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I V I a r l c t H e

• Hope C o l l e g e •

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Holland, Michigan • A student-run nonprofit publication •

S e r v i n g the Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 116 y e a r s

Committee makes strides

Chemistry talk presented by Arizona prof. Dr. M. Bonner Denton of the University of Arizona will del i v e r this, yearns J a m e s a n d J e a n e t t e N e c k e r s L e c t u r e in Chemistry at Hope College on Friday, April I I , at 4 p.m. in r o o m 102 of VanderWerf Hall. He will present "Advances in the Application of Array Detectors f o r I m p r o v e d C h e m i c a l Analysis." Denton is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Geosciences at the University of Arizona, where he has been a m e m b e r of the faculty since 1971.

Women's group swaps clothing A Clothing S w a p sponsored by W o m e n ' s Issuses Organization will be held T h u r s d a y and Friday in the D e W i t t L o b b y f r o m 1-5 p.m.

College receives gift of books R i c h a r d W u n d e r n e v e r attended Hope College, but he is l e a v i n g a l a s t i n g i m p a c t on those w h o do. Wunder, an art scholar w h o died on A u g . 4, 2002, at age 79, left the college more than 4,500 books through his estate. T h e g i f t c o m p l e ments the several thousand books he had already donated to the college, giving Hope one of the finest college art history collections in the M i d w e s t .

Sthepanie Szydlowski S T A F F REPORTER

Although many of H o p e : s students have differing opinions regarding issues of sexual orientation, it has been the goal of the Programming Committee as well as various student-led groups on c a m p u s to address these concerns with caution by providing opportunities for students to openly discuss their views in a nonconfrontational manner. During the 2001-02 year, the Task Force dealing with issues of sexuality met and drafted a report which

A K C M O n PHOTO BY CHAD SAMPSON

Every word of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Two Towers", the second in the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, was read in the Kletz last Saturday. The reading lasted 13 hours. Participants read for ten minutes each.

has led to formation of the Programming C o m m i t t e e on issues of Sexuality. Over 6 0 0 copies of the brochure developed by last y e a r ' s task force, "Virtues of Public Discourse," have been distributed and used on campus. J a m e s Herrick, chair of 2 0 0 2 - 0 3 ' s Prog r a m m i n g C o m m i t t e e on Issues of Sexuality, expresses a positive reflection of the P r o g r a m ' s recent accomplishments as well as a positive outlook for the issues at hand. T h e first accomplishment of the

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Dialogue on race issues concludes series Katie Taylor S E N I O R STAFF REORTER

T h e s c h o o l y e a r is w i n d i n g d o w n , and w h i l e m a n y s t u d e n t s have their e y e s focused on exams or maybe just the s u m m e r ahead, there are still s o m e c a m p u s activities p l a n n e d . T h o s e w h o n e v e r made it to a Dialogue on Race, for e x a m p l e / h a v e the opportunity to attend the final session tonight. T h e Dialogue on Race is an ongoing series of talks regarding issues of race sponsored by the O f fice of Multicultural Life. Lately, the topic of diversity has been a heated o n e at Hope. T h e purpose of the dialogues is to help students, faculty and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s learn about the issues and struggles faced by minorities and to celebrate

The band Irving Skellar performs at Earth Jam 2000. Earth Jam 2003 is coming to the Pine Grove on Saturday. The event will increase environmental awareness and focus student's attentoin on how they can improve the environment.

differences. S o far this year, there have been six dialogues b e f o r e tonight's session w r a p s u p the season. T h e y were held in October, November, January, February, March and April. S o m e of the topics included "My American Girls: A Dominican Story," "Civil Rights Martyrs," ' T h e Real Eve," and " W h e n Cultures Collide." Typically, the facilitator of the dialogue will s h o w a film relating to the topic and, following it, lead a discussion of the ideas presented in it. G l i n d a R a w l s , D i r e c t o r of Multicultural Life, is enthusiastic about the accomplishments of this y e a r ' s series. ' T h e turn out has been great. T h e

largest session had 80 participants, but the average a t t e n d a n c e is 3 0 people," Rawls reported. " M a n y have been students who either want to learn m o r e about diversity or need to complete an assignment for class. T h e r e are also s o m e c o m munity m e m b e r s w h o attend." T o n i g h t ' s d i a l o g u e is t i t l e d " H A P A , " which is the n a m e of the film being presented at the discussion. HAPA means "half," which is appropriate because the topic of the dialogue will be biracial identity. T h e speaker of the evening will be Residence Life Coordinator f o r C o o k Hall, Lisa Ortiz Rebel. "The topic of discussion is biracial identity, which is why I selected Lisa to be the facilitator f o r this session; she is of mixed racial heri-

tage," explained Rawls. T h i s is students' last chance to broaden their experiences and open their m i n d s to concerns f a c e d in either their o w n lives or in those of many people around them. "People should c o m e to this dialogue b e c a u s e more and more p e o p l e in the U . S . c o m e f r o m mixed heritage. This session will help e x a m i n e some of the issues that the c h i l d r e n of m i x e d r a c e u n i o n s e x p e r i e n c e , " said R a w l s . T h e dialogue will be held tonight in Maas Conference R o o m at 7 p.m. and is free and open to all. For summaries of the previous d i a l o g u e s or m o r e information about the O f f i c e of Multicultural Life, visit www.hope.edu/ multicultural.

Bands jam for the planet Danielle Koski BUSINESS M A N A G E R

Earth Jam, with its multiple activities in recognition of Earth Day, will be this Saturday from noon to 5:30 p.m. in the Pine Grove and is sponsored by the Environmental Issues Group. " W e will be h o p e f u l l y h a v i n g u p to f i v e bands," said Dyan C o u c h ('04), EIG president. Two of the bands playing on Saturday are Lyle! and Chris Bryan. T h e event will also include poetry readings and speakers. There will also be food and prize giveaways. "People should come to Earth Jam to listen to

some local music f r o m Hope College students, poetry, and some informative speeches," Couch said. • Earth D a y takes place on April 22, but because of the need to have Earth Jam on a weekend. Earth Jam was placed on April 12. According to Couch, Earth Jam is one of the ways that students can participate in recognizing the importance of protecting the environment. " H o p e students should care about the environment because we need to protect the environment so that it will be there for future generations,"

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Construction Update Campus, page 2

The Birds Arts, page 3

Stereotypes Infocus, page 5

Tennis Sports, page 8


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HAPA presents Asian Awareness Week A keynote lecture, food fair, and dramatic presentation will be featured from April 14-16 to enlighten students about Asian culture Kurt Koehler C A M P U S B E A T EDITOR

Next w e e k diversity will o n c e again lake center stage. T h i s time, however, the focus will shift from black. Hispanic, and disabled students to the nation's fastest growing minority ethnic group: Asian Americans. Asian Awareness Week will feature an Asian Food Fair, a keynote speech, and a p e r f o n n a n c e by the Great Leap drama group. ' T h e whole point of the week and o f o u r o r g a n i z a t i o n is to s h o w people a little of Asian flavor and culture," said Jean W u ( ' 0 5 ) . president of the Hope Asian Perspectives Association. T h e Asian Food Fair will be held in the Phelps Hall dining hall on M o n d a y f r o m 4 : 3 0 p.m. to 6 : 3 0 p.m. Various different dishes will be prepared and served. Admission for those not on the college's meal plan will be $5 per person. T h e keynote address will feature A n n e Choi, a professor of history at D e P a u w University. Choi will

d e l i v e r the a d d r e s s entitled, ' 4 La Choy, Chinese Food Swings American? Korean Immigrant Ent r e p r e n e u r s h i p in the 1920s" on Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Maas C e n ter. "Choi is a postdoctoral fellow and visiting assistant professor at De Pauw University, and in the fall will begin a postdoctoral fellowship at S w a r t h m o r e College in Pennsylv a n i a , w h e r e s h e will t e a c h on Asian American history and Asian American popular culture," according to a Public Relations press release. " S h e completed doctoral studies at the University of Southern California in American history, focusing on the experience of K o r e a n immigrants to the U.S. before 1945. A native of the Midwest, she c o m pleted her undergraduate degree at Indiana University, where she majored in history and East Asian studies. She holds an M.A. in history from the University o f Massachusetts."

