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olland, michi^an APRIL 7,1978

VOLUME NO. 90 - ISSUE 19

Zimmer and Gildner: 44

Unpredictable Joy" comes to campus

At 8:00 p.m. next T h u r s d a y , April 13, two highly regarded and wonderful poets, Paul Zimmer and Gary Gildner, will perform their poetry in Wichers Auditorium. GILDNER, who has published six books of poetry in the last ten years, is an editor of New Letters, a frequent contributor to anthologies and magazines, and has been awarded several fellowships, as well as t h e Theodore R o e t h k e Prize. Of Gildner's poetry, X. J. Kennedy has said, "One likes him immediately, and recognizes his

humor and his honesty." Zimmer, editor of t h e P i t t P o e t r y Series and Associate D i r e c t o r of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Pittsburgh Press, was chosen to be the judge of the Eerdman's Poetry and Prose Prizes and will announce the recipients during the reading. HE HAS published three books. Along with Gildner, Zimmer is a popular r e a d e r at college camuses and has recorded his poetry fcor the Library of Congress, "...poetry of real fulfillment,"

says t h e Partisan .Review of Zimmer's work, "...beats with an almost subliminal and yet somehow irrepressible gaiety." ONE CAN g e t a glimpse of Zimmer's art through some of his titles, like: "Cecil fishing for Love in Summer Moonlight," "Zimmer's Head T h u d d i n g Against t h e Blackboard," or "Leon Curses the Saucers Peeling from his Cabinet." "Zimmer is an u n p r e d i c t a b l e joy," announced The Chicago Daily News. A joy not to be missed.

Ridl featured at author's conference Jack Ridl, poet and facultv m e m b e r in t h e Hope English Department, will be the featured speaker at the fifth annual Young Authors' Conference, to be held at Hope, Friday, April 14. SPONSORED BY the Hope E d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t , t h e conference will involve approximately 475 elementary age children and 50 t e a c h e r s from p r i v a t e , parochial, and public schools in the Holland, Zeeland, Grand Haven, Allegan, Grandville, Jenison, Coopersville, and Hudsonville areas. Each child who a t t e n d s the c o n f e r e n c e has already been selected for this honor on the basis of some creative writing which he has written and shared with his classmates. During the three-hour morning conference, each child will participate in three activities: a sharing period during which he will read his own poetry or story to a small group of his peers, a c r e a t i v e activity time d u r i n g which each child will take part in creative movement and listen to a group of storytellers, and a large

group session led by Ridl. RIDL, who was named Hope's Outstanding Professor-Educator in 1976, t e a c h e s c o u r s e s in l i t e r a t u r e and w r i t i n g . He frequently portrays, as part of his literature courses, such literary p e r s o n a l i t i e s as Blaise Pascal, Mark Twain, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman. He has w r i t t e n radio shows, comedy sketches, music and lyrics, autobiographical essays, critical reviews, children's stories, and poetry. His poetry has been published in such l i t e r a r y magazines as The Southern Poetry Review, The Journal of Popular Culture, and The Reformed Journal. His most recent work, a tribute to basketball star, the late Maurice Stokes, has been selected to be displayed permanently in the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass. He has also given r e a d i n g s and conducted workshops in several area schools and colleges and has a p p e a r e d in campus t h e a t e r productions.

Faculty presents Chamber Concert The fifth and last Hope Faculty C h a m b e r Music Concert of t h e year will be at 4:00 p.m. on April 9 in Wichers Auditorium. Gail W a r n a a r on oboe and Joan Conway on oiano will p e r f o r m "Rondo for Oboe" composed by Carl Borgeson, "Siciliana' 1 composed by Michael Head and " A l c h e m y for Oboe and Tape Recorder, Op. 60" composed oy George Heussenstamm. A f t e r a short intermission Robert Ritsema on cello and Peter S p r i n g on bass will p e r f o r m " P r a y e r " by E r n e s t Bloch and

"Duet for Cello and Contrabass" by Gioacchino Rossini. The last piece to be performed will be "Liebeslieder Waltzes, Op. 52" composed by J o h a n n e s Brahms. Tne soprano parts will be sung by Joyce Morrison and Mary Bierling; altos will be Margaret S h e r m a n and Sarah Schendal; tenors will be Stuart Sharp and C h a r l e s Canin; ba sse s will be R o b e r t Coughenour and George Kraft. They will be accompanied by J o a n Conway and A n t h o n y Kooiker on the piano.

