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LETS ALL COME —17—18—19—

"SMILIN' THRU"

Volume XXXVII

Hope College, Holland, Michigan, April 17 1929

H M M T E R N I T Y CODNCIL HOLDS FUTST MEETING AND ELECTS OFFICERS Spoiwored^bjrtheApchor

Rhod<.8Scholarship

Langeland Pres, Brouwer V-Preg., Wolthorn Sec'y-Treas.

Election Held Soon

The culmination of the f i r s t project of the ANCHOR came last Monday afternoon a t f o u r o'clock when the f i r s t regular meetir.j?; of the I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y council of Hope College was held at the Knickerhooker Hall. The constitution which appears elsewhere in this edition was formally adopted, and then t h e group proceeded t o the main task of the day, namely the electing of the officers required by this constitution, The results of the balloting were as follows: President Earle E. Langeland Vice-Pres. Henry Wolthorn Sec'y-Treas Henry Wolthorn These officers will serve until November 15, of this year. The following are the delegates t h a t have been elected f r o m the d i f f e r e n t societies to serve upon this council: Addison: A r t h u r Oudemool Henry Wolthorn Cosmopolitan Stanley Ver Hey Herman Kruizenga Dickensian Wm. Hakken Coert Rylaarsdam Emersonian Earle E. Langland Elwin Vandenbelt Fraternal J . N. W. De Pree Alvin Cook Knickerbocker Donald Wade Paul Brouwer o

election of Rhodes Scholars will be held on December '» -students of this College or ^ ' n ' v c r s i t y must file their applica^ o n ® with the Secretary of the State Committee of Selection be' o r e October 19, according to a recen ^ announcement from F r a n k Aydelotte, American Secretary to Rhodes Trustees and President of Swarthmore College, A Rhodes Scholarship, the most coveted of all under - g r a d u a t e awards, entitles the holder to two years of study at Oxford Univerwty, with an annual stipend of (about $2000). If, at the end of the second y e a r the Scholar presents an approved plan f o r an additional year's study, the Rhodes Trustees will then extend his Scholarship to cover a third year, Kho d e s Scholars are elected without examination on the basis of t h e i r records in school a n d college, ami no restriction is placed upon their choice of studies. To be eligible a candidate m u s t be an nnmarried male citizen of the United S t a t e s , between the ages of

Duggan Promises To Make Address In Model League

m

ECTOR O F INBTITL'TE OF E n i T A TION W I L L BE P R I N C I P A L SPEAKER

Talk On Television Pleases Students MR. DICKEY GIVES FINE LECTURE TO LARGE CROWD IN GYM

Movies Shown In Carnegie Gymnasium, Thursday morning, April 11, at 11 o'clock, Mr. Dickey of the Michigan Bell Telephone Company at Grand Rapids delivered a very interesting lecture on Television. There were no fourth-hour classes in order that the entire student body and faculty might attend. Mr. Dickey explained very clearly t n d lucidly the steps necessary to transmit a picture, or a scene by wire or by radio. He even explained the making of the more important p a r t s of the sending and receiving a p p a r a t u s , "built" on the stage, as he said, a photo-electric cell (or "electric eye") a scanning disc, a vacuum tube, and a neon tube. Their uses and positions in the machine were shown, and the entire piocess of Television was made d e a r . The main dilficulty connected with it, said Mr. Dickey, is t h a t of synchronizing in some w a y the sending and receiving sets, f o r unless this is done perfectly, no coherent picture will be received. Although Television was for a time being employed by several regular broadcasting stations, it has been slopped now, except in the short wave channels, since it causes interference with other stations, due to the wide range of frequencies used. Mr. Dickey said t h a t it would probably be many y e a r s before Television is perfected, and t h a t then it would very likely be of a different type t h a n t h a t which he explained. A f t e r his lecture, he showed two motion-pictures, one showing the steps of sending a photograph by telephone, and the other showing how anyone in America may speak by telephone to anyone in England.

F O S T E R WILL ALSO SPEAK

SENIOR FLAK T0NITE, THUR, FRI.

M«r* Than 21 Michigan ('olltcru To H«vf K f p r M t n U t i v M on ( ampui for Leagut Mwl Stephan P. Dutotan, director of the Institution of International Education ulnce 1919, will be one of the principal speaker* on the proirram of the model assembly of the League of N a t i o n s to bo held here April 19 and 20 by the Student Christian aMociation. Sir Geortfe Foster, premier of the province of Ontario, Canada, will also be a lecturer a t one of the meetinff*, ahas been announced previously. Mr. Ihiwran, who Is a graduate of Columbia university and who received hi% master's decree from Rollins college, is widely known as un author and educator. He was the lecturer on international relations a t Columbia for two years and has been secretary of the American University Union In Europe since 19'.'6. Mr. Dutontn has been closely connected with education in the Philippines, Constantinople, and Athens, Greece, and was director of the Council on Forefen Relations, the ItalyAmerican society, the Huntiary society, and the Netherlands-America foundation. He is the author of "The Eastern Question—A Study In Diplomacy," " T h e League of NaUons," and "A History of Education." M i a i a t e n To Be H t r e Foreign ministers of 55 countries from more than 20 MichiRan college campuses will be in Ann Arbor for the model assembly of the League to discuss many of t h e ImporUnt question* which a r e at pres. e n t vexing the world. The admission of Ruasia (a question which is purely hypothetical in that it has never come u p for discussion before the League) t h e Mandates system of governing small countries, and the problem of Disarmament will be the m a j o r topics for controversey a t this assembly. This meeting is t h e second ot its kind to be held in Michigan, the first being held a t L a n s i n g last year. Colleges all over the country a r e awakening to t h e Importance of the international problems which a r e clamoring for settlement, and a r e attempting to present t h e * problems in the most enjoyable as well as the most penetratinw

CECIL RHODES nineteen and twenty-five, and must have completed at least his Sophomore year in college before the time he goes to Oxford. He must then be one of the men chosen to represent this institution in t h e competition. Scholars selected on December 7, 1020, will go to Oxford in October 1030. The qualities which will be considered in making the selection are literary and scholastic ability and attainments, qualities of manhood, truth, courage, and moral force of character, and physical vigor as shown in outdoor sports or other ways. Exceptional athletic prowess is not essential to election. These Scholarships were created by the will of Cecil Rhodes, the famous South African statesman and capitalist, who died in 1002. Their purpose is expressed in the t e r m s of his will: 4 i also desire to encourage and foster an appreciation of t h e a d v a n t a g e s which I implicitlyJMicve will result from the union of the English-speaking peoples throughout t h e world, and to encourage in the students f r o m the United S t a t e s . . . an a t t a c h ment to t h e country from which they have sprung, without I hope withdrawing them or their sympathies f r o m the land of their adoption or birth."

manner.v • A s t m U i e s HcM Elsewhere Such an assembly was recenUy held at Vaaaar college in which about 20 colleges and universities from Naw York. New Jergey, and Pennsylvania together with disnguished speakers from New York City. Washington participated. New England colleges will assemble at Mi. Holyoke in April for the second conference for thi. region, while in Umisiana, Chicago, and California simUar it*stings are to be held.

F u r t h e r information and application blanks may be obtained f r o m Dr. Nykerk or f r o m President F r a n k Aydelotte, American Secretary, at Swarthmore. Pa. Full information about study and life in Oxford is supplied especially f o r American students in Oxford of Today, published under the direc0 tion of the Association of AmeriI t is impossible f o r anyone to can Rhodes Scholars, by the Oxhave t h e desire to do a t h i n g with- ford University Press, 114 F i f t h out h a v i n g sufficient ability inher- Avenue, New York City. ent within himself to make the att a i n m e n t of t h a t t h i n g possible. —Ross. No good work is ever lost.

JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET SOON

Tonight you will have your first opportunity to see "Smilin* T h r u , " a romantic comedy in three acts, written by Allan Langdon M a r t i n , end presented by the Senior Class of Hope College. T h e proverb says that opportunity knocks but once. This being a very new and modern age, however, and the class cf '20 exceedingly progressive, the proverb is going to be done two better. In fact, opportunity is going to knock three times. But woe be unto him who fails to heed the call! Sorrow and mourning will be his who a f t e r F r i d a y evening is unable to say that he has seen one of the best Varsity plays ever p u t on at Hope College. Regardless of when you see the play, there is a real treat in store for you. Again, regardless of the fine cast which is doing its best to put on a production which will rective your cordial approbation, the stage setting, lighting effects and music a r e well worth the fifty or seventy-five cents which you will pay for a ticket. Imagine how much the quaint background of an old English house and garden will add to the beauty of a n y stage. Then the intricate lighting effects enhance the already a t t r a c t i v e scene. Two hundred fifty-seven lights will be used, giving thirty-five different effects on the stage. Carnegie Hal! doesn't see such elaborate s t a g e settings every day. The whole set Is being arranged by the Century Art Studios of Grand Rapids. F u r thermore, mid-Victorian costumes ore used in one act where c h a r m is indeed picturesque. J u s t a word, too, about the music. — Besides the regular orchestra which will play before each act, t h e r e will be s o f t music of violin and piano backstage at various times. Of course you know the title song which has long been a favorite with many. You will enjoy it all the more now when it accompanies such an a p p r o p r i a t e play. So "Smilin' T h r u " is waiting f o r

Student Volunteer Band Professor and Mrs. Hager e n t e r tained the officers of the Student Volunteer Band at a b r e a k f a s t last Saturday morning in honor of Mrs. Induk Kim, who, as a guest of t h e College, had done so much to ren waken the missionary spirit among the students. A f t e r a delightful b r e a k f a s t they accompanied Mrs. Kim to the 7:43 train. The Volunteers are very g r a t e f u l to Mr. and Mrs. H a g e r for t h e i r interest in missions on the campus, end are very sorry to know t h a t they shall have to be without help and guidance next year.

Student Volunteer Secretary at Hope

Number 84-11

WESTERN STATE NORMAL CALMS HOPE DIAMOND ARTISTS FOR FIRST LOSS C. Bremer Receives Appointments to Ohio Ohio S t a t e University has recently notified another Hope senior t h a t his application f o r post graduate work in chemistry has been accepted and that he has been granted an assistantship. This year Clarence Bremer is the Hopeite who is honored. Mr. Bremer lias been a most industrious student during his college days and high school career at Holland High school. He has always been admired by his classmates and all are overjoyed at his success. Bremer is, however, but one of the many men sent t o Ohio S t a t e from Hope. During the ten y e a r s preceding 1023, nine men were sent to Ohio on chemistry assistantships. Since that time Dr. Van Zyl has been head of our chemistry dep a r t m e n t and in that time six men have gone to Ohio. All of these men have made very enviable records. Dykstra, the first of this group, now is connected with the Dow Chemical Company, at Midland. Bussies, Shoemaker and Schurman a r e still pursuing their post g r a d u a t e work now, and Bussies expects to receive his Ph. D. degree this year. Van der Ploeg is now teaching at Ottawa Hills High school at Grand Rapids. Then, last, we have Bremer, who will study oiganic chemistry n e x t year. Of all the scholarships given by the school it is certain t h a t the science department h a s been responsible f o r the most, perhaps as high a s ninety percent. This is an enviable record for a n y one department of a school and is a direct compliment to Dr. Van Zyl and P r o f e s s o r s Lampen, Kleis and Thompson. The growing importance of the department must be recognized, when one considers the records. —o-

Last Friday Hope's campus was visited by Mrs. Induk Kim, a n a tive of Korea, and traveling secretary of the National Student Volunteer Movement. Mrs. Kim appeared at chapel, dressed in h e r native costume, where she spoke Iriefly about her experiences as a Christian in Korea. During the morning she hatl several conferences with the students. At half past three in the afternoon she spoke to a group of seminary and college men. Dr. A. Pieters, who presided at the meeting said, "I can add nothing to t h a t applause," when she had finished speaking. Mrs, Kim also spoke a t the Student Volunteer Meeting a t five o'clock where she emphasized the possibilities of missions in the world. "When a certain Mission Board can not send out all its available candidates," said Mrs. Kim, "Why not exchange with some other Board that has money but no candidates? We a r e all working f o r the same Christ and t h e welfare of the people." During the evening she visited the Dorian society where she spoke on " M y Impressions of t h e American College Woman." She said t h a t there are three types of women in the American colleges and universities. The cigarette .smoking, flippant type; the u l t r a conservative; and the sensible, thinking woman. Mrs. Kim captivated the h e a r t s of the students with her keen sense of humor and complete consecration to the Master. May she visit our campus again, before she re- Prof. Hooker Has Criticism of t u r n s to h e r native land, to inCabell Published inspire us with a g r e a t e r love f o r our fellow men. During the past few weeks, Hope College has been honored in a rather unique fashion. Professor Hooker, one of our own Faculty members, has had the distinction of seeing one of his works, an essay— "Something about Cabell" pubHope college will be the scene lished in the Sewanee Review, a of a high school district oratorical Quarterly of very high standing and declamatory contest when t h e which publishes essays both literwinners of 12 sub-district competi- ary and scholarly. And, w h a t is tions come here for the final con- more, this article was judged the tests on F r i d a y evening May 3rd. most outstanding of the entire isAmong t h e contestants will be sue. Mr. Hooker has m a d e a very Miss Alice K a t t e , sister of Hopeite Marion Katte, who won the sub- complete study of t h e works of district declamatory contest in Zee- J a m e s Branch Cabell and has not land last F r i d a y evening, while been satisfied with the criticisms Miss Eunice Godfrey of Saugutuck hurled a t the foremost American won the oratorical competition. The novelist of today. Since 1020, judges for t h i s contest were Pro- when Cabell published J u r g e n , confessors Hinkamp, Lubbers and Ray- troversy regarding his works has mond, all of the Hope college f a c - been most evident. In "Something ulty. about Cabell," Professor Hooker The difference between the dec- points out the fact t h a t critics have lamation contests and the oratory gone to either one extreme or the contests lies in the f a c t that the other in estimating his works, and declamations are memorized selec- that there was a dire need f o r a tions from a n o t h e r ' s writings while criticism which would be conservathe orations are original composi- tive and present the real Cabell to the public. tions of the orators. The title of the article was very It is quite a recognition for Hope to be chosen by the Michigan High cleverly chosen, it being a play on School Oratorical Association f o r the title of Cabell's latest romance the place in which to hold the con- —Something about Eve. Among test, since it is usually a state J a m e s Branch Cabell's best known school that is so honored. Because a works a r e ; Jurgen, The Soul of large group of Hopeites a r e expect- Melicent, F i g u r e s of Earth, and ed to attend to welcome the vis- Something about Eve. Hope College feels very proud itors, it has been suggested that that this distinct honor has come the literary societies go in a body to one of its instructors and are to the meeting, which will be held sure t h a t Mr. Hooker's literary at 8 o'clock. ability will bring him honor in the future. you tonight. If you w a n t to live to a ripe and h a p p y old age, f r e e f r o m "If ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to all regrets, come and give the Se- be wise." nior Class your support. — Wednesday, Thursday, and F r i d a y — 8 Wisdom is a simple m a t t e r of not P.M., in the gym. being the same damphool twice.

