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Groups ask for policy change on homosexuality Amy Soukup C A M P U S N E W S CO-EDITOR

Before s t u d e n t s left for spring break, two g r o u p s s u b m i t t e d petitions to t h e H o p e College Board of T r u s t e e s asking for t h e removal of "the "HopeCollege Institutional S t a t e m e n t o n Homosexuality," w h i c h was created in 1995 a n d ratified by Hope's Board of Trustees Executive C o m m i t t e e in 2001 (see box o n page 2). O n e g r o u p consists of various a l u m n i including Dr. Donald Lubbers ('53), f o r m e r president of G r a n d Valley State University, Bill DePree, a t w o - t i m e U n i t e d States ambassador, and Bruce van Voorst ('54) a f o r m e r foreign affairs c o r r e s p o n d e n t at N e w s w e e k and T i m e m a g a z i n e s a n d a Pulitzer prize n o m i n e e . The second petition was s u b m i t t e d by m e m b e r s of " H o p e is Ready," a g r o u p d e d i c a t e d t o an o p e n dialogue o n sexuality o n Hope's c a m p u s . The g r o u p p l a n s to c o n t i n u e to collect signatures until April 29. Karis G r a n b e r g - M i c h a e l s o n ('09) of H o p e is Ready said t h e RCA's 2009 G e n e r a l Synod C ounsel helped c o n t r i b u t e t o t h e group's decision t o petition for t h e r e m o v a l of t h e policy. The 2009 General Synod said t h e r e is "no c o n s e n s u s in the church regarding the antecedents of sexual orientation among humans, no c o n s e n s u s a b o u t w h e t h e r same-sex u n i o n s can be faithful expressions of covenantal c o m m i t m e n t , and n o c o n s e n s u s a b o u t w h a t ecclesiastical roles are appropriate for those w h o engage in h o m o s e x u a l practices." "On t h e g r o u n d s that t h e r e is a clear lack of c o n s e n s u s o n this issue in t h e RCA, we [Hope is Ready] firmly o p p o s e that H o p e College i m p o s e s a single position o n t o t h e entire c o m m u n i t y t h r o u g h institutional policy," said G r a n b e r g - M i c h a e l s o n . " W e believe in the capacity of t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y t o engage this issue in a sincere and searching way. H o p e is Ready believes t h e Institutional S t a t e m e n t o n Homosexuality is d a m a g i n g to s t u d e n t life and h u r t f u l t o m a n y m e m b e r s of t h e H o p e community."

Hope honors Disability Awareness Week

Stephanie Dykema ('10), a n o t h e r m e m b e r of H o p e is Ready, said, "If t h e executive committee feels the need t o replace this policy with s o m e t h i n g , I would e n c o u r a g e t h e m t o replace it with a s t a t e m e n t that, in t h e least, ensures protection against d i s c r i m i n a t i o n and violence for L G B T Q s t u d e n t s ... It is t i m e that s t u d e n t s s u p p o r t fellow s t u d e n t s and f r i e n d s t o truly create t h e c o m m u n i t y that H o p e is said t o have. I believe in Hope's potential for that c o m m u n i t y , and r e m o v i n g this policy would be a great next s t e p t o get there." Along with r e m o v a l of t h e Institutional Statement on Homosexuality, t h e initial g r o u p of a l u m n i also p e t i t i o n e d for t h e c r e a t i o n of an advisory b o a r d at H o p e similar t o that which a n o t h e r RCA affiliated college. C e n t r a l College in Pella, Iowa, created. The alumni's petition states that Central College "has designed a m o d e l of s h a r e d review and accountability for decision m a k i n g in such controversial and complex situations." The petitioning alumni suggest t h a t an advisory b o a r d at H o p e include representatives of t h e administration. Board of Trustees, faculty and s t u d e n t s a n d that t h e b o a r d should advise t h e President in specific cases regarding issues of a c a d e m i c freedom. The alumni's petition states, " W h i l e t h e president always retains authority for t h e ultimate decisions, w e believe there would be obvious advantages for t h e President and t h e spirit of a c a d e m i c f r e e d o m at H o p e College." According to H o p e President James Bultman, b o t h petitions have been received and will be reviewed at t h e next m e e t i n g of t h e Board of T r u s t e e s t h e first week of May. B u l t m a n will withhold c o m m e n t s until after t h e May meeting of t h e Board of Trustees, but he refers t h o s e with q u e s t i o n s to a letter w r i t t e n by Joel Bouwens, c h a i r p e r s o n of t h e Board of Trustees, w h i c h can be found o n this page. Another group called "Holland is Ready" has w r i t t e n

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H O P E COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

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A P R I L 7 . 2 0 1 0 • S I N C E 1887

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S T U D E N T S S I M U L A T E D I S A B I L I T I E S - On Tuesday, Cortney K i m m e l ('12), Manny Reynoso ( ' l O ) . Erin W i c k ( ' 1 1 ) and Kelly S h u g a r t ( ' 1 1 ) t a k e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o s i m u l a t e m o b i l i t y i m p a i r m e n t In t h e m a i n floor lobby of t h e D e W I t t Center.

its o w n petition and is currently accepting signatures in h o p e of s u b m i t t i n g t h e petition to Hope's Board of T r u s t e e s as well. Part of t h e petition reads, "For s o m e m e m b e r s of Holland is Ready, GLBT inclusion is an issue of civil rights. For o t h e r s it is a p o s itio n g r o u n d e d in lifelong C h r i s t i a n faith and Biblical study. For o t h e r s still, s u p p o r t

of this petition c o m e s f r o m an u n d e r s t a n d i n g of m o d e r n psychology, the personal experience of being gay, or t h e experience of loving a G L B T family m e m b e r or friend. For all of us, however, this petition c o m e s f r o m a desire to help make Holland a safer, m o r e w e l c o m i n g c o m m u n i t y for all p e o p l e regardless of their sexual

orientation." The g r o u p plans to collect signatures until April 22. Even with differing o p i n i o n s regarding homosexuality, m e m b e r s of Hope's c o m m u n i t y said t h e issue is i m p o r t a n t to address and have a shared desire to ensure t h e w e l c o m i n g SEE

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April 5, 2010 Dear Hope Community: You should k n o w t h a t H o p e has received t h e widely r e p o r t e d petition regarding its position o n homosexuality, a l t h o u g h significantly later than its c o n t e n t s were revealed to t h e press. T h e petition w a s a u t h o r e d by a small g r o u p of dissenting a l u m n i a n d addressed t o t h e Board of Trustees. The petition asked that copies of t h e petition b e f u r n i s h e d to all m e m b e r s of t h e Board of T r u s t e e s a n d t h e m a t t e r of revoking Hope's p o si t i o n b e placed o n t h e agenda for t h e next meeting. W e have also received a petition f r o m several s t u d e n t s in s u p p o r t of t h e position taken by t h e dissenting a l u m n i g r o u p . A l t h o u g h I find this a t t e m p t to p r o m o t e a m b u s h j o u r n a l i s m to b e offensive, Hope's Board of T r u s t e e s is not shy a b o u t addressing issues w h i c h relate to its core values of providing excellent a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m s in t h e liberal arts a n d n u r t u r i n g a v i b r a n t Christian faith. As a result, all T r u s t e e s will be provided with a copy of the petition and it will be o n t h e agenda at the next Board of T r u s t e e s meeting. Because t h e T r u s t e e s have no a u t h o r i t y to act except in a duly called m e e t i n g , and I r e s p e c t t h e deliberative process they u n d e r t a k e , it would be i n a p p r o p r i a t e for m e t o speculate a b o u t any decision they may make. You can b e confident t h a t t h e Board will consider this m a t t e r in its usual m a n n e r : carefully, thoughtfully, thoroughly and prayerfully and in t h e best interests of H o p e College. If you have q u e s t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g t h e Board's handling of this m a t t e r they may b e addressed to me, c a r e of t h e President's Office of H o p e College. Very truly yours, Joel G. Bouwens Chairperson H o p e College Board of T r u s t e e s

Accounting for H o p e - The 2 0 1 0 U.S. census calls for student participation. Page 6-7

Got a story idea? Let us know a t anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

Women's basketball final four— Hope's t e a m second In NCAA Division III. Page 12


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ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

Wednesday Men's Lacrosse

April 7

Hosts Saginaw Valley at VanAndel S t a d i u m at 7 p.m.

Thursday April 8 "Behind the Uniform: A Student Project" Two short plays by Steve Gllroy and S i m o n Stephens. DeWitt Main Theatre, 8 p.m.. A d m i s s i o n $ 2

Friday April 9 "Mr. Attraction" Dating Coach Ryan Clauson 8 : 3 0 p.m. Kletz

IN BRIEF

IDT DANCE TO PERFORM IDT is scheduled to present its annual concert at Hope College on Friday and Saturday, April 9 and 10, at 8 p.m. at the Knickerbocker. IDT, formerly InSync Dance Theatre, is an affiliate of the department of dance. The company is led by artistic directors Rosanne Marie Mork (Barton-DeVries) and Amanda Smith-Heynen o f the Hope dance faculty. Tickets for the performances are $7 for regular admission, $5 for students and senior citizens, and free for children age 13 and under, and are on sale at the ticket office in the main lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse.