Deadlines near ALL STUDENTS WHO WILL BE RETURNING TO HOPE NEXT FALL should have received a Housing Application for the 1978-1979 school year. This application should be returned to the Dean of Students Office immediately so that we will know each s t u d e n t ' s p r e f e r e n c e s for next

year. Anyone who did not receive an application, please come t o t h e Dean's Office, 102 Van Raalte, to pick up a duplicate. Any questions regarding olf-campus permission, housing assignments, or the room selection process should be directed to Bruce Johnston.

ALSO SERVING as r e s o u r c e people for the conference will be the Kent County Story Spinners and Miss Julie Raabe. The Story Spinners are a group of highlyrated story tellers sponsored by the K e n t County L i b r a r y . Miss Raabe, a talented Hope senior, has had broad experience in dance and c r e a t i v e m o v e m e n t . She has recently worked as a teacher of creative movement for the Holland Community Education program. All interested parents, teachers, a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and m e m b e r s of t h e community a r e invited to attend an informal open house on April 14 from 5-8 p.m. in the art gallery of the DeWitt Center to view the hand bound "books" brought to the conference by the children. Questions about the conference may be directed to Dr. Nancy Miller.

Milliken to speak at luncheon O t t a w a County Republicans today announced plans for a "78 Majority Luncheon" at Hope from noon til 1:30 P.M. Thursday, April 13. F e a t u r e d s p e a k e r will be Governor William G. Milliken, and e n t e r t a i n m e n t d u r i n g t h e meal will be provided by the Tulip Time Tuners of Holland. Honored g u e s t s include the Latino Community, senior citizens, and s t u d e n t s . " T h e Republican Party wants to earn the support of a majority of Michigan voters," commented luncheon co-chairperson Jack Holmes, "and this is one effort in that direction." Co-chairperson Ella Aleman urged m e m b e r s of t h e Latino Community, senior citizens, and students to attend the event. She explained that the luncheon was not restricted to Republicans, and that those who attend are under no obiligation. Tickets a r e available to all interested persons at $4.00 each with special $2.00 tickets available to Latinos, senior citizens, and s t u d e n t s upon r e q u e s t . P e r s o n s interested in attending should call Republican headouarters at 3963791 or one of tne luncheon coc h a i r p e r s o n s , Ella Aleman at 392-5004 or J a c k Holmes at 399-3410, ext. 3044.

Like to spend this s u m m e r creatively? On a Greek island in the sun? And earn a semester's c r e d i t for w r i t i n g about your Greek Experience? DR. JAMES A. Clark, a native of Holland and a graduate of Hope, will direct a summer program in C r e a t i v e W r i t i n g and Greek Literature from June 6 to August 24 on the historic island of Paros in Greece. Participants may choose d r a m a , p o e t r y , fiction o r / a n d composition. Or they may study Greek literature, either classical or modern. Since Paros has long been known for its art school, as well as its small colony of foreign a r t i s t s , musicians and w r i t e r s , students may also arrange coursework in painting, d r a w i n g , a r t h i s t o r y , p h o t o g r a p h y and cinematic history. AFTER visiting Greece and Paros in the 1960's, Jim and Katy Clark decided they had found their own personal paradise. In 1971, after both had taught English for several years at a university in eastern Kentucky, they gave up their positions, sold their house, took their savings and went to Paros. There they designed their own home, mastered the language and devoted t h e m s e l v e s to the w r i t i n g and a r t t h e y would no longer neglect. Since then, Jim has contributed frequent articles to the New York Times and has r e c e n t l y co-

