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freedom Hope College

This is an e n t i r e l y s t u d e n t staff f u n d e d i s s u e

F u n d i n g was raised by the d o n a t i o n s of s u p p o r t i n g f a c u l t y

Three men arrested on outskirts of campus Handcuffed man ran through back yards of cottages on 14th Street Erin L'Hotta INFOCUS EDTTOR Three m e n w e r e arrested inbetween 14,h and 15'h Slrcets on Columbia Avenue on April 5. Jeremy Schoen, officer of the Holland Police Deparlmeni, said [he men were arresicd f o r "a variety of reasons." T h i s included Jarccny, warrant for outstanding m i s d e m e a n o r , hindrance of an o f f i c e r ' s investigation, possession of marijuana and presence of an illegal substance while released on bond. Schoen was driving on Columbia A v e n u e a r o u n d 8 : 2 0 p.m.

when he pulled Qver the three men because of a loud m u f f l e r that met an e q u i p m e n t violation. H e also n o t e d that the c a r ' s d e s c r i p t i o n matched that of a man charged with larceny. " W h e n I i d e n t i f i e d the car, I called for back u p o f ' t w o undercover officers," Schoen said. "After I told the driver to gel out of the car, he w a s u n c o o p e r a t i v e . 1 inferred thai he w a s in possession of c o n t r a b a n d and I knew that I needed backup assistance," Schoen said. Schoen handcuffed the driver and brought him into the backseat of the

police car. T h e undercover o f f i c e r s arrived at the scene pretending to be college students relaxing on the f r o n t lawn of D i e k e m a C o t t a g e across the street. t4 I brought the driver into the backseat of the c a r and tried talking to him. I could smell marijuana on the guy, so 1 started patting him down. S o m e h o w I lost my grip and he took off," Schoen said. T h e driver ran out of the car toward I4 lh Street. He sprinted past H i n k a m p C o t t a g e , t h r o u g h the backyard of Kleinhekscl Cottage and hopped the fences of neighboring houses while handcuffed.

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PHOTO BY ERIN L HOTTA

Three men were arrested on Columbia Avenue after being pulled over in the above car for a traffic violation that led to multiple charges, including larceny.

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Students participate in Day of Silence Nick Engel SENIOR STAFF W R I E R

Last W e d n e s d a y an anonym o u s group of students chalked the sidewalks in support of the T h e National D a y of Silence in h o p e s of leaving the c a m p u s ^ w i t h a " m e s s a g e of l o v e . " T h e students, writing phrases such as, ' T o d a y is L o v e " and "Jesus Loves All " chalked the sidewalks and pathways of the c a m p u s . T h e y especially targeted Dimnent Chapel, but sidewalks next to the Dow, Phelps, a n d Van Z o e r e n a l s o h a d c h a l k i n g s by t h e d o o r w a y s . T h e chalkings were spread by an anonymous group of students

and not the H o p e S e x u a l i t y Roundtable: A Forum for G a y and Straight Students, the group responsible for organizing H o p e ' s chapter of the National Day of Silence. " I w a s n o t i n v o l v e d in t h e chalkings, but i did appreciate seeing them as I walked around camp u s , " said B a i l e y M a r t i n ( ' 0 5 ) , Sexuality Roundtable president. S o m e students felt that the messages weren't clear enough on their s u p p o r t of the D a y of S i l e n c e . " A t first 1 didn't m a k e the connection between the Day of Silence and the chalkings. Later somebody told me about it, so t h a t ' s h o w I found out," said Joe Vasko ('07). "I think that maybe the chalkings

could have been more effective for the event if they had said things like " T h i n k of the voices you are not hearing today" or "What are you going to do to end the Silence.... (T)hat could h a v e gotten p e o p l e thinking a little," Martin said. O n e of the students behind the chalking felt that the messages were quite effective. H e said that their goal was only to make people think. Another felt leaving the messages purposely vague encouraged m o r e critical t h o u g h t a m o n g students. A n o t h e r of t h e s t u d e n t s e x plained that the specific references to the Day of Silence were used sparingly because of a worry that all the messages would be erased.

Premier speaker comes to Hope

Campus Briefs

On April 12, the English Department paid $ 10,000 for guest speaker Dr. Ed Folsom to speak about renowned poet Walt Whitman. Folsom was the featured speaker for this y e a r ' s annual DeGraaf Lecture at Hope College. Folsom is also known as the "dean" of Whitman scholars. He has received numerous awards for his scholarly works including mutlitple b o o k s and electronic media focused on Whitman.

On O c t o b e r 11, 2004, chalkings w r i t t e n to a d v e r t i s e a n d b r i n g awareness to National C o m i n g Out Day were washed out. "I think they were there to show continued support and to help put the c a m p u s in a positive f r a m e of mind about the Day of Silence and to help explain what it is really all about: treating all our neighbors, regardless of their sexuality, with love and r e s p e c t , " said Helen Fylstra ( ' 0 5 ) , vice-president of the Hope Sexuality Roundtable. "(l)f it brought a smile to o n e person's face, then I think it's j o b well done," Martin said. Day of Silence is a nationally recognized youth movement that seeks

to "creat(e) s a f e r schools for all, r e g a r d l e s s of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression," according to the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, a national supporter of this new social movement on campuses. T h e first protest was organized at the U n i v e r s i t y of Virginia in 1996. In 2002, the seventh annual Day of Silence saw participation at over 1,900 colleges, and middle and high s c h o o l s a c r o s s the country. H o p e ' s D a y of S i l e n c e is cosponsored by the Sexual Issues Prog r a m m i n g Committee, the Crossr o a d s P r o j e c t , and the W o m e n ' s Studies Department.

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Students appear on local TV Twenty eight Hope students will present research at the 19th National C o n f e r e n c e on Undergraduate Research ( N C U R ) , being held at the Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., on Wednesday-Saturday, April 20-23.The conference will feature original w o r k s in the fields of art, biology, chemistry. communication, education, kinesiology, nursing and more.

Inside il

Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

AIDS awareness spreads Campus 2

Spring book reviews Arts 3

Hope versus Ml State Features 4

Professor Green Features 5


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CAMPUS BEAT

A p r i l 15, 2 0 0 5

AIDS awareness brings campus to life Evelyn Daniel SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Al ihc Gathering on Jan. 2S. Prayer of Jabcz author Brucc Wilkinson issued lo H o p e students a call to action. S p e a k i n g about G o d ' s d r e a m f o r e a c h of h i s p e o p l e . Wilkinson explained h i s o w n "big d r e a m " lo c o m b a t a big i s s u e - r i h e AIDS crisis that has struck the Alrican continent. He told personal storieyof h o w his faith in God made it possible to fulfill his d r e a m , o v e r c o m i n g the obstacles he faced. T h e n , dramatically, he asked all of those present w h o felt called lo the same dream lo commit on the spot to joining him, lo spend a m o n t h in A f r i c a themselves and do iheir pari. In loial, approximately 190 students agreed lo go on the trip wilh Wilkinson's " D r e a m for A1 l i e u " p r o g r a m that mghl. Hope students would join with college .students f r o m across the country and around the world to preach a message of abstinence to high school students in South A f r i c a and Swaziland to help stop the spread of AIDS. Although they did not know al the time which country they w e r e travelling to, h o w they w o u l d pay. o r h o w their parents and e m p l o y e r s w o u l d respond, their dream w a s lo m a k e a difference, and they w e r e c o m m i t t e d to making it happen. Now, with a f e w more details about their planned mission, the students are scrambling