APRIL 7 , 2 0 1 0

Hope's new Quidditch club soars C h r i s Russ STAFF W R I T E R

A fictional s p o r t h a s c o m e to life o n b o t h a global scale and o n H o p e Colleges c a m p u s . Q u i d ditch, a g a m e t a k e n directly f r o m t h e pages of ).K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels, is n o w being played at over 200 colleges and universities world wide. Four H o p e s t u d e n t s , C o r y Lakatos ('12), Emily Fleming ('12), Caitlin Roth ( 1 2 ) and A n n e Jamieson ('12) f o r m e d t h e H o p e College Q u i d d i t c h League this year, and t h e organization h a s been m a d e an official H o p e club. The g a m e is d e p i c t e d in t h e H a r r y P o t t e r b o o k s and films as consisting of p a r t i c i p a n t s w h o ride t h r o u g h t h e air o n b r o o m sticks attempting to score p o i n t s by t h r o w i n g t h e m a i n ball o r "quaffle" t h r o u g h t h e goal hoops. A n o t h e r key aspect of t h e g a m e involves t h e c a p t u r e of t h e "snitch," a small object t h a t r o a m s t h e playing field. The c a p t u r e of t h e snitch b o t h e n d s t h e g a m e and scores t h e t e a m t h a t c a p t u r e d t h e object a large a m o u n t of points. W h e n asked t o d e s c r i b e h o w t h e s p o r t is a d a p t e d for play at H o p e , Jamieson d e s c r i b e d it as, "the muggle version of t h e magic

sport." Muggle is a t e r m coined in t h e novels to describe people w h o a r e n o t magic. She said t h a t t h e s p o r t followed t h e s a m e basic principles, except that t h e flying w a s replaced by r u n n i n g while holding o n t o a b r o o m s t i c k with o n e h a n d . The Intercollegiate Q u i d d i t c h Association h o l d s an a n n u a l W o r l d C u p e v e n t t h a t in 2009, w a s s t r e a m e d live online. Hope's t e a m w a s f o r m e d after Jamieson and Roth, inspired to learn m o r e a b o u t t h e g a m e after watching t h e 2009 Q u i d d i t c h W o r l d C u p g a m e , noticed t h a t o n t h e IQA's website, H o p e was listed as a participant. Lakatos and Fleming had signed up with t h e organization t o receive a r u l e b o o k a n d t h u s w e r e listed o n t h e site. These four m e m b e r s t h e n got together t o f o r m t h e c u r r e n t organization. T h e club has m e t t h r e e t i m e s t o s c r i m m a g e and will m e e t again t o play o n April 10 at 2 p.m. in t h e Pine Grove. Jamieson s t a t e d t h e g r o u p has averaged an a t t e n d a n c e of a b o u t 15-20 p e o ple at t h e s c r i m m a g e s but added that they've had as m a n y as 30 s h o w up. Lakatos said, "There are a lot of H a r r y Potter fans h e r e at

H o p e , so t h e people w h o have been attending scrimmages and meetings have been quite e x c i t e d . They're really getting into it, b u t not t o t h e point where the competitive spirit b e c o m e s overwhelming." According t o t h e group founders, t h e club got off to a

i PHOTO BY HOLLY EVEN HOUSE

M U G G L E V E R S I O N — R u n n i n g and h o l d i n g a b r o o m s t i c k r e p l a c e s flying In Hope's new Quidd i t c h Club s c r i m m a g e s .

quick start. According to Jamieson, " W i t h i n 12 h o u r s of starting t h e club's Facebook group, it had over 100 members." A possible cause of t h e club's popularity could be t h e welcoming policy of its f o u n d e r s . Lakatos said, "This club has r o o m for all sorts. If you're a fan of t h e books, this is your club. If

Groups seek change • PETITION, f r o m page 1

Always boarding. Never bored. W h t « t»ic walls dose in. it's time for a road trip. And there's no better way for getting a?ound Holland than riding the v.AX. Oir 8 fixed -nwies go everywhere - to the fnalis, stores, bowling and movies. You don't have to be e finance major to kaeto thai riding MAX saves big bucks. One ways fares are stiii just $ L Or buy a Student.Semester Pass for $ 5 0 f w unlimited rices

you're looking to d o s o m e t h i n g oddball and fun, this is your club. If you're a s p o r t s person, this is y o u r club. If you're not really a s p o r t s p e r s o n (I'm not), that's O K too. You don't have t o be an athlete t o play, and if playing's n o t for you, we'd love to have you c o m e and watch!"

n a t u r e of t h e c o m m u n i t i e s of H o p e and Holland. Jordan W a l t e r s ('12) said, "The exploration of this issue has t h e potential t o ... but m y h o p e is t h a t every p e r s o n o n this c a m p u s is genuinely loved, c a r e d for, and r e s p e c t e d , and all t h e

while willing to investigate their hearts." D o n Van H o e v e n , o n e of t h e signers of t h e a l u m n i petition, also said, "This is not about t h e m e a n i n g of certain scriptural texts. It is a b o u t t h e m e a n i n g of h o w we regard and care for people. It is t h e m e a n i n g of compassion."

Hope College Institutional S t a t e m e n t On Homosexuality

on th« eight r * e d bus routes all seneste- long

Visit www.cslchamaxorg for bui routes and schcrfulcs or to purchase a bui pass online.

31ST ST

H o p e College, like its f o u n d i n g d e n o m i n a t i o n , t h e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in America, distinguishes b e t w e e n h o m o s e x u a l o r i e n t a t i o n and h o m o s e x u a l behavior or practice. N o t all p e o p l e w h o have a h o m o s e x u a l orientation engage in h o m o s e x u a l practice and n o t all people w h o engage in h o m o s e x u a l practices have a h o m o s e x u a l orientation. The witness of Scripture is firm in rejecting t h e moral acceptability of h o m o s e x u a l behavior while affirming t h e responsibility of C h r i s t i a n s t o b e fair and accepting of persons with a h o m o s e x u a l orientation. T h e College d o e s not c o n d o n e t h e c o m m i s s i o n of h o m o s e x u a l acts. N e i t h e r d o e s it c o n d o n e o r g a n i z a t i o n s or activities that aim t o vindicate t h e m o r a l acceptability of h o m o s e x u a l acts, or t h a t suggest by their m a n n e r of presenting themselves that they have that aim in view. Specifically, t h e College will not provide recognition or financial or logistical s u p p o r t for o r g a n i z a t i o n s or g r o u p s w h o s e p u r p o s e s include t h e advocacy or m o r a l legitimization of h o m o s e x u a l behavior. T h e College d o e s s u p p o r t fair a n d kind t r e a t m e n t for p e o p l e with a h o m o s e x u a l orientation. It likewise s u p p o r t s the scholarly e x a m i n a t i o n and discussion of all t h e issues s u r r o u n d i n g t h e p h e n o m e n o n of homosexuality. The College affirms the right of s t u d e n t s a n d faculty t o p r o p o u n d and d e f e n d ideas that may b e at variance with t h e institutional position of t h e College. P e r s o n s expressing such views are expected t o take c a r e not to attribute t h o s e views t o t h e College either by direct s t a t e m e n t or by intimation. John Jacobson, President August 16, 1995


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President signs historic health care bill into law Months of debate end with reconciliation vote; some states' attorney generals planning to bring suit

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to be the most expensive social legislation enacted in decades. President Barack O b a m a With this n e w signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law estimated to cost t h e country law on March 23. $1 trillion, the law Before President Obama indisigned the health care bill into m a n d a t e s » viduals to purchase law, he said, "It is fitting that Congress passed this historic health insurance by . r a n legislation this week. For a s , 2014, for employwe mark the turning of spring, ers to provide their with we also mark a new season in employees health insurance America. In a few m o m e n t s , (or else they will be when I sign this bill, all of the -/A N penalized) and for over-heated rhetoric over rean exchange to be f o r m will finally c o n f r o n t the established to allow reality of reform." • Although t h e health care bill individuals to select was signed into law, the bill is f r o m governmentapproved health inPHOTO COURTESY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS still facing s o m e challenges. H I S T O R Y I N T O L A W — President Barack Obama signs t h e health care reform bill into law on S I G N I N G surance plans. O n M a r c h 21, the Senate verSurrounding him are Vice President Joe Blden, House Speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Callf., and It also augments March 23. sion of t h e health care legislation Dlngell, DMich. Rep. John federal f u n d i n g for passed the House of RepresenMedicaid, fills in tatives by a slim vote of 219the federal g o v e r n m e n t back in individuals with a pre-existing a b a n d o n i n g o u r founding printhe cost gap for many prescrip212. This h a p p e n e d after Rep. charge of the student loan prociple that g o v e r n m e n t governs condition, and allowing adults Bart Stupak, D-Mich., agreed to tion d r u g policy holders and best when it governs closest to gram. to stay on their parents' insurgives uninsured Americans end r o p his objection to tax payer "This reform of the federal the people." ance until the age of 26) will f u n d i n g for abortion in the bill hanced subsidies to pay for covstudent loan programs will O n March 23, Republicans take effect this year. Eventually, erage. as long as O b a m a would sign an save taxpayers $68 billion over renewed their vow to repeal the The law will go into full ef- O b a m a and D e m o c r a t s say, the executive order to restrict such the next decade. And with this new law will provide health care m e a s u r e with the n e w slogan, fect in 2014. However, the presifunding. This would basically be legislation, we're putting that "repeal and replace." This oppoan executive order to confirm dent stressed that certain as- coverage for over 32 million unm o n e y to use achieving a goal sition is reflected by m o r e than insured Americans. pects of the law (i.e. tax credits, that federal f u n d i n g would not a dozen state attorneys general, I set for America. By t h e end of Republicans have not been the requirement of insurance be used for abortion purposes. this decade, we will once again including Michigan Attorney thrilled about this new legislaThis new law is considered c o m p a n i e s to sell policies to have the highest pr opor t i on of General Mike Cox, that have tion. In refiled lawsuits saying that the college graduates in t h e world," gard to the O b a m a said. new law is unconstitutional. newhealth The new law would strip O n M a r c h 31, Michigan care law. banks of their ability to issue House of Gov. Jennifer G r a n h o l m signed R e p r e - an executive order setting up a federal s t u d e n t loans in favor of direct government lending s e n t a t i v e s council to oversee the changes DROP and would no longer let private that will be brought by the new l e a d e r rh« banks to get fees for acting as federal health care law. In MichRep. John Lawsuit the "middleman" in federal stuigan this year insurance will be Boehner, dent loans. extended through Medicaid R-Ohio, D O N T Also, the g o v e r n m e n t would said, "This to 375,000 new Michigan resiuse the savings to boost Pell dents. G r a n h o l m also said that is a s o m grants and to make it easier for the g o v e r n m e n t would also pick ber day PHOTOS COURTESY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS s o m e workers to repay their up the entire cost for the n e w for the As t h e health care reform bill moved Its way through Congress and onto the student loan. This would affect people enrolled until 2017 and American president's desk, activists from both sides of the debate came out t o voice their would also pay for at least 90 a b o u t half of undergrads that people. opinions. (Above left) supporters of reform protest decisions made by attorney receive federal student aid and percent of their cost after 2017. By signing generals of 1 3 states t o challenge t h e legitimacy of health care reform on conabout 8.5 million students who Along with health care covthis bill, s t i t u t i o n a l grounds. (Above right) an opponent of reform t a k e s t o t h e streets t o are going to school with help of erage, the new legislation also President characterize the health care bill as a socialist" measure. Pell grants. includes provisions that put O b a m a is

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Health care reform spurs activism from both sides

Administration looks to expand domestic offshore oil drilling Eric Anderson C O - N A T I O N A L N E W S EDITOR

President Obama ann o u n c e d M a r c h 31 t h a t his administration plans on opening d o m e s t i c c o a s t l i n e s for drilling. T h e p l a n will o p e n a r e a s in t h e Atlantic coastline, t h e Gulf of Mexico and t h e coast of N o r t h e r n Alaska for oil exploration. W h i l e this position may d r a w fire f r o m t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l base of O b a m a s u p p o r t e r s , t h i s plan is m u c h m o r e c a l c u l a t e d t h a n it initially a p p e a r s . T h e O b a m a administration does support a s i g n i f i c a n t i n c r e a s e in o f f s h o r e drilling, while also i n c l u d i n g p r o v i s i o n s t h a t p r o t e c t envir o n m e n t a l l y sensitive a r e a s f r o m oil e x p l o r a t i o n .