COMMITTEE from 1 P r o g r a m m i n g C o m m i t t e e w a s assisting in the establishment of the "Sexuality Round Table: A F o r u m f o r G a y and Straight Students" this past September. Although a student-led organization, the Roundtable has been working under a framework agreement formulated last year. With the leadership of senior Elisabeth VanHouwelingcn, the sexuality round table has the goal of providing an open f o r u m in which both homosexuals and heterosexuals are able to discuss issues of sexuality on c a m p u s , w h i l e a t t e m p t i n g to broaden the knowledge of others as well. An O c t o b e r panel d i s c u s s i o n , "Moral Discernment and the Place of the Bible in the Life of H o p e College", and a February dialogue on sexual orientation between Dean of Chapel Timothy Brown and Professor David Myers. Both events were coordinated by the Programming Committee, and generated r e s p o n s e s f r o m the s t u d e n t s and faculty that w e r e "strongly positive," Herrick said. Also in February of this year, m e m b e r s of the Programming Committee worked with the Theatre Department in order to provide discussions following the p e r f o r m a n c e of " T h e Laramie Project." " T h e Laramie Project itself w a s an excellent and thought-provoking series of perform a n c e s , w h i c h the panels enhanced," Herrick said. Success between the C o m m i t t e e and the Sexuality Roundtable has also been achieved. An event this

past week entitled " A m e r i c a n Friends Service C o m m i t t e e , " w a s c o o r d i n a t e d by the S e x u a l i t y Roundtable, and endorsed by the Programming Committee. The c o n f e r e n c e included w o r k s h o p s on role-playing and principles of responding to opinions non-violently and non-confrontationally. The Roundtable cooperated with the Programming Committee to coordinate the event. Students from both Hope and Calvin attended, and V a n H o u w e l i n g c n c l a i m s that the conference w a s a success, and was enthusiastic about the Roundtable's relationship with the Programming Committee. Increased participation in the Roundtable forum has shown its effectiveness. Herrick also c o m m e n t s on the P r o g r a m ' s current and future projects. He provides that the Committee is currently working on developing a Resource Guide on issues of sexuality, and if the C o m mittee were to be continued next year, has r e c o m m e n d e d s e v e r a l new programs including a discussion board and perhaps a body image event. During a March 26 meeting and review of the Programming C o m mittee, Herrick claims that President B u l t m a n " s e e m e d generally pleased with our w o r k . " Herrick also senses a strong improvement in dealing with sexuality, and is pleased with the trust that the C o m mittee has established. " T h e C o m mittee provided. I believe, an important venue for discussion of concerns and proposals," Herrick says.

The L.A. based performance group Great Leap will be performing on Tuesday in a drama called "La Choy, Chinese Food Swings American? Korean Immigrant Entrepreneurship in the 1920s" at 7 p.m. in Maas Auditorium. On Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t r e , the L o s Angeles-based p e r f o r m a n c e g r o u p Great L e a p will present the dramatic presentation "A Slice of Rice, Frijoles and G r e e n s . " Great Leap is a c o m m u n i t y - b a s e d , n o n p r o f i t p e r f o r m i n g arts g r o u p seeking to use the arts to cross cultural borders to bring about positive social change. Since its 1978 founding by

director N o b u k o M i y a m o t o , Great Leap has sought to create, present and produce w o r k s that express the multicultural e x p e r i e n c e t h r o u g h p e r f o r m a n c e s and workshops. " A Slice of Rice, Frijoles and G r e e n s " is a compilation of c o n temporary stories that express the experiences of Asian, Latino, A f r i can and Deaf Americans. "It's g o i n g to be a very powerful

Construction projects continue on campus, nearing completion Carpenters wrapping up loose ends, college prepares two new sites Anjey Dykhuis C A M P U S B E A T EDITOR

A s t h e w e a t h e r b e g i n s to c h a n g e , s t u d e n t s will n o t i c e s o m e other changes on c a m p u s as well. T h e construction of the n e w elements of the Peale Science Center is drawing to a close this s u m m e r and the renovations of Peale and Dykstra Hall are s c h e d u l e d to be finished next s u m m e r . Work on the DeVos Field house and the Martha Miller Center f o r Global Communications will begin this summer. "(We hope to) provide facilities that will enable student and faculty p e r f o r m a n c e at the very highest levels," said President J a m e s Bultman. President Bultman comm e n t e d that the v a n d a l i s m at Peale did not affect the construction schedule and it will still be finished on time. T h e n e w buildings will house

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s o m e of H o p e ' s departments to red u c e the s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s t h e y have in their current locations. T h e DeVos Fieldhouse will be h o m e to the Department of Kinesiology and intercollegiate sports, the Martha Miller Center for Global C o m m u nication will b e c o m e quarters for the D e p a r t m e n t o f M o d e m a n d Classical Languages, the Department of Communication, the Office of International Education, and the O f f i c e of Multicultural Life. The expanded Peale will keep the Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Geological and Environmental Sciences and Psychology departments. It will also house the Nursing department. T h e Fieldhouse is anticipated to seat 3,500 spectators. It will hold activities for students, the athletic training program, local events and athletic events f o r H o p e ' s basketball and volleyball teams. T h e building projects are part of

ery year. The e n v i r o n m e n t a l issues organization was f o u n d e d in 1 9 8 7 a n d c o n t i n u e s its a d v o c a c y to t h i s d a y .

a larger undertaking of Hope College called "Legacies: A Vision of H o p e . " Legacies is a continual fund-raising campaign f o r $105 million to support the college's construction projects, renovations, and the E n d o w m e n t , w h i c h helps students obtain the means to help with tuition. S36 million are designated for the expansion and renovation of the science facilities, $ 2 0 million are put aside for the DeVos Fieldhouse, $ 3 0 million are g o i n g towards the E n d o w m e n t and $19 million allocated to the expansion and enhancement of campus facilities. A challenge grant by Kresge Foundation of Troy has offered to donate $ 8 5 0 , 0 0 0 once ano t h e r $3.1 m i l l i o n has b e e n raised to the Peale funding as an incentive to future supporters.

i

EARTH JAM from 1 Couch said. EIG has been a student organ i z a t i o n f o r 14 y e a r s a n d h a s p u t on E a r t h J a m a n n u a l l y e v -

performance. I think the c a m p u s should c o m e out and support it," said Maxine Gray ( ' 0 4 ) president of the Black Student Union. Great L e a p ' s visit is being cos p o n s o r e d by the Black Student Union, Hispanic Student Organization and H o p e ' s Asian Perspective Association student groups, by the o f f i c e of m u l t i c u l t u r a l life, and Sigma Lambda Gamma

A M C H O n PHOTOS BY ROB ONDRA

ABOVE: Peale Science Center expansion is currently under way and will be done in 2004. LEFT: Western Seminary construction contin ues despite the cold weather.


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ARTS

2003

Downey festival taking place this week Distinguished composer's visit ends with two concerts Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

In most cases, well-known composers can only be accessed through old books that can only be opened part way for fear of breaking the binding. But this week, a renowned contemporary American composer, John Downey, is visiting Hope's campus. The events during his weeklong visit, culminating in two concerts to be presented this weekend, are part of what is being called the Downey Festival. D o w n e y ' s musical style is far from old fashioned. One of the main aspects of his music is its progressiveness through time. O v e r the y e a r s as n e w t e c h n o l o g y h a s emerged, he has used a variety of electronic musical techniques, such as electronic tape with light sculpturing, partially controlled i m p r o v i s a t i o n , and c o m p u t e r - g e n e r a t e d sounds. "1 wrote three or four works in that medium. These were written in the '60s and '70s when synthesizers came out and people could use electronic sound," Downey said. "It's a certain kind of music that's all sort of evolving into a new style. One keeps writing and experimenting. There's always new sounds that a composer will bring to a piece." Another thing that Downey is well known for is his use of many different media. This

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John Downey attends a Symphonette rehearsal. The Symphonette, along with the Orchestra and Wind Symphony, will perform some of Downey's works at a concert at 8 p.m. on Saturday in Dimnent Chapel. can range from works for something as small as a chamber orchestra to that of a full symphony. "It's a question of style," Downey said. "In a university, you are going to be more experimental, take more chances. If you have just chamber music, it can be very expressive, but in a full orchestra it's a different sound. A wind ensemble has different demands than a symphony orchestra. A youth orchestra has different capabilities. That's an interesting challenge to me."

