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ope college

olland, michigan A P R I L 16,1981 VOLUME 9 3 - I S S U E 22

Elections to be held this afternoon by R i c h a r d K u h r t Student Congress elections will be held today. Students will be voting for p e r s o n s to fill the positions of p r e s i d e n t , first vice president and second vice president. This y e a r t h e r e a r e two c a n d i d a t e s for the office of president, one for the office of first vice president and two for the office of second vice president. The two people running for president a r e Ted Bolema and Chris Simons. According to the Student Congress constitution, the president s e r v e s a s " t h e chief r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the student body. Specific duties include initiation of policy concerning students, scheduling and leading meetings, and m a n a g i n g the Congress'budget. Ted B o l e m a is a t h r e e - y e a r elected m e m b e r of Student C o n g r e s s and is currently s e r v i n g as a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e - a t large. He h a s served on the Academic Aff a i r s B o a r d apd the Appropriations Committee Stated Bolema, " I n my t h r e e y e a r s on Student Congress, I have s e e n it develop f r o m a do-nothing organization to one which h a s accomplished a great deal in m a t t e r s of student c o n c e r n . However, 1 feel that Student Congress h a s not done enough to keep students i n f o r m e d . I hope to c h a n g e this by b e t t e r publicizing m e e t i n g s and a g e n d a to e n c o u r a g e m o r e participation by non-Student Congress m e m b e r s , by m a k i n g s u r e e v e r y t h i n g we

do is written up in the anchor, and by giv-

a s s u r e students' r i g h t s will be considered a s the DeWitt renovation p r o g r e s s e s a n d it can h a v e a g r e a t e r influence in the m a n y issues which need student input but h a v e n ' t h a d it. " I n o r d e r for this to h a p p e n , good leadership is an absolute necessity. It requires a president who has r a p p o r t with faculty, a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and a wide r a n g e of students. Also, a s f a r back a s I ' v e b e e n able to check, t h e r e h a s yet to be a w o m a n president of the Hope Student Congress. 1 think 1981 would be a g r e a t y e a r to c h a n g e that." Kevin Toren is the only person, since George C a r a v e l l a dropped out, r u n n i n g for first vice president. Should he be elected his responsibilities will include c a m p u s elections and polls, n e c e s s a r y publicity a n d coordinating C o n g r e s s speaker programs. Toren h a s s e r v e d on the student legislature for two y e a r s ; he h a s been a m e m b e r of the WTAS task force, t h e Athletic C o m m i t t e e , the Residential Life Committee, and the Religious Life Com-

working with an accounting s y s t e m that s e p a r a t e s e x p e n d i t u r e s kito categories, as they h a v e to when receiving student funding. "With s o m e i n c r e a s e d effort on the p a r t of myself and the c o m m i t t e e , these prob l e m s could be r e m o v e d . Meetings, phone calls and l e t t e r s a r e all p a r t of the solution, but an i n c r e a s e d c o n c e r n for communication will result in a b e t t e r working relationship for the Appropriations Committee, Student Congress and the organizations." B e r t r a m feels that a s a c a n d i d a t e she h a s set high goals. " I n the p a s t , " she said, "I h a v e often taken on responsibilities, and h a v e usually c o m e out on top. High school called for l e a d e r s h i p in organizations such a s b a n d a n d o r c h e s t r a , T h e a t r e Guild, science clubs and a m e d i c a l co-op p r o g r a m . In my one y e a r at Hope, I h a v e

mittee. Toren s t a t e d , " I feel that the student body should be a w a r e of what is going on in Student Congress, and I t h e r e f o r e would like to b r o a d e n the a v e n u e s of communication between the s t u d e n t s and t h e Congress. If elected, I can a s s u r e t h e students t h a t I would not fail t h e m . " Rick D e r n b e r g e r and Nickie B e r t r a m a r e the c a n d i d a t e s seeking the position of second vice president. Responsibilities include s e r v i n g as Appropriations C o m m i t tee c h a i r p e r s o n , overseeing t h e writing and distribution of m e e t i n g minutes, a n d tabulating r e s u l t s of Congress votes. Stated D e r n b e r g e r , " T h e second vice president is in c h a r g e of the Appropriations C o m m i t t e e . This c o m m i t t e e app r o p r i a t e s about $64,000 of student activities fees to d i f f e r e n t organizations. Having been on this y e a r ' s Appropriations C o m m i t t e e , I know w h a t imp r o v e m e n t s I would like to s e e in n e x t year's committee. " O n e i m p r o v e m e n t is c o m m u n i c a t i o n between t h e Appropriations C o m m i t t e e and the organizations being f u n d e d . M a n y of the organizations could use s o m e m o r e guidance in filling out their budget requests. Most organization l e a d e r s a r e very qualified to lead their group, but h a v e had little p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e in

ing s t u d e n t s a c h a n c e to voice their opinion on how they feel Student Congress can b e t t e r r e p r e s e n t t h e m . 4t I would also continue to work t o w a r d improving WTAS, with a long-range goal of m a k i n g the station F M open air. Another goal will be to get m o r e Student Congress input on m a j o r c a m p u s decisions, such a s the DeWitt e x p a n s i o n . " B o l e m a ' s opponent, C h r i s Simons, h a s been involved with the C o n g r e s s for two y e a r s , s e r v i n g on the Residential Life C o m m i t t e e and the S p e a k e r Series Committee. This past y e a r s h e held the position of s e c r e t a r y . " T h i s position," she stated, " i s m u c h d i f f e r e n t f r o m being a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e , since I h a v e to be a w a r e of w h a t ' s going on with e v e r y b o a r d and c o m m i t t e e . In one. way d t another I m involved with e v e r y t h i n g t h a t is happening in Student Congress. Working closely with the cabinet h a s provided m e with a b r o a d knowledge of w h a t is necessary to run this organization. I feel this position . h a s been the best p r e p a r a t i o n anyone could h a v e to s e r v e a s p r e s i d e n t . " Concerning the f u t u r e , Simons s t a t e d , " l h a v e one m a i n goal w h i c h I would like to see Student Congress achieve in the next y e a r : to b e c o m e a m o r e active force on c a m p u s and t h e r e b y be m o r e approachable and consequently more r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . It is o f t e n a n overlooked organization, p a r t l y b e c a u s e it had not been involved in c a m p u s issues to the extent it should, and also t h e student body h a d n ' t been m a d e a w a r e of our functions and a c h i e v e m e n t s . T h i s h a s s t a r t e d to c h a n g e a n d I would like to see it con-

worked diligently in m a n y a r e a s , including being a Student Congress r e p r e s e n t a t i v e for one of the l a r g e s t d o r m s on c a m p u s ( D y k s t r a ) and e a r n i n g a s e a t on the Academic A f f a i r s Board, enabling myself to voice student c o n c e r n s and to be a factor in initiating v a l u a b l e p r o g r a m s into the college c u r r i c u l u m . 4 i also fought for the students in the DeWitt expansion, r e a c h i n g decisions f r o m which we, the students, will benefit enormously. If elected, one of m y g r e a t e s t c o n c e r n s is unity : a m o n g s t onand o f f - c a m p u s students, and between the administration, faculty and students. Along with this office c o m e s the c h a i r of the Appropriations C o m m i t t e e , w h e r e I'll strive for cooperation a m o n g the student organizations to best benefit the students. If elected, I will do my u t m o s t to repretho •hiHontc "

