u e t by B o n n i e Ev er ts and Gordon Renker, Korean songs by B e n n y Van Lierop and his sister E l e a n o r , classical and village I n d i a n d a n c e s by K a t h y Work a n d o t h e r s , and many others. T h e evening's e n t e r t a i n m e n t is o p e n t o t h e p u b l i c and t h e r e is n o a d m i s s i o n charge.

FOR THE MANY OCCASIONS THAT JUST DON'T SEEM RIGHT

T H E P A I N T E R A N D T H E P A I N T E D - A r t i s t Delbert Michel sits b e f o r e o n e of his acrylic paintings w h i c h are n o w o n exhibit in Van Z o e r e n L i br ar y.

Artist Delbert Michel has exhibition in Van Zoeren A o n e - m a n show of paintings and drawings by Delbert Michel, assistant p r o f e s s o r of art, is o n e x h i b i t in Van Z o e r e n Library gallery until April 30. The w o r k s consist primarily of large acrylic paintings dealing with people-either f r i e n d s of the artist or personality t y p e s , q u i t e o f t e n s h o w n in satire. Michel c a m e to Hope in 1964 after completing his Master of Fine A r t s degree at the S c h o o l of A r t , University of Iowa. During the t i m e he has been at Hope he has had his work exhibited in numerous national exhibitions, has had

seven o n e - m a n shows and is represented in many p e r m a n e n t collections, a m o n g t h e m Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio; Grand R a p i d s Art M u s e u m ; C e d a r Crest College, A l l e n t o w n , Pa., and DePauw University. Michel has been g r a n t e d a sabbatical leave by H o p e College for t h e first s e m e s t e r of the 1970-71 school year, during which t i m e he will be residing in L o n d o n , England, f o r the p u r p o s e of research and creative work on satirical imagery in British art.

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Page 8

April 17, 1 9 7 0

H o p e College a n c h o r

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drove in a n o t h e r run with a line single. T h e split gave C o a c h Siedent o p ' s club a 4-7 record for the season. After a d o u b l e h e a d e r at Spring Arbor Saturday, the D u t c h m e n return to Van Raalte Field for twin bills with Ferris State and Grand Valley on Wednesday and T h u r s d a y .

Junior r i g h t h a n d e r Dick Nordstrom scattered seven hits and collected two safeties en route to the victory in game t w o . H o p e , trailing by two a f t e r o n e inning, t o o k the lead for g o o d with a three-run third, then a d d e d single runs in the f o u r t h , f i f t h , and sixth.

T h e Hope team record stands at f o u r wins and seven losses as the D u t c h m e n r e t u r n f r o m their spring tour. T h e sluggers lost three to David L i p s c o m b College. T h e first game was a s h u t o u t , 8-0. T h e Dutch were unsuccessful in their revenge game, posting a 2-1 loss. The final game provided no satisfaction f o r Hope, with a 10-0 loss.

Despite w h i f f i n g eight T o m m i e h i t t e r s in five innings, j u n i o r righth a n d e r Lon Hriksgave up five hits and allowed five walks, getting charged with the loss in the first game.

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Dutch score win over Aquinas Hope College's baseball team travelled to G r a n d R a p i d s Tuesday a f t e r n o o n and split a doubleheader with the T o m m i e s of A q u i n a s College. T h e Dutch rallied to win the nightcap, 6-2, a f t e r d r o p p i n g the o p e n e r , 4-2.

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T H E D U T C H faired better in a set of t h r e e games with Georgia South Western, winning one match 8-3 and the second 8-5. But Georgia pulled ahead in the third game to t a k e Hope, 4-3.

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In o t h e r tour action Hope lost to West Georgia, 4-2. T h e D u t c h m e n split a pair with Berry College, Berry taking the first game 1-0 and Hope returning f o r a 4-3 victory. T e a m s t a n d o u t s include Bob C o o p e r , with a . 5 0 0 average. Dick N o r d s t r o m b a t t e d for a .375 average. N o r d s t r o m leads pitching records with two wins and t w o losses. Don R e m o is credited with one loss and one win, while Lon Friks carries f o u r losses and no wins.