Besides his use of these different media is that of many other different means, such as improvisation, that contribute to the non-conventional quality of his work. "In improvisatory rhythms, the newness is a bit unpredictable and gives a certain appreciation to this organization of sound," Downey said. "I've used this improvisation in most of my pieces." Sometimes he will even use silence as a part of his music. "Silence b e c o m e s a m a j o r factor also,"

Hope presents 'The Birds' Theater department puts on ancient Greek play by Aristophanes

Spring student dance concerts wrap up term Maureen Yonovitz

Nick Denis

A R T S EDITOR

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Later this month, a new play is going to be flying into the DeWitt Main Theatre. The next presentation of the Hope College Theatre Department will be a production of " T h e Birds," by Aristophanes. The comedy follows t w o A t h e n i a n s , P i t h e t a e r u s and Euelpides, who leave Athens to get away from the pests such as poets, prophets and priests to find a better place to live. Along their journey, they climb the mountains in search of Epops, the king of the birds, who they imagine must know of an ideal place. Once they are among the birds, they decide to create CloudCuckooland in order to overthrow the gods. The subject matter of the play has much to do with current world events. "Aristophanes wrote the play in direct response to what was going

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PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Cast members of "The Birds" in rehearsal. The show will run April 23 to 26 in the DeWitt Main Theatre. on in Athens at the time," said John Tammi, professor of theater and d i r e c t o r of t h e p l a y , " . . . t h e Peloponnesian War had taken a bad turn for the Athenians and the future did not look very bright. We are trying to bring the same kind of topical reference and humor to our production." Cast members feel the same way about the good timing for the

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April 23,

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Downey said. ' T h i s is interesting because music is sound but music as silence is another dimension." A concert featuring the Wind Symphony, Orchestra, and Symphonette playing some of D o w n e y ' s works, including " C h a n t to Michelangelo," "Call for Freedom," and one of his most frequently p e r f o r m e d pieces, "Declamations," will take place at 8 p.m. on Saturday in Dimnent Chapel. " I t ' s n i c e to be p e r f o r m e d b y y o u n g groups," Downey said. "They are usually open to new sounds that the composer can bring to a composition." At 3 p.m. on Sunday in Wichers Auditorium, Hope music faculty members will give t h e i r o w n i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of s o m e of Downey's work. Among these performances will be the Shakespeare poem, " C o m e Away Death" from the play ' T w e l f t h Night," along with poems by D o w n e y ' s wife, Irusha, all of which Downey has set to music. "Music tries to reflect the aspect of the words in the poem," Downey said. In addition to the concerts, Downey will also be presenting a lecture at 11 a.m. on Thursday in Wichers Auditorium. The lecture will focus on D o w n e y ' s various musical styles. " S o m e works are quite early and others are quite recent," Downey said. "Hopefully (the lecture) will clarify certain aspects of the festival." All are welcome to attend any or all of this week's events. Admission is free.

2 5 & 2 6 . 2 0 0 3 8 p.m.

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For Tickets and Information, Call 616.395.7890

production. " T h e Birds,' although ancient Greek, is very alive today," said Jared Debacker ('05), "and due to some m o d e r n interpretation and line modification, it is a fast, clever play which makes many comments on our world, both here at Hope, and abroad." The student cast members and Tammi have been collaborating on the presentation of this work since February. "The entire company of the production (actors, designers and other m e m b e r s of the team) have brought their imaginatioins and creativity to the project. It's a real group effort. This collaboration is what I ' v e e n j o y e d the m o s t , " Tammi said. The production will also feature a set designed by John Anderson ( ' 0 3 ) , - and o r i g i n a l m u s i c b y Andrew Meyers ('05). ' T h e Birds" will be in the DeWitt Main Theatre on April 23, 25, and 26 at 8 p.m., and April 24 at 9 p.m. For tickets and information, call the DeWitt Theatre Ticket O f f i c e at 395-7890.

Those who missed the fall student dance concert or those who went and want to see more of their peers' dancing and choreographing talents at work will get their chance at 8 p.m. next Monday and Tuesday when a whole n e w round of student-choreographed dances are presented in the spring student dance concert. "The show is similar to the fall concert in the fact that is a student choreographed show but it is different because it is a new show, with new artists," said Erin Rupert ('04), a dancer and cochoreographer in the concert. Like in last semester's concert, there will be two separate shows. One will be in the Knickerbocker Theatre and the other will be in the Dow. " O n e or t h e o t h e r (of t h e

s h o w s ) i s n ' t better than the other, those pieces just happen to look better and work better with the intimate space in the D o w or the d a r k stage, and separate stage in the Knick," Rupert said. "In the Dow the dancers can more easily interact with the audience and in the Knick it is a show to see instead be a part of." In o r d e r t o d e c i d e w h i c h dances would go in either show, the dance students had a final s h o w i n g a n d p l a c e m e n t in which they presented their pieces to two faculty members. "They talk to you about your progress, what you could do to improve your piece and also explain where your piece would work the best," Rupert said. For all of the concerts, admission is free and all are welcome to attend.

What's Hangin'? ' T h e Two Towers'' .v

7 : 3 0 , 9 p.m, midnight Fri. and Sat. 3 p.m. Sunday Admission $2 Winants Auditorium

Tfclent J a m 8 p.m. Saturday The Knick

"Parallel Lives"

Two Siberians

Friday and Saturday DeWitt Studio Theater Admission $2

Cool beans coffeehouse Tonight, 9-11 p.m. The Kletz


'Anchor

SPOTLIGHT

Student soldier writes back To many students at Hope, the support f o r our troops serving our nation hits close to home. There are brothers, sisters, parents, and friends that have been deployed at v a r i o u s t i m e s o v e r the e n d u r i n g conflict that has plagued our country. They have chosen to leave their friends and family to pursue a comm o n goal,and in fact, some of them

come right f r o m the Hope College family. A m o n g them are three U.S. Marines, Timothy Grover ( ' 0 2 ) and Carl Daniel C03), stationed in Africa, and G a b r i e l Wise ( ' 0 6 ) deployed to Kuwait and now believed to be in Iraq, according to friends. Lance Corporal Timothy Grover graduated f r o m Hope in D e c e m b e r 2002. After four and a half years

he received his A C S certified B S in Chemistry. Right now, he is serving the United States Marine Corps in Djibouti, A f r i c a in support of Operation Enduring F r e e d o m . H e wrote to us to share his experience: his fears, his challenge, his passion and his drive. In order to k e e p the c o m m u n i t y a w a r e of o n e of its alumni, here is his letter:

(Being here right now), I feel very warm. T h e temperature is above 100 degrees Fahrenheit daily, the humidity is above 5 0 percent and rising. I am out here to do a service f o r my country. M y c o m p a n y and its attachments are here in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, which is the War on Terrorism. We function as the security force for the base, standing guard at the front gate and along the walls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We also have a reserve force in case a crisis or attack occurs, so that they can quickly react to the situation and support the sentries that are at the position in duress. O n e challenge that I face as a sentry is pulling the night shift of guard duty. Imagine sitting in a tower 4 0 feet off of the ground, alone in the dark, with nothing but radio c o m m u n i c a t i o n s checks every hour to keep you company. T h e task to which you are assigned is to observe and monitor everything that takes place in front of that tower on the other side of the wall. If you fail to do this, or you fall asleep, it could mean the lives of everyone on the base. (By the time you are on duty,) you have already been awake f o r most of the day, taking care of such essentials as meals, exercise, personal hygiene, w e a p o n s maintenance, and laundry if needed. N o w you must stay awake all night long and be observant or not only you, but everyone inside the base, could be (killed). T h e r e are a several things that drive me. First, I have a mother and a sister at home. I have friends both f r o m my h o m e t o w n and f r o m Hope College. M y j o b is to support the anti-terrorist operations that get carried out in Africa, and the way I do it is by standing guard. If 1 fail in my job, (it) could mean that the anti-terrorist operations could be c o m p r o m i s e d . W h a t that means f o r my family and friends back h o m e is the possibility of another terrorist attack on American soil. I m a y not even open fire on any aggressors or " e n e m i e s " while I am here, but I k n o w that what I and Lance Corporal Carl Daniel (*02) do is essential to making progress toward a safe United States. I am also driven by the pride associated with being a United States Marine, which drives m e t o work constantly on improving my physical fitness, my military education, and doing my j o b to the best of my ability. T h e last thing that drives me is the thought that I will eventually c o m e back home.