to gel donations a n d prepare lor their irip. A s a non-profit organization, D r e a m for A f rica d o e s not refund received trip donations if travellers have not paid in full by the deadline. although they m a y choose within 30 d a y s to use the money toward another trip. As a result, to help their peers reach their goal in time, many Hope students have been joining together lo raise both donations and A I D S awareness. On April 2. students held a free desscrl night in the Maas auditorium, with all donations benefiting Dream f o r Africa. Although many of t h t 150 to 200 people w h o planned and attended the event were not travelling to Africa, they fell that the cause was well worth their time and money. ' T h o u g h I d i d n ' l feel called to go. I fell called to help in some way. I knew I needed to do something," said J a m e s Post ("06). In the.past several monlh.s r Xhe A I D S crisis has bec'opie a far more visible issue on H o p e ' s c a m p u s : O n e siudent group, w h o led chapel on April 6. has "been meeting every other week during ihe s c ^ o o l ^ e a r 4o discuss h o w lo best r a i s e a w ^ e n e s s of HIV and AIDS. T h e students joiftpd wilh C h d s p a n u i y ' dergraduates nationwide at the Siudent A I D S S u m m i t at Wheaton Col lege'in. mid-February. T h e y c a m e back wilh a bbtter-undcrstanding of the scale of the issue and ideas to

bring the H I V / A I D S discussion lo Hope. " A I D S is such a m a m m o t h issue in the world," said Will Neltlelon (*07), w h o took part in the s u m m i l a n d chapel service. When considering h o w best to 'bVing the I s s u e ' l o the attention of cafopus, the students realized that the raw numbers might be too m a m m o t h to even comprehend. "You c a n ' t understand what 2 6 million dead means, or what 8 0 million projected dead really means. We decided lb lake a more personal approach.'* Neltlelon said. Al the Chapel scrvice, students told the stories of four people and their families, scattered throughout the world, w h o had contracted HIV.,An orphan contracted the virus through coniaminated vaccination needles and spread il lhrough drug use. A w i f e received it by staying faithful to her HIV-positive. a d u l t e r o u s h u s b a n d . By h u m a n i z i n g AIDS, their hope w a s t o remove some of the stereotypes and social stigmas that often accompany it. -Despite the great success at chapel, many tear that the current enthusiasm op c a m p u s will fade loo quickly, wilh little qclion. " W e all c a m e out of chapel f c e f t p ^ v e r ^ ' ' excited about it, but I fear that rjb ope is going to go out and actually do a ^ ' f h i n g . It's good to lay the seeds, but those ^eeds need lo.be nurtured," Post said. " T h e r e Should be more action taken, whether helping'iirocganization or praying more o r even going over r to Africa." | : -• r For Neltlelon and the others involved, increased awjireness of H I V / A I D S j s ^ h e ' n e c x

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essary first $tep toward eventual action,. "Studenls should leari1: as much as they can, read about it, Google it. You have to give yourself;a background and discern what i t ' all means. Thai gives you a foundation for

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P H O T O S BY J A M E S

Free dessert night, held on April 2, raised funding for 150 to 200 students participating in the Dream for Africa program. The event raised more than $1,200 for the cause.

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how to act," Neltlelon said. As fcvjdent by the 190 students travelling to A f r i c a this s u m m e r . H o p e studenls are ready!to create change. "We have an audie n c e w h o is y e a r n i n g f o r social j u s t i c e , " Netllcton said. " ( A I D S ] is not £ o i n g to go apywhere. It's something thai our generation

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Startling Statistics * RIDS kills 8,000 people euery day, or t h e equlualent o f one person euery t e n seconds. * Rn e s t i m a t e d 3 9 . 4 million people are liuing m i t h HIU/RIOS u j o r l d u j i d e . * 500,000 c h i l d r e n u n der 15 die o f RIDS each year. 14 m i l l i o n children haue lost one or b o t h p a r e n t s to the disease. * The t i n y south Rfrican n a t i o n of Swaziland has one o f the highest rates o f HIU/ RIDS in the uiorld, u i i t h 38.8% o f the adult p o p u l a t i o n i n fected. Source: Ruert.org and UJHD

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You mieht not want to read this SHEA T i

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It might just change everything. In April 2 0 0 2 , T h e C a m b o d i a Daily told R e y ' s story. In m a n y ways, h e ' s probably much like you. Twenty-one years old, middle class, university student. He likes his motorbike, f a s h i o n a b l e clothes, and hanging around wilh friends. He also likes gang-raping prostitutes. In C a m b o d i a ' s c a p i t a l c i t y , Phnom Penh, this pastime is known as bauk. Generally, it looks something like this: T w o b o y s purchase a prostitute f o r $ 6 and lake her to a liny p l y w o o d room, rented for $ 1.50. There, about ten of the boys' friends are waiting. A s an act of camaraderie and power, diey spend the night raping the prostitute. A 2004 N G O study found that o n e in three people between a g e s 13 and 28 knew s o m e o n e involved in bauk. And only about 13% of those s u r v e y e d thought raping a prostitute was wrong. Women in C a m b o d i a usually end u p in prostitution because of poverty. T h e average yearly income of THE

C a m b o d i a n s is US $ 3 1 0 (that of A m e r i c a n s is US $ 3 7 , 6 1 0 ) . F o r some, this m e a n s a choice between hunger and prostitution. Others, though on a search for a stable exi s t e n c e , n e v e r g e l lo m a k e that choice. . Sex traffickers promise jobs in restaurants or markets to w o m e n in poverty, then delivers t h e m to a brothel instead. They sell the deceived w o m a n to the brothel o w n e r w h o doubles the price, calls it debt, begins charging interest, and puts her to work. C a m b o d i a ' s population roughly equals that of New York City, and sex s l a v e s n u m b e r no less than 55,000, the population of Holland, Zeeland, and Jenison combined. Even more alarmingly, 3 5 % of those enslaved are children. A N e w York T i m e s article tells the story of 15-year-old Srey Raih, a "typical" victim of trafficking. She w a s promised a dish-washing job. Traffickers instead delivered her to a M a l a y s i a n brothel where she was forced to work 15 hour days, seven days a week, without pay o r access lo contraceptives.

Despite threat of murder, Srey Rath escaped and appealed to police. They responded by arresting her for illegal immigration. After a year in prison, a Malaysian p o l i c e m a n d r o v e Srey Rath a w a y and sold her to a taxi driver. T h e taxi driver sold her to a Thai policeman. And the policeman sold her to a brothel where she spent two more months before a risky escape. In C a m b o d i a , as well as in Malaysia, T h a i l a n d , and the Philippines, police often contribute to the p r o b l e m m o r e t h a n a l l e v i a t e it. Even when the victims of trafficking succeed in filing a convicting report, c r i m i n a l s a r e s e l d o m arrested. W h i l e the t r a f f i c k e r s run free, their victims seldom do. Some fear the c o n s e q u e n c e s of e s c a p e attempts. M a n y die of AIDS. S o m e escape or are liberated, but end u p back in brothels, driven by drug addiction or the stigmas surrounding their previous profession. T h o s e w h o do b e c o m e free still face poverty and the fear planted deep inside of them. As privileged college studenls in