Hope Professor Has Writings In Sewanee Review

Hope To Entertain High School Orators

I

SCORE

11-0

Van Lente, Poppink, Van Oss, and Steffens Twirl The Hope college baseball team showed that they had practiced only a few nights previous to the opening game, as they returned from Kalamazoo Saturday evening with a bat sack filled with goose eggs having been blanked by the Western Teachers college nine by a 11 -0 score. The g a m e had many good f e a t u r e s for the Hopeites despite the walloping as it brought t ) light many weaknesses and points of strength, so that Coach Schouten will be able to iron out some of the defects. Fielding was very po >r for our diamond artists, seven errors being chalked up •»gainst ' h e ball chasers. The winning Teachers team pounded out nine hits to five for the Hope team, the errors therefore making the wide dfiference in score. Cox Van Lente started on the mound for Hope and held the opposition scorless in the f i r s t canto. On a combination of hits and costly errors three Kazoo men crossed the plate in the second inning, and during the following inning's activities three more players bearing the Kazoo insignia trotted over the home pan. Poppink and Van Oss were used for two innings apiece and showed up very well in the box considering the experience they have had. Four pitchers were paraded into the game as pitchers and held the batting attack of the Schoutenmen to five measly singles. H a r r y Ver S t r a t e and Wally Hyink each got two singles in f o u r trips to the plate. Mackay secured the best average of the afternoon, getting two hits, two walks, and a strike out in five attempts. The Hope students have no reason to feel sorry f o r the baseball team, thinking t h a t a disastrous season will be the result. The weather conditions were very poor on Saturday and the baseball played showed the effects of it. Next Saturday the Hope team will encounter their f i r s t M. I. A. A. g a m e by playing the Albion club at Albion. A much improved baseball team will face the Methodists and they will be given a battle as only a Hope team can fight them. . The f i r s t home game will be played on April 27, the Hilsdale team meeting the Hopeites in a doubleheader. A large crowd should come out to see the big a f t e r noon of baseball. Score by innings: Hope 000 000 000 0 5 7 W. S. T. C. 033 102 02x 11 9 2 Batteries: Van Lente, Poppink, Van Oss and S t e f f e n s ; P r a y , Ellington, Swafort, Kimball and Johnson.

Society Heads Get Together To Set Banquet Dates A change in the method of a r r a n g i n g spring banquet d a t e s of the Literary Societies was made this year, under the sponsorship of the President of the Student Council, Mr. Chas. Rozema. Instead of beseiging Dr. Dimnent for several months in advance, the various society presidents met, and were given the available dates. They then indicated their p r e f e r ences, and dates were a r r a n g e d which were mutually satisfactory. The schedule follows: May 24 Alethian May 25 Knickerbocker May 30 Dorian | May 31 Dickensian June 1 Sybilline ' J u n e 3 Sorosis j J u n e 5 Cosmopolitan J u n e 6 Delphi ^ J u n e 15 Emersonian Fraternal (undetermined) * The S t u d e n t Council deserves much credit for introducing this forward step.


Page two

THE

ANChOft If you should see a Co-ed w e a r i n g a little gold " H , " d o n ' t c l a s s i f y , h e r a s a Senior athlete. She received t h e token f o r e x t r a - c u r r i c u l a r a c t i v i t y o t h e r t h a n athletics, a a a

THE ANCHOR T H E ANCHOR S T A F F gnHtof

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Campus N e w t

Evelyn Steketee

Miss B a r k e m a : "How did you like P a r i s ? " S t u d e : "Aw, they speak too much Donald Martin F r e n c h there."

— M y r o n L e e n h o u t i , William Kujrper .Bernadln® Slebera

Humor Alumni Rxekanvt*

Paul

Head Reporter^

Brouwer

*

Marlon Alday, Adella Beeuwken, Nicholaa BurKKraaff. Anne Buth, William Harold Hoover. Cktuch, Harold Hoover, Tlllie Mawellnk, Eather Mulder, J o h n Mulder, A r t h u r R o b e r t Notier, Cynthia NienKuU, Ro1»crt C y n t h i a P a l m e r , Lillian Sabo, H a r r y Ver Strate, E d i t h Drescher, I v a n J o h n s o n , Rudolph N l c h o l i , H o w a r d Schade..

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Then t h e r e ' s t h e one about the Scotchman who, a f t e r being asked to b r i n g a present to a golden wedding, brought a goldfish.

Schneider

• * * BUSINESS STAFF Bualnenii M a n a R t r AaiUtant«..^..„— Circulation M a n a g e r . — AitsistanL...............

... Raymond .LOUIB D a m t t r a , Lola , Harry C. V a n

— —

McGllvra De Wolfe K. Smith Leeuwen

Many of us, as someone has said, are like wagons without springs that jar as they pass over the tiniest pebble. Every little occurence aflfects us pleasantly or unpleasantly, to such a degree that trifles may change a happy mood to one of deepest gloom. Another writer has said, "Little things are like little sticks. Taken alone they can not hurt us, but bound together they may crush or break us." The problem then seems to be to keep the little sticks from getting together—and we can. If we keep storing up and cherishing all our petty grievances and troubles, not only the mood of the time will be changed, but the mood, as we learn in psychology, will change into temperament, and temperament into disposition, and the first thing we know we are hopelessly in a rut—habitually morose and mentally down-trodden. Too bad, isn't it? Espedaily when it's nobody's fault but our own. Remember that Cassius said to Brutus: 44

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars

But in ourselves, that we are underlings."

CONSTITUTION OF THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL —o ARTICLE I T h e name of t h i s organization shall be: T h e I N T E R F R A T E R N I T Y COUNCIL. A R T I C L E II Section 1.

T h e purpose of the I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Council shall

he: The promotion of fellowship and co-operation between

the societies. The s u p p o r t of the Student Council, and all other s t u d e n t activities t h a t may reasonably expect the support. Section 2. T h e Council shall not have a n y t h i n g to do with the f o r m u l a t i o n or discussion of a n y rules, regulations, or a n y action w i t h r e g a r d to methods of t a k i n g new men into the societies, except by special a m e n d m e n t to this constitution. 2.

A R T I C L E III. Section 1. T h e m e m b e r s h i p of the I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Council shall consist of t w o delegates f r o m each society. Section 2. Of the two delegates f r o m a n y one society, the one shall be designated a s the Senior d e l e g a t e ; and the o t h e r a s the J u n i o r delegate. A t the beginning of each new t e r m each society shall elect, or otherwise choose, one m a n to become their J u n i o r delegate, while the a c t i n g J u n i o r delegate shall become the Senior delegate. A R T I C L E IV. Section 1. T h e officers shall consist of a P r e s i d e n t , a ViceP r e s i d e n t , and a S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r , chosen f r o m the whole group by ballot. Section 2. No two men f r o m any one society shall hold office a t the s a me time. ARTICLE V Section 1. The P r e s i d e n t shall preside a t all m e e t i n g s . when possible. Section 2. T h e Vice-President shall preside when t h e President is absent. Section .3. T h e S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r will keep the records of the Council, a n d take care of the finances. Section 4. T h e r e shall be two t e r m s of office in each school year. T h e one extending f r o m April 1, to November 15; t h e o t h e r f r o m November 15 to April 1. Section 5. T h e officers f o r a new t e r m shall be chosen f r o m a m o n g the J u n i o r delegates, b e f o r e the new d e l e g a t e s a r e installed. A R T I C L E VI

W e a t h e r f o r e c a s t : F a i r tonight and Thursday. Not much change in temperance. •

Everette:

Section 1. All voting shall be done by the roll call. Section 2. E a c h society shall have one vote, cast by the Senior delegate. Section 3. E i t h e r the Senior or the J u n i o r delegate f r o m any society m a y a s k f o r a stay of voting on any m e a s u r e f o r which h e does not wish t o a s s u m e responsibility, f o r a m i n i m u m period of f o r t y - e i g h t hours, d u r i n g which t i m e he m a y c o n f e r with h i s society upon the m a t t e r , and sense t h e i r wishes. Section 4. A unanimous vote is required to pass a n y measure. A R T I C L E VII VOTING ON O F F I C E R S

Section cluding the Section Section

1. Each individual d e l e g a t e shall have one vote, inPresident. 2. A m a j o r i t y J s required to elect any man to office. 3. V o t i n g shall be done by ballot. ARTICLE VIII

Levies f o r such p r o j e c t s a s m a y require financing shall be m a d e upon the societies upon a m e m b e r s h i p r a t i o basis. A R T I C L E IX Section 1. Meetings shall be each m o n t h a t call of President. Section 2. Meetings may be the d e l e g a t e s f r o m any one society Section 3. T h e m e e t i n g place

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"Dick" the Shoe Doctor

We imagine t h a t the f o u r mile course m a y lose some of its popularity now t h a t t h e t e n n i s season h a s begun. T h e only trouble is to find some tennis courts. "a a a A f t e r t h e lecture on Television, Telephoto and T r a n s - A t l a n t i c Telephone we i m a g i n e t h a t some of u s had b e t t e r s t a r t s a v i n g r i g h t now if we ever w a n t to talk to London, a a aQ u a r t e t s seem to be quite in vogue on the c a m p u s . T h e r e is u F r a t e r Q u a r t e t , a Cosmos Q u a r t e t , * and an E m e r s o n i a n Q u a r t e t who s a n g a t t h e m a s s meeting. Oh, t h e r e is no question a b o u t it. It t a k e s a m a s s m e e t i n g to b r i n g out talent. a a a T h e r e c e r t a i n l y a r e some fine actors in the Senior Class, a r e n ' t t h e r e ? W e hope they've learned to be c a r e f u l with t h a t gun.