T h i s plan w o u l d also help to d e c r e a s e d e p e n d e n c e on oil imports, although how much oil can be gained f r o m t h e s e a r e a s is yet to be d e t e r m i n e d . P e r h a p s t h e biggest i m p a c t this a n n o u n c e m e n t will have is o n t h e f u t u r e of a climate bill. M a n y r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in t h e a f f e c t e d a r e a s had b e e n p u s h ing O b a m a to d r a f t a c l i m a t e bill t h a t f o c u s e s o n d o m e s t i c p r o d u c t i o n of energy t h o u g h oil drilling, n a t u r a l gas and n u c l e a r energy. O b a m a h a s proposed exploring a broader r a n g e of e n e r g y o p t i o n s , specifically n u c l e a r energy, since his c a m p a i g n . T h i s m o v e is also n o t a n ind i c a t i o n t h a t O b a m a is aband o n i n g e x p l o r a t i o n of alternative e n e r g y s o u r c e s such as solar, wind or b i o f u e l s . D u r i n g

his o f f s h o r e drilling a n n o u n c e ment, O b a m a indicated that

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[ O b a m a is] s e n d i n g as clear a signal as possible t h a t h e is willing to c o m p r o m i s e in a way t h a t will b r i n g f o r t h a great energy and climate bill, a n d h e wants Republicans t o b e a p a r t of it. — SEN. MARY LANDRIEU, D - L A .

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this w a s p a r t of a n overall plan to r e d u c e d e p e n d e n c e o n oil

i m p o r t s . Specifically, O b a m a m e n t i o n e d l o o k i n g to fuel m i l i t a r y vehicles with b i o f u e l s a n d r e p l a c i n g existing f e d e r a l vehicles w i t h h y b r i d m o d e l s . T h e plan h a s already d r a w n fire f r o m many d i f f e r e n t angles. W h i l e s o m e coastal representatives were supportive of t h e m e a s u r e , o t h e r s w o r r i e d t h a t t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l risks p o s e d by oil e x p l o r a t i o n w e r e u n n e c e s s a r y and t o o d a n g e r ous. Republicans w e r e quick to criticize t h e plan as n o t e n o u g h to lessen d e p e n d e n c e o n oil i m p o r t s . T h i s could be a t t r i b u t e d to t h e p r o t e c t i o n s put f o r w a r d in t h e O b a m a adm i n i s t r a t i o n ' s plan; specifically, t h e b a n n i n g of oil drilling in a r e a s w h e r e f o r m e r Presid e n t G e o r g e W. Bush lobbied

for drilling. However, t h i s p r o p o s i t i o n can hardly be v i e w e d as partisan. O b a m a ' s plan d o e s inc o r p o r a t e a n u m b e r of provisions for o f f s h o r e drilling t h a t t h e Bush a d m i n i s t r a t i o n w a s u n s u c c e s s f u l in i m p l e m e n t i n g b e f o r e t h e end of Bush's seco n d t e r m . Sen. M a r y L a n d r i e u , D-La., c o m p o u n d e d this p o i n t w h e n she said, " [ O b a m a is] s e n d i n g as clear a signal as possible t h a t he is willing to c o m p r o m i s e in a way t h a t will b r i n g f o r t h a g r e a t energy and climate bill, and he w a n t s Rep u b l i c a n s to be a p a r t of it." It r e m a i n s to be seen w h e t h er this plan is a c o n c e r t e d eff o r t t o w a r d d o m e s t i c oil prod u c t i o n o r simply p r e p a r a t i o n for the u p c o m i n g climate bill debate.


4

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK

IN QUOTES

" N o n e of us alive have seen the flooding that w e are experiencing n o w or going to experience. This is u n p r e c e d e n t e d in o u r state's history." - D o n Carcieri, R h o d e Island governor, o n t h e - r e c o r d - b r e a k i n g N o r t h e a s t r a i n s that have f o r c e d h u n d r e d s of p e o p l e f r o m t h e i r h o m e s ; R h o d e Island h a s e n d u r e d its w o r s t f l o o d i n g in a c e n t u r y .

"The nation c a n s t o p praying." - Sir Alex Ferguson, M a n c h e s t e r United m a n a g e r , c o n f i r m i n g t h a t star soccer player W a y n e R o o n e y will r e c o v e r in " t w o t o t h r e e weeks" from ankle-ligament d a m age. E n g l a n d f a n s w o r r y that t h e i r W o r l d C u p h o p e s could e v a p o r a t e if R o o n e y m i s s e s t h e f o u r n a m e n t in S o u t h A f r i c a .

"I w a n t every Indian child, girl and boy, to be so t o u c h e d by the light of education." - M a n m o h a n Singh, p r i m e m i n i s t e r of India, o n t h e n e w law making education a fundamental right f o r every child in I n d i a .

"The c h a i r m a n of the Republican National C o m m i t t e e Michael Steele - you probably h e a r d a b o u t this — he got in a lot of trouble. I guess they d r o p p e d over $2,000 to staffers at a topless b o n d a g e t h e m e nightclub right here in Hollywood. A n d what's the Republicans' big issue right now? Isn't it — oh, yeah — cutting d o w n on w a s t e f u l s p e n d i n g ? Michael Steele. Doesn't he s o u n d like h e w o u l d be a d a n c e r at a b o n d a g e t h e m e nightclub?" - Jay L e n o o n "The T o n i g h t S h o w with Jay Leno."

"They're n o t big n u m bers, b u t they're w e l c o m e numbers" - S t u a r t H o f f m a n , chief e c o n o m i s t at P N C Financial Services G r o u p , after t h e Labor D e p a r t m e n t a n n o u n c e d that private e m p l o y e r s a d d e d 123,000 j o b s in M a r c h . T h e u n e m p l o y m e n t r a t e is still nearly 10 p e r c e n t .

"That is an outrage. I will pay Mr. Snyder's obligation. I am not going to let this injustice stand." - Bill O'Reilly, Fox N e w s h o s t , o n t h e $16,500 that a c o u r t o r d e r e d A l b e r t Snyder, f a t h e r of a fallen solider w h o s e f u n e r a l w a s p r o tested by t h e W e s t b o r o Baptist C h u r c h , t o pay the p r o t e s t e r s , w h o m S n y d e r h a d sued.

"Suggested usage options include popcorn receptacle, rain hat, perennial planter, lampshade or yoga block." - S t a r b u c k s , in a n April Fools joke, explaining possible a l t e r n a tive uses for Plenta, its n e w 128 fl. o u n c e d r i n k size.

APRIL 7 . 2 0 1 0

Russia rocked by subway terrorist bombings Meghan McNamee

and 23 hospitalized. A m o n g the d e a d was police chief Vitaly Vedernikov. The bombers used a car filled with explosives T h e w o r s t violence in almost as a d i s t r a c t i o n while a n o t h e r six years rocked M o s c o w M a r c h 29 as t w o female suicide b o m b e r dressed as a police officer ran into the suicide b o m b e r s attacked t h e Lubyanka and Park Kultury c r o w d of p o l i c e m e n a d d r e s s i n g t h e scene. It is a tactic t h a t subway stations a r o u n d 8 a.m. T h e Lubyanka station lies i n s u r g e n t s in Iraq have used u n d e r t h e Federal Security before. T h e attacks have left the Service (FSB), a KGB successor. Russian p e o p l e It is s u s p e c t e d shocked and that Lubyanka looking for was c h o s e n as 66 a n s w e r s . retaliation for They [the terrorists] Prime M i n i s t e r t h e d e a t h s of are beasts. W h a t V I a d m i r militant leaders ever their m o t i v a P u t i n h a s led by t h e FSB. tion, w h a t they are the way in The death doing is a c r i m e attacks against toll was 40 while insurgency, over 70 -were by any law and any killing many hospitalized. moral s t a n d a r d . I of t h e N o r t h In a televised have n o d o u b t that Caucausus s t a t e m e n t w e will track t h e m rebel leaders. at Lubyanka d o w n and destroy Thestrikeshave station, Russian placed doubt P r e s i d e n t them. in t h e Russian D m i t r y — RUSSIAN PRESIDENT people. M e d v e d e v said DMITRY MEDVEDEV Accordingto to t h e m e d i a , 59 the Washington including the Post, Sergei Washington M a r k e d o n o v , a specialist on Post, "They [the terrorists] c a u c a u s u s at t h e I n s t i t u t e for are b e a s t s . W h a t e v e r their Political and Military Analysis, m o t i v a t i o n , w h a t they are said t h a t t h e attacks m i g h t d o i n g is a c r i m e by any law and spark debate. any m o r a l s t a n d a r d . I have no "Putin gained great d o u b t t h a t we will track t h e m popularity by d e m o n s t r a t i n g d o w n and d e s t r o y them." his readiness to c r u s h t e r r o r i s t s , Russian officials have t a k e n b u t I t h i n k a f t e r 10 years of a harsh stance on the terrorist attacks, especially a f t e r a b r u t a l r h e t o r i c and actions, it's t i m e for a n e w u n d e r s t a n d i n g , " s e c o n d attack in Kizlyar, N o r t h said M a r k e d o n o v . C a u c a u s u s , t h a t left 12 dead