authored a book on the history and c u l t u r e of P a r o s . He will be assisted in the Creative Writing P r o g r a m by J e f f r e y Carson, a writer for the Athenian magazine in Athens. PAROS, located in the heart of t h e Cyclades, is s u r r o u n d e d by such islands as Mykonos and T h e r a (Santorini), Melos and Naxos. The island is known among archaeologists for its prehistoric remains, among classicists for its green-hued marble and the love poetry of Archilochus. Participants will have a unique o p p o r t u n i t y seldom had by the visitor to Greece. They will live in, and experience, a seashore Greek island village of small whitewashed houses. Using Paros as a base, they will explore nearby islands as well as visiting Athens and Crete. Up to 19 credit hours may be earned during the 12-week program. The program is sponsored by Schiller College in G e r m a n y . Tuition for t h e full summer is $1150. Further information may be had by contacting Prof. James Prins or Pr o f . J a n e H a r r i n g t o n in t h e English Department. Or students may write lor a catalogue on the C r e a t i v e W r i t i n g P r o g r a m in P a r o s , by w r i t i n g to: Schiller College Europe, Friedrich-EbertAnlage 4, 6900 Heidelberg, West Germany.

Washington semester offered in May Do you w a n t to watch Jody Powell brief the press? Are you interested in speaking with a top White House official about urban problems? Do you want to speak to S e n a t o r R o b e r t Griffen? Would you like an interview with a top Ford Administration aide? The Political Science Department is sponsoring a May Term course in Washington D.C. During the three week period (May 14 June 2), the group of students will i n t e r v i e w over 50 people in 35 government agencies and interest groups representing a wide range of viewpoints. Students will have a day with Congress, a day with the press, days with military agencies. White House agencies, e n e r g y and

environmental agencies, intelligence agencies, an elections 1978 day, and so forth. Students will have a first-hand look at such controversial groups as the C.I.A., F.B.I., National Rifle Assoc. Center for National Security Studies, t h e Congressional Budget Office, and others. The course is open to all students from freshmen to graduating: seniors. Those who a r e t h i n k i n g of applying for t h e Washington Honors Semester can b e n e f i t f r o m a quick look at government agencies. Fees above tuition ($180) will be kept to a minimum ($280). If you a r e i n t e r e s t e d in this p r o g r a m call Professor Zoetewey (ext. 3040) or come to Lubbers 208.

Vaughn urges 19 year veto S t a t e R e p r e s e n t a t i v e Jackie Vaugh III (D-Detroit) has hand delivered a personal l e t t e r to Governor William Milliken, urging him to veto legislation raising the legal drinking age in Michigan to 19 years of age. 'THIS discrimination in singling out our 18 year olds for punitive action must not become law," Vaughn stressed. Accompanying the letter were t h e Governor of M a s s a c h u s e t t s ' v e t o message of a similar bill raising the legal drinking age to 19 and a Detroit Free Press editorial opposing the action in Michigan. "AS LONG as we consider our young people responsible enough to marry, vote, hold office, and die for our country, we cannot deny them the right to drink," Vaughn pointed out to t h e Governor. "Rather, we must deal with any infraction of t h e law, w h e t h e r d r iv in g or p r o v i d i n g alcohol to minors, on the same level and in the same manner we punish other adult groups." Vaughn, a leader in the fight for the Age of Majority Act, which gave 18 year olds adult rights and

responsibilities, said it is illogical to deny drinking rights to 18 year olds on t h e basis of t r a f f i c accidents, since statistics do not support the theory that 18 year olds are involved in more alcohol-related accidents than any other age group. "THE BILL may appear to be politically expedient in resolving the teenage drinking problem in our schools, however it is ludicrous to deny 18 year olds the right to drink as a means of eliminating drinking by 16 and 17 year olds,' Vaughn wrote. "With such a line of reasoning, it would be equally reasonable to deny all parents of minor children the right to drink so that young people would not have access to alcohol in t h e home." S t a t i s t i c s indicate t h a t 98 percent of our young adults are good citizens with only two )ercent having infractions of the aw. Since there is no firm evidence to s u p p o r t r a i s i n g t h e d ri n k i n g age, it should not be raised and the Governor should veto the bills.