the United Slates, w e may feel paralyzed by the tangle of sex-related p r o b l e m s in C a m b o d i a . But the truth is that w e can help. T h e basic steps are these: learn, share, act. L e a r n . Start with the C a m b o d i a profile at w w w . b b c . c o . u k . T h e n check out www.frcctheslaves.neu tislavery.org" www.antislavery.org, www.amnesty.org,www.ijm.org, and www.hrw.org. S h a r e . O n c e y o u ' v e researched, educate. Tell your f r i e n d s , your parents, your Bible study, your sorority o r fraternity, your congressm a n (Pete H o e k s t r a : 184 S o u t h R i v e r A v e n u e ; 3 9 5 - 0 0 3 0 ) . Ask hard questions of businesses you support, churches you attend, and organizations you participate in. Find out what they're going to d o to improve the situation and hold t h e m accountable. A c t , D o n a t e to o r g a n i z a t i o n s such as International Justice Mission fwww.iim.com) or other credible human rights groups. Get your group involved whether y o u ' r e a m e m b e r of Hope D e m o crats or Republicans, Nurses Chris-

tian Fellowship, or Greek Life. Join a group whose explicit focus is h u m a n rights. T h i s could mean the c a m p u s H I V / A I D S group. Amnesty International, W o m e n ' s Issues Organization, Juslice League, or others. G o to the heart of the problem. H u m a n r i g h t s o r g a n i z a t i o n s in Southeast Asia need college graduates to intern, volunteer, or work full time. Short-term, long-term, you decide. We can take steps to untangle these complex problems. In fact, as m e m b e r s of a global community seeking justice for all, w e must. I told you this might just change everything. Justice League is a group of students try ing to ask and answer hard questions about social justice. These students aim to discern God's definition of justice, perpetuate conversation on campus, and take steps toward a more just community, country, and world. For more information, contact Lynnae Ruberg or Kirs ten PIess via campus email.

COLUMNIST WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE MEMBERS OF JUSTICE LEAGUE FOR THEIR ASSISTANCE WITH THIS ARTICLE,


ARTISTICISM

A p r i l 15, 2 0 0 5

An Empty Pier, Three Days Before the Death of Winter Nicholas Engel S E N I O R S T A F F REPORTER

S o it w a s t h a i m y f o o t s t e p s brought me to the edge of an icy pier. N o o n e w a s t h e r e ; p e o p l e w o n ' t be coming to the lakeshore until the air warms a little. It was just a b o v e f r e e z i n g . All f o r the better. I didn't want people around right now. T w o more footsteps and I stood on the ice of the pier. S u n l i g h t assailed the ice, promising its death within days, a deaih I was powerless to prevent. I longed f o r the cover of rainclouds. For God so loved the w o r l d that he f o r m e d rain, t h a t e v e r y few d a y s the earth w o u l d creatc the tears His children had not the courage to shed—tears to w a s h away the stains of their excess. T h e r e is l i g h t e v e r y w h e r e . Reflections f r o m the lake, the ice. the glass from a buoy, all mingle in a kaleidoscope of white haze. M y vision blurs, mirroring for a second a mind forever haunted by the phantom of a girl w h o left without slaying and wounded without drawing blood. 1 opt to k e e p my e y e s open. Much of the ground here is still covered in ice. O n e slip and my b o d y would fall out from under me, s m a s h i n g o v e r the r o c k s b e l o w , m u c h like the ice d r i p p i n g haphazardly o n t o them now. T h e individual drops sound almost o r c h e s t r a t e d , a s if the ice w a s a unified society of water droplets, f r o z e n in place and silently aching f o r their liberation. F o r a moment, I contemplate also finding my liberation on the rocks, next to the droplets, wondering what sound my b o d y w o u l d m a k e as it d e t a c h e d from human society. But there w a s no O n e else there to hear it, for the pier was empty; and at that m o m e n t I k n e w beyond doubt that G o d had left us, and that w c are, all of us, impossibly Alone.

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A x T c h o r

The Mission: In Memory of the Living Film review Nicholas Engel

Two factions formed KOHI KT DlvNIKO over h o w best to fight I the European mercenaries advancing on the mission. One. led by n e a r l y a l l of t h e Jesuit priests, waited in ambush for the mercenaries. Their h o p e w a s to route the force before they could reach the w o m e n and c h i l d r e n b a c k at t h e mission. The second group didn't try to fight at all. It c o n s i s t e d o f t h e c o m m u n i t y ' s children, the v i l a g e ' s m e n a n d w o m e n w h o chose not to fight, and o n e lone Jesuit, F a t h e r G a b r i e l . who led the community in choral singing within the chapel. He felt very strongly that if G o d is love, thpn there w a s no place for the sword on this earth. H e h o p e d the p o w e r of G o d . w i e l d e d nonviolently. would protect the c o m m u n i t y more fully than anything he could have done

t h e d e s p a i r e t c h e d all over his face. T h e n , as HE his head falls back, his eyes catch sight of the E u c h a r i s t h e l d u p by Father Gabriel. His face clears a little, and the camera shows him a l m o s t p e a c e f u l as h e falls into death. Ten seconds later the mercenaries hit Father Gabriel. He falls, but a half-second frame captured another believer picking up the Eucharist and continuing the march. The community d e p i c t e d in the m o v i e h a d no g o o d c h o i c e s ; anything they could c h o o s e w o u l d e n d in death o r slavery for t h e m s e l v e s and their families. Yet most of them chose to take a nonviolent approach: why? P e r h a p s the r e v o l u t i o n a r i e s are r i g h t ; perhaps it is better for the oppressed to take u p a r m s and overthrow their oppressors in rebellion. Ho we v e r , The Mission d o e s n ' t take that stance. T h e mercenaries who fired on innocent children will have to live with the m e m o r y of their actions f o r the rest of their lives. T h e y took innocent life, and that k n o w l e d g e m i g h t p o s s i b l y b e e n o u g h to change the mercenaries' hearts. T h e violent resisters, on the other hand, g a v e the mercenaries a reason to fight back and no reason to d o u b t the righteousness of their Jf.RKNn IRONS

MISSION

SENIOR STAFF R E P O R T E R

" N e v e r d o u b t t h a t a s m a l l g r o u p of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." Margaret Mead, an American anthropologist of the World War II era. said this towards the end of almost thirty years of fieldwork in the South Pacific. T h e world was suffering horrific human calastrophc and s o c i e t y w a s i n c r e a s i n g l y s u c c u m b i n g to pessimism about people's capacity for change. Mead didn't believe that. Her experiences in the South Pacific were enough to prove, to her at least, that the cultural patterns of racism, warfare, and environmental destruction s w e e p i n g Europe at that time were learned, that they weren't inherent to the human condition, and that there w a s some glimmer of hope for the world. Mead saw hope where there w a s none. Times have changed since the ' 4 0 ^ , and it s e e m s that more people believe in M e a d ' s quote than ever before. T h e desire to affect c h a n g e is there f o r m a n y of us. but o n e question remains; h o w d o you do it? The Mission tries to find an answer. It's a 1 9 8 6 f i l m d e p i c t i n g a b a n d of J e s u i t missionaries seeking to bring the teachings of J e s u s Christ to native South Americans. T h e Jesuits are incredibly successful, until political upheaval in the Old World threatens to destroy the fledgling mission and kill o r enslave the native converts. T h e end of the film is a portrayal of both the Jesuits' and the native South Americans' s t r u g g l e to s a v e t h e m i s s i o n s a n d t h e i r c o m m u n i t y ' s newly-discovered w a y of life. It w a s n ' t a unified resistance, however.

in violence. T h e planned a m b u s h failed to stop the advancing Europeans, and soon children and w o m e n could see the mercenaries, a r m e d with muskets and artillery, marching on their village. W h e n they set the chapel a l i g h t Father Gabriel brought e v e r y o n e o u ts id e and, with the Holy Eucharist raised, led a p r o c e s s i o n right t o w a r d s the hostile mercenaries. T h e r e is a p o i g n a n t s c e n e d u r i n g the p r o c e s s i o n of t h e l e a d e r of the v i o l e n t r e s i s t o r s : R o d r i g o M e n d o z a . H e f a lls , riddled with bullets and realizing that his a m b u s h will inevitably fail. You can see

actions. The Mission offers unique insight to those of us w h o have never experienced losing our homes and way of life to a force w e can't oppose.