GUEST W R I T E R

T h e r e c e n t M o s c o w attacks c o m e to your streets, and you w e r e carried o u t by female will feel it in your o w n lives and on your o w n skin." suicide b o m b e r s , 17-year-old T h e Russian g o v e r n m e n t is Dzhennet Abdurakhmanova not taking t h e t h r e a t s lightly. and suspected 20-year-old W h i l e t h e Russian police have M a r k h a U s t r a k h a n o v a . Both women were widows of always dealt with i n s u r g e n t s in a questionably h a r s h manner, militant leaders and r e c r u i t e d and trained with a b o u t 30 M e d v e d e v p r o m i s e s they will only get tougher. o t h e r s . They've b e e n called "The m e t h o d s themselves black w i d o w s . m u s t be b o t h m o r e effective and M a n y Russians fear t h e m o r e rigorous, r e t u r n of t h e o n e m i g h t even black widows, say harsher. f e m a l e suicide 66 T h e point is bombers from [The] A m e r i c a n to pre-empt Chechnya. The people s t a n d u n i t e d these incidents, group has been with the people of to prevent responsible Russia in opposition terrorist acts for attacks in to violent e x t r e m and to p u n i s h August 2004 terrorists," he t h a t killed 10, ism and h e i n o u s told t h e press. July 2 0 0 3 t h a t terrorist attacks Putin even killed 15 and that d e m o n s t r a t e c u t o f f a n o f f icial t h e 2004 attacks such disregard for trip to Siberia on Russian h u m a n life. and returned p a s s e n g e r jets. t o t h e capital. They are — PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA A c c o r d i n g a p a r t of t h e to The Islamistmilitant w Washington g r o u p in N o r t h Post, he called C a u c a u s u s the bombings according to crime terrible in its Doku U m a r o v w h o claimed c o n s e q u e n c e s and disgusting responsibility for t h e M o s c o w in its manner." bombings. President Obama issued In February, U m a r o v issued a w a r n i n g t a r g e t i n g central cities a s t a t e m e n t c o n d e m n i n g t h e b o m b i n g s , telling "ABC N e w s " in Russia. He m a d e good o n his t h a t t h e "American people p r o m i s e w h e n he r e c o r d e d his stand u n i t e d with t h e p e o p l e of claim to t h e attacks as r e p o r t e d Russia in o p p o s i t i o n to violent by T h e N e w York Times saying, extremismandheinousterrorist "You Russians h e a r a b o u t t h e war o n television a n d t h e radio. attacks t h a t d e m o n s t r a t e such I p r o m i s e you t h e w a r will disregard for h u m a n life."

Fifteen appointments made during congressional recess Sam Tzou SENIOR STAFF WRITER

President O b a m a and W h i t e House officials announced M a r c h 27 that he would be appointing 15 different g o v e r n m e n t officials during t h e Easter recess. According to t h e W a s h i n g t o n Post, these sorts of a p p o i n t m e n t s do not require c o n f i r m a t i o n f r o m Congress. The appointments immediately sparked d e b a t e and intense discussion f r o m g o v e r n m e n t officials as well as political analysts. The Republican Party, in particular, was upset with t h e a p p o i n t m e n t s , as O b a m a appointed four n e w officials to the D e p a r t m e n t of Labor. Republicanswereparticularly upset a b o u t t h e a p p o i n t m e n t of

66 I simply c a n n o t allow p a r t i s a n politics to s t a n d in the way of the basic f u n c tioning of government. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

99 Craig Becker, a f o r m e r labor union chair, to t h e National Labor Relations Board. Analysts and Republican senators viewed

to stand in t h e way of the basic this a p p o i n t m e n t as a radical f u n c t i o n i n g of government." labor advocate. Even so. Republicans "Once again the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n showed t h a t it r e s p o n d e d this past week had little r e s p e c t for t h e t i m e by describing t h e m o u n t i n g backlash that h o n o r e d constitutional roles Republican would occur this N o v e m b e r if and p r o c e d u r e s of Congress," t h e president continues to use Sen. John McCain, R- Ariz., political loopholes a r o u n d the told CBS N e w s t h e day of the Congress. appointments. "What this "This is clear is going to payback by the do is cause administration W h a t this is gothe election to organized ing to do is cause of a lot m o r e labor." t h e election of a lot Republican Even so, t h e m o r e Republican Scott Browns in White House November who Scott B r o w n s in stood by its are d e t e r m i n e d decision last N o v e m b e r w h o are to come in week. d e t e r m i n e d to c o m e and provide O b a m a and in and provide some checks White House s o m e checks and and balances officials have in W a s h i n g t o n balances in W a s h e x p r e s s e d to stop the discontent with ington to s t o p the overreaching Republican overreaching of the of the congressional government. government," moves that — SEN. LAMAR Sen. Lamar have forced t h e ALEXANDER, R-TENN. A l e x a n der, delay of m a n y R T e n n . , governmental said w hen appointments. describing the Republican w ho "If, in t h e interest of scoring was elected to fill Sen. Edward political points, Republicans in Kennedy's seat in M a s s a c h u s e t t s the Senate refuse to exercise that and caused D e m o c r a t s to lose responsibility, I m u s t act in t h e their 60-vote filibuster-proof interest of t h e A m e r i c a n people and exercise my a u t h o r i t y to fill majority. Other more moderate these positions o n an interim representatives basis," O b a m a said in a Wall congressional Street Journal report. "I simply were also disappointed and c a n n o t allow partisan politics expressed differences with the

66

99

bill, including Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-S.C, w h o co-

66 Republicans t o o k a position w h e r e they're going to try and slow and block progress on all f r o n t s w h e t h e r it's legislation or appointments. — SENIOR WHITE HOUSE ADVISER DAVID AXELROD

99 sponsored five bills this past year with D e m o c r a t s . G r a h a m has worked with several Democratic senators to create an immigration reform bill that would be agreeable for b o t h parties as well as the W h i t e House. G r a h a m , however, was r e p o r t e d o n M a r c h 28 saying t h a t with these a p p o i n t m e n t s such c o o p e r a t i o n and passage will be even m o r e difficult. Even so, White House officials remained supportive. "Republicans t o o k a position where they're going to try and slow and block progress o n all fronts w h e t h e r it's legislation or appointments," Senior W h i t e House adviser David Axelrod said o n CNN's "State of t h e Union."


ARTS

Ami 7, 2010

TIN

ANCHOR

5

Mat Kearney and Ingrid Michaelson take the stage and take some hearts Llndsey Wolf A S S T . A R T S EDITOR

Music is good for the soul. 1 experienced the powerful soothing-affect of music this weekend while attending Ingrid Michaelson and Mat Kearney s co-headline concert in Chicago at the Riviera Theater. Michaelsons and Kearneys music appeals to both the young and the old. The audience consisted of a wide variety of people. High school students and couples of all ages packed the small venue on Friday night. Indie-pop singer-songwriter Ingrid Michaelson took the stage first, entertaining the audience with music from her three albums, "Girls and Boys," "Be OK," and "Everybody." In between songs, Michaelson interacted with the audience and provided humorous commentary. She encouraged audience participation and had the crowd singing, shouting and doing hand motions throughout her performance. Halfway through the concert, a rowdy, group of guys mustered up the courage to talk to Michaelson. After shouting and catching her attention, the guys

passed a card up to Michaelson on stage and asked her to read it. The card included a picture of Jacob, a high school senior, his phone number and the words "Will you go to prom with me?" Playing along, she dedicated her next song, "Maybe," to lacob. Needless to say, that kids life will never be the same. Michaelson's fun-loving personality is evident in her song lyrics and upbeat music, as well as her comedic remarks. One of my favorite songs off her latest album, "Everybody" is a feelgood love song. Michaelson sings, "Swing open your chest and let it in; lust let the love, love, love begin." In 2008, Michaelson opened for lason Mraz. A year later, she began her own tour of the U.S. and Europe. Michaelson's songs have been featured in popular T V shows, such as "Grey s Anatomy" and "One Tree Hill." Michaelson has collaborated with many popular artists, including Sara Bareilles, William Fitzsimmons (who visited Hope College last fall) and Joshua Radin. After an adaptation of Britney Spears' "Toxic," Michaelson

and her band left the stage. F o l lowing Michaels o n ' s lively, memorable perf o r m ace was the talented Mat Kea r n e y, whose m u s i c can be described as a mix of pop, rock and rap. The singersongwriter plays the guitar and piano, as well as the harmonica and mandolin. Kearney delighted fans for an hour with music off both of his albums. Kearney's career took off in 2006 with his debut album for Columbia Records, "Nothing Left to Lose." After the release of his album, Kearney toured with John Mayer and The Fray in addition to his own headline stints. Since 2006, his music has been featured on hit shows such as "Grey's Anatomy" and his songs continue to make

n.

kcarncy

the Top 40 list, including "Nothing Left to Lose," "Undeniable" and "Breathe In Breathe Out." Kearney's most recent album, "City of Black & White" was released in 2009. Kearney describes the album as a "feel good" album on his website, www.matkearney.com. Kearney explains, "I knew that I wanted the whole record to feel good when I put it on. I wanted the drums and bass to demand something of your body, I wanted the songs to come to life when 1 played them live." For the record, 1 was bobbing and swaying, moving and groov-

ngrld

ing for the entire concert. I'd say that Kearney accomplished his goal. As an encore, Michaelson and Kearney took the stage together for a duet. They performed Death Cab For Cutie's "1 Will Follow You Into the Dark." Believe me when I say that music is good for the soul. If you don't agree, I invite you to listen to Ingrid Michaelson and Mat Kearney. Maybe then you'll change your mind.