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T h e Outing Club g e t s r e a d y for a bicycle t r i p to Saugatuck. (photo by Randy W a r r e n )

Voorhees becomes co-ed by K i m Mooi At the last C a m p u s Life Board m e e t i n g it w a s decided t h a t Voorhees Hall would be a co-ed housing facility. In light of this decision Hope P r e s i d e n t Gordon Van Wylen said, " T a k i n g into consideration the p r e s e n t s t a t e of the residential life h e r e at Hope, I think this is the best way to use this new f a c i l i t y . "

New financial aid cuts reviewed

s t u d e n t s s t a r t p a y i n g interest on their by C r a i g P o t t e r Sinclair loans while they a r e still a t t e n d i n g school Two w e e k s ago Hope P r e s i d e n t Gordon J . Van Wylen a t t e n d e d a GLCA presi- but this w a s voted down. In view of the p l a n n e d cuts. Van Wylen d e n t ' s c o n f e r e n c e in Washington, DC. Their p r i m a r y c o n c e r n w a s w h a t e f f e c t is doing h i s best to " p u t college r e s o u r c e s into support and e n c o u r a g e m e n t of cont h e proposed b u d g e t cuts a r e going to tinued s t a t e and f e d e r a l a i d . " H e also h a v e on the financial aid a v a i l a b l e to w a n t s to " e n c o u r a g e s t u d e n t s to apply for educational institutions. D u r i n g t h e i r stay in Washington, the p r e s i d e n t s inter- t h e loans a s e a r l y a s is c o n v e n i e n t . " viewed m a n y d i f f e r e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in At this point it is a p p a r e n t t h a t s t u d e n t s o r d e r to d e t e r m i n e w h a t cuts a r e going to should k e e p in touch with their local t a k e place. Van Wylen r e t u r n e d with " c a u t i o u s op- b a n k e r s , for the loan situation c a n c h a n g e tinued. I f r o m b a n k to bank. M As Student Congress b e c o m e s a m o r e t i m i s m . " H e found that although t h e T h e p r e s i d e n t s also reviewed t h e positive force, other i m p r o v e m e n t s about BEOG a n d s t a t e g r a n t s a r e going to exm u t u a l p r o j e c t s of the GLCA colleges, the c a m p u s will follow. An active Con- perience cuts, g u a r a n t e e d s t u d e n t l o a n s such a s o v e r s e a s studies, but no serious g r e s s c a n m o r e effectively assist WTAS will still be available. At o n e point t h e p r o b l e m s o r c h a n g e s c a m e up. in continuing its i m p r o v e m e n t s , it c a n F e d e r a l G o v e r n m e n t considered m a k i n g

Though this s a m e decision w a s r e a c h e d e a r l i e r in the year, it w a s r e - e v a l u a t e d due to s o m e u n f a v o r a b l e opinions exp r e s s e d by t h e Voorhees Cabinet, a g r o u p of women who w e r e responsible for g e n e r a t i n g a l a r g e a m o u n t of the building's remodeling costs; s o m e of t h e m e m b e r s w e r e opposed to m a k i n g Voorhees a co-ed d o r m i t o r y . After c a r e f u l evaluation of the deliberations at last week's m e e t i n g . Van Wylen concluded that, " W e ' r e going to go a h e a d and m a k e Voorhees a co-ed d o r m i t o r y . And at the end of the y e a r , we will e v a l u a t e how well this s e e m s to be working o u t . " Voorhees Hall will house 110 s t u d e n t s , with w o m e n occupying the first two floors and m e n on the third. The d o r m i t o r y ' s r e s i d e n t s will b e p r i m a r i l y upperclassmen. " I a m s u r e Voorhees will be greatly enjoyed by those s t u d e n t s living t h e r e n e x t y e a r , " said Van Wylen. " A n d 1 a m equall y s u r e t h a t t h e r e s i d e n t s will do their b e s t to t a k e c a r e of this new f a c i l i t y . " T h e first r e s i d e n t s to occupy V o o r h e e s will be t h e p a r e n t s of this y e a r ' s g r a d u a t i n g class. F i r s t choice for occupancy will go to those p a r e n t s who attended Hope and w e r e once Voorhees residents.


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Incidents reported by Public Safety this week:

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Vehicle related: driving on g r a s s m a i n t a i n a n c e truck hit a pole; hil-and This spring the Women's Interest run in Physics-Math parking lot. Group at Kalamazoo College is providing Suspicious P e r s o n : at Meyer Cottage an opportunity for interested students to O t h e r : u n a u t h o r i z e d " p e r s o n In attend a student-run conference on building: Chem-shields s a l e s m a n ; noise w o m e n ' s studies. rp. .. ^ ^Uipidllll by fraternity complex, noise complaint i h e theme is " C o m m u n i c a t i n g Her complaint, btory: Women's Studies and Women's Lives."

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Safety seminar

Students will present p a p e r s and lead discussions and workshops; Louise Bernirow, author of the book Among Women, by David Nieuwkoop will be the guest speaker. The conferpripp u/iii r ^ " S a f e t y In The Streets." a discussion 1 and film about day / S 24 , N i n ! A TO/ "'" P h y s i c a l SAFETV and rape, W i l 1 b e h e l d A r i l 16 a t 7 Kalamazoo C o l l i T h o ^ T 1 t P P Winants 8 e attendine the r o n f p r ^ h m ? Auditorium. Sponsored by the Health and J a n e t slim ext fiS24 or a ^0n Counseling Center, the discussion will be

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storms by J u l i e Garllnghouse " Rhinoceros, an absurdist comedy by E u g e n e lonesco, d i r e c t e d by J e a n Crevjere, associate professor of F r e n c h , will

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the b a s e m e n t of the DeWitt Student and Cultural Center In their first attempt at absurdist t h e a t r e the cast and director will a t t e m p t to c o m m e n t on the condition of man, particularly on the phenomenon of conformitv. the abuse of reason, and the t r a p of self-delusion, lonesco's work is a s a v a g e t r e a t m e n t of the effects of any m a s s hysteria, or m a s s consciousness - the extinction of individuality and humanity.

cians a s well as t h e actors; c r e a t i n g a herd of s t a m p e d i n g q u a d r u p e d s will be no easy task, and with pertinent dialogue vollying simultaneously, timing is an im-

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C r e v i e r e is e x c i t e d a b o u t he challenges, but is hesitant about disclosing his interpretation of lonesco's work, " I t ' s like a favorite story of mine about a painter who exhibited his w o r k s at a gallery - for every person who inquired about the 'meaning of his work, he had a different story," Creviere I n n y believes that the responsibility for the effectiveness of the show the creation of " m e a n i n g , " will be the product of the hard work and skill ot the cast. As direc-

Berenger, the hero-of-sorts of the play, is an average, middle-aged citizen who lakes a firm stand for unreason in the midst of a community afflicted with the plague of rhinocerilis, the disease of conformity. As he sees his friends, a v e r a g e citizens, as well as philosophers and intellectuals t r a n s f o r m t h e m s e l v e s into a s t a m p e d e of raging rhinos. Berenger shows us that maintaining integrity can be a lonely endeavor in a world where others bow to the allure of mindlessness. The work is challenging for the techni-

tor, my only c o m m e n t a r y is the production, he said. The set h a s been designed h > D t Smith, lighting by Michael G n n d s t a f f , and costuming by B a r g Ingleman. Berenger will be p o r t r a y e d by Br an Goodman, J e a n by Chuck Bell, T n s h Jenkins will take the p a r t of Daisy, and Dudard will be played by John De Jong. A ril 24 a d The show will P " f ' April 28 through ^ 2,' ^ available at the m a m ticket booth, DeW Center.