Electric Shoe Hospital D. Schaftenatr, Prop. Phone 5 3 2 6

I Nary

Hello everybody! How are you? We hope you all enjoyed S p r i n g Vacation and house cleaning. W e suppose you can rest now till Summ e r Vacation because all your t e r m p a p e r s a r e finished. B e t t e r be careful with those b u r e a u d r a w e r s o r your rest will have to be disturbed by a n o t h e r cleaning.

Lee Candies

Arnold's | Confectionery Join Dyktnu Joseph Btrpui PImm 5442

Model Laundry "The Soft Water Laundry" Wet Wash, Rough Dry Finished Work i

Holland,

Mickifu

Were sure to have what you want in the line of Sporting Goods

Where All Sportsmen Meet.

" I n t h a t case I would advise you to sleep in a n o t h e r r o o m . " Ma wasn't s u p e r s t i t i o u s : "Daddy, do you remember where you first met m u m m y ? " "Yes, d e a r , it w a s a t a dinner p a r t y and there were t h i r t e e n a t the table." »

»

Drowning m a n : "Uh-blub-elp-lubublubs." Drowsy b y s t a n d e r : "You said a mouthful, brother. • • • Notier: " W h e r e you f r o m ? " V. D. N a a l d : "Chicago." N o t i e r : " L e t ' s see your bullet wounds." •

#

" I will not use tobacco," Said little Robert Reed, My m o t h e r and my s i s t e r s now Monopolize the weed." •

J a y K.: " I shall n e v e r m a r r y , until I have f o u n d my direct opposite." D i p : " T h e r e a r e m a n y intelligent g i r l s on the c a m p u s . " •. •

P r o f : " A n d did I m a k e myself plain?" F r o s h : "No, God did t h a t . " • • • The absent-minded professor took off his wife and kissed his sock. " S a y , J o h n n y , a man was j u s t arrested." "What f o r ? " " F o r chasing a cow f o r a milk shake."

Conquering the Cascades NOW falls every month in the year

S' where the Great Northern crosses the

record impossible without electric power. And electrification has been extended

Cascades. Steep, tortuous grades increase

to the entire 75-mile route through the mountains.

the difficulty of the railroading problem. Nature has stubbornly resisted man's

Have you noticed the aisle in t h e new c h a p e l ? I t ' s j u s t the t h i n g f o r t h e s w e e t h e a r t s on p a r a d e to t h e a l t a r d u r i n g synod. a a a W h a t would h a p p e n if — 1. Dr. NykerK entered t h e blindfolded t e s t ?

called a t a n y time provided a g r e e t h a t such is necessary. shall be optional.

3. There Hope?

were

no

Fords

I in January 1929, the new Cascade tunnel was opened. Man, with electricity as an ally, had conquered the Cascades. ' The eight-mile bore was driven in three years—a

at

4. Michigan w e a t h e r could be f o r e c a s t accurately one h o u r ahead of t i m e ? ».

effort to conquer the range.

GENERAL

The Dorm really g o t on fire ? 3 ITN B R A L -ot—

Civilization is simply a n education in faith.—Slosson.

B L B C T R 1 C

C O M P A N Y

J

are always deliciously - fresh

First Tune On New Chimes Will B e - ? W h a t do you think will be t h e first h y m n played on our b e a u t i f u l chimes in the new c h a p e l ? When seeking i n f o r m a t i o n one . m u s t go directly to those w h o . know. So I did! F i r s t , I sought out . our f u t u r e o r g a n i s t and quietly p u t the question t o him. He immediately said he didn't know and didn't think any one else could tell, since it w a s so uncertain. Then I w e n t to a n o t h e r reliable source and w a s told t h a t he t h o u g h t t h e hymn " N e a r e r My God To T h e e " would be t h e first. Upon a s k i n g him t h e r e a s o n s f o r his opinion he . said first because of the crosses on t h e tower symbolizing e v e r y t h i n g in the h y m n , and because t h e college itself, being a C h r i s t i a n college, brought one closer to J e s u s . S e e k i n g also t h e opinions of t h e s t u d e n t body, I asked one young lady. She said she t h o u g h t it would be " M y F a i t h Looks U p to T h e e , " t* cause it w a s such a b e a u t i f u l hymn. Upon a s k i n g a senior, he quickly and g r a t e f u l l y replied. " P r a i s e God F r o m Whom All Blessi n g s Flow," his reason being t h a t his long lost wish was a t last being fulfilled; n a m e l y t h a t of a new chapel. W h a t do you t h i n k ? o We have a t e r r o r of isolation because of our insecure g r e g a r i o u s ness. W e t r y to catch every epidemic of e r r o r f o r f e a r of singul a r i t y . — E . H. G. Wells.

13 E. 8th St.

W« Call For and Deliver

CAMPUS

* $ * " H a s a n y t h i n g s t a r t l i n g happened at the country club l a t e l y ? " Some people were busier t h a n "Yes, a couple of men f r o m the o t h e r s d u r i n g vacation. A t least c o u n t r y asked to join." they h a v e more to show f o r t h e i r N e g r o caller a t H o s p i t a l : "I came activity. How m a n y of you can to see how m a h f r e n ' J o e Brown sport an Emersonian o r a Sibylline was getting along." pin like M a r j o r i e Du Mez and S t a n N u r s e : " W h y , he's g e t t i n g along Van I ^ r e ? fine; he's convalescing now." * * a N e g r o : "Well, I'll sit down and Dutch Poppink and M a r g a r e t wait till he's t h r o u g h . " R u d d have also each lost a n d « « * gained something. Oh yes — " i n Mrs. F a r m e r (who keeps sum- the S p r i n g a young m a n ' s f a n c y . " a a a m e r b o a r d e r s ) : " W e h a v e a speake a s y in the woodshed a n d a night Dr. Nykerk h a s lost and gained club in the barn, and t h e hired girl s o m e t h i n g too. He lost h i s old F o r d t a k e s a bath in t h e d i n i n g room with t h e rumble-seat. His gain is twice a week. W e w a n t our New n new F o r d without a n i m b l e r , a a a York g u e s t s to feel a t home." In case you didn't realize it, we P a t r o n : " D o you serve, lobsters j u s t w a n t to remind you t h a t t h e r e was a mass m e e t i n g last T h u r s d a y . here?" T he group singing was particularly W a i t e r : " C e r t a i n l y , we cater to good. No w o n d e r ! See who led it. everyone." W e t a k e f o r g r a n t e d t h a t a course in technique of s i n g i n g has been H. F.: "Doctor, can you cure me added to the E d u c a t i o n d e p a r t of s n o r i n g ? I snore so loud t h a t ment. I awaken myself."

2. Bill and Dot would get t h i n g s settled ?

A m e n d m e n t s m u s t first be presented before the Council, a n d passed b y it. T h e y m u s t then be p resen ted to the societies, a n d receive t h e u n a n i m o u s s u p p o r t of th em, b e f o r e going into effect.

You see a b e a u t i f u l girl walking down t h e s t e e t She is, of course, feminine. If she is s i n g u l a r you become nominative. You walk across to her c h a n g i n g t h e verbal and then become dative. If she is not objective, you become plural. You walk home t o g e t h e r . Her m o t h e r is accusative and you become imperative. H e r b r o t h e r is an indefinite article. You walk in and s i t down. You talk of the f u t u r e and she c h a n g e s to the object. You kiss h e r and she becomes masculine. H e r f a t h e r becomes present and you become t h e past participle.

P r o f : " W h a t ' s a dry d o c k ? " S t u d e n t : " A physician who won't fill out subscriptions."

held the third Wednesday of

ARTICLE X

GRAMMAR T A L K

hasn't touched a revolver yet."

*

VOTING ON MEASURES

Betty S.: "Really, goodlooking boys are so scarce t h e s e days, I t h i n k 1 ought to make mine do another year."