Student production 'Behind the Uniform' opens April 8 in DeWitt Main Theatre Annellse Belmonte A R T S EDITOR

Opening this week is a student-directed and performed show called "Behind the Uniform" about the lives of those in the Afghanistan and Iraq conlicts and the families and relations left behind. The show actually consists of two short plays chosen by student directors Jeri Frederic^spn ('10) and Sarah Gosses ('10) to complement each other. The title of the two pieces performed side-by-side was brainstormed by the cast and voted on. The first show, "Motherland," by Steve Gilroy, is primarily a monologue-show, featuring various women's stories and experiences with their loved ones who are in the Army. Some of the stories are tragic, others

are humorous and a lot of them intertwine. A lot of the characters in the play are actually based on reallife testimonies and people. For example, Kalee Fox ('11) plays Elsie, a mother whose daughter was lost in the conflict. "I found pictures of her online. And she was talking about the things she was talking about in the play," Fox said. In one scene, her character receives her dead daughter's belongings in loads of boxes and can't even look at them. Cast member Brittany Schultz ('13) says, "Since i t s real people, it gives you a sense of whom it affects. They really had children die and it's just amazing." The politics of war aren't the focus of "Behind the Uniform" as much as the women themselves and what they've actually gone

through. Gilroy, who was the original writer and director of "Motherland," compiled almost 20 hours of interviews to create the show. He says of the interviewees in the original process of compiling a script, "The women we've worked with have let us into their homes and their lives and we're incredibly grateful for their generosity and enthusiasm. We view these women as collaborators not subjects, and the text of the play is comprised entirely of words spoken by them." He continued in his director's notes, "These stories are not just relevant to the women and communities but resofiate far beyond." "Obviously it's not just an

Lawrence Arabia —4Chant Darling1 C a r r i e d b y t h e o h - s o c a t c h y " A p p l i e Pie Bed," L a w r e n c e A r a b i a d i s p l a y s a w o n d e r f u l und e r s t a n d i n g of h a r m o n y r e m i n i s c e n t of Fleet Foxes. U n f o r t u n a t e l y t h e r e s t of t h e a l b u m just falls flat. T h e s o u n d l a c k s d e p t h a n d t h e s o n g s a r e c o i n p o s e d with n o s e n s e of d i s c e r n i b l e p u r p o s e . D o yourself a f a v o r a n d p i c k u p " A p p l e Pie B e d " a s a s i n g l e ; t h e s u m m e r will h a v e m u c h m o r e h u m m i n g i n v o l v e d . -AM

WTHS Music R e v i e w s with Paul Rice, A a r o n Martin a n d Laura H e l d e r o p |

Fang Island — T a n g Island1 If t h e P o w e r R a n g e r s g r a d u a t e d h i g h s c h o o l a n d built a s p a c e s h i p , t h e m u s i c t h e y l i s t e n e d to m i g h t s o u n d a bit l i k e F a n g Island. O r if Animal Collective d e c i d e d their s o u n d would b e b e s t s u i t e d to A n d r e w W.K. c o v e r s . O r if t h e Ratatat d e c i d e d that i n s t e a d of m a k i n g y o u d a n c e , t h e y w a n t e d to p u n c h y o u in t h e f a c e . F a n g I s l a n d is a r o c k b a n d w h o s e i d e a s n e v e r fail to fly o v e r t h e top, b u t t h e y ' r e far e n o u g h o u t s i d e of t h e b o x that t h e y n e v e r s e e m p r e t e n t i o u s o r o v e r b e a r i n g . If y o u w a n t to h e a r what an 8-year-old boy's imagination sounds like, y o u will a d o r e this a l b u m . -PR

American issue," Schultz says, "So many people don't realize that there are loads of British there...and it's interesting to see what other countries think of this war." The show after intermission, "Canopy of Stars" by Simon Stephens, also centers around a British family. The play follows a British soldier as he fights to justify his involvement in the war and sacrifices his personal relationships with his family. At first, we see him waiting in a bunker with another soldier as they wait for another battle. Next, we see a raid where a soldier is injured, and then there's a startling juxtaposition to what his life is like at home. Since most of the characters come from different locales in

England, the cast worked with the directors to find examples online *md listen to lljv specific traits of people who come from those regions. The examples i ranged from young to old to help differentiate between what speech patterns might be used for a more experienced or more "hip" person. The cast weren't supposed to completely mimic the dialect or even the real-life character, but get a flavor for it and make it their own. "Behind the Uniform" will be playing in the DeWitt Main Theatre April 8-10 at 8 p.m. with a matinee at 2 p.m. on April 10. Tickets will be $2 at the door.

Ted Leo and the P h a r m a c i s t s — 'The Brutalist TBDLEOANO THEPHARMAOS TS THi HHUTALISI Wfif KS Bricks' In g e n e r a l . T e d Leo a n d the P h a r m a c i s t s a r e a politically o r i e n t e d b a n d . T h e A m e r i c a n political l a n d s c a p e p r o v i d e s m o s t of t h e i n s p i r a t i o n f o r T e d Leo's m u s i c , a n d this a l b u m s h o w s it a s m u c h a s a n y of his o t h e r s . As usual, h e p l a y s a lot of s h o r t , fast g u i t a r riffs a n d s i n g s r with lots of p a s s i o n a n d f o r c e . T h e a l b u m is u p b e a t , like m o s t of his m u s i c . Overall, this C D is a v e r a g e , only b e c a u s e it s o u n d s s o similar to T e d Leo's o t h e r stuff. -LH

jA-SON

J a s o n C o l l e t t - 'Rat A Tat Tat' C o u n t r y m u s i c is a distinctly A m e r i c a n p h e n o m e n o n . C a n a d i a n s i n g e r - s o n g w r i t e r Jason Collett w r i t e s m u s i c that fits c o m f o r t a b l y into t h e A m e r i c a n a s u b s e t of country, a l s o o f t e n c a l l e d alt-country, w h i c h c o v e r s a w i d e t e r r i t o r y of t h e g r o u n d b e t w e e n p o p - c o u n t r y a n d e x p e r i m e n t a l , i n d e p e n d e n t songwriting. W h e r e artists like W i l c o or t h e Avett B r o t h e r s s u c c e e d at m a k i n g A m e r i c a n c o u n t r y s o u n d f r e s h a n d d i f f e r e n t . Jason C o l lett d o e s t h e s a m e t h i n g musically a n d lyrically with his o w n C a n a d i a n h e r i t a g e . "Rat A Tat Tat" is c h o c k full of C a n a d i a n p r o p e r n o u n s , b u t with its c h i p p e r h o o k s a n d f u l l - b o d i e d p o p a p p e a l , it w o u l d n ' t s o u n d out of p l a c e o n a n y A m e r i c a n t o p 40 station. -PR


6 THT ANC IOR

' — FEATURES

APRIL 7 , 2 0 1 0

Campus Census 2010 You count Ayanfe Olonade & Brennigan Gllson F e a t u r e s Editors

You've heard about the U.S. Census, and you might think it's a lot of government mumbo jumbo. Why do they need to know if I stay here or I live somewhere else anyway? Well, the census that was mailed to residents has already been collected, but on April 7, Hope students who haven't returned a form must attend a meeting to fill out the census form. And as with any act of your life, you should act definitively and with understanding. It's not a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In fact, the questions you answer help determine where $400 billion of federal funding will go; hospitals, bridges, roads, schools, senior centers, emergency services and public works projects. The information you give the government also helps determine how many seats in the House of Representatives your state will occupy. And many people will use the data from the form to rescue victims, support causes, determine different markets and place individuals in an accurate job pool. What you put down on this form does matter to our nation, and it should matter to you too.

Census Chronology 1790 • The nation's first census. 6 5 0 f e d e r a l m a r s h a l s go h o u s e - t o - h o u s e u n a n nounced, writing down the n a m e of t h e h e a d of t h e household and counting the other residents. The census c o s t s $ 4 5 , 0 0 0 , t a k e s 18 m o n t h s and c o u n t s 3.'9 m i l lion people.

1860 • Data f r o m t h e 1 8 6 0 c e n s u s is u s e d d u r i n g t h e Civil W a r t o m e a sure relative military strength and m a n u facturing abilities of the Union and Confederacy.

1810 • First i n q u i r i e s o n U.S. manufacturing capabilities a r e m a d e . A t t h e time, the need to export agricultural products and import manufactured goods had entang l e d t h e U.S. in s o m e s k i r m i s h e s of t h e N a p o leonic W a r s .

1890 • M a j o r innovations are made to the " s c i e n c e of s t a t i s t i c s " as t h e Census Bureau introduces m e c h a n i c a l tabulators. Never a g a i n is t h e census hand tabulated.

1840 • Congress requests n e w i n f o r m a t i o n on social m a t t e r s such as " i d i o c y " a n d m e n t a l illness. M a n y q u e s t i o n s on c o m merce and industry are added, lengthening the f o r m to 8 0 q u e s t i o n s .

1850 • Significant census reforms a r e m a d e . Federal g o v e r n m e n t utilizes scientific a n d f i n a n c i a l r e s o u r c e s t o discuss w h a t s h o u l d be a s k e d , h o w t h e i n f o r m a t i o n s h o u l d be c o l l e c t e d and h o w it s h o u l d be r e p o r t e d . First t i m e d e t a i l e d i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t all m e m b e r s of a h o u s e h o l d is collected.

1910 • Entry into W o r l d War I ( 1 9 1 7 ) has agencies and policymakers t u r n i n g to t h e Census B u r e a u for industrial statistics to plan the w a r effort.

1930 • O n s e t of t h e Great Depression p r o m p t s t h e Census Bureau t o m a k e inquiries about unemployment, migration and income.


APRIL 7.

2 0 1 0

FEATURES

Listen up, Hope College! Fill out your census form so that YOU COUNT! As a college community, we will be taking part in the 2010 census. The residential directors and the resident assistants will be instrumental in making sure this process takes place on campus smoothly. Last week, Dr. John Jobson sent out information from student development regarding Hope students' participation in the decennial census. In his letter to the campus, he mentions a few things that everyone should note about how the census will take place on campus: If you live in a Hope College-owned or controlled living unit, you must attend a meeting on Wednesday, April 7, to fill out the census form and return it to your RD/RA (your RD/RA will provide additional information regarding the exact time and location of your meeting). If you live off-campus, census materials should have already been delivered or will soon be delivered in the mail. Please fill out and return them as soon as possible (a postage-paid envelope is included with the census materials). According to the U.S. Census Bureau, college students have always been hard to count. Historically, this tends to happen because people believe that college students are counted on their parents' questionnaire. This is not true, because college students who live away from home will receive their own separate questionnaire, the Census Bureau says.

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By participating in the census, you're making a statement about what resources your community needs going forward. If you care about this community, participating in the census is a way to show that. According to the Census Bureau, " I t is your community's voice in the government."

1940 • W i t h t h e aid of modern sampling techniques, the Census B u r e a u c r e a t e s the first "long f o r m " t h a t is s e n t to o n l y a s u b s e t of t h e p o p u lation.

1950 • First e l e c t r o n i c digital computer tabulates figures 1 , 0 0 0 to 1 m i l l i o n times faster than previous equipment.

*Choronology from Washington Post

1970 • People of Hispanic or S p a n i s h d e s c e n t asked to identify t h e m s e l v e s as such.

1980 • After the 1980 c o u n t , t h e Census B u r e a u faces 5 4 l a w s u i t s , m a n y by civil r i g h t s g r o u p s , c h a r g i n g it w i t h i m proper and unconstitutional methods of counting.

2000 • First t i m e p r o f e s sional a d v e r t i s i n g campaign ($167 m i l l i o n ) is used to promote the count.