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anchored inside Student designers display

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New York artists at Hope

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A "free"gift

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Wanted: Servants

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Hope College anchor

Programs offered for film making The Gray Film A t e l i e r , a non-profit. New York State production center, is offering a most unusual and creative opportunity to u n d e r g r a d u a t e or g r a d u a t e students interested in filmmaking. THE ATELIER is accepting applications from students with little or no experience in filmmaking, but who have exhibited strong i n t e r e s t in e i t h e r l i t e r a t u r e or creative writing, social sciences, and/or in the fine arts. The film program was designed for young persons who have a lot on their minds and who have always wanted the opportunity to express themselves in film. This a l t e r n a t i v e a p p r e n t i c e study program, now in its seventh year, includes a number of unique f e a t u r e s . It is an intensive, full-time, one-year p r o g r a m devoted e n t i r e l y to t n e s t u d y of filmmaking. MANY LEADING universities have granted full credit for study undertaken at the Atelier, meaning t h a t s t u d e n t s need not interrupt their university careers. This program has filled a void for many scnools which have had to cut back their media programs for economic reasons. The Gray Film Atelier is organized as a professional production company modeled a f t e r t h e film studio of y e s t e r y e a r . Student apprentices gain actual experience in each studio unit. For example, more than 30 studentapprentices have participated over t n e past t w o v e a r s in t h e production of the Atelier's feature film, EVERYMAN. EVERYMAN, a full-length film.

is a contemporary version of the medieval morality play and is intended for national distribution. T h e a p p r e n t i c e s filled all crew positions from P r o d u c t i o n Mana g e r , to A s s i s t a n t D i r e c t o r , to Cinematographer, to Gaffer and Grip. EVERYMAN was sponsored by a seed grant from tne National Endowment for the Arts. Other Atelier films have represented the United States in major international film festivals at Grenoble, France and Trieste, Italy. THE FORMAL classes at the Atelier are taught by its director, Paul Gray, who is both a film director and a teacher. During the 1960's, Gray was the Head of the Drama and Film Department at Bennington College in Vermont. The Atelier was started in 1971 in Brussels, Belgium and is now located in the village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., equidistant between the Capital, District of New York State and the Vermont border. The Atelier apprentice program represents a unique opportunity for women s t u d e n t s since t h e v s h a r e t h e functioning of all creative, technical, and producing roles. The Atelier is authorized to accept s t u d e n t s f r o m abroad, provided they have good command of the English language. Students interested in obtaining additional information or application procedures should contact Ms. J u d y Reynolds, A d m i n i s t r a t i v e Assistant, The Gray Film Atelier, P.O. Box 70, Hoosick Falls, N.Y. 12090. T h e p r o g r a m accepts a limited number of candidates each year.

Apply Early,

Job opportunities for summer employment good PROSPECTS look good for National P a r k s , S t a t e P a r k s , Private Summer Camps and resort areas. Many new job opportunities exist in support industries adjacent to Parks and recreation areas.

Careers in photography offered Olden Camera, one of America's most respected equipment supply houses selling directly to professional, industrial and government m a r k e t s , is now i n t e r v i e w i n g graduates seeking challenging and permanent careers in the photographic consumer sales field. Applications are being accepted for numerous positions, including Conventional Sales, Technical Rep, Account Manager, Assistant Purchasing A^ent, Assistant Merchandising M a n a g e r , and Assistant Advertising Manager. Candidates should have extensive technical knowledge and be thoroughly familiar with both new and formerly owned photographic equipment. A c a r e e r a t Olden o f f e r s an excellent salary, a fine benefits package, and an opportunity for growth from within the company. Resumes should be sent to Robert Olden, President, Olden Camera and Lens Co., Inc., 1266 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 1265 .