MOODS

V

«

— A l i c e Drunson, Donald Wade, Gordon V a n A r k

AAWtiea

1.

II

QwiitT Skte Rtpiraf Tkl't far

The conquests of electricity on the land and on the sea, in the air, and * underground, are making practicable die impossibilities-of yesterday. As our vision encompasses wider horizons, elec-, tricity appears as a vital contribution to future industrial • progress and human welfare.


SSZHBKBB S

t h e

a n c h o r

Page Three

William Hohenzollern By Emll Ludwi^

(h>

Give Hun One of lour Cards,Bob! •Two men in a sedan and a farmer and his boy in a smaller car had stopped on a country road for a short discussion of business in general. The farmer and one of the men from town were old friends. The other was unknown to him. "Give Mr. Hartley one of your cards, Bob," suggested the farmer s friend." You ought to do some business with him before long." Now, if Bob had presented his card to Mr. Hartley, there would be little of interest to us in the transaction. But Boh did not We a card lo gh* him!

/

Whatever your business or profession may be, you can't afford to be without a supply of personal cards. Your business is built by making yourself known favorably to a lot of people. When folks need, or consider, something in your line, you want thrm to think of you. If they have your card the chances are in your favor. There is no better place in this community to get personal cards—for business, social or campaign use—than right at this newspaper office. Our prices will please you just as much as the cards. Let us prove it. Kou need them NOW I

Holland City News 82 W. 8th Street (Second Floor) Bell Telephone 6050

HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

r i e l i e i o u ^

P o o d

—AT T H E -

O r e e i i

M i l l

SUITS

By Henry Wolthorn

Smart styles

See "Smilin' Through" Lawrence Vredevoogd, J a c k Pelon, Everett B kken, and Leon Bosch who.are playing promin e n t R o l e s in " S m i l i n ' T h r o u g h " s a y t h a t g r e a t e s t s a t i s f a c t i o n c a n b e h a d b y t h e c a r e f u l d r e s s e s only w h e n w e a r i n g c l o t h e s t h a t c o m e f r o m " T h e College Store."

John J. Rutgers Co.

PCollars, Sweaters, Handblocked Ties, Costume Jewelry, Belts

SHOPPE

The arrival recently of samples of cotton, cotton seed, cotton boll, and cotton glass, all neatly mounted in a case, as a g i f t to the Museum, evidences the continued interest of Attorney G. H. Albers of San Antonio, Texas. Mr. Albers was graduated from Hope in 1891, and has always shown much kindly interest in his Alma Mater.

Mr. Wynand Wichers, ex-professor of history a t the college, addressed the Y. M. C. A. last Tuesday evening on the subject, "Religion For Men Of Today." Mr. Wichers said t h a t the religion for men of today was the same as the religion for men of yesterday, and that it was the same as the religion for men of tomorrow would be. Three things needed to be emphasized, he said. First, the divinity of the C h r i s t ; second, the authority of the scriptures; and third, the necessity of a spiritual life. The preliminary singing was accompanied by Herman Laug, Christopher Kreunen, and Edward Tollman at the blowers; Harvey Woltman at the piano; and H a r r y Friezema as 'front-singer.' Herman Jansen rendered a very lovely solo, ' i Come-To Thee."

1

J.C.PENNEYC® 6 0 - 6 4 East 8th St.

Holland,

-

As perfume is to the rose so is good nature to the lovely.—McG. The steam t h a t blows the whistle never makes the wheels go round. Civilization is the mastering of nature and the taming of man. Knowledge comes—but wisdom —Hellwald. lingers.

-

Michigan

For the Teeth

For the Girl

Peace . . . quiet . . . stillness. The room is a s still a s a vault except f o r the incessant motion of a broom, vigorously sweeping the floor. A Hope " f r e s h y " is wildly scattering dust here and everywhere, occasionally coughing and sneezing; this is due to the flying particles of germs. Outside of t h a t . . . . silence. Suddenly the door is slammed open and then another and—"The house is on fire!" So shouts one youngster to our frosh. Action follows; our frosh flings the broom from her—makes a mad dash f o r the . . . . trunk (no, not the door); pulls out her valuable formal clothes, upsetting the trunk and turning things topsy turvy; then she runs to the door. Someone runs up to the room with a 5 gallon pail full of water, hands it to our friend and then rushes out again. With her formal in one hand and a milk pail in another our fellow student doesn't know whether to rush to the window and fling herself from the burning edifice or wait for some handsome young man to run to her rescue. A f t e r some considerable thought she dashes in the room with the pail (and formal) then tries to open the window to pour the water on the smoking roof. She succeeds only to find t h a t the screen nailed to the window will not budge; and feebly sprinkles the w a t e r on the roof upsetting more of it in the room than on the former. Then she thinks; perhaps she had better go to another window to see if a ladder is there on which to climb down? J u s t as she is about to s t a r t looking for a hero, someone shouts up again, "The fire's out:" our poor frosh is left to spring clean her room again a f t e r j u s t finishing it before the fire; cleaning of which took 4 hours. And thereby hangs a tale! Hear ye, fellow students: if one seeks excitement during spring vacation t r y . . . . Housecleaning!!!!

Ten fifteen with all the dutiful sophomores and freshmen settled to slumber, came three peals from the bell and up popped all the recumbent ones, grabbed towels and a valuable each, making f o r the head of the stairs where the calm and collected fire liutenants counted the noses. Down the stairs they filed and a whoop issued f r o m those who first reached the lounge where was stationed the mistress of ceremonies, Mary Otte, watch in hand and repressing the mirth occassioned by the various "valuables" amassed. One Dormite appeared with her treasured alarm clock, another had a newly acquired photograph of Gordon, others carried diaries, history books, a box of rouge, a bathmat and a man's society pin. There were no records broken in point of time but much improvement is expected. Two inmates locked into their room by the peculiar behavior of the door knob were released just in time to add to the general effect of the occasion.

-

Toilet Necessities

Spring Housecleaning Proves Very Exciting

Voorhees Girls Enjoy Fire Drill

Y. M. C. A.

$22.50 and P. S. BOTER & CO.

KNOOIHUIZEN

The biographer does not seem to be in sympathy with the subject of his work, but neither does he seem to have any strong feeling against him personally. Another fact which would lead us to believe t h a t the author has given a true account is that a large p a r t of the work is quoted from books, letter, and diaries of men who were in closest connection with the Kaiser during most of his career. Emil Ludwig often speaks of the Emperor as an actor. William was bom with a lame arm, and his whole object in boyhood and young manhood was to show the world that in spite of his weakness, he was equal and superior to other young men of the realm. And this tendency of his was characteristic of his whole life. Always wanting to be in the eyes of the world, concealing his f a u l t s and weaknesses, and actually believing that all the other rulers of the world were numskulls compared with him. The biographer sums up his conspicuous t r a i t s as a young man a s "vivacity, vanity, arbitrariness, instability, charm, extravagcnce." Two more were brought out later in life — boasting and cowardice. For when, a f t e r the war, his country is groaning in distress, he "rolls a w a y in liis luxurious car. to ease and comfort in a neutral country — hut an alien land from which there will l»e no home home-coming."

J

CHRIS KOROSE, Proprietor

For Men and Y o u n g Men.

What is your favorite type of non-fiction? Biography? Then you i will certainly want to read one of the many new books our library has recently acquired. It is a biography of William Hohenzollern, the Last of the Kaisers, by t h a t most popular of modem biographers, Emil Ludwig. I t is not simply a book portraying the life and character of William the Second, but it also acquaints us with many men men very prominent in the political world of the half-century preceding the Word War. These include Bismarck, Holstein, Eulenberg, Bulow, Max von Baden, and a great many others. Besides these two purposes of the book, it also gives us an insight into the intrigues and secret machinations of the European courts, and thus gives a better understanding of the causes of the World War. For it describes all the events and incidents leading up to the war, not only in Germany, but in other countries of Europe as well.