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The Hope Chapel Choir p e r f o r m s at the Crystal Cathedral.

Choir to be on TV •

The Hope Chapel Choir will be f e a t u r e d on the Hour of Power p r o g r a m Sunday, April 26, on WZZM-TV, channel 13 at 10 a m and WUHQ, channel 41 at 11 a m.

Under the direction of professor of music Roger Rietberg, the 69-voice choir s a n g in the Crystal Cathedral of Garden Grove Church in California as p a r t of their annual spring tour.

Chapel to feature recital

WTAS staff changes WTAS, the c a m p u s radio station, 610 AM, 103.3 FM cable, recently announced its executive staff for the 1981-1982 a c a d e m i c year. The positions will be filled as follows: general m a n a g e r , Jon J u n g ; p r o g r a m director, Tim E m m e t ; music director, Dick Hoekstra; assistant music director, Fritz F l a k s t r a ; news director, Craig Potter Sinclair; sports directors. Mark L a m a n and Mark B a j e m a ; traffic director, Chris Staff ; personnel director, Steve P o p e ; advertising- m a n a g e r . Sue Latham; business director, John T h o m a s ; and chief engineer, Glenn OConnell. The graphics position h a s not yet been

Auditions held Auditions for the 1981 season of the Hope S u m m e r Repertory T h e a t r e will be held on Saturday, April 18 in the main t h e a t r e of the DeWitt Cultural Center. An appointment will be n e c e s s a r y for an audition, according to John T a m m i , artistic director. Auditioners should come with a three-minute p r e p a r e d audition containing two contrasting pieces and a song. Audition t i m e s will be assigned for the t i m e period between 1 and 4 p . m . Interested persons should contact the Hope T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t , 392-5111, extension 3131.

filled. In r e f e r e n c e to the staff, John Vassallo, present general m a n a g e r , stated, "I want to thank everyone for a super y e a r and wish those who will be taking over m a n a g e r s h i p of the station next y e a r the best of luck."

Concerned about pregnancy? Free pregnancy testing

many faculty m e m b e r s , r e g i s t r a r Jon by Kim Mooi Huisken drew up several a l t e r n a t i v e s and The Academic Affairs Board recently decided that m i d t e r m g r a d e s should not submitted t h e m to the Academic Affairs be sent home to the p a r e n t s of f r e s h m e n Board. The Academic Affairs Board h a s decidstudents. The decision c a m e a f t e r m u c h delibera- i ed to implement at least one of these tion concerning the value of fhe c u r r e n t alternatives and will proceed to consider m i d t e r m grading procedures. In response the necessity of other c h a n g e s being to the negative feelings expressed by m a d e in the future.

OLLAND THEATRE

STARTS FRIDAY Shows Nitely 7:00 & 9:10 Sat. Mats. 1:00 & 3:10

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The *3 Spring Special Show Papa your Hope College I.D. and pay only $395 for any dinner on the menu - between now and May 2.

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University in Chicago before t r a n s f e r r i n g to Hope; she is a student of professor Roger Davis. P r a t t is currently organist and choir director at Christ Community Church in Spring Lake. G u m p p e r is a c h e m i s t r y m a j o r at Hope; he h a s been director of the student church choir at Hope the last two y e a r s and has been a m e m b e r of the Collegium Musicum his entire college c a r e e r .

Midterm policy changed

R i s t o r a u t e

NEED HELP?

Organist P a t r i c i a P r a t t of Spring Lake and baritone John G u m p p e r of Flint will present their senior recital Saturday, April 18 at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Both seniors a r e to receive their degrees f r o m Hope this May. P r a t t is a native of Villa P a r k , IL and will receive the bachelor of a r t s degree in music. She began her studies at DePaul

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397-2653

HELD OVER Shows Nitely 7:00 & 9:10 Sat. Mats. 1 : 0 0 & 3 : 1 0


Voorhees At last, Voorhees Hall is ready to house students. Its scheduled opening next semester has sparked a torrent of creative ideas for making it a truly unique living environment. These ideas have, in turn, prompted a controversy is over whether or not Hope should | have a "special" dornT § ^ Many students, upon hearing u cj rumors that Voorhees was to

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become an honors dorm, were indignant. Why, they asked, should certain students be singled out and formed into an elitist community of "better" students, set off from the rabble? Why should the academically motivated be taken out of circulation, leaving the presumably academically non-motivated remainder of the campus to flounder without the positive influence of those aspiring to greater things? Speaking as members of the . Thor , en 8 rabble, we should like to clarifv ..? g r o w i n g controversy the matter a bit First Voorhees f - u o v e r t h e c ' u e s t i o n of h o w "Chris-

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students interested in such an atmosphere. There is, however, a danger even here. The danger is in Voorhees growing too close to being the oft-dreaded honors dorm. There has been talk of special speakers being brought in; these programs certainly should not be l i m i t e d to a t t e n d a n c e by Voorhees residents. It is also to be hoped that GPA never become a criterion for resident selection. We are opposed to the concept of an honors dorm. Such a situation would be elitist and unfair to the rest of the academic community. It does not, however, appear that this is what has been proposed. The student body can rest easy; what has been suggested for Voorhees has real potential. Voorhees will not be an honors dorm next year; we hope it never becomes one.

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Student body need not fear that all the intelligent folks will be secluded in one corner Of the Campus. What is, instead, encouraged is that residents be "committed to their academic work and to living in an environment surrounded by others who noQQpec cimiio** c o r d f n gp m i! ,

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' freshmen and transfer students, after their first semester on cam u P s. have revealed disappointment in Hope as a Christian school. The question of w h a t m a k e s a Christian college arises w en 00 n a ^ ^ ^ 8 t the differing perspectives

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a church service consisting of songs skits, scripture and sometimes a short sermon and then perform the service for different churches. There are also many smaller Bible study groups, a Big Brother/Big Sister program and even a program in which students visit a nursing home. Many of and

their teaching. Another notable feature is ih,rmcarr"r,,,r!f at all Althouch^ffprnT 0