nan

Chad Sampson

SOLE MAN

Production editor

Supporting troops, not war I w a s sitting with a group of war protesters outside representative Hoekstra's office the day after we started b o m b i n g . A car pulled by an middle aged male yelled out the window, "I support our troops you [expletive deleted] traitors!" There is a way of thinking that exists in our country right n o w that says anti-war equals anti-American or anti-war equals anti-troops. T h e logic behind this reaction is that in order to support our troops w e need to support the war or that in order to be an American you must support the war America is involved in. T h i s logic however. is faulty. A m e r i c a is supposed to a democracy. We elect leaders and representation in our government in an attempt to represent public voice in the government. There is a certain amount of responsibility has to be taken by all citizens of voting age for the actions of our government. Democracy, when it is acting in its ideal fashion, is about the expression, discussion and c o m p r o m i s e in issues of policy, law and government action. If this is an appropriate description of Democracy, then dissent is a perfectly legitimate reaction to government action. To take this

idea further, public expression of dissent is a f u n d a m e n t a l principle, which without, democracy could not exist. T h e conclusion that must be reached is that a protester is fulfilling his or her patriotic duly. On the issue of whether or not anti-war is equal to anti-troop, it needs to be examined what it means to support our troops. T h e word support is a loaded term in this instance that needs to be defined. If supporting troops is equal to supporting war, then it might be correct to say that antiwar is anti-troops. T h i s m o d e of thought, however, would assume that a) the war describes part of a troops fundamental essence and/ or b) the troops risking their lives requires supporting a cause whether the war is just or not. T h e latter argument can be easily dismissed because under this premise a 9/11 high-jacking must be supported by all M u s l i m s whether they were moral or not, simply because he gave his life. Most M u s l i m s however, do not support the high-jack because they think the attack w a s unjust. To address the former argument, w e can look at the antithesis of the argument which would state that the war does not describe the troops f u n d a m e n t a l essence. A supporter of this case could say I don't support what

our troops are fighting for, but I support their safety and their right to life. Because there is no contradiction in the antithesis, the original statement is then false. N o w as far as the peace m o v e m e n t is concerned, the rights of peaceful assembly, freedom of speech and petitioning the government are protected by the United States Constitution. Peace protestors are exercising these rights to try to raise awareness, or possibly change public opinion, but also to show that America d o e s not have solidarity in its current policy. T h e goals of the peace m o v e m e n t usually come f r o m a respect f o r all h u m a n life and a wish to pursue peaceful ends to conflict. But these are things that all people should hope for. Most of the conflict on the Iraq issue arises between groups that disagree over whether peaceful conflict resolution would have failed o r not. So the next time you see a protestor d o n ' t give them the finger. T h e protestors want our troops home safe f r o m harm. T h e y .ire not against their country because disagreeing with the president is not unpatriotic, it is a right and duty in a fuctioning democracy.

Ap ^ r i l 9, 2 0 0 3 Maxitte

Gray

THE GRAY AREA

Guest writer

Affirm affirmative action Hundreds of concerned students and citizens f r o m far and near rallied in front of the highest court of the land, well b e f o r e opening arguments got underway. T h e two United States S u p r e m e court cases which h a v e the p o w e r to turn back the hands of time are Barbara Grutter v. Lee Bollinger, et al. and Gratz v. Bollinger. Both cases are regarding the admissions process at the University of Michigan, Grutter v. Bollinger is pertaining to the law school, and Gratz v. Bollinger addresses the undergraduate process. T h e s e landmark cases have stirred u p controversy and various feelings within our nation. Even our o w n president has voiced his opposition to affirmative action, and based on the severity of the case, the court is immediately releasing oral arguments to the public, a very u n c o m m o n practice. Affirmative action remains a controversial issue, but let's picture colleges and universities without a policy that requires th e m to not discriminate against a student based on race. Yes, I am against discrimination of any kind, but affirmative action policies are not discriminating against anyone in my opinion. It is simply ensuring that history does not repeat itself, and the ugly head of racism does not control our country as it once did. T h e overall minority percentage, which includes international students, at H o p e College makes u p less than 10 percent of the campus. Although H o p e is a private college and can abide by its o w n rules and regulations in

terms of admissions policies, this number can still be seen at public and private institutions of higher learning across the board. Aside f r o m historically Black colleges and universities, you will not see a c a m p u s of minority students w h o are the majority. That alone speaks volumes. Imagine with m e for a moment, that w e never had a Constitution or Cill of Rights, which could be enforced throughout the land. Imagine that the 13,h and 19,h a me n d ment were nonexistent and people made their own rules as they went along. President A b r a h a m Lincoln was proven to have o w n e d slaves of his o w n , so how can w e really believe f o r a m o m e n t that people would have allowed w o m e n to vote? Slaves to count as a whole person instead of three fifths? Read your bill or rights, and think about the reasons generations of p o w e r b e f o r e us decided to make and a m e n d enforceable laws, and where w e would be without them. T h e goal and the overall result of affirmative action policies relating to institues of higher education is a positive one. Minorities can now apply to these schools, be considered and accepted into higher education programs, where we were once not allowed to. Hey, I didn't write history, but now w e all h a v e to r e a p the consequences of many immoral, racist decisions generations b e f o r e us have made. Let's r e m e m b e r w h y affirmative action was instituted and not take that away. R e m e m b e r that history can only repeat itself if we allow it to.

H O P E C O L L E G E IS S E E K I N G C O M M E N T S F R O M T H E P U B L I C A B O U T T H E C O L L E G E IN PREPARATION FOR ITS P E R I O D I C EVALUATION BY ITS R E G I O N A L A C C R E D I T I N G A G E N C Y .

T H E COLLEGE WILL U N D E R G O A C O M P R E H E N S I V E EVALUATION VISIT ON M O N D A Y - W E D N E S D A Y , S E P T . 2 2 - 2 4 , 2 0 0 3 , BY A T E A M REPRESENTING THE H I G H E R L E A R N I N G C O M M I S S I O N OF THE N O R T H C E N T R A L A S SOCIATION OF C O L L E G E S A N D S C H O O L S . H O P E C O L L E G E HAS BEEN A C C R E D I T E D BY T H E C O M M I S S I O N SINCE 1 9 1 5 . T H E TEAM WILL R E V I E W T H E INSTITUTION'S ONGOING ABILITY T O MEET THE C O M M I S S I O N ' S C R I TERIA FOR A C C R E D I T A T I O N A N D G E N E R A L INSTITUTIONAL R E Q U I R E MENTS. T H E PUBLIC.IS INVITED T O S U B M I T C O M M E N T S REGARDING T H E C O L LEGE: P U B L I C C O M M E N T ON H O P E C O L L E G E HIGHER LEARNING COMMISSION N O R T H C E N T R A L A S S O C I A T I O N O F C O L L E G E S AND S C H O O L S 3 0 NORTH L A S A L L E STREET, SUITE 2 4 0 0 CHICAGO, I L 6 0 6 0 2

C O M M E N T S M U S T A D D R E S S SUBSTANTIVE MATTERS RELATED T O T H E Q U A L I T Y OF T H E INSTITUTION OR ITS ACADEMIC PROGRAMS. C O M M E N T S MUST BE IN WRITING A N D SIGNED; C O M M E N T S C A N N O T BE TREATED AS CONFIDENTIAL. A L L C O M M E N T S MUST BE RECEIVED BY F R I D A Y , A U G . 1, 2 0 0 3 .