I.V.C.F. presents "Lord, Lord 4. The need for a personal The m a n i f e s t a t i o n of a new organization at Hope College is response of an individual by the Holy Spirit for salvation. soon to take place. A multi-media production called LORD, LORD 5. Belief in the personal return will be shown early this month, of Christ. Chapters vary from campus to sponsored jointly by t h e Chaplain's office and a new group on campus in function, form and campus, Inter-Varsity Christian organization. At p r e s e n t t h e primary purpose of tne I.V. group Fellowship. It is a complex slide on Hope's campus is fellowship and and s o u n d t r a c k p r e s e n t a t i o n personal growth. The group meets based on the verse "Why do you every Thursday night at 9:45 in call me Lord, Lord and do not what I say?" from Luke 6:46 (RSV). the fourth floor faculty lounge in L u b b e r ' s Hall for fellowship of DEALING WITH t h e m e s on prayer, singing and Bible devodiscipleship, the Will of God and tions. t h e Lordship of C h r i s t , LORD, LORD will be presented twice - at THE MEETING is led by students but occasionally a faculty 7:30 and 9:30 on Tuesday evening, April 11 in DeWitt's main theater. member or area minister will lead devotions. A special activity that This production is made by has been influential in strengthenTwenty-One H u n d r e d Producing the group in fellowship and tions, a branch m i n i s t r y of c o m m i t m e n t has been weekly Irtter-Varsity Christian Fellowship p r a y e r p a r t n e r s . Two or t h r e e (I.V.C.F.) and everyone from the campus and community is welmeet during the week for prayer come to come. or to share concerns and to get to I.V.C.F., or I.V. for short, is a know one another. The m e e t i n g s a r e open to Christian Fellowship organization on college and u n i v e r s i t y camstudents and faculty. Everyone is welcome. puses across the nation. It is a part of an i n t e r n a t i o n a l organization BESIDES the Thursday night called International Fellowship of meeting, I.V. has other activities Evangelistic Students. Each cam- and events planned. Small Group pus involved has a chapter which Bible Studies meet on Monday, is run and organized by the Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursstudents. day e v e n i n g s . Social activities THEY ARE helped in any wav build f r i e n d s h i p s within t h e by full and p a r t - t i m e I.V. staff m e m b e r s who s e r v e all t h e chapters in their area. The I.V. group of Hope began in September 1977 and, although they are not yet an official chapter, they are growing and becoming an active and influential force on campus. Plans are underway now with Dr. William Mungall, associate the Relicious Life Board and the National I n t e r - V a r s i t y Head- professor of chemistry at Hope, q u a r t e r s to form t h e official nas been named a member of the organic c h e m i s t r y examination I.V.C.F. Chapter at Hope. I.V. IS a unique fellowship on committee of the American Chemithis campus in that it is run by cal Society. As a member of this committee. students. Being part of a nationDr. Mungall will join 16 other wide organization also ties it to other colleges across the states. Many regional or i n t e r - c a m p u s conferences and r e t r e a t s a r e planned. As a non-denominational organization, I.V. a d h e r e s to simple Christian doctrine. These beliefs a r e s u m m a r i z e d in five basic points: Phyllis K l e d e r has been ap1. Belief in t h e s u p r e m e pointed student employment coorauthority of Scripture. dinator at Hope. 2. Belief in the diety of Christ. In h e r new position she will 3. The necessity and efficacy of c o o r d i n a t e t h e placement of Christ's death for the atonement of students in campus jobs and assist sin. Âťn pvflhiating financial needs of