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no drmkmg on campus" r u l e - t h e r e are Christian because not everyone here is a Annfh" "I r 0 0 m u ' f o l l ower of Christ. They overlook the fact Another example is the emphasis or that here is an excellent opportunity to sororities and fraternities. This emphasis share their own beliefs with unbelievers Lf!rn. e t C e S K a r y 0 n , j 0 I n i n g a s o rority-or and to learn how to relate to different peofraternity, but on pledging and the ac- pie. In h 2 ~ S t h t h e PlldgeS h a v e t0 p e r f o r m essence then, neither the faculty nor before they can become active members, the students are fully right in their ng k" t h e aC . t . IV,eS " h a n d a n d Perspectives; it depends on the individual f«)t. Imagine being called at 8 a.m. to and what the individual is looking for. 8 a f t e r b e i n g k e p t 0Ut Th0se lookln untii e a T i h ' g f o r a good academic tiv P ? s r v e i S a m e m 0 r T g T h e s e a c ' s c h 0 0 1 ' t h o s e l 0 0 k i n g for a good academic ^ supposedly, to draw/ school that provides Christian activities o f ^ f a s t ^ v p f l r ' Q ^ i ' Q u i t e a few and those whose fun is in parties and last year s pledges say that they dislike drinking will find all at Hope. many of the actives for what the activies Danette Matteson made them go through. Another complaint students have rais^>fX' ( olk-tfv ed is that Hope is more academically, rather than religiously, oriented. A lot of students come for academic reasons, A oOIIAIUI, l U n d michigAifc m rather than because Hope is a Christian mu school; thus, there are students who have Mrntber oj the P u b l i s h e d w e e k l y ' no interest in religion. There are also through ribioc l a r e o S e p t e m b e r those who are ''believers" but not c o u e c i a r e April, except during pRessi "followers"—they believe in Christ, but exam periods and do not practice his teachings. college vacation and The religious side that the faculty holiday periods, 24 believe in and the non-religious side that issues per year, by and for the students the students see both exist on Hope's camof Hope College, Holland, Michigan, pus. So what then makes a Christian colunder the authority of the Student lege? It is the people. A student can make Communications Media Committee. the college what he wants it to be. Subscription price: $6 per year. Member, For example, some students who say Associated Collegiate Press. Office Hope is not Christian do not participate in located on lower level of the DeWitt the Christian activities offered. They try Cultural Center, telephone 394-6577. a couple activities, decide they don't like The opinions on this page are not them and stop attending. These kids do necessarily those of the student body, nothing to change the program, confaculty or administration of Hope College. tribute no new ideas, and do not voice « « » • > G a n g e s they would like made. Do they

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Robert G. Wilkie

Sports editor

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Photo editor

Lara Rector

Eva Dean

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Richard L. Kuhrt

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the assistant leaders. Now he not only has the opportunity, but also the power, to make the program more effective. TTlhose lh0Se W h o wwant a n t t to o p party art a n who but y c can Pparty, a r t y , 1but nnnrtimitiAc (n**

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Diana Beyer Steve Pope

Second-class postage paid at Holland, Ml 49423. POSTMASTER: send address

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Some students also do not think Hope is

changes to Hope College anchor, Hope College, Holland, Ml. • •


Five-year itch

What happened to pre-med Tim? by RobertG. Wilkie W a n d e r i n g around c a m p u s , I c a n n o t help but notice m o r e a n d m o r e people w e a r i n g g r e e n hospital p a n t s ; they h a v e b e c o m e quite the fashion f a d in the last couple of y e a r s . I ' m s u r e t h e r e is someone, s o m e w h e r e , just waiting patiently in the w i n g s for the p r o p e r m o m e n t to m a r k e t d e s i g n e r greens, p r o b a b l y with a n a m e like , 4 Docteur K i l d a i r e . " But I digress. However, I c a n recall a t i m e when hospital p a n t s w e r e a r a r e sight and only a select few possessed t h e m . As a f r e s h m a n at Hope, I m e t quite a few p r o j e c t e d Pre-Med s t u d e n t s ; in fact, roughly one third of the g u y s on my floor c a m e in a s Pre-Med hopefuls. T h i s seemingly chosen group contained two definite factions. F i r s t , t h e r e w e r e the serious students, whom it w a s a p p a r e n t would s o m e d a y b e giving physicals a n d writing illegible prescriptions; they normally followed a 6-1 schedule, that is, six d a y s study to one day relaxation p e r week. T h e other g r o u p consisted of t h e not-soserious s t u d e n t s who enjoyed t h e reputation and i m a g e associated with being P r e Med. T h e s e were t h e ones who a l r e a d y had their hospital g r e e n s and w o r e t h e m at e v e r y w a k i n g m o m e n t ; their schedule took on m o r e of a 5-2 look: five d a y s of

partying, two d a y s of r e c o v e r y , and a token Inclusion of a p r e s c r i b e d d o s a g e of studying. . It w a s m y f o r t u n a t e f a t e to be invited t t a p a r t y at t h e h o m e of T i m , a m e m b e r of the Pre-Med-ltated p a r t l e r s . When w e d r o v e through t h e g a t e of his E a s t G r a n d R a p i d s E s t a t e , I w a s a w e - s t r u c k by t h e surroundings and couldn't help but wonder what a w a i t e d m e behind the Ivycovered stone walls. At t h e door we w e r e Informed t h a t e n t r y w a s r e s t r i c t e d to those w e a r i n g hospital g r e e n s ; m y kindh e a r t e d friend lent m e his g r e e n top and I w a s thereby g r a n t e d admission to this gala affai r. I m m e d i a t e l y I realized that this w a s not a typical run-of-the-mill p a r t y . I found myself s u r r o u n d e d by a m y r i a d of hospltal-green-clad s t u d e n t s In v a r y i n g d e g r e e s of inebriation. Our m o s t congenial host, T i m , provided s p e c i m e n bottles (unused, I hoped) for g l a s s e s and tongue d e p r e s s o r s a s utensils for t h e cheese s p r e a d and g u a c a m o l e dip; m e a n while, w e a r i n g a white lab coat with a stethoscope around his neck, he mingled a m o n g his cohorts, t h r e a t e n i n g unsuspecting guests with an o v e r g r o w n syringe. At the end of t h e night, v e r y few people rem a l n e d in an upright position. We decided

Working for satisfaction This is in response to the editorial and letter to the editor r e g a r d i n g s t u d e n t s ' s a l a r i e s . T h e complaint is t h a t student organization executives don't get paid enough for the work they do. They set a

ST! high v a l u e on the fact that SAC e x e c u t i v e s don't get paid at all. I'd like to p r e s e n t the whole picture. I a m t h e c o - c h a i r m a n f of the coffeehouse c o m m i t t e e , the m o s t a c t i v e c o m m i t t e e of SAC. I put in a n y w h e r e f r o m five to 35 hours p e r week for SAC. Whether it is being s t a g e m a n a g e r for the P P L c o n c e r t , or calling prospective perf o r m e r s , or setting up coffeehouses, I don't get paid. Why do I do it? P e r s o n a l satisfaction. I Ipve w o r k i n g for SAC. T h e people I work with a r e g r e a t . More i m p o r t a n t l y , it m a k e s m e feel good when I see o t h e r s happy. By bringing c a m p u s entertainment to others, not only do I p l e a s e myself, but I p l e a s e others.