ALUMNI

Listerine Tooth Paste

H i n d s Cream

«

39c

19c

Ponds Cream

-

29c

Colgate's

19c

Ipana

Pompeian Cream

39c

33c

Pepsodent

Pompeian Powder

39c

33c

Pebeco

33c

Coty Coldcream

- 89c

Coty Powder

-

Odo-Ro-No

For the Man

-

Listerine

-

89c 29c 23c

William's Mug Soap

04c

Palmolive Cream

29c

Woodbury Facial Soap

William's Cream

29c

Jaciel Powder

Mennen's Powder

19c

Jaciel Cream

-

39c

Valet Blades

39c

Pen-Co N a p

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19c

-

19c -

69c

HOPEITES: You a r e i n v i t e d t o u s e t h e B a n k i n g f a c i l i t i e s of

THE FIRST S T A T E B A N K The oldest and the largest State Bank in the County

B. H. WILLIAMS JEWELER (Successor to W. R. Stevenson)

PARKER PENS AND PENCILS W a t c h I n s p e c t o r s for t h e P . M . R a i l w a y

COLONIAL BARBER SHOP Beauty Shop in Connection Call for Appointments 2071

COLONIAL SWEET SHOP ndles, Fancy S u n d a e s , Hot Fudge S u n d a e s , Hot Choi late, Toasted Sandwiches, Gilbert's Chocolates

OPPOSITE TAVERN SERVICE

QUALITY

ARTIC Ice Cream [SERVE IT AND YOU PLEASE ALL! 28th W. 9th St.

Phone 5470

Spring Suits and Top Coats Ready to wear and made to measure. Get yours at

VISSER & BAREMAN 50 East Eighth St.

FRIENDSHIP

Stop in at Laughlin s Restaurant The Students Rendezvoi/s. Quick Service, W h o l e s o m e Foods, Cleanliness. W h e r e food is "Most like Mothers*'

$4.50 Commutation Tickets $4.00

CLASSES f

that have gone before have shown appreciation of the interest and courteous attention that w e make a part of our printing service.

Holland

Printing

Fine Printing PROGRAMS, CALL. CARDS. STATIONERY,

Co. FINE PAPERS

210 College Ave. y HOLLAND

We Cuf Your Hair the Way You Like It. FORTNEY S BARBER SHOP Roar of Olllo's

Call 5704 for Appointment

We like to have people interested in us, and in what we are doing. The kind attitude and sympathetic help of one person can do more towards making us exert our energies than can almost any other agency. These people whom we like, and with whom we are glad to be, we call our friends. They are the source of our well-being and of our joys. Friends are chosen because they are congenial. We need their influence to keep up our courage. Other people judge us by them. If one desires to maintain a high calibre character, the choice of his friends are the first step towards attaining that goal. Our associates mold us like huge hammers, for at every moment their own habits and reactions clash with our own. Strong personalities subdue those that are less determinate. Our associations rapidly make us, or break us. How is it possible to strengthen our level of friendship, so that we may give more, and in return receive more? Only a soul that runs deep, like the forest stream, can utilize the resources of friendship, so that they become enduring parts of one s. own makeup. We hu^ry to many places, and we remember but little of life—still there is always the knowledge of friends. We have them forever, and they warm our hearts. H e can plan for their benefit, and perform sacrifices to help them, for they have firmly become a part of us.

OUR MISSIONin life is the continued production of Good Priatlng. Having the most modern type and equipment and directing all our efforts to this one phase of the printing business enables us to give you

Better Printing—Better Service

Stekelee-Van Huls Printing House,Inc. 9 E n t 10th ( t .

H o l l a n d ' s Laading P r i n t t r s

Phoiw $908

Holland, Mich.

The Only Certain Way to Succeed is earn and then spend less then you earn. You will find a Savings-book your b6$t aid. We have one at this bank for you. Call to day and get it.

FEOPtES $ 3

.


THE

Page Pour

AKCHOR

of prohibition will applaud a slam

NEW WAITERS HAVE STRENUOUS DUTIES

A T H L E T I C S

The t r i a l s and t r i b u l a t i o n s of a novice in t h e w a i t i n g p r o f e s s i o n a r e m a n y and varied. It w a s Abie's first order and he approached the formidable looking p a t r o n with knees t h a t showed an uncontrollable tendency to shake. H i s hand, in B<lS6bdlI which he carried a g l a s s of w a t e r , u n f o r t u n a t e l y displayed a similar • V E N E T I A N B O W L '—LONG weakness, and tell-tale blotches apREVERED CUP, TO T A K E p e a r e d upon t h e table-cloth. H a p T h e Mass Meeting held T h u r s d a y E Y E O F A L L CON5 pily, the m a n ,, absorbed in l " n i g h t a t Carnegie Hall was quite r..^, TENDERS paper, did not notice t h e m , nor did w e | i a t t e n d e d , and proved to be a Abie either. T h e y o u t h was a t a v e r y e n t e r t a i n i n g function. T loss to know how to m a k e the m a n ,p o s t a i ^ evening off P r o f e s —h e first of a f u t u r e series of m oor ba! bal1 a w a r e of his presence, but finally TOr w i n t e r w a s elected t o direct the ' ' * K a m e s w a s Plai,ei1 he resorted to t h e ancient custom s j . outdoors on the campus, on MonVgrio)1| songs w e r e sunK of coughing. T h e ruse workwl mo re i n c | u d i n g w e e t day a f t e r n o o n according to c a r e f u l thp favoritc

Fraternities Desire MASS MEETING Games IN GYM. THURSDAY

at i t H e r b e r t Spencer claims t h a t if t h e mind is s t r o n g l y excited by p l e a s u r a b l e f e e l i n g s , and a n y unsuspected t h o u g h t or event occurs a l a r g e a m o u n t of nervous e n e r g y is converted into l a u g h t e r o r t e a r s . T h u s he believes l a u g h t e r t o be an expression of n e r v o u s energy. T h i s

feii

the meeting. J o h n j ^ a s t e r 0 f Ceremonies w a s The l i n d * t h e p r o g r a m proceeded. n u m b e r was a s h o r t talk by "D imples" D D ee Velder Velder in in which Dimples" which he he rticularly urged the fellows, ami p a r for the F r e s h m e n , to come out —

track. As a result of his talk no doubt there will be m o r e c a n d i d a t e s for o u r track team. T h e next numing effect upon the u n h a p p y novice; bjjgj, s r w w aa ss aa g s 0 o |l 0o ^y by H Haarrrryy rF nr ieesseem maa.. " H e y ! w a i t e r , w h a t ' s a idea of giv- p j e ' s a n g "IJoses of P i c a r d y " a n a i n g me such a little piece of m e a t ? applauded. After this we|]

11 is llopt (, t h a t

W h a t is i t ; a s a m p l e ? "

n u m b e r Coach Schouten presented

pressed.

Mulder, E v e r e t t Poppink, William challengers.

Hoover is going to t r y something which Coolidge s t a r t e d but could not c a r r y o u t ; t h a t is, to give fewe r a d d r e s s e s a s chief executive. Hoover r e f u s e d to a d d r e s s the D.A. R. or the A m e r i c a n Red Cross. H« proposes t o give only t h r e e f o r m a l talks a year.

'

an

inter

"

r a er

Holland

oocs

Graid Harn

ENSEMBLES

$15.22 Sleeveless dresses with smart long or finger lip coats in Crepe, Georgettes and Prints.

Slioppe

Candy

Ice Cream Hot Lunches

COZY INN

* mental a t t i t u d e is good t h e result

foot, the result will be e i t h e r t e a r s or l a u g h t e r , d e p e n d i n g on the menII tal a t t i t u d e . If t h e result happened to be someone to whom t h e baby w a s f r i e n d l y t h e result would be u n r e s t r a i n a b l e laughter. If perHv Henry Wackerbarth chance t h e tickler happened to be T h e first t h i n g an i n f a n t does a- s t r a n g~e r the result m i g h t be a bedlam. T h e s a m e is t r u e even of w h e n i t e n t e r s this vale of t e a r s is i f more. It is t h e a d u l t , if t h e adult receives a t o b a w l a n ( 1 a( (l a ew

K u y p e r and Myron Leenhouts. M r . Schouten t h a n k e d P r o f e s s o r s Hink a m p and W i n t e r f o r t h e i r help and i n t e r e s t and also praised the boys themselves. T h e n to the following F r o s h of this y e a r ' s b a s k e t -

Ladies & Gentlemen

Q1"*® Pl« U 8 lWe, since we notice t h a t i n f a n t s and even a d u l t s laugh when we expect them to cry. W e also observe t h a t both crying and l a u g h i n g produce tears.