Graphics by Emiiy Dammer


APRII 7, 2 0 1 0

Beautiful Feet

Musings on mutual misunderstandings

Bryant Russ Columnist

Karen Patterson Co-Editor-in-Chief

Christian mediocrity A sense of Hope campus. However, the support of the Holland community cannot be discredited. Hundreds of community members attend sporting events, theater and dance performances and even events like Vespers. Many may be alumni or have children who are alumni. Even so, they have no obligation to Hope College. This sense of generosity is another part of what makes Hope feel like home. Those who know me know that I have no love for my hometown. When 1 try to explain it to people, 1 tell them it's about the same size as Grand Rapids but has nothing going on. Perhaps, though, it's not the lack of activities that is the problem. Maybe it's the lack of community. Obviously, every city and town has its problems, and Holland and Grand Rapids are not excluded, but the support that I have seen amazes me. Since so many students at Hope are from the area, they may not even be aware of the support if it's something they've grown up with. However, for me it has been a unique part of my Hope experience that I could not have foreseen before freshman year. For some people, home will always be the house they grew up in or wherever their family is living. For others it will be where they move to after graduation and settle down. While these are both true for me, H o p e will always hold a special place in my heart as a home 1 can come back to and support.

Over spring break, I had an opportunity to travel to Bloomington-Normal to watch the women's basketball Final Four and national championship games. The Shirk Center, while certainly a nice facility, is no DeVos Fieldhouse. However, both Friday night and Saturday afternoon, it was difficult to determine the difference. The Shirk Center seats 2,500 and approximately three-quarters of those seats were filled with Hope fans for the championship game against Washington University on Saturday afternoon. Easily half of the facility was filled with fans wearing orange and blue for the Friday night game against Rochester as well. Friday night, one incredulous reporter asked coach Brian Morehouse if there was anybody left in Holland or if the entire town had accompanied the team to Illinois. To say in the least, it felt like a h o m e game, as cheers of "Let's go Hope!" and "Fire up, Dutch!" fired the crowd and players up. While the outcome of the game was not what Hope fans and players were hoping for, it was an unforgettable experience. As 1 was driving h o m e after the final game with my dad, we discussed how unique it is that Holland and Hope have such a mutually beneficial relationship. My dad attended Illinois Wesleyan {the host school of the tournament) and shared that when he was a student, you would have never seen so many community members at a Wesleyan sporting event. Since the beginning of sophomore year, Hope has felt like home to me; I believe a large part of this is due to my friends and the general environment on

You are in danger of becoming just like everyone else. I know this because 1 am too. There is a gravitational pull towards the comfort of an average life. Graduate college, get a job that pays well, meet your spouse and have a family; be happy. At first glance there doesn't seem to be anything wrong with this average life, but take a look at the fine print and notice that typical existence is characterized by an average c o m m i t m e n t to Christ, average joy and average love. Yet following in the footsteps of Jesus is anything but an average journey. I am not saying that there is anything wrong with getting a good job and having a family — 1 hope to have both someday. The problem comes when self-gratification comes before Godglorification. Take Christmas cards for example. 1 have read hundreds of Christmas cards that describe the fun a family has had in the past year. While I totally agree that it is important to enjoy being a family, I wonder if we have missed some of what it means to be followers of Christ. 1 don't want my Christmas card to say that my family and I have simply enjoyed ourselves this year, but that we've charged headlong into darkness with just a shred of light and a whole lot of faith; that we have met with both the sorrowful and the hopeless and

put clothes on their backs and a smile on their faces; that we have made the enemy angry with us; that we have met the hungry, naked and imprisoned and treated them like kings — treated them as Christ. I remember sitting in church while the pastor wondered aloud why the world hadn't turned upside down since Christ called his followers to love like him. "How can there still be so much hate and hurt if the Church has been loving like Jesus?" Maybe the problem is that we've settled for mediocrity. Instead of living like Christ, we slowly become content to live as acquaintances of Christ. But the invitation to join in what God is doing on earth is still on the table. As Hope students, we are as vulnerable as anyone. It makes sense to want a self-gratifying lifestyle focuscd--um gaining wealth and happiness. We must struggle with the question of what it looks like for us to die to ourselves daily in order to follow Jesus — we must pray to be made into something more than ordinary. Bryant is convinced that he has the best friends in the world. Love you guys.

Karen is excited to be staying "home" in Holland for the summer. Warm weather, the beach just a few miles away and no classes — it's gonna be great!

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VOICES

Ami 7. 2010

THE ANCHOR

9

Grace & Peace Grace Olson Columnist

Breaking the fast Confession: I am a food-blog junkie. Some people swear off Facebook for Lent; I had to give up food blogs. I check a few of them daily, waiting for a new recipe, ingredients I haven't tried, a photo that makes my mouth water and urges me into the kitchen. If there's no new post, I'm not discouraged: heading to their archives, I search for ingredients I fiave in my refrigerator and pore over recipes I've already read a dozen times. Now that Lent s over and I can resume my blog habit, I thought I'd celebrate by trying a column I've often dreamt of writing. I must preface this with a disclaimer: what follows in this column might be of little use to those of you on a meal plan. Forgive me. Or don't, and instead clip the column and take it h o m e with you over the summer. And now, for food column number one (and Only): My post-May 9 plans are coming together: I'm staying in Holland this summer. My secret reason for wanting to be here, after the more practical reason that I'll be here in the fall and yearlong leases are easier to se-

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cure, is that 1 love cookouts. Last summer, my friends and I gathered once a week to grill burgers, share salads and dips and indulge in that quintessential summer dessert: pie. Because I love nothing more than friends and a good strawberry rhubarb pie, I'll be living here. Here's a strawberry-rhubarb pie recipe that over the years my m o m has developed and I've tweaked. For the juiciest, most flavorful pie, pick out the pinkest stalks of rhubarb and the ripest-but-not-yet-soft strawberries you can find. The farmers market is always reliable. I also recommend making this crust from scratch because it takes about five minutes and tastes exponentially better than a store-bought crust. Joan Olson's S t r a w b e r r y R h u b a r b Pie Crust: 1 VI cup white whole wheat or whole wheat pastry flour 1 Vi tablespoon sugar Vi teaspoon salt Vi cup oil 2 tablespoons milk Filling: 2 /i cups mixture of diced strawberries and rhubarb 3 tablespoons sugar 3 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons cornstarch Va cup sugar splash of water

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Topping: 1 cup sliced strawberries To make the crust, stir together the flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, and salt. In a jar, mix the oil and milk, seal the lid and shake well. Add this liquid to the dry mixture and mix. Press the crust into 9-inch pie pan and bake at 475 F for 10-13 minutes, until barely golden. For the filling, cook the 2 cups of fruit, 3 tablespoons of sugar and 3 tablespoons of water in a saucepan over medium heat. In a medium bowl, combine the cornstarch (in a pinch, you can substitute flour, another natural thickener, but the filling will look foggy instead of translucent), H cup sugar and a quick splash of water to dissolve the cornstarch. To this mixture, add half the hot fruit mixture and stir. W h e n it's combined, pour all of it back into the pan with the rest of the fruit mixture and cook until it thickens. Taste a bit of it on a spoon; if it's too tart, add a little sugar. After baking the pie crust, pour the filling into the crust and spread it evenly. Cool the pie on the counter for 15 minutes and then chill it in the refrigerator. Just before serving, arrange the remaining cup of sliced strawberries across the top of the pie. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream. Grace thinks a bake-off is in order and will happily provide the ingredients or a mouth, for taste-testing. To the two other 440 College Ave. men whose birthdays weren't in October, she advises them to watch out for pies. She's on a roll.

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Alumnus urges board to overturn homosexuality policy I have read with interest Hope's Institutional Policy on Homosexuality and the petition to have it removed. From my perspective the petition appears to be a well-reasoned one. I think the position (or lack thereof) taken by the RCA and the arguments in the petition about a lack of consensus concerning the issue certainly weaken the position taken by the college. If the "witness of Scripture is firm in rejecting the moral acceptability of homosexual behavior", all I can say is it can't be too firm or we would have a non-issue. W h e n beliefs are pitted against one another, and there is not definitive data to prove that one belief is correct (or more correct than another), it becomes

14

parties of conflicting positions. Racial, ethnic, political and religious intolerance seem to be cornerstones in our world of today. Any actions to reduce intolerance should be welcome ones. For a college to take a position that it will be tolerant of how one thinks and feels about sexuality, but intolerant of how one sexually behaves, even though that behavior really does not adversely affect others, suggests the college has the wisdom to determine exactly which behaviors are "morally bankrupt." From my perspective such a position is quite presumptuous. I know I would not like to be the one called upon to defend this position, especially if my real defense ultimately boiled down to " this is how I feel about

incumbent on interested parties to put forth arguments why one's belief should prevail over another's belief. I believe the petition makes a strong argument why removal of the policy is in Hope's best interests. If Hope wants to retain the policy, I think it is incumbent on the college to make the case why it is better for Hope to retain the policy. Using the argument that the witness of scripture is firm is not an adequate argument since, as stated, its firmness is in dispute. I would submit that removal of the policy creates a climate that is more likely to foster tolerance. I would submit as well that fostering tolerance increases the probability of more harmonious relationships between

things." I would hope the Board seriously considers the petition and ultimately overturns the policy. If not, then I would hope the college would engage in "truth in marketing". O n e can make the case that H o p e should be able to determine which behaviors it will and will not abide provided they do not violate any laws in doing so. But by acquiescing to that position on an'issue such as this one, one is affirming that it is permissible to constrain tolerance. I find this disconcerting and the authors of the petition and those who have signed it must feel the same. John R. Knapp, PhD Class of 1966

o i c e s of H o p e C o l l e g e G u y 1: You really have to find a girl here, o t h e r w i s e you will never find one.

G u y in Phelps: "Hi!" Girl replies: "Hiii!!" Girl says to friend: "He is s u c h a nice guy." Friend: " W h o is he?" Girl: "I don't know."

Prof: "...So let's say this horse was told to add 9+5, then he would stomp his foot 13 times."

G u y 2: ...that's what I a m afraid of.

Boy 1: "Do you have chest hair?" Boy 2: "I wish! I check every day!"

Girl 1: ohhhh are you sick?

Girl 1: "What would you do if 1 fell in love with him?"

Girl 2: (with a little sass) No, I just didn't shower...

Girl 2: "Be an awkward third wheel."

discussed with Editor-in-Chief. Please limit letters to 5 0 0 words.

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Girl's friend:"Wow, t h a n k s for being so inconsiderate. You probably t h i n k you're really cool now."