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I feel that d i f f e r e n t jobs r e q u i r e different r e w a r d s . I, personally, see no a r e a for personal s a t i s f a c t i o n as a ticket t a k e r at SAC movies. I, too, would want to be paid for that job. T h e s a m e holds t r u e for other jobs on c a m p u s : the people who check IDs at Dow, S a g a w o r k e r s , and those b r a v e individuals who get up e a r l y to collect g a r b a g e . However, for other positions such a s editor of the anchor, or p r o g r a m director of WTAS, or a m e m b e r of SAC, one m u s t find the r e s u l t s of the work done to be r e w a r d enough. F o r e x a m p l e , SAC is a non-profit organization. If you w e r e to pay SAC m e m b e r s , this would r a i s e t h e Student Activities F e e or d e c r e a s e t h e n u m b e r a n d / o r quality of c a m p u s activities. It would c a u s e SAC m e m b e r s to be hired b a s e d on need r a t h e r t h a n c o m m i t m e n t . It would also put SAC in a minority. Most organizations like SAC on other c a m p u s e s a r e all-volunteer. With this in mind, if you think I and my fellow c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s should be paid, then go a h e a d a n d p a y us. But don't expect b e t t e r results. We a r e doing our best. Dick Donohue

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to leave when Tim chose to begin his lab work for R e g u r g i t a t i o n 201. T h e f a t e s and destinies of the s t u d e n t s present at that p a r t y v a r i e d widely. As one might Imagine, a l a r g e n u m b e r f r o m this group c h a n g e d m a j o r s a f t e r the first s e m e s t e r ; 4 t Pre-Med to P h y s - E d " seemed to be quite a p o p u l a r p h r a s e . O t h e r s buckled down, a f t e r t h a t first s e m e s t e r of mild d e c a d e n c e and klneslologlcal fun, to stick It out as P r e - M e d m a j o r s ; at this

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very m o m e n t , they a r e probably dissecting livers s o m e w h e r e In Medical school. And w h a t of T i m ? I o f t e n wonder w h a t h a p p e n e d to h i m . T h e r e are, of course, r u m o r s t h a t he dropped out and, upon selling his hospital p a n t s to a non-PreMed t y p e for a n e x o r b i t a n t price, b e g a n his own b u s i n e s s selling hospital g r e e n s on college c a m p u s e s a c r o s s the nation. M a y b e 44 Mr. T i m D e s i g n e r G r e e n s " a r e just around t h e c o r n e r .

Discussing Christianity D e a r Mr. Sivertson: I just completed r e a d i n g your c o m m e n t a r y entitled , 4 Is Hope C h r i s t i a n ? " in the M a r c h 12th issue the anchor. It w a s a very p r o v o c a t i v e piece. I w a s especially i m p r e s s e d with t h e way you tactfully avoided any mention of the thousands of Hope g r a d u a t e s who h a v e gone on to s e r v e the nation a n d t h e world in responsible decision-making positions, and have initiated motion in the ever-slow wheels of c h a n g e . You also forgot to mention t h e h u n d r e d s of g r a d u a t e s who h a v e gone on to s e m i n a r i e s a c r o s s the country and h a v e become o r d a i n e d m i n i s t e r s of t h e Gospel, and a r e now s p r e a d i n g t h a t Gospel to the f a r c o r n e r s of our e a r t h . Oh well, I won't quibble o v e r a few insignificant and trivial omissions. T h e m o s t disturbing p a r t of your letter is that b e n e a t h all the b i t t e r n e s s , b e n e a t h all the a n g r y rhetoric, t h e r e r u n s a small t h r e a d of truth. I think it is a forgone conclusion t h a t a g r e a t deal of disparity exists between p a g e 25 of the c a t a l o g u e and the actual p r a c t i c e s of the College a s a whole, but then why should we r e q u i r e the witness of Hope a s a c o r p o r a t e body to be any less inconsistent t h a n a r e our

witnesses as individuals (yourself excluded, of c o u r s e ) . So, w h e r e do we go f r o m h e r e ? We could a l w a y s revive the old Calvlnlstlc tradition of witch b u r n i n g . I can see it all now, the P i n e G r o v e b a t h e d In the light of a w i t c h ' s p y r e while t h e Chapel Choir sings " O n w a r d Christian Soldiers" In the b a c k g r o u n d . We could b e h e a d a few heretics, flog s o m e b l a s p h e m e r s and then t o r t u r e the rest of those h e a t h e n b a s t a r d s into submission. It just m i g h t work. One final c o m m e n t . You m a d e fleeting mention to J e s u s who is the Christ. I thank God that he didn't " f i t into societ y . " I t h a n k God that he walked the e a r t h and pointed out " b l a t a n t h y p o c r i s y " w h e r e he saw it, and I thank God for all the o t h e r wondrous a c t s His Son p e r f o r m ed on e a r t h . But most of all I a m g r a t e f u l for the s u f f e r i n g and d e a t h of Christ that, a m o n g other things, r e m o v e d f r o m m e the a w e s o m e responsibility of h a v i n g to judge m y fellow m a n . " F o r the w a y in which you judge, you will be judged; and by your s t a n d a r d of m e a s u r e , it will be m e a s u r e d to y o u . " It all c o m e s down to s p e c k s and logs, Mr. Sivertson. T h a n k you for r e m i n d i n g m e . Respectfully Submitted, Donald I n m a n

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Reviewing South Africa's situation by Craig Potter Sinclair

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blem of r a c e , but r a t h e r a conflict between cultures. It involves an entirely different way of thinking, and an entirely different way of life. To deal with this problem, the nationals c a m e up with the concept of apartheid. As A m e r i c a n s looking at the situation in South Africa, we h a v e to r e m e m b e r the situation that existed only 100 y e a r s ago with the natives of our own country. Had there been more Indians, such that they constituted a larger part of fhe population, would we h a v e required a s y s t e m such as a p a r t h e i d ? Many A m e r i c a n s choose to ignore these thoughts, considering themselves in a position to judge the situation in South Africa. This is easy when we don't have to worry about the Indians, for now they a r e nearly all gone; for us, the problem no longer exists. And then we have those who point out how blacks have actually died in riots in South Africa. Do these people forget that people a r e dying in riots all over the world, m a n y in countries which a r e allies of the United States? And historically, millions of blacks died on ships heading for A m e r i c a n shores. Riots, conflict and death a r e inevitable p a r t s of a changing and modernizing world. With the black population in the United States only 100 y e a r s out of slavery, h a s the situation of these peoples who constitute such a large p a r t of our population really corrected itself? The f a c t s seem to show that it has not. This is t r u e because of the impossibility of correcting an imbalance that has developed over m a n y y e a r s . T h e situation in South Africa is FAMILY HAIR STYLING similar, but m a d e m a n y t i m e s worse by 4mllionziJ / ^rojtiiionut ,Uair Mtpfuifmenlthe l a r g e r black population. If one then says that the South African APPOINTMENTS DAILY g o v e r n m e n t should be t a k e n out of the CALL hands of the white ."minority", and be given to t h e blacks, which blacks should it be given to? There a r e m a n y conflicting CLOSEO MONDAY KUSEI RICOMMfNO tribes in t h e country, and if the govern17 W 16th R K MOOUCTS HOUANO ment is given to the blacks, a civil w a r KTWBNUVII A CB4TIAL will clearly result. Out of this a tribe will e m e r g e and rule, another minority gover-