^ e a r ^ u ' | ' v a l x 0'1 11(' ( i a m o n ( • ogists give little credence to this ( a p t a i n s h a \ e been a p p o i n t e 01 t h e o r y a n ( j y e t j n m y m j n ( | con. each team, but like politicians in t a i n 8 a l a r g e essence of t r u t h , Mexico, their jobs are rie , so t i e D a r w i n says t h a t l a u g h t e r is an " A n c h o r cannot r e a s o n a > e ex- ^ p r g g g j ^ 0 f j 0 y ( claiming t h a t to publish heir n a m e s . As w h e n j o y i a i n t e n | ! e i t l e a d a t o p u r . custodian of the Venetian ou , p 0 s e i e s 8 m o v e m e n t s such a s j u m p the . i . . , 1 . , *. . i „ „ t h e hu e 0V,n 0 u K l K <" P ^ "Vj i n g about, s t a m p i n g the f e e t , clapprize, the F r a t e r s have e ec e( i ei hands, and various involWebb. The unveiling o e cup u n t a r y facial movements, and a pew a s c u n a r chuckling cnucKiing in in the m e tm 8 l a t— ed — to have a , e n . p* a C e culiar h r oaati.. a e r ^ Monday s g ^ m e — t e w i n n e i s ^ j ( ) r e o v e r l a u g h t e r is caused by a ( 0 n l ' R unveiling. tickling of the imagination. If the

ufter

For

seem8

P r o f e s s o r J a m e s and L a n g e have made an h y p o t h e s i s s t a t i n g : the body is first effected by the emotions and then t h e mind. They say t h a t we do not feel bad and then cry, but t h a t we cry first and then feel bad. (They did not know t h e i r e f f e c t i v e l y t h a n Abie had hoped f o r , P , a n s f o r m e ^ l ) V t h e , r Presidents, onions). When someone m a k e s u s A ( j e ] j n e ^ u t c o n t r a r y to this t h e t h e C o s m o s an(1 t h e F r a t e r 8 h a v e the uo r du ec rt w a s hurled w out- vin—so cevening t hi ni inngg but vening wwaass aann yy aand n a Wie DUI "All • AII — - - - - - - - - - - - laugh laugn by oy tickling ucKiing our bodies ooaies we loud and b r u s q u e a f a s h i o n t h a t our W e t „ e x c e p t f o i . t h e d r o p s o f r a i n now declared the existence of a f e e l f r e e h e a r t e < j interiorly. Psychols t a r t l e d hero did not know w h a t it w a s all about. However, not d a r i n g to question, he m e r e l y gave a g h a s t l y smile, and guessed a t the order. P r a y i n g to Allah, t h e w a i t e r brought in t h e meal. T h e h u n g r y customer gave one look a t the m e a t , then demanded in a tone of voice t h a t exerted a quite p e t r i f y -

REEFER'S Restaurant

68 East 8th Street

WHY WE LAUGH"

uad t e a m , s w e a t e r s w — ball e r e- ^ pf-r e s c n t o l by t h e generosity of P r o f e s s o r M L e a n : Ronald Fox, T i t u s Van

46 e xe, e ^ *"ae a * ^ e P^P® 1 " The physical sciences have evi- H a i t s m a , Louis D a m s t r a , H a r v a r d j n a g r a n g e place, it sees light, it P®' ' ' J * time y * . ' ' ? • ,S dently been developed so f a r beyond D a l m a n , Tom Beaver, A1 Rassen- m U 8 t e x p r e s s itself in some way. 1 u. ,au hter B u t lf g the m o m e n t is int h e political sciences t o constitute broek, W a t s o n S p o e l s t r a , E a r l e T h o easiest outlet seems to be in 0 1 une ra S t e d e g e r d a , B e r n a r d Bouma, Nich.ry|ng. if it does not c r y t h e phys' W » K c am iscor ui t a menace to civilization.—Slosson. resu olas Cupery a n d H a r v e y H o f f m a n . j c j a n usually paddles it a little bit A yell w a s given u n d e r the guid- ^() m a k e it cry. Twenty-five years ^ h e n ' approached P r o f e s s o r ance of Klay f o r t h e coming v a r - j a t e r t | 1 ( . i n f a n t g r o w s u p into man• o n the subject, he said t h a t sity. The n e x t n u m b e r w a s a duet j 1 0 0 ( 1 o r womanhood. Still, it m u s t he knew of no h a r d and f a s t rules by G a r r e t t Nonhof a n d Marion e x p r e s s itself when i t sees some- or theories concerning the subject Alday. I n s t r u m e n t s used were t h e ^ j n g s t r a n g e . W h a t shall it d o ? If li» l i gbter. He alleged t h a t he peiviolin and t h e h a r m o n i c a . A f t e r j t s o happened t h a t the baby w a s a sonally g o t t h e heartiest laugh out t h i s a sketch w a s given by Lois De g | r j l j a l ) V t a n ( | i t chanced to meet o f observing p a s s i n g f u n e r a l s . To Wolf and M a r g a r e t Van Leuwcn o r s e e a G r a n g e boy baby (grown m o s t people t h i s would not be a e n t i t l e d : "A Comedy, T r a g e d y and u p w i t h t W e n t y - f i v e y e a r s experi- s t i m u l u s f o r l a u g h t e r . But there is Opera." T h e Harmonica fiends, e n c c . i n l h e w o r l l l ) i t i s ( i u i t e a p t to the position w h e r e we d i s a g r e e on L. Seudder, H. J a n s s o n , 11. K r a a i , ^ave some superfluous emotion to the causes of l a u g h t e r , j u s t i f y i n g I). Hicks, t*. Ko/.ema, G. Nonhot c y p r e s s , especially if t h a t boy baby ^ l e s t a t e m e n t t h a t t h e r e a r e no then e n t e r t a i n e d . P r o f e s s o r Lam- N V a g a b j e t o t . a u s e chills along the hard a n d f a s t rules. P r o f e s s o r , {ten spoke a few words and P r o f e s - s | l i n a l And so the young 1 ™ * ^ a t the irony of the situation. Mir Winter pr e s e nt e d our f a i t h f u l | a ( j v expresses her emotions. If t h e Irony too, m a y be considered a s a t i m e keeper of eleven years, with 0 p , ) 0 r t u n i t y f a v o r s l a u g h t e r , she cause of l a u g h t e r . his l e t t e r . P r o f e s s o r H i n k a m p then t . h a r m s him with a dainty laugh or F r o m personal observation, I explained t h e function and idea of s m | | e , f t e a r s s e p m b e t t e r suited to have arrived a t many and varied t h e new Board of Control. He <*x- t h t . ( M . c a s i o n s h e will cry. Darwin conclusions. L e t u s take the i n f a n t plained w h a t they h a v e in mind t o t . | a i m s t | i a t the s a m e methods of (I seem to be quite adept a t kiddo and who t h e m e m b e r s w e r e . H e | n t c r s e x u a i cft&rming a r e practised n a p p i n g ) why does it smile, why then awarded l e t t e r s t o t h e follow- ^ and other does it l a u g h ? I believe if the inthe a n t h o p o i d ape i n g m e n ; V e i n Vanderhill, B e r n a r d a n j m a i | B u t milady and milord f a n t were only able it would break De P r e e , Dean M a r t i n , Alvin ( ook, | a U g h and c r y f o r various other its crib l a u g h i n g a t some of the "Carl Van Lente, J o h n Klay, Clai- reasons, in f a c t so many, t h a t we antics we go t h r o u g h in o u r e f f o r t s ence Diephouse, W a l t e r De \ e l d e r , a s j { 0 U r s e l v e s " W h y do we l a u g h ? " to m a k e it l a u g h . Think it over. Alvin Vanderbush, Clarence Becker ^ w e ] a U g h , we certainly Don't we do some r a t h e r insane and R a y De Young. Following t h i s 0 U g h t to be pitied. I know some and undignified t h i n g s in order to the H a r m o n i c a fiends a g a i n e n t e r - f o | k f . w h 0 t h o u g h it h a s m a k e t h e baby laugh. We stand on a s t a i n e d and were succeeded by an j ) e e n a j o n p ^ m e gjnee t h e y have our heads we m a k e noises like animals, we m a k e foolish faces. I be" a d d r e s s " by Doctor Robinson. He h a ( J t h e i r j a s t | a U K h . spoke a b o u t athletics, d e b a t i n g and L a u g h t e r is a wonderful t h i n g ; lieve t h a t it is instinctive in t h e the Senior Class play and al?o j i a g benefits, physiological a s well baby to laugh, and t h a t when we added some of his plentious wit. p h y s i c i a n s a r e beginning tickle it, even the slight imaginaa s socjai N e x t the E m e r s o n i a n (|iuirtette t o recommend a good laugh a day tion of a baby can develop in such s a n g a few songs. T h e y were H a r r y ^heir p a t i e n t s as a cure f o r vari- a brief span. V e r S t r a t e ; H e r m a n J a n s s e n , Neil o n s a i | m e n t s . L alaughter ugl stimulate.^ If we see a genious or a man or Van Leeuwen and W a l t e r De Voih e a r t , g e t s ihe blood c i r c u l a t iwoman n g ^ ^ ^who ^ ^ ^ seems ^ ^ ^ ^ ^to^ ^have ^ ^ ^ ^conW