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Sterotypes revealed at Hope College Carly Jugenitz GUEST WRITER

L o c a t e d on ihe west c o a s t of Michigan, Hope is known by many as a certain type of institution. Hope is a small school that provides a liberal-arts education and is affiliated with the Christian Reformed faith. T h e s e three qualities alone yield numerous stereotypes about what the education is like, what types of students will attend, and h o w strict the administration will be. But even more intriguing are the stereotypes that h a v e been f o r m e d within the intimate college community. Most students w h o attend Hope can recall a time when people have prejudged them based on the fact that they attend Hope College. Todd E d e m a ( ' 0 3 ) even experienced this phenomenon w h e n he studied offc a m p u s in Philadelphia. "I interned with the Philadelphia Eagles, and, because they had a prior experience with another H o p e student, they assumed I was extremely religious because of the sole fact that 1 attended Hope. T h e y often referred to m e and R a n d A r w a d y ( ' 0 3 ) as the Christian brothers f r o m Hope College." W h a t is even more fascinating is that, although m a n y students have experienced stereotyping of some sort, they still contribute to the ster e o t y p i n g that o c c u r s within the H o p e community. While these preconceived beliefs are not always truthful, they do hold a lot of p o w e r on-campus. For exa m p l e , if a student is to w e a r a sweatshirt with Greek letters, they are automatically labeled as Greek and seen by non-Greeks as the typical " G r e e k " student w h o participates in the typical " G r e e k " activities and associates with the typical " G r e e k " friends. However, it d o e s not stop there. If those same students are wearing a Greek sweatshirt with Sigma S i g m a or Omicron K a p p a Epsilon on it, they are prejudged even more as a Sigma or a Prater. And by no fault of their own, w h e n they interact with people w h o do not know them as an individual, they have to live with the preconceived beliefs and carry the stereotypical baggage that c o m e s with being in that organization. There are many other stereotypes

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CHAD SAMPSON

Rachel Hilla ('05) and Ashley Boer ('05) demonstrate that in real life, members of the Greek community can be friends with members of different orginizations. present at Hope that people believe in. S e v e r a l s t u d e n t s e x p r e s s e d these as the most popular stereo-. types within H o p e ' s c o m m u n i t y : students at Hope are avid C h r i s tians, females attending Hope are in search of their " M R S . Degree," H o p e s t u d e n t s are f r o m a f f l u e n t backgrounds, athletes are glorified by the school, and m e m b e r s of the D e w Crew are a little too passionate about H o p e basketball. S o if these stereotypes are not truthful and they do not correctly portray the student population, then why do they exist? It s e e m s that when students are confronted about the stereotypes they have adopted into their belief system that they do not k n o w w h e n or w h y this occurred. Most often students have not had personal experience with people they pre-judge; they simply attach stereotypes b e c a u s e of rumors they have heard.

Parallel Lives, based on the Kathy & Mo Show" by Kathy N a j i m y and M o G a f f n e y

T h e p o w e r of language that allows rumors to spread like wildfire often acts as the backbone for many stereotypes. One thing is inevitable; p e o p l e like to talk a b o u t o t h e r people. People seems to like it even more when rumors involves 'juicy' information that is almost, but not quite unbelievable. With H o p e being such an intimate college community, people tend to talk more because they are more familiar with other organizations, or people w h o are stereotyped. Most of the time r u m o r s h a v e little or no validity. R u m o r s feed off previous situations, events of the past, and historical traditions. T h e b o t t o m line is this: rumors m a g n i f y and exaggerate the truth. And because people enjoy hearing and spreading rumors, stereotypes are f o r m e d and people are placed in stereotypical b o x e s about w h o they are and what they are like according to rumors. It seems that people readily ack n o w l e d g e this fact, however, stereotypes still exist, and rumors continue to spread faster than the speed of light. So is there any w a y that stereotypes will ever cease to exist, or is it just an inevitable fact that people need to learn tp live with?

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It would be an overly idealistic statement to say that stereotypes can be eliminated. In fact, as long as p e o p l e talk with o n e another, rumors will always be present and c e r t a i n s t e r e o t y p e s will be s u p ported. However, stereotypical views can be minimized. T h e key to this is awareness. If people allow t h e m s e l v e s to be e d u c a t e d about other organizations, activities or points of views, they will be able to better understand people w h o are different f r o m th e m without profiling t h e m into a stereotypical category. Communication professor Deirdre Johnston explains how education can help to decrease stereotyping. "Education should ideally decrease people's dependence on stereotypes that are both erroneous and harmful to others." According to Johnston, there is a positive correlation between education and a b a n d o n m e n t of stereotypes. "As a person's education about diversity issues and interaction with divers groups of people increases, that person will find their old stereotypes aren't predictive a n y m o r e - they just w o n k work, and will therefore be a b a n d o n e d . " T h e remedy f o r stereotyping on

H o p e ' s c a m p u s begins with each of us. We all know the stereotypes that are present, and w e need to take the first step and m a k e o u r s e l v e s aware. If there is prejudiced attached to what w e say and what w e hear, and if we are able to b e c o m e aware of it, then we will have to p o w e r to c h a n g e stereotyping at Hope. It is important to realize that und e r every stereotype, there is an individual and that individual is much m o r e complex and intriguing than the stereotype that they have had attached to th e m b e c a u s e of what they are involved with. At Hope we are surrounded by people w h o are different that ourselves in m a n y ways. Instead of classifying those people with differences into stereotypical boxes, we should embrace the differences and increase our awareness of all the unique p e o p l e w h o make up humankind. We are all fortunate to be surrounded by diversity in the Hope community, and we need to take advantage of our situation. By increasing interaction with our peers and by raising our awareness instead of stereotyping and profiling we enable ourselves to make the most out of our college experience.

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Recycle the Anc EIG sponsors the 14th Earth Jam! zycle the Anchor! Recycle the Anchor! Recycle the Starring Katie Carlston and Lauren Toner, directed by Kristin T i s c o m i a

Ancl,or!

Recycleth

April 11 & 12, 8 p.m., DeWitt Studio Theatre, $2 admission A r u > l T r v r ?

This Saturday, noon to 5:30. In the Pine Grove, or the Klete-tn case of rain. —•


Anchor I

OPINION

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Turn off that TV for freedom T o g o a l o n g w i t h m y c o l u m n f r o m last w e e k , 1 w o u l d

it m a y h e l p o u t y o u r g r a d e s at t h e s a m e t i m e . T h r o u g h this w h o l e o r d e a l , w e h a v e s e e n t h e d a y ' s e v e n t s in Iraq b r o a d c a s t like a f o o t b a l l g a m e , play b y play, f r o m e m b e d d e d j o u r n a l i s t s o n n e t w o r k s like C N N o r F O X N e w s . T h e only d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n the w a r c o v e r a g e and a f o o t b a l l g a m e is that, in t h i s c a s e , t h e m e d i a a r e b e i n g c e n s o r e d . In t h e G u l f W a r o f 1990, t h e m i l i t a r y m a d e s u r e t h a t w h a t c a m e out in t h e n e w s p a p e r s a n d o n t e l e v i s i o n b r o a d c a s t s w a s w h a t t h e y w a n t e d t h e p u b l i c t o see. T h e g o v e r n m e n t q u i c k l y hid t h e c h a r r e d b o d i e s a n d o t h e r t e r r i b l e i m a g e s o f t h e w a r t o p u m p u p p u b l i c a p p r o v a l 13 y e a r s a g o , a n d they a r e a s s u r e d l y d o i n g it a g a i n . I a m thoroughly upset w h e n I find myself sucked into a T V like a m i n d l e s s z o m b i e , w h i l e t h e rest of t h e w o r l d p a s s e s a r o u n d m e . D a y a f t e r d a y in t h e K l e t z , I s e e students and faculty alike stop their reading f o r class or t hei r d i s c u s s i o n w i t h e a c h o t h e r t o w a t c h t h e a c t i o n o n t h e TVs. T o a v o i d b e i n g s u c k e d i n t o this T V t r a p , I p r o p o s e a s i m p l e s o l u t i o n : t u r n t h e set o f f . G o w i t h o u t t h e f l a s h y i m a g e s a n d r e p o r t e r s d i s c u s s i n g t h e latest p u s h into B a g h d a d f o r as l o n g as y o u c a n s t a n d it. B e d a r i n g a n d t a k e it a s t e p f u r t h e r : R e f u s e t o w a t c h a n y t e l e v i s i o n , not j u s t t h e n e w s . I m a g i n e t h e t i m e that w i l l b e f r e e d u p to d o o t h e r t h i n g s t h a t w e a r e a l w a y s l a c k i n g t i m e f o r , like w r i t i n g t h o s e p a p e r s , d o i n g h o m e w o r k , or c a l l i n g y o u r mom. If y o u t a k e this c o u r s e o f a c t i o n , it will of c o u r s e m e a n

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d i f f i c u l t to f i n d an u n b i a s e d n e w s s o u r c e t h a t will h a v e t h e m o s t u p to d a t e i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t c i v i l i a n a n d m i l i t a r y c a s u a l t i e s , but t h e y a r e o u t t h e r e . T w o p l a c e s y o u c a n start are Truthout (www.truthout.org), and the International Red Cross (www.icrc.org).