With all that A m e r i c a n s h e a r about South Africa, one might get the impression that we a r e well informed on the situation in that country. But 1 would a r g u e that the opposite is closer to the truth. American thoughts about events in South Africa a r e jumbled with misinformation received from the media. The situation in South Africa is complex. It is m a d e even worse by the pressure applied by the international community, and specifically by the neighboring African countries. The c r u x of the criticism coming f r o m the outside world, and p r i m a r i l y f r o m the United Nations, is South A f r i c a ' s policy of " a p a r theid, M m e a n i n g separation of the r a c e s . The complex history behind this policy should not b ^ ignored, for an understanding of it is essential in order to understand the racial difficulties present. It involves conflicts that occurred early in the settlement of the c a p e a r e a by Dutch immigrants. As the Dutch s t a r t e d to work their way up the African continent, t h e r e were African t r i b e s moving down. E v e n tually they met a n d conflict resulted. Many y e a r s later, a " n a t i o n a l " p a r t y e m e r g e d with an answer to the problem between the two peoples. It should be r e m e m b e r e d t h a t it is not m e r e l y a pro-

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capitalists. South Africa in this context becomes a symbol of their strivings, with little r e g a r d for the actual situation. When these Third World countries a r e themselves often ruled by dictators, and oppressors of m a n y of their own peoples, it s e e m s ironic that they a r e constantly harping on South A f r i c a ' s interior prob l e m s of inequality a m o n g their races. The world's view of South Africa involves much hypocrisy and irony. Yes, t h e r e is a . difficult situation in South Africa with their racial situation, but it is no m o r e a m a t t e r of moral contemplation than the oppression.of peoples in all the other African countries. But in the long run it s e e m s evident that the situation in Africa is going to change. As the other countries e m e r g e in their development, p r a g m a t i c considerations will force us to recognize these other countries, to deal with problems that arise f r o m their modernizing process. This m a y m e a n c h a n g e s in South Africa also, but we should still try to look at the situation not only from the side of the struggling minority, but also with a view of the historical background and the consequences that would result from the changes that a r e being r e c o m m e n d e d for South Africa, with much p r e s s u r e from the international community.

The Pulse

Are you staying around? by Ingrid Anderson and Anne Brown F o r this week's Pulse we asked: " D o you plan on staying in Western Michigan a f t e r you g r a d u a t e ? " T h e responses of 50 Hope students polled w e r e as follows:

NO: YES: I DON'T KNOW:

58% 28% 14%

Many of those who a n s w e r e d " n o " commented that plans for g r a d u a t e school would t a k e them out of Western Michigan a f t e r they g r a d u a t e . Others,

whose only tie to Western Michigan is Hope, said they would r e t u r n to their homes in different s t a t e s and other a r e a s of Michigan. Some felt that going to a bigger place would afford t h e m more opportunities and different experiences. One student said, " I t ' s too q u i e t . " The m a j o r i t y of those who said they would stay in Western Michigan a f t e r they g r a d u a t e c o m m e n t e d that they had spent most of their lives in the a r e a and had no intention of leaving. Others commented that they would stay in the a r e a if the job m a r k e t looked promising.

Coffeehouse review by Dick Donohue Huge s w a r m s of people huddled outside Phelps Hall F r i d a y in the pouring rain, waiting for the final sound and lights checks to be finished for The Gnu T a v e r n Band. When the doors finally opened a t 8 p.m., all 15 people strolled in. The band consisted of pianist B r i a n Schipper of Village Inn acclaim, P a u l Van Heest on d r u m s and Kelly " S k i h h e a d " T u c k e r on string bass. Although the crowd w a s small, t h e r e

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w a s some dancing, lots of sing-a-longs and loads of fun. "We'll h a v e to do this next y e a r with m o r e people," r e m a r k e d Schipper. Next Saturday, in the Kletz, SAC will present Dan Deffenbaugh. Deffenbaugh is a senior who plays frequently for The Creperie; his repertoire includes J a m e s Taylor, E a g l e s , some original music and some bluegrass. WTAS will simulcast the concert, which will s t a r t at 7:50 p.m.

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ning the m a j o r i t y . The present South African g o v e r n m e n t is in a stable situation when c o m p a r e d to the other, black g o v e r n m e n t s of the African continent. When one says, based on a moral conviction, that blacks should rule, one should consider the s u f f e r i n g that would take place in a civil w a r . Does that not deserve moral consideration? Another consideration should be the lives that the blacks actually have to live under the present government and the wages they e a r n . It is t r u e that the blacks do not hold positions as high as the white people, doing most of the m a n u a l and unskilled labor. But this also h a s to be qualified by placing it relative to the situation for blacks in the rest of the African countries; when this is done it can be seen that the w a g e s e a r n e d a r e no better in these countries with economies that a r e hurt by the social and political conflict. The p r i m a r y opposition to the South Africans comes f r o m the United Nations. Here is an organization dominated by newly independent Third World countries, with strong leanings to the left. P a r t of the "New World O r d e r " proposed by this group of nations is control of their little countries by the " s u p p r e s s e d " peoples of the world instead of the " e v i l "

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Lacrosse charges to 4-0 record T h e Hope L a c r o s s e Club is off to its best regular-season s t a r t e v e r by winnnlng its first four outings in a s m a n y tries. L a s t week the D u t c h m e n d e f e a t e d the MSU Jayvees 14-5 and stopped the Chicago L a c r o s s e Club's B t e a m 9-8 In a thrilling come-from-behind victory. Hope t r a v e l e d to E a s t Lansing Tuesday, April 7, in anticipation of a face-off with the S p a r t a n s ' highly touted v a r s i t y , but a scheduling e r r o r p r e v e n t e d that. In a g a m e m a r k e d by e r r o r s , Hope opened up a 3-0 lead early in the first q u a r t e r . Hope set a fast scoring p a c e a s

senior middle G r e g Bekius p u m p e d in his nrst goal of the season to s t a r t t h e scoring. The Dutch continued to p u m p the ball Into the net; J a m i e " C h i p s " Robertson, P e t e Van E e n e n a a m and M a r k L a m a n all scored their second goals of the y e a r as John Cronk and Jeff Hanson led the attack. Hope went on to easily d o m i n a t e MSU 14-5 behind a sterling two-goal perf o r m a n c e by G r e g Bekius and an overwhelming hard-hitting defensive effort The g a m e provided m a n y lessons for the