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April 24, 25, 26 and 27

jjl

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Spring

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Coats

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and

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White Cross Barbers

After You Have Tried the | Others, Try the Best

College Barber Shop [Fanoerly Fortaey's] R e a r of Ollies

d e r . P r o f e s s o r W i n t e r then g a v e a better, ventilates the lungs, and in llittle l i l p a r t i c u l a r " H " in the f o r m of g e n e r a i makes all the o r g a n s come gold H's given by Mr. W. H. H a r - U ! ) f o r a much-needed airing. It will die to t h e Senior l e t t e r m e n f o r b e n o t i c e d , t h a t a s a g e n e r a l rule, Lt hfeai rH clean ^ H ^ nsM p o| rM tsM m aM n s| hi iM pM and ^ J hj awr d^ s t o u t people a r e jovial and take work. Those men were E v e r e t t g r e a t pleasure in b o a s t i n g of their B e k k e r , B e r n a r d De Pree, George jocundity. When they laugh their De Roos, Raymond De Young, whole body l a u g h s with them I W a l t e r De Velder, Clarence Diep- w h e r e a s thin people h a v e much difhouse, W a l t e r Hyink, J o h n Klay, ficu|ty i n g e t t i n g t o g e t h e r a good Herman Laug, Dean Martin, | a U g h . U u g h t e r a s a disease is inC h a r l e s Rozema, E d w a r d S w a r t - f e c t i o U S a n d contagious, "while hout, Russel J a p p i n g a , Alvin V a n - ^here is infection in disease and derbush. A f t e r this t h e Hope Song S O rrow t h e r e is n o t h i n g so irresistw a s sung and the m e e t i n g broke up. j b | y contagious a s l a u g h t e r and o humor"

Y. W. I N S T A L L S N F W O F F i r F R S J ^ l ^ n W r i V E j I X O TK . nnirlv PARTED NFTICPRS a n d th ^ l ^ of he Y W C A were the cabinet of the Y.VN .C.A. installed into office last Tuesday e v e n i n g in t h e chapel building. T h e r o o m was m a d e v e r y impressive by U e a r , c o n c i s e , creditable typed on .he R o

y a

. PorUb.c

h e l p s t o g e t y o u higher Fl * 1 ' I) I K n i l k S n A f l K V I U U i O U U U l i •

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grades, P i M o r e U W I I t

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tbe new ones, ^ p l y dress-

ed in white. Miss Boyd talked on m a k i n g resolutions. Our resolutions should not include too wide a field, t h e y should be specific and acted u p o n

i m m e d i a l e l y

S a r a h

K l o o s t e l

.

obtain most of m y m a t e r i a l by ob- audience g e t s quite a " k i c k " out of n a t i o n and introspection. How- a f a m i l y feud, n a g g i n g wife, egotistic boaster. P e r h a p s we can see ^ e i 1 n a \ e been able hnd a t situation a b,t 0 g r e a t e r and m or e learned psychoi- ^ ; 3 ° ^ og.sts than myself who have dared to Conc uor

'

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wh

' ' ' ' he acted quite coyly

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College Sweet Shop College A v e . a n d 14th S t .

We hope you have enjoyed your VACATION as much as we do your PATRONAGE

Huizinga Jewelry Co. "SMILIN' THROUGH" All H o p e m e n g o s m i l i n g t h r o u g h w h e n t h e i r c l o t h e s a r e a t t e n d e d to b y t h e P a r i s C l e a n e r s .

Z activities of normal f u n c t i o n , a . S O meone swear on the staire l a u g h t e r ; and t h a t l a u g h t e r is a ^ e a , someone s w e a r on t h e s t a g e m a n i f e s t a t i o n of the play instinct. h o w w e ' a u g h , we think it quite T h e r e is undoubtedly m u c h t r u t h in a m u s i n g ; so a g a i n we find the stimulus {or i n a s m u c h a s t h e play l a u g h t e r in ••eviewing of t h i s t h e o r > . ,

the c h a r g e to the new presi- instinct is a complex instinct com- ""J" 0 W J e n ' o r s in the lives of uie v i w i r c tu mic ii< p ^ i. -lU others. Some of o u r over emotional dent Was acce t€t, by B e r n a P - b i n i n K f h e n a t u r a l instincts with b r o t h e r s would get a good l a u g h a t dine Siebers. Following the usual t h e instinct of mimicking and imi- a scene of superfluous emotion, they ceremony t h e r e m a i n i n g officers t a t i n g . T h e e a r l y Greek w r i t e r s ob- would e n j o y seeing t h a t other w e r e installed. T h e new cabinet is tained t h e i r comic effect by satiris- People o f t e n become victims of • , . , , , . , j - j - i*u r n* # t h e i r passions and emotions. Many t a l r e a d y l a y i n g plans to m a k e next i n g and ridiculing the follies of o t h e r s o u r c e f . o f h u m o r utilized by MAM y e a r a big one f o r Y. W. R u t h t h e i r age. We employ t h i s method the s t a g e involve the s a m e prinH i e f t j e played a medley of h y m n s r f o r s t i m u l a t i n g l a u g h t e r on our ciple. T h e recurrence of the inciJ u s t preceding the m e e t i n g the two vaudeville s t a g e to-day. T h e public f l e n t s of t h e i r own lives and lives of cabinets held a dinner in t h e Delheartilv anolaud t h e mimicking , > t h f r 8 b™ 1 * much l a u g h t e r and phia room. The individual t a b l e s l\.a , y PP * . . . ,. applause, it pleases the hoi polloi, were attractively decorated with or ridiculing of their local police ^ spring flowers. d e p a r t m e n t . Or t h e w n o t i n f a v o r

__ W /H\ HI III ItB&L. I L ill / i P g » IM | y

Ice Cream —

But let us r e t u r n to o u r question derived f r o m this. The t h e a t e r capi" W h y do we l a u g h ? " In t h e writ- talizes on t h i s especially in the ^ t h . g t r e a t . H e j h a v e h a ( 1 t o stereotyped " h o m e comedy." The

t n ' t h e i r bfa^k ^ o w n t ' n s t f - elusions'" on t h e s T h j a " 8 P r o f e m o r

work

siderable power or control suddenly fall into the power of some inanim a t e or less significant object such a s a b a n a n a peel or the trick of a nitwit we a r e quite a p t to laugh. This is particularly t r u e on the s t a g e or screen where we a r e not so p a r t i c u l a r about w h a t o t h e r people will think of us because we laugh. Bergson gives t h i s a s his explanation of cause of l a u g h t e r . I would m a i n t a i n t h a t it is a cause inasmuch a s we can see people b i g g e r and b e t t e r than ourselves run into m i s f o r t u n e s and difficult i e s . Much personal satisfaction is

A. P. FABIANO

"Let Flick Do It"

g Ua vce K

CLEANERS EAST SIXTH STREET Phone 2)54 W E CALL FOR A N D DELIVER •;

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04-17-1929