Fancy a springtime read? Perhaps these novels can entertain Book reviews Evelyn Daniel SENIOR S T A F F R E P O R T E R

T h e s u n is s h i n i n g , birds are s i n g i n g , flowers are blooming, and love is in the a i r — s p r i n g h a s a r r i v e d . W i t h t h e c h a n g e in seasons, students often find the urge to destress (Papers? Homework? What h o m e w o r k ? ) and devote their lime to more relaxing pursuits (playing Frisbee golf, laying

Free Expression

possessing strong on the beach, taking a I > o y T R "I H KTK T K M R I O N S morals and a great desire n a p in the Pine Grove). f o r i n d e p e n d e n c e , she T o utilize this newly fights love every step of created "free lime," one the way. While Bronte's might look f o r literature CHARLOTTE BRONTE l a n g u a g e can gel a bit that explores the heavy and the s p r i n g t i m e t h e m e s of background narrating love and the outdoors. J a n e ' s c h i l d h o o d is Much Ado About rather tedious, the story Nothing - William of Jane and Rochester is Shakespeare unforgettable. Shakespeare tells the The Really Short story of a selfP o ems of A.R. proclaimed bachelor Ammons and bacheloretle for life. U s i n g n a t u r e a s an Benedick and Beatrice. overarching theme, Although each A m m o n s ' collection of p r o f e s s e s to loath the 160 short p o e m s (some other, their friends Hero, as short as o n e or i w o Claudio. and Don Pedro lines) takes a witty, and plot to bring the couple together in love. o f t e n c o m i c approach to life that M e a n w h i l e , o n e of the most comically s i m u l t a n e o u s l y f o r c e s r e a d e r s to ask big evil men in all of Shakespeare. Don John questions of themselves. A s a 20* cenlury (who calls himself a "plain-dealing villain") author w h o grew up during the Great s e e k s to s t o p H e r o a n d C l a u d i o ' s D e p r e s s i o n . A m m o n s writes of h u m a n s ' approaching marriage. Of course, chaos and relationship with nature and the uncertain, comedy ensue. Although it was written in precarious condition of m o d e m life. the late 1500s. Much A d o contains more Their E y e s Were Watching G o d - Zora prose than any other Shakespearean play,

Jane Eyre

1 «

A/VCH&ft PHOTO BY ERIN L'HOTTA

Br eak These

BARS

making it among the easiest to read. J a n e Eyre - Charlotte Bronte Although a much darker and more mysterious story. Bronte's best known novel also f o c u s e s on irue love. Jane works as a governess in a spooky old English mansion, full of creaks, evil laughter, and inexplicable fires, w h e n she finds herself falling in love wilh her e m p l o y e r , the wealthy Mr. Rochester. Not one to be mastered by her emotions.

Neal Hurston Hurslon tells of the quest of a young b l a c k w o m a n . Janie. to find h e r place in society in Florida during the first third of the 20 ,h century. Although it lakes her a few tries, and three husbands (a working farmer, L o g a n ; a rich man. Joe; and a poor m a n . Tea Cake), to discover the secret to love and irue happiness, that knowledge helps her survive even the most unthinkable of tragedies.


FEATURES

^Anchor

A p r i l 15, 2 0 0 5

The last time Hope beat Michigan State... A I O^ iz I b -*,4* 1 ^ H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

AMPUS 4-SPORT M A N LIKES THRILL QF "JUST LIVING"

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I . A//CHOR

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TOM SHASHAGUY

The 1937 Hope basketball team w o n the MIAA title over Michigan State, 25-21. J o h n " C h i n k " Robberts, the team s oldest s u r v i v i n g member at 89, is bottom row, second from left. In reflection, Robbert a g r e e d that the H o p e / C a l v i n rivalry

Erin L'Hotta

w a s very intense d u r i n g his f o u r years at H o p e f r o m 1933-1937.

INFOCUS EDITOR

R e m e m b e r w h e n H o p e beat M i c h i g a n Stale? R e m e m b e r w h e n 10 o r 12 p e o p l e packed in a c a r lo w a l c h ihe m e n ' s baskeiball team s h o w the S p a r t a n s w h o ' s b o s s ? R e m e m b e r the c h e e r s ? T h e r u c k u s ? T h e M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p ? John " C h i n k " R o b b e r t s ( ' 3 7 ) r e m e m b e r s this day. It w a s the day h e scored six p o i n t s a n d led the Flying D u t c h m e n to a 25-21 victory o v e r M S U . Robbert said he felt a s e n s e of c o n q u e r on that d a y of Jan. 29, 1937 in Jenison Fieldhouse. The Holland Sentinel sports writer Watson Spoelstra d i d n ' t refer to H o p e ' s victory o v e r M S U as c o n q u e r i n g , in fact he referred to the D u t c h m e n a s struck by " s t a g e fright." T h i s stage fright led the S p a r t a n s 10 score the first eight points, oulscoring H o p e during the first full half of the game. Robbert c o u l d n ' t stand for this. He c a m e back full force d u r i n g the

" W h e n I w a s a student, H o p e a n d C a l v i n w o u l d a l w a y s g o back and forth with mischief. T h e H o p e / C a l v i n g a m e was cancelled not b e c a u s e of bad s p o r t s m a n s h i p f r o m our t e a m s , it was cancelled b e c a u s e of the f a n s , " R o b b e r t said. T h u s , H o p e / C a l v i n rivalry led to H o p e ' s M I A A c h a m p i o n ship o v e r M i c h i g a n Stale.

H o p e history a s a m o m e n t to n e v e r be forgotten. But yet, as this article is b ei n g read, how m a n y even k n e w this event e x i s t e d ? Oldest L i v i n g H o p e Basketball Player " I ' m something like A m y Lowell, w h o wrote of herself: 'Born in A m h e r s t . Lived in Amherst. Died in A m h e r s t . ' O n l y the city is Holland, a n d I a m not quite willing lo c o n c e d e myself d e a d . " - R o b b e r t at the age of 21.

s e c o n d half a n d m a d e H o p e ' s first basket q u i c k l y f o l l o w i n g it

C o l u m n of old A n c h o r article. He was the only four letter sport

with a n o t h e r two free shots. A f -

a shot. A f t e r a f e w more baskets,

final eight minutes. H o p e flew to a lead of 23-21 in the closing minutes. Stale then m i s s e d the

fimml Hour • iVf

ITl* :k ur

M r . ft L i b e r t

LL

.\m\ i-jthiii I'm I.r»wvll, who vvroto of .*T ' •! •Born ii Amhorj.t; Lived in Amtierstj Died In Arnli- h ': u»i<T only tho .-Ky ifi jnot q u i t e

v.-llii»k" 10

{U

M l f diNul/' 1 •' mjI. In reilDMW to my aueatk'n, he ul " I > t my nnnic nV o f f t l w firM iilny. U w h Hnru t h ' M j g t 1 lny Kiokcd lik«* a O . iiK-sc, r n l i e d nw 'H'hink."