Men's track victorious by Steve Underwood Hope's m e n ' s t r a c k t e a m opened up the Ml A A dual meet season with two e a s y wins over the l e a g u e ' s celler-dwellers. The first victory w a s at a home meet on Wednesday. April 8, when Hope d e f e a t e d Olivet 124-24. Then the Dutch traveled to Adrian, where, under what coach Gordon B r e w e r called " a d v e r s e conditions," they ripped a p a r t the Bulldogs, 120-30. The men will travel to the F e r r i s State Invitational with the w o m e n ' s track t e a m on S a t u r d a y , and will e n t e r t a i n Aquinas and G R J C at home on Wednesday. This w e e k ' s highlights by event: WEIGHTS — Captain Scott Van Der Meulen won the shotput in both m e e t s and had an impressive d i s t a n c e of 47 , 4" in the meet against Olivet. Van Der Meulen was second in the discus to Bill M a u r e n . who also won twice. M a u r e n ' s best fling was 139'9". M a u r e n also won the Olivet javelin in 173'9". Keith Lynes had a strong put of 42'2.5" in the Olivet m e e t . VERTICAL J U M P S - Pole vaulter Jon L u n d e r b e r g easily d e f e a t e d his opponents in both meets. High j u m p e r Chris F l e m ing also won twice, clearing G T ' at Adrian, barely m i s s i n g 6 ' 6 " . HORIZONTAL J U M P S - Tom Hop hopped to two super j u m p s at Adrian, winning the long j u m p in 21'10". then skipping 4 r 9 . 5 " in the triple jump. J o h n Coughenour had a 20'8.5" second p l a c e behind Hop's 20'IT' in the Olivet m e e t , while Bill Hoekstra led a sweep in the Olivet triple j u m p SPRINTS — D a v e McKinnev led a

sweep in the l#0-meter at Adrian, nosing out Hop and Coughenour in 11.32 seconds. These three and Bob Constant also won the A d r i a n 400-meter r e l a y . Steve Cameron won the 200 at Adrian in 23.3 and had a powerful 51.3 split to lead off the 1600-meter relay. With^strong r u n s by Gregg Sturrus, Kurt DeVette and Mark Whiting, the f o u r s o m e turned in a winning time of 3:27.7. Whiting nipped DeVette in the Olivet 400-meter. Both were under 52 seconds. H U R D L E S — F l e m i n g w a s all smiles a f t e r a personal best of 57.9 seconds in the 400 hurdles. He w a s just a h e a d of Tim Dawes (who also broke 1:00). Jeff Schut was Hope's best over the 110-meter barriers. winning at Adrian and getting second against Olivet. MIDDLE DISTANCES Mark Southwell uncorked a p a i r of d e v a s t a t i n g kicks, both in the final turn, to win the 1500- and 800-meter r a c e s at Olivet in 4 02.8 and 1:58.2. respectively. T e a m m a t e L a r r y Kortering took South in the Alma 1500 ( 4:06.9), before Soutti won the 800 there. LONG DISTANCES - With the opposition providing little opposition, four different D u t c h m e n have notched wins. John Victor won the 5000-meter (15:37.2) Wednesday, and Mark Northuis ran away with it S a t u r d a y (15:51.8). L a r r y Fischer, 33:26.8, and Steve Underwood. 31:28.7. t r a d e d 10.000-meter v i c t o r i e s . Dick Hoekstra. 5000. and M a r t y S h o e n m a k e r . 10,000, have turned in strong second place finishes.

Dutch that w e r e to prove useful S a t u r d a y , April 11, against the Chicago L a c r o s s e Club. On a wet but p l a y a b l e Van R a a l t e field. the D u t c h m e n anticipated a good g a m e against the Chicago L a c r o s s e Club. T h e first q u a r t e r opened with junior M a r k Van Gesel scoring within two m i n u t e s of the opening whistles. Attack m a n J o h n Cronk scored m i n u t e s l a t e r and the g a m e was underway. Second q u a r t e r antics showed Hope still capitalizing on offense. The third q u a r t e r w a s another story, though. A rallying Chicago t e a m , taking a d v a n t a g e of n u m e r o u s m a n - u p situations caused by

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H o p e p e n a l t i e s , d u m p e d in thret? u n a n s w e r e d goals to lead 6-4 by the s t a r t of the fourth q u a r t e r . Finally things c a m e together in the fourth q u a r t e r and scoring b e c a m e m o r e f r e q u e n t for the D u t c h m e n ; Cronk, C a r a v e l l a and Craig" Garfield all contributed to n a r r o w i n g the g a p to 7-8. B r a d Cook salvaged t h e g a m e and sent it into o v e r t i m e when he scooped up a loose ball > and quick-sticked by the goalie with just — t* minutes r e m a i n i n g . The g a m e ended with r a p i c t u r e - p e r f e c t w i n n i n g goal by s Caravella, with t h e assist coming f r o m i P e t e Van E e n e n a a m . Hope h a s u p c o m i n g g a m e s this week against Notre D a m e and Detroit C.C.

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Men's tennis opens well After a spring-vacation trip south, during which they won their l a s t t h r e e matches to m a k e the journey record 5-3, the m e n ' s tennis t e a m began its n o r t h e r n season by winning two out of three. The first opponent in the cold w a s Aquinas, in a non-conference dual, whom the n e t t e r s p r o m p t l y d e f e a t e d 5-4. Then, however, the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n took on Division II G r a n d Valley State College, but the men f r o m Allendale showed little m e r c y for Hope, trouncing the Dutch 8-1. S a t u r d a y w a s just the opposite and then some, as in their first league contest Hope

w a s able to demolish the Bulldogs 9-0. F o r the year, P a u l B o e r s m a is leading the way in singles p e r c e n t a g e s at 7-4, while Derrick V e l a r d e is 6-4. and captain Doug Ruch. J a y Updegraff and Mark Johnson a r e all 6-5. In doubles, Johnson is 7-3 with various p a r t n e r s , Updegraff 6-2, and John Christian 6-3, while Jeff P l o m e r is 4-1. all with Johnson. The men will t r a v e l to K a l a m a z o o Friday for a two-day Great L a k e s Conf e r e n c e Association (GLCA) t o u r n a m e n t .

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Sports

Women's track races to the top by Steve Underwood

O •c U J J o u a c x

F a c e d with their two toughest opp o n e i t s in the opening w e e k of MIAA dual-meet compeition, the Hope w o m e n ' s t r a c k t e a m got their act t o g e t h e r quickly, and c a m e u p with a pair of big victories. A 159-123 decision over Calvin on Thursday, April 9, followed by a IGO^-l^Va triumph against Alma Saturday, established the Dutch as t h e t e a m to beat in the MIAA. Coach R u s s DeVette cited a "good combination of individual p e r f o r m a n c e s with d e p t h " and a "willingness to m o v e a r o u n d , " or p a r t i c i p a t e in e v e n t s when needed, a s t h e u l t i m a t e f a c t o r s . H a v i n g both m e e t s at h o m e p r o b a b l y didn't hurt, either. The w o m e n hosted Olivet, St. M a r y ' s and GVSC last T u e s d a y ; they will travel with the m e n to the F e r r i s S t a t e Invitational S a t u r d a y , and r e t u r n to host Albion next Wednesday. H e r e a r e event-by-event highlights of the w o m e n ' s big week. W E I G H T S — School r e c o r d s fell like dominos in t h e weights — four in all. Kathy Fox led the assault, setting stand a r d s in the shotput, at S S ' S V , a n d the javelin, 96', in the Calvin m e e t . She won

t h e shot in both m e e t s , and w a s second twice in spear-chucking. Sue Williams won the discus in r e c o r d d i s t a n c e vs. Calvin, only to b r e a k it with a r u n n e r - u p tossof H O ' V to A l m a ' s Lisa K a p p l a t e r .

kicked l a t e to d e f e a t A l m a d i s t a n c e machine L i s a Thocher by t h r e e seconds in what is p r o b a b l y t h e best 1500 in MIAA history. She also won the Calvin 1500 and won the 800 both m e e t s , with two 2:27s.