Anchor Staff

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Anchor Staff Anchor

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editor-in-chief Nick Denis production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Anjey Dykhuis Kurt Koehler arts editor Maureen Yonovitz sports editor Dave Yetter photo editor Rob Ondra business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants ad manager Ana Santibanez Zamora production asisstant Jason Johnson advisor Mark A. Lewison Senior Staff Reporters: Erin RHey Katie Taylor Staff Reporters: Gienn Lester, Stephanie Szydiowski Photo Assisstant: Anneke Meeter The Anchor is a product of student effort ami is funded through the students of Hope College, funding w hich comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

/ ^ A n c h o r 2003 spring semester, Issue #23 of 25

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To the Editor: I ' m not a person that normally complains a lot or gets easily offended and upset by things, but the methods used for housing assignments for this upcoming fall semester definitely struck a nerve. Recently I filled out an application for a four-person apartment, as did a group of guys I know. Applications were tumed in, and it turned out my group did not receive an apartment, but theirs did. Now. normally this would be no big deal, however my group had a total of 22 more credits than their group. How does that work out? Well, according to Hope College Housing, they received an apartment based on the guy to girl ratio at Hope. This semester, according to the enrollment data on the website of the Registrar's office, the guy to girl ratio is almost 1.6 girls for every guy. True it's not very equal, but it's not exactly an overwhelming amount either. The enrollment data shows 62% of Hope's campus to be female this semester. It only seems fair then that, at the

very least, 62% of the apartment spots should be reserved for females and the rest for males. Perhaps this is how the housing department does it, although based on what I've seen these past t w o w e e k s , I tend to doubt it. However, would this proposed method be any fairer than simply putting everybody in one big g r o u p and a s s i g n i n g a p a r t m e n t s e n t i r e l y b a s e d on credit h o u r s ? Some would say yes because guys on this c a m p u s tend to have less credit hours. Well, the enrollment data shows them to be taking the same amount of credits at Hope as w o m e n . T h e d i f f e r e n c e must be found in A P credits. How is it any harder for a guy to get AP credits than a girl? That Y c h r o m o s o m e isn't completely useless is it? If they don't have the credits, that is their o w n fault. E v e r y b o d y should be pitted against everybody else for an apartment, not guys versus guys and girls versus girls. It's the only way Hope can do it and be completely fair. Yes, there probably will be more apartments with girls than with guys, but take a look

around...there are more girls here! I ' m not speaking as a feminist, far from it actually, but consider housing options for guys versus girls. W h e n guys c o m e to Hope, they have the option of living in one of several dorms with quality rooms, D u r f e e and P h e l p s for e x a m p l e . W h e n g i r l s c o m e to H o p e , the greater majority of them are sent to.. .dun dun dun.. .Dykstra. I spent my freshman year in Dykstra, and it was great living in a cluster, but that's the only good thing about Dykstra. The rooms are on the small size with jail-cell windows, furniture from the '60s, makeshift closets in a giant wood wall unit (that takes up more space than anything), and c o m m u n i t y b a t h r o o m s with s h o w e r s built to a c c o m m o d a t e a toddler. It's not exactly quality living. but you shouldn't expect that for your freshman year. However, some of us get it (guys) and some of us do not (girls). Is it so much to ask then that we get equal opportunity for apartments? —Brittany

Gasper COS)

Uncle Sam ignoring Iraqi civilian deaths To the Editor:

t h a t y o u will e i t h e r b e c o m e u n i n f o r m e d o r y o u will h a v e t o f i n d o t h e r s o u r c e s o f i n f o r m a t i o n . In t h i s t i m e , it m a y b e

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Men are not the oppressed minority in housing

like to p o u t f o r w a r d an i d e a f o r a w a y to m e a n i n g f u l l y p r o t e s t t h e w a r in Iraq w i t h o u t c a r r y i n g a r o u n d s l o g a n s a n d

A p r i l 9r 2 0 0 3

When the military destroys enemy weapons tucked close to civilian and religious sites it occurs to me that Bush might not have the Iraqi peoples' best interests at heart. I am not a fool, and I realize that civilian deaths occur in battles especially in urbane settings, but if these were American citizens that Saddam parked tanks next to surely we wouldn't be bombing idle weapons next to daycare centers. When criminals take hostages in the States we don't have our police forces lob grenades in to the area. Why not respect the lives of the people we are trying to liberate just the same. Iraq needs to be liberated, but the Bush administration also needs to care about civilian casualties. The people of America are very concerned with the number of troops that are wounded or die. but why don't we hear estimates on Iraqi Civilian deaths. W e ' r e supposed to care right? W e ' r e trying to help these people a f t e r all. H o w e v e r , In a t h o r o u g h r e a d of t h e C E N T C O M April 2mi briefing (latest at time of writing) I see no mention by General Brooks of Iraqi casualties or Fatalities. Nor are there any reporters who asked. In order to appreciate how American Generals and foreign reporters keep dodging and rephrasing the same question over and over you will h a v e to read the C E N T C O M briefings. In the April 1M briefing an unidentified foreign reporter asked "When you show us these impressive satellite footage and video clips, you

probably want us to believe that. A, your bombs are accurate; B, you do not target civilians. If that is really the case, I ' m just wondering, how can you explain the death of between 500 to 700 civilian Iraqis and injuring many more thousands?" General Brooks responded, " . . . O u r approach has been and will continue to be one that tries to minimize the impact on civilian populations and other structures that we don't intend to affect. We are very satisfied with the precision of the work that has been undertaken thus far. The numbers that y o u ' v e provided, I cannot account for. I don't know the source of those numbers and I don't know what the veracity of those numbers would be. There are clearly deaths that have occurred on the battlefield." C E N T C O M does have an estimate of Iraqi deaths. If British intelligence can provide its reporters with an estimate so can C E N T C O M . The general elaborates on his difficulties with the estimate in another section of the same briefing. "I think the number is something we can't get our hands around, but it's a number that the Iraqi regime has a pretty good grip. They're contributing a tremendous portion of this number, whatever it happens to be." Why are reporters at the B B C more informed about civilian deaths than a Marine Brigadier General assigned to C E N T C O M ? Or is he in the loop, but has chosen to ignore and censor the facts because it looks better? —Paul Hayes COS)

Show support for your lacrosse team at tournament To the Editor: The m e n ' s lacrosse team is now halfway through its season, despite some setbacks caused by this crazy Michigan weather. Their record is currently 5-1. The team has a lot of young talent. It consists of a numb e r of p l a y e r s w h o h a v e n e v e r played the game before college, yet dedicated themselves to attending indoor practices from midnight until two in the morning for much of this semester. This Saturday is the annual wooden shoe lacrosse tournament hosted by hope. It is the

largest such tournament in the state, with ten teams and thirteen games over the course of the day. Hope plays against Kettering at 11 a.m. and against Ferris State University at 1 p.m. If they win those games, they will go on to play in the semifinals at 4:30 p.m. and then the finals at 5:30 p.m. Last year, we had so many fans come and support us at our tournament, and our team agrees that this huge support is what won us the tournament, as both the semifinals and finals were won by one goal. The team would therefore like to invite the entire campus to

come out to the buys athletic fields and support us this weekend, the weather is supposed to begin to get nicer and what better way to celebrate than with a day of lacrosse. This is truly a unique and fun experience and the team loves the community support. The m e n ' s team also has one final home game on April 16 at 6 p.m. against central Michigan and plays at Calvin on Thursday April 24 at 4:30. Come out and see what the fun of lacrosse is all about. —Patrick