limiting His Altey 1 him what ho thawjtfht <4 bcir.i, tin* oj.;y man \i "VVell/' h e ftuid ">. L . ru'j i|UOt* :i:. - O'i'l- «h.l:. if Hop had r: tliWIy-Winh:; te^ tji I'd 1> etiplftin. I cfln'! play tho fh I"but I'm 11 rnurt

iii A c o l u m n about Robberts, a fourletter athlete, appeared in the Anchor on J u n e 3,1936.

nis," he added. "But I ' m

Mbfe a r n u i i e d te play

good at c o u r t i n g . " M i d i l i a n State alterthe In 1935-36 H o p e won 15

Hopfi/CatYla g i m e w a s

oul of 18 g a m e s . Coach Schouten taped

e a n c a l a d d u e i a t h e

rivalry's Iniensltv.

a n k l e s of 1 9 3 0 ^ players in C a r n e g i e g y m . He w a s also

g a m e . C a p t . Bill P o p p i n k ( ' 3 7 ) rebounded, scored and gave

q u i t e p o p u l a r in t o w n f o r

Robbert, now 89, w a s part of C o a c h Bud H i n g a ' s 1937 lege n d a r y first M I A A C h a m p i o n ship team, w h i c h was long reported a s an " u p s e t " by M S U . " W e snuck u p on ' e m . " said R o b b e r t . " A n d s o m e h o w w e won the g a m e . " M S U w a s shocked by H o p e ' s victory largely because they h a d n ' t played the D u t c h m e n since 1930. In fact, ihe only reason thai H o p e pl ayed M S U was b e c a u s e it served as a replacement g a m e f o r the H o p e / C a l v i n g a m e that w a s cancelled. In 1937, H o p e and C a l v i n w e r e in the middle of an intense rivalry w h i c h continued a s a "six y e a r s hiatus". C o a c h H i n g a was noted to h a v e a particularly strained relationship with C a l v i n ' s c o a c h , w h i c h escalated rivalry to the point of c a n c e l i n g their s e c o n d season of g a m e s against o n e another. Randall Vande Water ( ' 5 2 ) , author of 100 years of reported that H o p e students w e r e notified

that the g a m e was cancelled within the f o l l o w i n g note f r o m administration: "Fan behavior before, during and after (Hope/Calvin) g a m e s are o f t e n less than exemplary, and there is a tendency to use g a m e results to bolster d e n o m i n a t i o n a l positions on

^QP/

h e l p i n g lo t a k e h o r s e s h o o v e s w h e n competitively

Hope men a 25-21 victory.

Sunday m o r n i n g . "

tJu-

b e captain. I c a n ' t play ten-

shot w h i c h w o u l d h a v e lied the

Hope Basketball,

ur

-vith

had a tiddly-winks team, I ' d

the D u t c h m e n were flying, M S U panicked, and a timeout was

n e c k . 19-17. T h e n 2 1 - 1 8 in the

A ..l c t t d i J :

fc.j.r

ball, b a s k e t b a l l , track a n d baseball. He s a i d , 4 i f H o p e

lied the g a m e at 10 by lipping in

T h e game continued neck and

• , uiiJoa

IION^PVIT, V

m a n at H o p e , playing fool-

ter g r a b b i n g a rebound, R o b b e r t

c a l l e d . T h e c r o w d w e n t wild.

T h e c h a m p i o n s h i p went d o w n in

rr.v

[••tie ttuii

»rv

h« h a d m w -

lh»_ h e a t .

"

racing them on S"1 St. 1936-37 made first M I A A title. 14-3 record, 9 - 1 in the

MIAA. For the first lime since 1928. Since rivalry was too intense, they arranged to plan Michigan stale. H a d n ' l played them since 1930.. For 36 d a y s during the winter of 1937 f r o m J a n 12 to Feb 16 , H o l l a n d ' s 6 4 m e m b e r crack national guard c o m pany D of the 126 ,h infantry was in flint on sit-down strike riot duly. C o r p o r a l M a r c u s , one of the lead players of the H o p e basketball t e a m m i s s e d the g a m e . H o p e o f f i c i a l s w o u l d n ' t let him c o m e back lo play M S C . Several carl o a d s of students a c c o m p a n i e d t h e team to the contest. H o p e ' s basketball team w a s q u o t e d a s having "stage f r i g h t " during the opening m i n u t e s in ihe historic Jenison Field House. M S C took a d v a n t a g e of this and scored 8 points. M S C m a d e 9 of 10 free t h r o w and h o p e three of six.

" C h i n k " poses for a photograph during his time on Hope basketball.


C

A p r i l 15, 2 0 0 5

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Campus blitzed by poetry O n the nighl of M a r c h 31 si, 2 0 0 5 , a g r o u p of H o p e C o l l e g e s l u d e n l s c a m e logeiher all with o n e c o m m o n goal in m i n d : l o spread the j o y of poetry t h r o u g h o u t the c a m p u s . By the next m o r n i n g , m u c h of this poetry had b e e n t a k e n d o w n , b u t the spirit still lives on in t h o s e w h o took part.

" M y heart is with all t h o s e k i d s on both

all o v e r c a m p u s t o d a y ! : )

Librarian at H o p e

" Corrie Smith

" I c l i m b e d the a n c h o r and recited ' H u m a n ity I L o v e Y o u ' ! " Kathryn F r e n s " T h a n k you for the c h a n c e to share art,

seventh year o f poetry blitzing in 2006.

p o e m s , h a p p i n e s s , a n d o u r s o u l s with the c a m p u s that n e e d s this, " B a r b a r a S t o d d e n .

heart." Karen Schuen " N o m a t t e r w h e r e 1 go, or w h a t I e n d u p Sally S m i t s , H o p e g r a d w h o a t t e n d s g r a d school at U of N o r t h C a r o l i n a A V i l m i n g t o n

could

make

me

smile for 24 h o u r s straight. I A s h l e y Perez "I w a s de-

t

i f o u n d three lovely p o e m s t a p e d l o my

o f f i c e d o o r t o d a y . " C a r l a Vtesers "I h o p e s o m e day that e v e r y o n e gels to h a v e this kind of joy, w h a t brings a b u n c h o f

p o e m s — y o u m a d e my n i g h t ! "

are

Ashley Perez

Smits o r g a n i z e d a blitz there the same night.

Hope students AIM away " T H A N K Y O U to the p e o p l e w h o put u p the

guys

love you all!" "Amazingfuntimesshouldhappeneveryday"

d o i n g , this will b e m i n e f o r e v e r . " sent b y

"You

a m a z i n g . . .no o t h e r g r o u p of p e o p l e

H e r e ' s to a lucky

" T h e Poetry Blitz will a l w a y s be in m y

"I L O V E D seeing poetry

sides of the A t l a n t i c . " Priscilla Atkins, Arts

college k i d s together with piles of p o e m s and s o m e tape and m a k e s t h e m w a n t to d o this

termined lo h a n g e v e r y last o n e of m y 3 0 0 p o e m s . At 5 : 2 6 this m o r n i n g I s n a p p e d a c o u p l e photos of the poetic pine grove." P o e m s had been strung from tree to tree. "At

8:20 a

year a f t e r y e a r no m a t t e r w h a t part of the

b l e e p b l e e p i n g w o k e m e . T h e n f r o m m y pillow I glance out ihe w i n d o w to the pine grove

world they are in. It'll happen next year wher-

to see n o t h i n g . " Ashely B o e r

Naomi Shihab Nye

ever I am." Maggie Machledt h a v e t a k e n the Poetry Blitz to F r a n c e . We arc going to p u t up p o e m s all o v e r N a n t e s at the s a m e t i m e that you all are." D e l p h i n e Lebel. student at H o p e last year f r o m F r a n c e .