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APRIL 7 , 2 0 1 0 •

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Your success is our goal.

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Ami 7, 2010

SPORTS

THE

Spring break trips get teams rolling Six athletic teams spend spring break competing across the country

ANCHOR

11

T H I S W E E K I N SPORTS

Friday Baseball

April

9

at A l m a at 2 p.m.

Softball

James Nichols

at Illinois Wesleyan Tournament at ASSISTANT S P O R T S EDITOR

1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Men's Tennis

IMHI The Flying D u t c h m e n traveled to W i n t e r H a ven, Fla., t o c o m p e t e in 10 g a m e s over seven days d u r i n g spring break. Finishing t h e break with a 7 - 3 record, t h e baseball t e a m started its season off strong. H o p e d r o p p e d its first two g a m e s o n M a r c h 19 to U W - W h i t e w a t e r , 5 - 3 and 11-3. The Flying D u t c h m e n t h e n c a m e o n strong, winning their next six g a m e s by a c o m b i n e d score of 47-20. H o p e shut o u t D e n i son (Ohio) 3-0 o n M a r c h 20. M a r c h 22 saw a doubleheader between

H o p e and W e s t e r n C o n n e c t i c u t , resulting in, t w o w i n s by t h e Flying D u t c h m e n , a 7 - 2 victory a n d a 9-0 s h u t o u t t h r o w n by D a n n y D e t m a r (12). The Flying D u t c h m e n swept a n o t h e r d o u b l e h e a d e r t h e next day. This t i m e they beat Lawr e n c e (Wis.) 9 - 2 in t h e first g a m e a n d 9-7 in t h e s e c o n d . Hope's third d o u b l e h e a d e r in t h r e e days resulted in a split. H o p e was able t o defeat Luther (Iowa) in t h e first g a m e 10-9 b u t w e r e o v e r m a t c h e d in t h e s e c o n d game, losing 11-6. The final g a m e of t h e trip e n d e d with a b a n g . H o p e e m e r g e d in a g a m e that saw 31 total r u n s , barely w i n n i n g 1615 over W a s h i n g t o n & Jefferson (Pa.)

The Flying Dutch traveled to Florida t o c o m p e t e in t w o different tournaments, resulting in 10 g a m e s played over seven days. The softball t e a m ret u r n e d h o m e with an even 5-5 record. B o th g a m e s o n M a r c h 19 resulted in H o p e losses, first t o Spring A r b o r (Ind.) 14-9, t h e n t o And e r s o n (S.C.) 7-3. The Flying D u t c h w o n their first g a m e o n M a r c h 20, 6 - 4 against Trinity (Conn.). Unfortunately, they were not so succesful in their s e c o n d game, b o w i n g t o U W - S t o u t 95.

at GLGA Tournament at Kenyon and

The Flying D u t c h were shut out 8 - 0 by U n i o n (N.Y.) o n M a r c h 22. Regaining themselves, they d e f e a t e d M I T (Mass.) 5 - 4 later that day. H o p e o n c e again split games o n M a r c h 23, first losing 7-0 to D e P a u w (Ind.), t h e n s m o t h e r i n g D'Youville (N.Y.) 9-2. Finishing strong, t h e Flying D u t c h w e r e able t o w i n b o t h g a m e s o n M a r c h 24, bringing their spring break r e c o r d to 5-5. Michelle M a r r a ( 1 1 ) t h r e w a s h u t o u t in t h e first g a m e against W a s h i n g t o n & Jefferson (Pa.), leading t h e way t o a 6 - 0 win. The Flying D u t c h t h e n carried their m o m e n t u m into t h e second game, defeating Grinnell (Iowa) 5-4.

Denlson, Ohio.

Saturday Track & Field

April 1 0

at Ferris Invitational at 1 0 a.m.

Softball at Illinois Wesleyan Tournament at 9 a.m. and 1 1 a . m .

Baseball vs A l m a at 1 p . m .

Women's Tennis at Kalamazoo at 1 p.m.

Men's Tennis at GLGA Tournament at Kenyon and Denlson. Ohio.

Tuesday Baseball

April 13

vs Aquinas at 2 p.m. (Doubleheader)

Softball vs Albion at 3 : 3 0 p.m. (Doubleheader)

Men's Tennis vs Kalamazoo at 4 p.m.

H e defeated D a n Vollm a n 6-3, 6 - 1 as n u m b e r t w o singles and, alongside c a p t a i n John G a r d ner ( 1 0 ) as n u m b e r o n e singles, t r i u m p h e d over Peter D u n n a n d D a n Vollman 8-4. The Flying D u t c h m e n lost to C a r l e t o n (Minn.) 7 - 2 t h a t day. The next day was o n c e again unsuccesful for H o p e , losing 8 - 1 t o De-

Pauw (Ind.). C a w o o d had t h e sole victory for t h e Flying D u t c h m e n at n u m b e r t w o singles. Barely edging o u t Allegheny (Pa.) 5 - 4 o n M a r c h 25, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n got t h e ball rolling for t h e next 24 hours. The Flying D u t c h m e n didn't lose a single m a t c h in t w o g a m e s o n M a r c h 26. Their first u n f o r t u n a t e o p p o n e n t was E l m h u r s t (111.) w h i c h they easily d i s p o s e d of 9-0. Aft e r a break, they went back o u t and swept a n o t h e r t e a m f r o m Illinois. 9-0. This time, t h e culprit was Principia. N o n e of t h e H o p e players or pairs lost a single set in either match. T h e closest a n y b o d y c a m e was C a w o o d w h o had to go t o a tie-breaker t o settle t h e first set of his m a t c h against Elmhurst, eventually w i n n i n g 7-6.

The w o m e n ' s t e n n i s t e a m also traveled t o Hilton H e a d , S.C., d u r i n g spring break. Unlike t h e men's team, t h e w o m e n c a m e back to Holland with a losing record, w i n n i n g o n e of four games. T h e Flying D u t c h got off to a m e d i o c r e start, losing 6 - 3 to C a r l e t o n (Minn.) o n M a r c h 22. C a s e y Baxter, ( 1 3 ) at n u m b e r five singles, was t h e only H o p e singles player to get a victory, w i n n i n g 6-2, 6-3. N u m b e r two doubles Katherine Garcia ( 1 1 ) a n d Nicole Spagnuolo ( 1 1 ) w o n 8-6. N u m b e r t h r e e d o u b l e s Marissa Kooyers ( 1 0 ) and Leah LaBarge ( 1 3 ) also w o n by a score of 8-4.

The Flying D u t c h lost their next m a t c h 7-2 t o D e p a u w (Ind.). N u m b e r six singles Kooyer w o n 6 - 1 , 5 - 7 (10-3) and n u m b e r t h r e e d o u b l e s Shelby Schulz ( 1 3 ) a n d Beth Olson ( 1 0 ) w o n 8-5. A f t e r a day off, t h e Flying D u t c h w o n their only m a t c h of t h e trip, 8-1 over Allegheny (Pa.). The last m a t c h of t h e trip was t h e worst for Hope, resulting in a 8-1 loss t o Esrkine (S.C.) o n M a r c h 26. The n u m b e r t h r e e d o u b l e s pair of Kooyers and LaBarge was t h e only victory for H o p e t h a t day, w i n n i n g 9-7. T h e Flying D u t c h w o n a total of 14 m a t c h e s in four m a t c h - u p s over a five-day span. U n f o r t u nately for H o p e , its o p p o n e n t s w o n a total of 24 m a t c h e s .

The men's track a n d field t e a m traveled t o Emory, Ga., to c o m p e t e in t h e 2010 E m o r y University Invitational o n M a r c h 19 and 20 and t h e E m o r y Track & Field Classic f r o m M a r c h 2527. The Flying D u t c h m e n finished in s e c o n d place with 134.5 p o i n t s , 13.5 points b e h i n d host Emory. Noteable events for t h e Flying D u t c h m e n included t h e 100- meter dash, discus throw, 1,500- m e t e r r u n , 4x100m e t e r relay and 4x400m e t e r relay which resulted in second, first and second, first, first, and second place finishes respectively. The Flying D u t c h m e n

did even better at t h e E m o r y Track & Field Classic, finishing first with a score of 194, 38 p o i n t s m o r e t h a n s e c o n d place Emory. Four events w e r e w o n by t h e Flying D u t c h m e n at t h e m e e t . John D o n k e r s l o o t ( 1 1 ) w o n t h e high j u m p , Nicholas Rinck ( 1 1 ) w o n t h e 110-meter hurdles, Jeff M i n k u s ( 1 0 ) w o n t h e triple j u m p and Bryan Dekoekkoek ( 1 0 ) w o n t h e discus throw. Second place finishes by Flying D u t c h m e n included t h e 4x100 and 4 x 4 0 0 - m e t e r relays. The 4 x l 0 0 - m e t e r relay c o n sists of A n d r e w Schofield ( 1 1 ) , Christian Everett (13), C a m eron Lampkin ( 1 1 ) and Kyle VanderVeen (12). The 4x400m e t e r relay includes s t u d e n t s Frank Previch (10), A a r o n Triber (10), P r e s t o n Pierson ( 1 0 ) and Nicholas Rinck.

The w o m e n ' s track and field t e a m traveled with t h e men's t e a m to Emory, Ga., t o c o m p e t e in the 2010 E m o r y University Invitational o n M a r c h 19 and 20 and t h e E m o ry Track & Field Classic f r o m M a r c h 25-27. The Flying Dutch scored 135 points at t h e E m o r y Invitational, w h i c h was good e n o u g h t o e a r n t h e m second place b e h i n d h o s t Emory, w h i c h scored 143 points. Ten t e a m s finished behind t h e Flying D u t c h . First, second and t h i r d place all w e n t to H o p e in t h e high j u m p . Flying D u t c h r u n n e r s finished s e c o n d place in t h e 10,000-meter run, 100-meter hurdles, t!H-

pie j u m p and 1,500-meter run; H o p e also finished first in t h e 1,500-meter r u n . The Flying D u t c h also finished second at t h e E m o r y Track & Field Classic, finishing with 118 points, a substantial 50.5 points b e h i n d first place Emory. The only first place finish by a H o p e r u n n e r was Sharon Hecker ( 1 2 ) in t h e 5,000-meter run, c o m i n g in with a t i m e of 18:39.10. O n e o t h e r Flying D u t c h had a first place finish. Kristen Reschke ( 1 3 ) w o n t h e triple j u m p event with a total distance of 10.47 meters. Kelsi V a n d e G u c h t e ( 1 3 ) finished second in t h e javelin t h r o w for t h e Flying D u t c h with a distance of 33.27 meters. Kate Nelson ( 1 2 ) also finished an event in second place for H o p e , r u n n i n g t h e 800 m e t e r race in 2:21.45.