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Sophomore o u t f i e l d e r Bob C o o p e r c o n t i n u e d his impressive hitting, rapping out six hits in eight trips to the plate during T u e s d a y ' s action. Cooper acc o u n t e d for b o t h D u t c h runs in the first game. In the o p e n i n g inning, he singled, stole second and scored on an error. In the next f r a m e , the New Jersey native

third twicc at Wabash T h e Flying D u t c h m e n concluded their i n d o o r track m e e t s at Wabash University in Indiana S a t u r d a y . T h e meet consisted of several d i f f e r e n t relays in both r u n n i n g and field events. The Dutch c a p t u r e d two firsts and a pair of third place finishes as they c o m p e t e d against 1 1 other teams. Hope placed first in the 440-yard relay with a time of 44.1. T h e D u t c h m e n . a l s o won the sprint medley with a clocking of 3 : 4 1 . 6 . A third place was picked up in the 880-yard relay with a time of 1:32.9. A 3 : 2 6 . 6 clocking was good for a third place in the mile relay. Sophomore Cliff Haverdink t u r n e d in the best p e r f o r m a n c e for Dutch r u n n e r s with a time of 49.8 f o r 440 in the mile relay. Hope will begin Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association dual meet c o m p e t i t i o n this Saturday when they host the Kalamazoo College Hornets. The meet will start at 2 p.m. at Van Raalte Field.

May 1 deadline set for financial aid applieation The deadline for the P a r e n t ' s C o n f i d e n t i a l S t a t e m e n t for the 1970-71 academic year is May 1. S t u d e n t s must s u b m i t t h e PCS by the deadline t o be considered for any financial aid. According to Paul Kleinheksel, Director of Financial Aid, Hope has over SI million w o r t h of aid to give its s t u d e n t s in addition to c a m p u s jobs. College financial aid is d e t e r m i n e d by the individual student's family i n c o m e and assets. T h e College seeks to give the most m o n e y to the best s t u d e n t s with the greatest need.

Free marionette tickets available to students Free admission t i c k e t s to t w o p e r f o r m a n c e s of the Peter A r n o t t Classical Marionette T h e a t r e are presently available in t h e o f f i c e of C o o r d i n a t o r of S t u d e n t Activities and the t h e a t r e d e p a r t m e n t o f f i c e . A p e r f o r m a n c e of Euripides' Medea on April 24 will be followed by a S a t u r d a y p e r f o r m a n c e of Marlowe's Dr. faustus. Both p e r f o r m a n c e s will be in Winant's A u d i t o r i u m at 8 p . m .

Because of the p o p u l a r i t y of A r n o t t ' s p e r f o r m a n c e of Oedipus Rex last spring, he has been asked to r e t u r n this year f o r his second engagement at H o p e . Tickets have been available to the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y this week, and n e x t week will be released t o the general public. F a c u l t y and s t u d e n t s are urged t o pick up their tickets soon.

SCHOOL SUPPLY AND GREETING CARD CENTER

C o a c h G o r d o n Brewer said that the H o r n e t s should be strong in the pole vault and p e r h a p s the javelin, but they lack overall balance. F a n s should look for a battle in the pole vault b e t w e e n Ken C a l h o u n of Kazoo and H o p e ' s Bill B e k k e n n g .

• GIFTS • PLAYING CARDS • CHESS • POSTERS COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND WE HA VE SOMETHING

. . .

FOR EVERYONE.

*rHJ: i C

WITH A L I T T L E ENGLISH—Lois Veen Hoven serves as Tina Van Loan plays net in the w o m e n ' s t e n n i s match with Kalamazoo T u e s d a y . Hope lost to Kalamazoo.