" I l o v e i t ! L o v e it s o m u c h ! T h a n k s ! G r e a t spirit in this !! Ml"

" E v e r y t h i n g a b o u t this is a m a z i n g ! it's an " W e ' r e in the m i d d l e of it. J o s h is w e a r i n g a grim reaper c a p e and Kathryn has on a black f r a b r i c m a s k . T h i s is s o g r e a t ! " M a g g i e

a w e s o m e e x p e r i e n c e to h a v e ! " J o n a h O g l e s " T h e p o e m s plastered to my d o o r m a k e m e smile." Andrew Dell'Olio

Machledt

arrest f r o m 1 S c h o e n ran after h i m . O n e of the

m e a n o r a n d p r e s e n c e of an illegal

. u n d e r c o v e r o f f i c e r s positioned at Diekema Cottage jumped up from

s u b s t a n c e w h i l e released o n b o n d . S e v e n p o l i c e cars r e m a i n e d o n the

the grass and ran full force towards

s c e n e f o r an additional 3 0 m i n u t e s

15 ,I, S t . k n o c k i n g i n t o A l l i s o n Stewart ('06) w h o was going to

while a search dog s n i f f e d the car

h e r car parked in D i e k e m a ' s driveway. "1 w a l k e d past the u n d e r c o v e r c o p while h e w a s sitting o n my f r o n t p o r c h , a n d then all of a sudd e n h e w a s a blur running past m e .

f o r additional drugs. " T h e whole thing was scary," s a i d S t e w a r t . "1 c a m e h o m e a n d there were two men I didn't know silting on my front steps. T h e y flashed m e their b a d g e a n d said that

T h e n I saw a g u y in h a n d c u f f s run-

they w e r e u n d e r c o v e r c o p s , b u t h o w w a s I s u p p o s e d lo k n o w if they

ning t h r o u g h the b a c k y a r d s across

really w e r e ? It's scary lo think that

Ihe street," said Stewart. T h e driver w a s caught and ar-

there w a s a h a n d c u f f e d m a n run-

rested b y S c h o e n b e h i n d S a m ' s

ning a r o u n d the n e i g h b o r h o o d . " . S t e w a r t w a s n ' t the o n l y H o p e

G r o c e r y on the c o m e r of 15 ,h St. Lee Nguyen, owner of S a m ' s

student that w a t c h e d the event. A c r o w d o f 15 o r s o students gathered

Grocery, said "1 w a s w o r k i n g at

on the c o r n e r of 14,h St. and C o l u m -

the l i m e and d i d n ' t k n o w that any

bia Ave. w a t c h i n g the spectacle of

of this e v e n took p l a c e . " A f t e r the arrest, the driver w a s

police cars and search d o g . H o p e C o l l e g e o f f i c i a l s w e r e no-

e s c o r t e d t o the police station via police car along with the two

tified of the incident the next day.

d r i v e r ' s f r i e n d s w h o w e r e arrested

Sgt. W a l t e r s , of C a m p u s S a f e t y , said the incident w a s r e p o r t e d a s

f o r w a r r a n t of o u t s t a n d i n g m i s d e -

larceny.

silence f r o m 1 April 6'H was Hope's

third obser-

vance of the Day of Silence.

The

national Day of Silence happens on April J3". hut the Hope Sexuality Roundtable protest

decided to move Hope's

day forward

a week to bet-

ter mesh with Hope's schedule. "The reason the dales were

nized a D a y of D i a l o g u e on April 7' h . T h e D a y of D i a l o g u e consisted of s e s s i o n s b y Joel T o p p e n . H o p e political science professor, Jim L u c a s , a gay pasior. and p a r e n t s of g a y s and lesbians, and were o p e n to all students. " W e thought that b y h a v i n g the

c h a n g e d f r o m the n a t i o n a l d a l e s

D a y of D i a l o g u e we provided a w a y

were they worked belter with H o p e ' s c a l e n d a r . . . . (T)he national

f o r p e o p l e on the c a m p u s t o learn m o r e a b o u t L G B T ( L e s b i a n . Gay,

d a t e s c o r r e s p o n d m o r e with high school s c h e d u l e s . . . . T h i s y e a r the

Bisexual, Transsexual, T r a n s g e n d e r ) issues a n d d i a l o g u e

national dates fell on disability

about them." said Martin. " ( T ) h e D a y of Silence is m o r e of

a w a r e n e s s week and we did not w a n t l o c o n f l i c t with t h a t , " s a i d M

a r t i n . Sexuality R o u n d t a b l e also orga-

ihe protest day, while the D a y of D i a l o g u e is a learning d a y , " Martin

said.

Day of Silence www.cltivotsilenfe.org

project

Diversity is not exclusivly at Scott m y s o p h o m o r e students w h o h a s

Charles W. Green

m a n y students included at least o n e

GUEST WRITER

slory of h o w their i n - l h e - d o r m ex-

lived both in and o u t of Scotl Hall

E v e r y y e a r since the fall of

p e r i e n c e s a n d conversations illumi-

1999, b e t w e e n 5 0 and 6 0 i n c o m ing s l u d e n l s h a v e o p t e d t o s p e n d

n a t e d o r r e i n f o r c e d w h a t they had

during h e r t w o years at H o p e says, "I w o u l d c h a l l e n g e those w h o talk

learned in class. T h a t ' s pretty p o w -

a b o u t Scott Hall lo try a n d m a k e

their first year al H o p e in Scott

erful. A s t r o n g s e n s e of c o m m u n i t y

their r e s i d e n c e hal l s s i m i l a r to ours [Scott is] a c o m m u n i t y

makes difficult conversations

that k n o w s h o w to e n c o u r a g e and

more productive F o r m a n y r e a s o n s , d e a l i n g with

be there for e a c h olher. S c o t l Hall is an e x a m p l e of h o w the rest o f

racial and cultural d i f f e r e n c e s can

the hal l s should l o o k . " 1 c o u l d n ' t

W o u l d n ' t it be better for the col-

b e d i f f i c u l t or tense, e v e n frighten-

e g e l o spread t h e m across c a m pus lo live with other s l u d e n l s ?

ing f o r s o m e . T o g e l b e y o n d sup e r f i c i a l d i s c u s s i o n s or p o l i t i c a l

agree m o r e . A final o b s e r v a t i o n W h e n people express concern

^ s t lime, I addressed s o m e of the

c o r r e c t n e s s , w e h a v e lo b e h o n e s t

misconceptions about the residen-

with o u r s e l v e s and with e a c h other. W e h a v e d i s c u s s i o n s in o u r p r o -

Hall as Phelps Scholars. T h e question s o m e t i m e s is raised, therefore, as lo w h y they also live tog e t h e r in the s a m e hall. D o n ' i they already d o e n o u g h t o g e t h e r ?