Kearney ('03)


^ V r i c K o r

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

A p r i l 9, 2003

Unconditional support is not necessary

Classified

national support. I d o n ' t support t h e m in their killing

To the Editor: 1 a m told to " S u p p o r t o u r T r o o p s " n o w that w a r h a s b e g u n . I say, it all d e p e n d s o n w h a t you m e a n . 1 w a n t o u r troops o u t of h a r m ' s way. I support t h e m in their right to c h o o s e the military, their f e e l i n g that they are d o i n g their patriotic duty, a n d in their thinking that they are doing good. But I d o n ' t support t h e m for w h a t , at the p r e s i d e n t ' s orders, they are d o i n g in Iraq. I oppose their hostile e n t e r i n g of a c o u n t r y without inter-

of Iraqis, both soldiers and innocent civilians. A n d I o p p o s e t h e m in their inevitable d e s t r o y i n g of at least s o m e infrastructure and resources that will lead to miseries in the f u t u r e . Please d o n ' t lopk at m e strangely if I c a n ' t u n q u a l i f i e d l y agree t h a t " But, of course, all citizens can and s h o u l d support o u r t r o o p s . " —Neil

Wo 11man,

Professor of Psychology; Manchester College

Christians should stop arguing about polotics To the Editor: I a m studying abroad this s e m e s ter and I w a s noticing that the debate b e t w e e n liberal and c o n s e r v a -

On the other h a n d , o u r best reli-

Please, s t u d e n t s of H o p e , d o not

g i o u s i m p u l s e s c a n r e m i n d us of

a l l o w y o u r s e l v e s to be caught up in the h a t e f u l g a m e of d e c i d i n g

what kind of p e o p l e w e really w a n t to be; authentic faith can lift us to the h e i g h t s of o u r humanity. Reli-

w h o is the " b e s t " Christian, we are all terrible C h r i s t i a n s . T h a t is the w h o l e point. Instead of q u i b b l i n g

tive has escalated to a d e b a t e o v e r o p i n i o n s a b o u t the w a r in Iraq. I

g i o u s v i s i o n that a w a k e n s b a s i c values c a n e n a b l e us to transcend

h a v e n e v e r written to the A n c h o r

n a r r o w s e l f - i n t e r e s t and e m b r a c e the c o m m o n g o o d rather than re-

norant hours, let us o p e n o u r m i n d s and use o u r e d u c a t i o n f o r the bet-

d u c i n g things to their lowest c o m -

terment of the least of these, w h o m .

lege w a n t s t o seek after the love of Christ w e will not get a n y w h e r e by

mon denominator and negotiating factional interests (The Soul of

Christ l o v e d so m u c h ! T h i s m e a n s we need t o f o l l o w the l o v i n g ex-

d i v i d i n g o u r s e l v e s a s such. I s u g -

Politics, 1995)." T h e w a r in Iraq

a m p l e of Christ, e m b r a c i n g d i f f e r -

gest that w e take a step back and realize that from a Christian stand-

s h o w s us vividly that w e are living in a t i m e a n d p l a c e o f p a r a d o x .

e n c e s in o p i n i o n , c r e e d , g e n d e r , race, and sexual orientation. Rather

point both of the d o m i n a n t politi-

W h i l e c o u n t l e s s die v i o l e n t l y in

than t h r o w i n g a r o u n d a r g u m e n t a -

cal i d e o l o g i e s in the United states h a v e taken a p r o f o u n d turn f r o m the

Iraq we are a b l e to c a s u a l l y d e b a t e f r o m our position over just war

tive w o r d s a b o u t the existing political order, let u s be the " H o p e "

genuine love that Christ teaches. To

of a n e w g e n e r a t i o n that will relin-

q u o t e J i m Wallis, w h o s p o k e in

theory. E a c h day w h i l e w e attend to o u r

C h a p e l this fall, " H i s t o r y and experience tell u s that religious vision

studies and b u s y s c h e d u l e s , 3 5 , 0 0 0 p e o p l e die of h u n g e r - r e l a t e d p r o b -

can turn into sectarian divisiveness,

lems. It s e e m s clear that o u r soci-

j u s t i f y i n g s o m e of o u r w o r s t h u m a n

ety and w o r l d n e e d s a radical turn a w a y f r o m b u s i n e s s as u s u a l .

b e f o r e but I think that I h a v e s o m e t h i n g to say. If this Christian C o l -

behavior.

like the a p o s t l e s at their m o s t ig-

q u i s h this fruitless pursuit. I issue this as a c h a l l e n g e , both to m y s e l f

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a n d to all of my f e l l o w students. T h a n k s for y o u r t i m e .

—Elinor Douglass ('04)

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SHOOTING STRAIGHT

Shooting Stvaiiiht

Sports editor

Swimming takes dedication and heart 1 w a s g l a n c i n g at H o p e ' s sports s c h e d u l e s last w e e k

G e o r g i a on their s p r i n g b r e a k

w h e n I c a m e u p o n the schedule for the s w i m m e r s . I k n e w that

Championships.

the s w i m m e r s d i d n ' t h a v e the easiest s c h e d u l e , but 1 w a s n ' t a w a r e of the s a c r i f i c e s that t h e s e athletes m a k e . S w i m m e r s are the athletes w h o h a v e the hardest s c h e d u l e and are s o m e of the m o s t d e d i c a t e d athletes in s c h o o l . T h e s e a s o n b e g i n s with p r a c t i c e s at the start of O c t o b e r a n d nationals a r e n ' t o v e r till the e n d of M a r c h . T h e t e a m

c o m p e t i n g in the N a t i o n a l A / V a H O K PHOTO BY DAVID YETTER

T h e p r a c t i c e paid o f f , h o w e v e r , and both of H o p e ' s

Two Hope players battle during Saturday's game. The men have a 12-2 overall record.

s w i m t e a m s had s u c c e s s f u l seasons. T h e m e n f i n i s h e d

Tennis has 5-2 weekend

second at the M 1 A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s f o r the e i g h t h straight year, w h i l e the w o m e n w o n

m e n B o b b y D o d y and A n d y Phillips. F r e s h m e n A n d y

their 20th in school history.

David Yetter

in d o u b l e s play. T h e m e n play again this w e e k e n d in the G r e a t L a k e s C o l l e g e s A s s o c i a t i o n ( G L C A ) Tour-

Also, n i n e s w i m m e r s c o m p e t e d at the N C A A C h a m p i o n -

S P O R T S EDITOR

their tenth M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p in the last 12 y e a r s and

practices early a n d o f t e n ,

ships in G e o r g i a . Brian S l a g h ( ' 0 3 ) , D a v i d O m e e ( ' 0 6 ) , Jeff

s w i m m i n g lap a f t e r lap, h o p i n g

Heydlauff ('05), Chris

to i m p r o v e their times. T h e r e were e v e n practices o v e r

H a m s t r a ( ' 0 4 ) , and Travis

C h r i s t m a s break, and getting u p early o n b r e a k to g o to any kind of practice is a b o u t as m u c h f u n as a b a d c a s e of the shingles. T h e d o r m s were not e v e n o p e n during s o m e of the b r e a k and s o m e s t u d e n t s e v e n had t o slay at a hotel until the

T o u r n a m e n t , b e a t i n g O b e r l i n a n d Wooster, t w o t e a m s

and Priya M a l v i y a ( ' 0 5 ) . T h e w o m e n then d e f e a t e d

f r o m O h i o . But they f e l l to K e n y o n on S a t u r d a y b y a

Wooster, O h i o later in the day b y a score of 5-0. Singles

A m e r i c a P e r f o r m a n c e s for

score of f i v e g a m e s to three. T h e m e n beat A q u i n a s y e s t e r d a y b y a score of 6 - 3

w i n n e r s f o r H o p e i n c l u d e d A n n e l i e s e Fox ( ' 0 6 ) and Jennifer Coleman ('03). Doubles winners included

relays w h i l e Slagh also got a m e n t i o n in the 2 0 0 - y a r d free.

to i m p r o v e their overall r e c o r d to 12-2.