by Bob Vanderberg As promised, here are my National league picks for the 1970 squad. S o m e of y o u may think I'm cheating by c o m i n g out with these p r e d i c t i o n s this late, but t h e y were made b e f o r e the April 6 openers. BY T H E WAY, 1 think Cincinnati will beat Pittsburgh in the play-offs, and then will beat O a k l a n d in the World Series in October. Remember, you heard it first... NATIONAL L E A G U E - E A S T 1. P I T T S B U R G H - T h e Pirates' big q u e s t i o n mark is pitching, but 1 have a feeling that Bob Veale, Bob Moose, Steve Blass and Dock Ellis are going to c o m e t h r o u g h big. T h e Pirates stayed close last year in the division race, when t h e y played three rookies r e g u l a r l y - c a t c h e r Many Sanguillen, first b a s e m a n A1 Oliver, and third baseman Richie Hebner. E q u i p p e d now with a year's e x p e r i e n c e , they j o i n the likes of R o b e r t o Clem e n t e , Matty Alou and Willie Stargell. 2. C H I C A G O - T h i s is the last chance f o r this team as presently constituted. Durocher must win or go packing. The trade for J o h n n y Callison should help some. The pitching is s o u n d , starter-wise, with Fergie J e n k i n s , Bill H a n d s and K e n n y H o l t z m a n , but bullpen is a quest i o n - m a r k . Infield of R o n S a n t o , Don Kessinger, Glenn Beckert

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National League outlook

As A n

STATIONERS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN S E R V I N G WESTERN M I C H I G A N SINCE 1900

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and Ernie Banks is still the best in the league. 3. ST. LOUIS—The Cards may have gotten burned on the Phillie trade, although Richie Allen gives the team a needed long-ball threat. T h e loss of third baseman Mike S h a n n o n , who may be out for the season, is b o u n d to hurt. T h e pitching looks good with Bob G i b s o n , Steve Carlton and Nelson Briles heading a staff which could lack relief help. 4. NEW YORK-A second straight p e n n a n t is too m u c h to expect f r o m this punchless club. Look for Tommie Agee to slump badly in '70. T o m Seaver and Jerry K o o s m a n will probably c o n t i n u e to baffle the hitters, but the rest of the staff is on the d o u b t f u l side. 5. P H I L A D E L P H I A - T h e Phillies are the most improved t e a m in the division. Tim McCarver brings a winning a t t i t u d e f r o m St. Louis, and ex-Card Joe Hoerner should greatly aid the bullpen. T h e r e are several good y o u n g players like Larry Hisle, Don M o n e y , Larry Bowa, D e n n y Doyle and Oscar G a m b l e . T h e r e are s o m e good pitchers, t o o Chris Short, Grant Jackson, Woodie F r y m a n and Rick Wise. 6 . M O N T R E A L —The Expos have a few good ones in R u s t y S t a u b , Ron Fairly, Marv Staehle, C o c o Laboy and Mack Jones. But there is little, if a n y , pitching. NATIONAL LEAGUE-WEST 1. C I N C I N N A T I - T h e Reds appear to be the strongest of a not-so-strong lot. T o n y Perez, Lee May, Pete Rose, B o b b y Tolan and J o h n n y Bench can all

pound the ball. A mediocre pitching staff will be helped by the fact t h a t the Reds will be playing in the new Cincinnati S t a d i u m instead of tiny Crosley Field. T h e acquisition of Jim McGlothlin from the Angels should help pitching, along with hard-throwing rookie Wayne Simpson. 2. ATLANTA—The Braves are the same team t h a t won the West last season, b u t t h e y have lost the services for a couple of m o n t h s of injured 18-game-winner R o n Reed. H o y t Wilhelm and Cecil Upshaw head the league's best bullpen. T h e c l u b ' s s h o r t s t o p p r o b l e m remains unsolved. 3 . SAN F R A N C I S C O —The G i a n t s have Willie Mays, Willie McCovey and Bobby Bonds, b u t they still have p r o b l e m s at t h i r d , short and behind the plate. Outside of J u a n Marichal and G a y l o r d Perry, t h e pitching staff is no bargain, either. 4. LOS A N G E L E S — T h e Dodgers just d o n ' t scare y o u , t h a t ' s all. Sure, Willie Davis, Maury Wills, Manny Mota and T e d S i z e m o r e can hit p r e t t y well, but overall the Dodgers are not an o f f e n s i v e t e a m . T h e pitching, overpowering in the K o u f a x - D r y s d a l e era, is good but n o t o u t s t a n d i n g . 5. H O U S T O N — T h e Astros have a great p i t c h e r in Larry Dierker, good bats in J i m m y W y n n , Denis M e n k e , T o m m y Davis, Jesus Alou and D o u g R a d e r , and a lock on f i f t h place. T h e y could move up if rookie firstb a s e m a n J o h n Mayberry c a m e t h r o u g h big. 6. SAN DIEGO—The Padres are at least five years a w a y .

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