tial c o m p o n e n t o f t h e P h e l p s Scholars Program. This week, I

g r a m that very f e w A m e r i c a n s e v e r

about the relatively high level of diversity in t h e P h e l p s S c h o l a r s P r o g r a m , their implicit a s s u m p tion is lhat without the p r o g r a m there w o u l d be m o r e diversity in

w o u l d like l o o f f e r s o m e a d d i -

h a v e in an inter-racial o r inler-cul-

tional i n s i g h t s into the p o s i t i v e r o l e — i n d e e d , the essential r o l e —

lural selling. We get t o the t o u g h stuff. T h i s is p o s s i b l e only b e c a u s e

that living l o g e i h e r p l a y s in o u r

w e k n o w e a c h o t h e r s o well, be-

tables. That is pretty problematic, h o w e v e r . In the first place, there

program. Living together and learning

c a u s e we can see e a c h other as in-

are s t u d e n t s — b o t h m a j o r i t y and

t o g e t h e r are m u t u a l l y reinforc-

d i v i d u a l s a s well a s m e m b e r s of racial g r o u p s . W h e n you k n o w and

m i n o r i t y — w h o are here, in part, because we do have a Phelps

ing O f f e r i n g a residential/academic

respect people, eai s u p p e r wilh t h e m , brush y o u r leeth together in

Scholars P r o g r a m . F u n h e r m o r e .

p r o g r a m f o c u s e d on diversity is-

the b a t h r o o m , m a k e late-night runs

s u e s is o n e o f the 3 0 points o f the

lo Meijer, g o h o m e wilh t h e m for a

ing hall is not a larger n u m b e r of

c o l l e g e ' s C o m p r e h e n s i v e Plan for Minority Participation, a p p r o v e d

w e e k e n d or o v e r a b r e a k — w h e n you live in g e n u i n e c o m m u n i t y to-

barely-integrated tables, with students of color sprinkled evenly

b y the Board o f T r u s t e e s in 1998.

g e t h e r — t h e n you c a n gel e x c h a n g e ideas in a way that rarely is pos-

a r o u n d . T h e likely alternative is a larger n u m b e r of racially segre-

sible in olher contexts. A sense of c o m m u n i t y helps

gated tables, and f e w e r truly inte-

As w e began o u r p l a n n i n g , il bec a m e clear that the p r o g r a m s with

other halls and olher cafeteria

the likely alternative t o a f e w racially integraied tables in the din-

f i r s t - y e a r s t u d e n t s start o f f g r e a t

g r a t e d a r e a s . In s c h o o l a f t e r school wilh n o p r o g r a m like PSP,

M a n y things arc r e q u i r e d in ord e r lo m a k e a s u c c e s s f u l transition

students have n o easy w a y to form genuinely integrated social

l o college. O n e of the m o s t impor-

circles, so they cluster in the din-

study logeiher. they are significantly m o r e likely t o talk a b o u t

tant is finding a g r o u p of friends. T h e residential c o m p o n e n t of the

their course material outside of

Phelps Scholars Program allows o u r s t u d e n t s to h e l p e a c h olher ad-

ing hall in s a m e - r a c e g r o u p s . In recognition of this widespread phenomenon, psychologist

the g r e a t e s t i m p a c t o n s t u d e n t s w e r e t h o s e that c o m b i n e d strong a c a d e m i c c o u r s e w o r k with c o m munal living arrangements. W h y ? W h e n s t u d e n t s live a n d

class a n d l o b r i n g real-life issues into the c l a s s with them. T a k e a w a y the learning a n d t h e r e ' s no knowledge to serve as a guide. Take a w a y the living logeiher and the learning becorties just another class. Pul t h e m t o g e t h e r and ihe result is e x p o n e n t i a l l y m o r e p o w erful. W h e n Prof. J o h n Yelding and I asked o u r students in F Y S last fall t o reflect on the m o s t meaningful aspects of our course.

Beverly Daniel T a t u m entitled her

just s u c c e s s f u l l y t o c a m p u s life. As I h a v e w a t c h e d this o c c u r y e a r af-

r e c e n t b o o k , " W h y a r e all the Black kids sitting together in the

ter year, I h a v e b e c o m e c o n v i n c e d that this is the best w a y for m o s t

c a f e t e r i a ? " (Of course, the q u e s -

s l u d e n l s t o e n t e r college. W h y not

tion a p p l i e s j u s t a s w e l l l o ihe W h i t e students eating at all-While

o f f e r other living-learning opportunities for H o p e s t u d e n t s on a vari-

tables.) M y s u g g e s t i o n ? L e t ' s look for additional w a y s at H o p e

ety o f topics? O n e p r o g r a m c o u l d b e f o c u s e d on e n v i r o n m e n t a l care,

t o bring s t u d e n t s of m a n y backgrounds into c o m m u n i t y together,

f o r e x a m p l e , and another o n C h r i s -

and o f f e r o u r support to those pro-

tian m i s s i o n and service. O n e of

g r a m s lhat d o that already.


ll

AncKor

Editor's voice It's the end of the year and I'm the editor, so I'm writing a column 1 d o n ' t think there's a w a y to c o m e out of f o u r years of college the same as w h e n you started. I know I haven't. While it is true that H o p e is labeled as a m o r e conservative college, it is here that I truly learned to think for myself and for m my o w n opinions about the world. I often feel like I don't have the time to care, but in all h o n c s t y j u s t by being here at this college, and even j u s t by waking u p in the morning, I have chosen to care about something every day. For example, I chose to be an English m a j o r because I care about writing, I c h o s e to be a geology m a j o r because I care about the Earth. I care about the newspaper. I care about my family and friends. And perhaps most importantly, I care about what kind of impact I can h a v e on the world. I'd like to think that my year as editor of the n e w s p a p e c especially in light of recent events, has had s o m e sort of effect on this campus. When my letter announcing student c o n g r e s s ' decision to freeze the A n c h o r account w a s put on K n o w h o p e last w e e k , the response f r o m professors, friends and classmates w a s overwhelming. T h e c o m m e n t s I have received range from pieces of a d v i c e such as '"you should have a save the A n c h o r b a k e sale" to questions like "so, h o w m u c h d o e s it cost to print the A n c h o r a n y w a y ? " O u r mailbox has also been filled with letters f r o m students asking h o w they can help by j o i n i n g the A n c h o r staff next year. It is these things that show what kind of an e f f e c t something like this can h a v e on the c a m p u s . It also s h o w s just h o w amazing the people o f Hope College truly are and what w e have the potential to do. O n e amazing thing c a m e f r o m the A n c h o r staff itself. A f t e r hearing student c o n g r e s s ' decision a little over two w e e k s ago, I w a s pretty much ready to give up everything. I figured I'd stick around, try to help out as m u c h as I could getting ready for next year and go out quietly with a final online issue. But my staff w o u l d not let that happen. Ever since they heard the news, they have been tirelessly putting up posters, talking to classes about the Anchor, planning out next y e a r ' s budget and constitution and constantly finding m o r e w a y s to promote o u r paper and m a k e it an even stronger publication. This n e w s p a p e r in y o u r hands is a product of that dedication. We have taken it upon ourselves to raise the money to run o n e final printed issue o f the A n c h o r for this school year. T h a n k you for reading it. And thank you to all my friends, professors and classmates and to the m e m b e r s of the A n c h o r staff, past and present, for a great four years.