M a l v i y a and F o x , w h o w o n their m a t c h 8-1. T h e i r

D a n M a n n ( ' 0 3 ) d e f e a t e d N a t e Price to i m p r o v e his overall record t o 12-2 and then t e a m e d with K e v n e y

m o m e n t u m w a s h a l t e d on Saturday, h o w e v e r , a s they

D u g a n ( ' 0 4 ) , t o i m p r o v e their d o u b l e s r e c o r d t o 12-1.

bad weather. D e s p i t e the loss t o K e n y o n , C o a c h Karen P a g e w a s

Barkel ( ' 0 6 ) all h a d All-

T h e year w a s s u c c e s s f u l for both t e a m s and it s e e m s that all their hard w o r k p a i d o f f .

attitude and the e f f o r t s that e v e r y b o d y put o u t and w e ' l l

lost to K e n y o n . Play w a s f o r c e d i n d o o r s b e c a u s e of

T h e m e n s u f f e r e d their s e c o n d loss of the s e a s o n

C o a c h Patnott said that he e n j o y e d the s e a s o n a n d is

road a lot as well. R o a d trips

" I w a s h a p p y with the

last Friday to W h e a t o n C o l l e g e . D u r i n g their 5 - 2 loss, D a n M a n n a n d K e v n e y D u g a n w e r e H o p e ' s only w i n -

pleased with h o w the w o m e n p l a y e d o v e r the w e e k -

n e r s o n the day.

w e e k e n d a n d is e x p e c t i n g a lot f r o m the w o m e n . " W e d e f i n i t e l y s t e p p e d it u p in this t o u r n a m e n t , "

end.

T h e y r e b o u n d e d Saturday and gained a victory o v e r A d r i a n in M I A A m a t c h play. T h e y d e f e a t e d the Bulld o g s o n S a t u r d a y by a score of 9-0. T h e y i m p r o v e d

be r e a d y to start again next O c t o b e r , " h e said.

S h e is l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to the t o u r n a m e n t this

P a g e said. " O u r m o m e n t u m is back o n track a n d we

their t e a m r e c o r d t o 11-2 o n the s e a s o n and 3 - 0 in

p l a y e d with a lot of heart and p r i d e . " T h e w o m e n will play this w e e k e n d at the M i d w e s t

M I A A play.

Region Invitational.

Basketball players earn awards Kerkstra, Overbeek named Ail-Americans

nament. T h e w o m e n w o n both of their m e e t s on Friday. T h e y

T h e H o p e C o l l e g e m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s t e n n i s t e a m s played a n u m b e r of g a m e s o v e r the w e e k e n d .

beat Oberlin, O h i o in the early g a m e b y a score of 5-4. W i n n e r s for H o p e i n c l u d e d S t e p h a n i e S p r i n g e r ( ' 0 4 )

already l o o k i n g a h e a d .

s o m e s w i m m e r s w e r e in

R u e m e n a p p and N a t e R e e d w e r e a m o n g the w i n n e r s

T h e w o m e n w o n t w o g a m e s o n F r i d a y at the G L C A

school w a s o p e n e d . T h e s w i m m e r s are o n the took t h e m to m o r e than one different stale o v e r the year and

S o m e w i n n e r s for H o p e in singles play w e r e f r e s h -

Men, women improve MIAA records with road victories

to a c c o m p l i s h together.

III A l l - F r e s h m a n t e a m b y the D i l l

" O u r s e a s o n w a s the m o s t f u n anyone could ever ask for,"

N e w s . C a r l s o n , w h o a t t e n d e d Hol-

K e r k s t r a said. " W e took six solid

D i v i s i o n III p l a y e r s in the nation

l e a d e r s f r o m the senior c l a s s and

that w e r e n a m e d to the team. C a r l s o n b e c a m e a starter for the

land H i g h S c h o o l , is one of the ten

Rain Out A n u m b e r of sports h a v e h a d their g a m e s c a n c e l l e d or r e s c h e d u l e d b e c a u s e of the cold a n d the s n o w that has b l a n k e t e d the West M i c h i g a n a r e a o v e r the w e e k e n d . B e l o w are the sports w h i c h h a v e had g a m e s c a n c e l l e d b e c a u s e of the w e a t h e r or f r o m s c h e d u l i n g conflicts.

Softball

D a v i d Yetter

incorporated relationships with o u r

S P O R T S EDITOR

younger teammates, classmates, facilty, a n d m e m b e r s of the c o m -

F l y i n g D u t c h m e n in t h e t e a m ' s

T u e s d a y , April 8 T h u r s d a y , April 10

A d r i a n at H o p e H o p e at A q u i n a s

postponed cancelled

third g a m e . He q u i c k l y b e c a m e a

Friday, April 11

H o p e at O l i v e t

cancelled

Kerkstra ('03), and Jeff Carlson

munity."

( ' 0 6 ) h a v e all r e c e i v e d a c c o l a d e s

S h e also reflected o n the unbel i e v a b l e s e a s o n that the F l y i n g

f o r c e o n the t e a m a n d n e v e r looked back. He e n d e d u p a v e r a g i n g 10.2

Track

points p e r g a m e , b e c o m i n g H o p e ' s

Wednesday, April 9

Home meet

postponed

Don O v e r b e e k ('03), A m a n d a

for their play during the 2 0 0 2 - 2 0 0 3 basketball season. A m a n d a Kerkstra has b e e n n a m e d as a firstteam All-American by the D i l i N e w s . Kerkstra became Hope's

all-time

Gingras-

second l e a d i n g s c o r e r of the t e a m

will o u r s e a s o n be

m i n u t e s o v e r the t e a m ' s

replicated, no o n e will do what w e

28 games. C a r l s o n led the t e a m

have done,

in t h r e e - p o i n t a n d f r e e t h r o w s h o o t i n g . He

while averaging 24.2

and

that is part of the legacy that we leave behind w h e n

points leader this year, breaking Karen

Dutch had. "Never again

we graduate."

Carlson

Hoekstra's previous record of 1,369 points. S h e w a s the leading scorer on the H o p e team that won the M I A A , a v e r a g i n g 16.2 points a g a m e . She also led the t e a m in a n u m b e r of other categories, including field goal percentage ( 5 5 % ) , r e b o u n d s (9.1), and steals (1.8).

Kerkstra was h o n o r e d by the a w a r d , but she mostly praised h e r t e a m m a t e s f o r w h a t they w e r e a b l e

For Don

the men, Overbeek

Kerkstra

also r e c e i v e d a p o s t s e a s o n a w a r d . He w a s n a m e d as a second-team All

Calvin at H o p e

postponed

Non-Profil Organization

made a team-best 50

141 E I 2 T H S T

U.S. P o s t a g e

three-point field goals and shot 5 4 % f r o m be-

PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

PAID Hope College

h i n d t h e line. H e a l s o

shot 9 7 % f r o m the f r e e t h r o w line, c o n v e r t i n g on 3 0 out of 31 shots f r o m the c h a r i t y stripe. A l o n g with b e i n g n a m e d t o the

led the t e a m in s c o r i n g , f i n i s h i n g with 4 0 8 points and a v e r a g i n g 14.6

All-Freshman Team, Carlson was also voted to the M I A A a l l - c o n f e r -

p o i n t s a g a m e . H e a l s o led t h e

e n c e second team. "I think I did real well for my first

Jeff C a r l s o n ( ' 0 6 ) , H o p e ' s 6 ' 4 , , guard, w a s n a m e d to the D i v i s i o n

Friday, April 4

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR

American by the Dili News. Don

D u t c h m e n in f r e e t h r o w s m a d e (105), r e b o u n d s (285), and b l o c k e d s h o t s (94).

Baseball

y e a r , " C a r l s o n said. " T h e g u y s instilled a lot of c o n f i d e n c e in m e and it w a s g r e a t g e t t i n g to play o n a t e a m that w o n so m a n y g a m e s . '

Profile for Hope College Library

04-09-2003  

04-09-2003  

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