LONG DISTANCES Kim Brown kicked late to edge t e a m m a t e Wendy S h o e n m a k e r in the Calvin 3000-meter in 11:45.8. E a r l i e r , S h o e n m a k e r e d g e d Brown for third in the 1500 in 5:25. Nancy

J U M P S - M a r g e Deckard won the long jump twice, her best effort a 15'8" against

Carol Bringman had a fine 2:31.5 for second in the Calvin 800.

Ritchie is making a strong comeback from injury.

Calvin. Carol Miknis and Chris Stegehuis h a v e both gone o v e r 15'. Stegehuis won the high j u m p on T h u r s d a y at 4'10 M , while Kay V a n d e r E e m s went 4'8" to win S a t u r day. S P R I N T S — T h e 400-meter relay s q u a d of Nancy Highlander, Deb L o c k h a r t , J e a n i n e Pilon a n d Lisa DeVette won twice, c r a c k i n g the school r e c o r d with a 52.00 vs. Calvin. L o c k h a r t h a d her own r e c o r d in the 100-meter h u r d l e s that d a y in 15.72. She also took the 100 d a s h and t h e hurdles vs. Alma. DeVette w a s hot in other events in the Calvin m e e t as well. She blazed to a Hope r e c o r d 1:01.9 in t h e 400-meter and won the 200-meter in addition. M I D D L E DISTANCES - Captain Val Hendrickson had p e r h a p s the most imp r e s s i v e p e r f o r m a n c e of the week — a scorching school record, 4:49.7 in t h e 1500-meter. Trailing most of the race, she

Archery hits mark byKarlineMuir The w o m e n of the a r c h e r y t e a m s t a r t e d their season off with a bullseye this p a s t T u e s d a y with a win a g a i n s t A l m a . Combining for t h e winning s c o r e of 1164 points to A l m a ' s 1084 w e r e K a r l i n e M u i r with 459 points (of a possible 600), L e a h F i s h e r with 403 and Carol R y s k a m p with 302; Sharon McKee rounded out the fourperson t e a m with a 262. ( F o u r people shoot for s c o r e but only the top t h r e e a r e added t o g e t h e r for the final t e a m score.) Wendy Hanson, who w a s in fine f o r m but shooting exhibition that day, shot a very good 379. S a t u r d a y the t e a m of Muir, R y s k a m p and F i s h e r t r a v e l e d with coach Grondin

to G r a n d Blanc to c o m p e t e in t h e Michigan Collegiate A r c h e r y Championship. The other schools r e p r e s e n t e d w e r e Kirtland, Albion, Delta, K a l a m a z o o a n d U of M, with a total of 32 p a r t i c i p a n t s —14 of t h e m women. Muir c a m e in fifth in individuals, F i s h e r w a s sixth a n d R y s k a m p eighth. It doesn't sound v e r y i m p r e s s i v e until added together to f o r m t h e secondp l a c e w o m e n ' s t e a m at the txwirnament, topped by K-zoo's 1386 to H o p e ' s 1220. Albion took third with a 1156. They m e t T u e s d a y with Albion in Dow at 3 p . m . ; T h u r s d a y they travel to K a l a m a z o o ; Monday, April 20 they go to A l m a ; and they a r e h o m e a g a i n April 22, f a c i n g K-zoo again at 3 p . m .

*

••

-. /

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y-

mmm A Hope student takes advantage of the warm weather to work on his tennis game, (photo by Paul Paarlberg)

Softball team defeats Calvin • The softball t e a m e x p e r i e n c e d t h e yoyo s y n d r o m e last week as they split two league double-headers for a s t a n d i n g record of two wins and two losses. Something does not seem to click f o n j h e second g a m e s of the double-headers, as the first g a m e s a r e always the s u r e win. In a m a t c h - u p against Adrian last Wednesday, t h e Dutch s t a r t e d the s e r i e s on the right foot by d e f e a t i n g the Bulldogs 3-1. P a m C u s h m a n s t a r t e d at p i t c h e r for the first g a m e , only to be relieved by Kerri I s r a e l s in the seventh. C u s h m a n picked up the win with t h r e e strike-outs and four hits. F a y e - R a y e B e r e n s led the offense a s she went two for t h r e e at the p l a t e and slugged in an R B I ; B e r e n s is presently a v e r a g i n g .454 with 15 total bases. I s r a e l s also exhibited a strong bat during t h e g a m e , a s she drilled a t r i p l e to left c e n t e r a n d w a s eventually driven in by Liz G r i m e s ' hit to the third b a s e m a n . The g a m e h a d been tied until t h a t point. The second g a m e proved to be less eventful, as the Dutch w e n t down in defeat 6-5. Half of the g a m e w a s p l a y e d in the dim light of t h e evening, and it w a s a p p a r e n t t h a t this side-effect w a s giving

the Dutch s o m e p r o b l e m s . I s r a e l s w a s on the mound for the second duel and struck out six victims while allowing eight hits. Offensively it w a s Susie T a g u e who led the swinging b a t s by going two for four with a double and a triple. Last S a t u r d a y ' s hot contest against arch-rival Calvin ended up with the s a m e results as that a g a i n s t Adrian. The first g a m e w a s easily won, the second w a s closely lost. C u s h m a n again s t a r t e d a s p i t c h e r but faced s o m e p r o b l e m s in the top of the third; I s r a e l s went in a s relief and took the win with six strike-outs and four hits. Senior N a n c y Kropf h a d a good day at the p l a t e by swinging two for t h r e e with two singles, a n d B e r e n s a g a i n showed off h e r batting e x p e r t i s e a s she w a s two for four, also with two singles. An offensive rally in the sixth inning sent Hope through its e n t i r e line-up b e f o r e all t h r e e outs w e r e accomplished. Six r u n s w e r e scored, with Lynn F r a n k responsible for b a t t i n g in two of the six. F i n a l score of the first g a m e : 9-1, Dutch. T h e second g a m e followed in the m a n n e r of the second g a m e with A d r i a n ; the D u t c h ended closely in d e f e a t , 3-2.

TOMMY L. Is presently quarantined with a

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rare strain of public embarrassment which doctors fear may prove fatal. Though the cause is unknown, it may be linked to late-

TO S.D.: Happy Birthday. I love you. I love you. Lovingly, ?

night calls received f r o m k n o w n foot fetishists this week. Rabbis are concerned for his soul:

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school year. Call Mary, 396-1569. DO YOU LIVE in New York City or close by? Well, guess what you can do for f r e e ! ? Take a

J.L. MURPHY HAIRSTYLING Metis and Women's Haircuts $6 Perms $25-$30

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French assistant home and be her guide for TALES OF. HOFFMAN-Tickets for this beautiful

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KIM BIERBAUM -Spring is here: little bunnies

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Saturday.

8

p.m.

WTAS

simulcast

6)0

04-16-1981  
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