The men's tennis t e a m traveled t o Hilton Head, S.C., for their a n n u a l spring break trip. This year, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n went 3-2 d u r i n g t h e trip. Bobby Caw.opd ('13) s e c u r e d t h e only t w o w i n s t h e Flying D u t c h m e n would get o n M a r c h 22.

IN BRIEF FLYING D U T C H PERFECT 3 - 0 AT G L C A T E N N I S T O U R N E Y

The w o m e n ' s t e n n i s t e a m went a p e r f e c t 3-0 at t h e G L C A t o u r n a m e n t in Oberlin, Ohio, this past w e e k e n d . H o p e s h u t o u t W o o s t e r 9-0 o n Friday. Saturday, t h e Flying D u t c h edged o u t Kenyon 5-4. T h e y finished up t h e t o u r n a m e n t Sunday, routing host O b e r l i n 8-1. BASEBALL TEAM 5 - 1 SINCE SPRING BREAK TRIP

The Flying D u t c h m e n have w o n five o u t of six g a m e s since spring break, taking their overall record t o 12-4 this season. The Flying D u t c h m e n s o a r e d past Olivet o n M a r c h 27 with a c o m b i n e d score of 32-15 in t h e t w o g a m e s of a doubleheader. The Flying D u t c h m e n t h e n w o n two m o r e games 7-6 and 7 - 1 against t h e C o m e t s o n M a r c h 29. H o p e t h e n split a d o u b l e h e a d e r with Calvin o n April 1, w i n n i n g 10-9 in t h e first g a m e and losing 7 - 4 in t h e s e c o n d . The Flying D u t c h m e n ' s s e c o n d doulbleheader against Calvin o n M o n d a y e n d e d with two H o p e victories, 7 - 1 and 6-2. SOFTBALL TEAM S L U M P S AFTER S P R I N G B R E A K

The softball t e a m is 1 - 3 since r e t u r n i n g f r o m spring break. The Flying D u t c h lost b o t h games o n M a r c h 27, first by a score of 12-8 against Illinois College, t h e n by a score of 3 - 2 against St. N o r b e r t , Wis. Hope d r o p p e d t h e first g a m e of its d o u b l e h e a d e r against C a r t h a g e 2 - 1 o n M a r c h 30, but c a m e back with a 15-11 victory in t h e second leg of t h e m a t c h - u p .


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SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

Ami, 7. 2010

Women's basketball finishes second in the nation

P H O T O S BY K A R E N P A T T E R S O N

S O C L O S E — Hope's s t a r t e r s Jenny Cowen ("10), Liz Ellis ("13), Erika Bruinsma ( ' 1 1 ) , Philana Greene ( ' 1 0 ) , a n d Carrie S n i k k e r s ( ' 1 1 ) look on d u r i n g t h e n a t i o n a l c h a m p i o n s h i p game. Karen Patterson CO-EDITOR

IN C H I E F

O n M a r c h 20, in B l o o m i n g t o n N o r m a l , 111., t h e H o p e College w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m finished o n e of t h e m o s t successful seasons in the school's history. Finishing t h e 2009-10 season with a 32-2 record, t h e t e a m m a d e its 12th a p p e a r a n c e in t h e N C A A Division III t o u r n a m e n t , with this year m a r k i n g t h e fifth consecutive trip to t h e postseason. A f t e r a solid w i n over Rochester in t h e Final Four o n M a r c h 19, t h e t e a m looked to

topple W a s h i n g t o n University in St. Louis for a third national title. However, after 4 0 m i n u t e s of play, t h e W a s h - U Bears c a m e o u t o n t o p with a final score of 65-59. Both F r i d a y s Final Four a n d Saturday's c h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e s had h u n d r e d s of H o p e f a n s in a t t e n d a n c e , m a k i n g t h e Shirk C e n t e r feel m o r e like DeVos Fieldhouse. "We've led t h e nation in a t t e n d a n c e the last t h r e e years," coach Brian M o r e h o u s e said after Fridays semi-final victory.

"We don't necessarily get every s t u d e n t , but we have a loyal following." That loyal following w a s vocal in th e ir s u p p o r t as t h e t e a m battled with W a s h - U Saturday a f t e r n o o n . T h e Flying D u t c h started off slow, s h o o t i n g for only 19 p e r c e n t in t h e first half. C a r r i e Snikkers ('11) led t h e t e a m with seven p o i n t s , but two fouls early o n limited her playing t i m e in the half. "I don't think I foul that m u c h , so having f o u r fouls in t h e g a m e was weird," Snikkers said. "I just

w e n t o u t there and played tough, and w h e n t h e post players went in, I t r u s t e d t h e m to play tough and strong, and they did." Fellow starter Erika B r u i n s m a ('11) also found herself in foul trouble with two early on, but r a t h e r t h a n letting it get to her, she used t h e situation to increase h e r level of play. "You have t o worry a b o u t fouls to a certain extent, but also just play t h e game," she said. "I think s o m e t i m e s ... it gives you m o r e of an incentive to play better defense and n o t let your player get t h e ball." That mindset of tough defense helped t h e Flying D u t c h hold t h e Bears to only 24 p o i n t s in t h e first half. However, s t r o n g s h o o t i n g in t h e paint and a c c u r a t e free t h r o w shots near t h e end of the g a m e gave t h e W a s h - U Bears an edge that t h e Flying D u t c h couldn't quite o v e r c o m e . "I a m very p r o u d of my team," M o r e h o u s e said after the game. "Losing in this g a m e d o e s not d e f i n e your c a r e e r or you as a person, and it d o e s not d e f i n e this t e a m . We didn't s h o o t t h e ball real well in the first half, but we c a m e s t o r m i n g back in t h e second. "They m a d e big free t h r o w s going d o w n t h e stretch, and 1 t h o u g h t we were going t o catch t h e m at the buzzer, but they just played a little bit better than us today." For c a p t a i n s Philana G r e e n e ('10) a n d Jenny C o w e n ('10), t h e c h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e marked t h e

end of an illustrious collegiate career: three MIAA titles and conference tournament c h a m p i o n s h i p s , t h r e e trips t o t h e Elite Eight, a Final Four and championship game appearance a n d a four-year record of 114-9. "If I'm a senior, that's h o w I w a n t to go out," M o r e h o u s e said. "I t h o u g h t they b o t h played great and set t h e t o n e for H o p e College. There w e r e a lot of people following their lead, and you don't w a n t to go o u t with regrets." For b o t h C o w e n and Greene, t h e loss was bittersweet. "I think for b o t h of us, we can live with not winning this one," C o w e n said after t h e c h a m p i o n s h i p game. "The t e a m we had, t h e p e o p l e a r o u n d us: it m a k e s this feel like t h e season of o u r lives." For Greene, it w a s not just t h e experience of playing basketball, but t h e everyday things like practice t h a t m a d e playing for t h e Flying D u t c h an u n f o r g e t t a b l e experience. "This year we got t h r o u g h certain g a m e s n o t b e c a u s e of talent or h o w we played, b u t b e c a u s e we t r u s t e d each o t h e r a n d loved each o t h e r and kept t h a t bond," G r e e n e said. "I a m so p r o u d of this t e a m for playing until t h e b u z z e r s o u n d e d a n d n o t quitting, even w h e n we k n e w it w a s o u t of reach. "The title would have b e e n great, b u t t o go away with these 23 people s u r r o u n d i n g m e t h a t I love so m u c h m e a n s m o r e t h a n any trophy, ring or banner."

Carrie Snikkers named Division III player of the year Bethany Stripp SPORTS EDITOR

In C a r r i e Snikkers' ('11) t h r e e years as a H o p e College w o m e n ' s basketball player, she h a s built u p an impressive list of individual basketball h o n o r s : M I A A player of t h e week, M I A A m o s t valuable player for 20082009 and t w o - t i m e first-team All-American. D u r i n g Final Four w e e k e n d , Snikkers received yet a n o t h e r recognition: N C A A Division III State F a r m / W B C A player of the year. The award, p r e s e n t e d t o o n e player in all three N C A A

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divisions, in a d d i t i o n to o n e N A I A , o n e j u n i o r college/ c o m m u n i t y college and o n e high school player, is c h o s e n by vote f r o m players n a m e d to the eight All-Region t e a m s . Snikkers is t h e first w o m e n ' s basketball player f r o m H o p e to receive this honor. Snikkers posted high n u m b e r s this season. She averaged 14.4 p o i n t s p e r g a m e and scored in t h e d o u b l e digits 21 different times, including five g a m e s in w h i c h she scored 20 or m o r e points. She also m a d e an impact o n t h e glass, pulling d o w n

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10.3 r e b o u n d s p e r game. Eight different t i m e s t h r o u g h o u t t h e season, three of w h i c h o c c u r r e d during the N C A A tournament, Snikkers both scored and g r a b b e d r e b o u n d s in t h e d o u b l e digits. She also led t h e t e a m in blocked shots, denying h e r o p p o n e n t s 71 different t i m e s t o give her b o t h the single s e a s o n and c a r e e r record, even t h o u g h she still h a s a n o t h e r season left in her basketball career. "She's i m p r o v e d each year she's been at Hope," coach Brian M o r e h o u s e said. These figures are r e m a r k a b l e in light of t h e fact t h a t Snikkers played in only 26 g a m e s this season. A m i d - s e a s o n stress f r a c t u r e in h e r foot sidelined Snikkers for eight g a m e s at t h e end of D e c e m b e r a n d t h r o u g h m o s t of January. "I t h o u g h t she really put h e r t r u s t in t h e coaches, medical staff a n d t e a m m a t e s w h e n she was o u t with her foot injury," M o r e h o u s e said. "By p u t t i n g t e a m first, she allowed it to heal and was ready for t h e t o u r n a m e n t . O u r success as a t e a m a n d her quality play led to her player of the year selection."

H 0 T 0 C O U R T E S Y OF M O P E

B E S T I N T H E N A T I O N — Snikkers* r e c o g n i t i o n as w o m e n ' s b a s k e t b a l l player of t h e year m a k e s her e l i g i b l e for Division III f e m a l e a t h l e t e of t h e year.

04-07-2010  
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