OPINION

A p r i l 13, Y o u r

Your voice

2005

v o i a

Your voice

Students respond to diversity articles by Prof. Green To the editor,

verse'. Most, if not all, of us k n o w lhat it is ihe opposite. H o w many countries can you n a m e where the indigenous population is c a u c a s i a n ? Exactly. T h e w r i t e r ' s r e s p o n s e lo the l a s t s t a t e m e n t ("...Hope C o l l e g e is 9 4 % W h i l e , and it's the students of color w h o d o n ' l want lo leave their c o m f o r t z o n e ? " ) is a puerile attack on us 'non-diverse' people moreso than an appropriate response lo a real concern. T h i s statement also goes against the w r i t e r ' s p r e v i o u s res p o n s e . w h i c h s a y s " s t u d e n t s of color, like everyone else, are here to gel an education, not lo "have an impact"." If that's the case, he really shouldn't be accusing the rest of us f o r not attending s o m e university in Africa. M y m a j o r con-

cern, however, is lhat the Phelps Scholars are, yes, in Scolt Hall. And yes, they have a 'table' in Phelps. I am also involved on campus, and can't say I know any Phelps Scholars. Where are they? Scott Hall. It's simply not healthy lo botlle u p our most influential diverse students in o n e place so they have little influe n c e on the rest os us. and then say thai ihe c a m p u s is diverse. If ihey c h o o s e lo live o n l y w i t h o t h e r Phelps Scholars, that only hurls the rest of us because ihey d o n ' l s e e m lo want lo gel lo k n o w us or help us learn aboul their cultures. Please, infiltrate the while society!

To ihe Editor,

ing ourselves aboul h o w others live and/or experience the world is an

T h a n k you for publishing the series of articles about c a m p u s diversity wrilien by Dr. Charles Green. I especially appreciated the article aboul the Phelps Scholars Program in the last issue. Articles and discussions similar lo this are essential to H o p e ' s "forward motion" in regards to the on-going debate and e f f o r t lo bring more cultural and racial diversity lo campus. Inform-

appropriate and important step in b e c o m i n g a place and a b o d y of people that are receptive lo diversity of all sorts. A s a participant of the PSP, I w a s exposed lo people with a myriad of different backgrounds and was impressed at h o w this environmeni most identifiable in Scott Hall w a s enriching, e n c o u r a g i n g , and challenged me lo question and build

upon my o w n experience and background. That said, I am glad that the word aboul the P S P is being spread and many of the myths aboul the program dispersed. Hope College has the potential to be a place rich in cultural and racial diversity; I believe ihe P S P has set an excel-

I read this article because I had filled out the diversity survey I got in my email. I w a s disappointed to see this article which seems lo carelessly discard all the concerns about the Phelps Scholar Program. The article answers what is basically the same question three limes. T h i s is a litlle excessive: "Most Scot Hall r e s i d e n t s are s t u d e n t s of c o l o r . " "Most students of color at Hope are in Scott Hall." "Students of color should be distributed across c a m p u s , not c o n c e n t r a t e d in S c o t t Hall..." The first of these statements that the writer adresses implies lhat the majority of the Hope c a m p u s is ignorant of the fact thai you d o n ' l have lo have colored skin to be 4 di-

Alex Taylor

l e n t e x a m p l e of t h i s p o t e n t i a l , which I hope continues to spread throughout H o p e ' s community. Jennica Skoug

Former staff member comments on frozen Anchor account T o the editor. It saddens m e greatly lo hear of Student C o n g r e s s ' decision to shut d o w n the Anchor. T h e A n c h o r has been a H o p e institution f o r 117 years. W i t h o u t the Anchor, w h o will inform the c o m m u n i t y of in-

creases in tuition, club and cultural events, elections and faculty changes thai affect the lives of students? I believe that the loss of the Anchor - regardless of ihe duration will negatively impact the lives of students on campus. I would like

lo encourage H o p e ' s students, faculty and administration lo work lo preserve ihe Anchor and to make sure lhat truly independent media at the college survives. Andrew Kleczek Anchor staff f J998-2001)

Toilet papering in Pine Grove is unsightly, bad for environment

Anchor Staff

. Anchor Staff Anchor Staff Anchor Staff

editor-in-chief Maureen Yonovitz campus beat editor Amanda Zoratti arts editor Jordan Wolfson infocus editor Erin L'Hot la spotlight editor Jenny Cencer sports editor Katie Bnrkhardt copy editors Kirsten Winek Rachel Dorr distribution manager Garrison Dyer production assistant Sean Daenzer advisor Mark A. Lewison

Senior Staff Reporters: Lindsey Manthei, Andrea Vandenburgh, Evelyn Daniel, Nick Engel

Staff Reporters: Neil Simons, Nick Everse, Dave Yetter, Holly Beckerman

To the editor.

be in the middle of a busy and noisy town. You can imagine my frustra-

O n e of the things 1 have loved about Hope College these last four years is the Pine Grove. Lying on the grass there, under the branches o f the majestic pines on a spring day is a much needed escape from the realities of essays, e x a m s , and research projects that know no end. It is a treat to have a small bit of nature right in the middle of the c a m p u s . T h e Pine G r o v e serves as a rendezvous point f o r friends w h o want lo chat, play guitar, read poetry, eat lunch, or take a nap. I think that it might be the most beautiful spot on campus. Sitting there in the shade, between classes when the air is still and cool, you would never think that if you walk t w o minutes in any direction y o u ' d once again

t i o n t h i s m o r n i n g as I w a l k e d through the G r o v e and instead of seeing blue sky between the naked branches of the trees, I spied the ugly, tattered remains of someone's toilet papering expedition f r o m the previous night. I would like to ask what the purpose of such an action is, or rather, do you think about the c o n s e q u e n c e s of such v a n d a l i s m b e f o r e you execute your plan? At H o p e w e h a v e a very e f f i c i e n t , hard-working group of ground maintenance people and it is they who will have to take care of that m e s s in the Pine G r o v e . D o you think it will be easy for them to clean up the paper which floats high in the trees? Do you think that they have nothing better to do than tidy

up after y o u ? Perhaps you w o u l d also like lo consider the effects your T P fun has on the environment and on your fellow students w h o actually appreciate a beautiful and litter free campus? And if the ecological and aesthetic reasons f o r not loilet papering our c a m p u s aren't g o o d e n o u g h r e a s o n s to abstain, maybe you could think a little more about your pocket book: messes in public places cost money to clean up. W h e r e d o e s the college gel this m o n e y ? From you. S o next lime y o u ' r e a litlle bored and need an adrenaline rush, maybe you should think about doing something a little less destructive than defacing our Pine Grove.

Angela Haberlein

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e within the college and related communities The A n c h o r reserves the right to edit d u e to s p a c e constraints N o personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous

The y\juhor is a product of student effort and is funded thmugh the students of /lope College, fmdi/ig wh'uh comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee, letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. Vie opinions addressed in the editorial arv solely llune of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Sers ice are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. Wc reserve the right lo accept or reject any advertising.

/ / / A n c h o r 2005 spring semester, Issue #19 of 26

Letters chosen on a first c o m e first s e r v e basis, or a representative sample is taken N o a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief m a y verify identity of writer T h e A n c h o r reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter submitted

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office or e-mail Anchor@hope.edu

('05)


April

1 5 ,

2005

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

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^Anchor

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The Staff

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April 15, 2005

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AA/CHO/* PHOTOS C O U R T E S Y J O I N T A R C H I E V E S O F H O L L A N D

T h e A n c h o r u?

1 9

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fin The 2004-2005 Anchor Staff, counter-clockwise from lower right: Maureen Yonovitz ('05), Jordan Wolfson ('06), Amanda Zoratti ('08), Lindsey Manthel ('08), Erin L'Hotta ('06), Evelyn Daniel ('08), Nick Engel ('08) Not Pictured: Jenny Cencer (r07), Katie Burkhardt ('08)

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