Summer Job Research Analyst for t h e national O p p o r t u n i t y Research Program indicates that summer job opportunities for the summer of 1978 look excellent. High School g r a d u a t e s and College students will find many o p p o r t u n i t i e s in t h e r e c r e a t i o n areas. Some National Parks hire as many as 3,000 summer employees. SEVERAL h u n d r e d p r i v a t e camps throughout the nation will be seeking summer employees in v a r i e d capacities as counselors, s w i m m i n g i n s t r u c t o r s , music directors, and general activities such as cooking, maintenance, etc. I n d i v i d u a l s with special t a l e n t s and abilities in t h e a r e a of entertainment, livestock handling,

GARBAGE* one cause that doesn't need your contribution. Student designers display garments

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groups. Since the group is young and new on its f e e t , o u t r e a c h programs have been minimal. A big brother type ministry of prayer support with the Inner City Mission of Holland and a sharing outreach with the youth groups of local churches are a few of tnese programs. THE CHAPTER and its members are in turn aided by other b r a n c h m i n i s t r i e s of I.V. like T w e n t y - O n e H u n d r e d Productions. Besides t h e a r e a staff m e m b e r s , t h e r e is a national h e a d q u a r t e r s in Madison, Wisconsin. The I.V. Press publishes books, Bible s t u d y guides and devotionals. There are Bible and Life, and L e a d e r s h i p t r a i n i n g conferences scheduled at different c a m p u s e s t h r o u g h o u t t h e academic year. And during the summer, weeklong to month-long camps in discipleship, personal growtn and l e a d e r s h i p t r a i n i n g a r e held on C e d a r Campus in t h e U p p e r Peninsula. The I.V.C.F. is just beginning on Hope's campus, but it promises to be a dynamic ana g r o w i n g o r g a n i z a t i o n . If y o u ' r e curious, interested or have any questions, stop in on Thursday night and see what it's all about.

Mungall chosen for committee c h e m i s t s from all over t h e c o u n t r y in w r i t i n g , compiling, editing and testing out questions for standardized exams to be used in colleges and universities all over the world. Dr. Mungall has been a member of the Hope faculty since 1971.

e t c . should i n v e s t i g a t e t h e s e opportunities. Dude ranches and guest resorts a r e also good o p p o r t u n i t i e s for those who like tne out-of-doors, and a r e willing to work on an operating ranch. AS ALWAYS, it is emphasized that individuals desiring summer e m p l o y m e n t in t h e s u m m e r opportunities throughout the nation should apply early. Students interested in obtaining a d d itio n a l i n f o r m a t i o n may req u e s t a F R E E b r o c h u r e by sending a self-addressed S T A M P E D e n v e l o p e to Opportunity Research, Summer Job Dept. SJO, Lock Box 730, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814.

A fashion show f e a t u r i n g approximately 50 creations designed by two Hope s t u d e n t s will be presented April 7 - 9 in Wichers Auditorium of the Nykerk Hall of Music. The show on April 7 will begin at 9 p.m., on April 8 at 2 p.m., and on April 9 at 8 p.m. T h e g a r m e n t s h a v e been designed oy Isaac Myers, a junior

pre-med m a j o r f r o m New York City, and Wanda Walker, a senior c o m m u n i c a t i o n s m a j o r from Queens, New York. Entertainment will be provided by Hope students Jeanne Moore and Shelia Sawyer. The show is sponsored by the Hope Black Coalition. Admission will be $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for students.

Final senior day sponsored Hope will sponsor its final high school senior day of the school year, Friday, April 14, according to admissions d i r e c t o r T h o m a s LaBaugh. The purpose of senior day is to introduce high school seniors to

the academic program and campus life of Hope. Students will have an opportunity to attend classes, tour the campus, meet with faculty and students and participate in preprofessional conferences.

ACTIVITIES CALENDAR; FRIDAY, APRIL 7 Film: "Dr. Zhivago." Winants Auditorium. 6:30 and 10:00 b m $1 with I D. ' SATURDAY, APRIL 8 Dance. Ballroom. 9-12 p.m. Music by: The Whiz Kids. $1. Martha Bums in the Pit. 9:00 p. m. Senior Recital. Linda Pyle, clarinet and Judy McKenna, Soprano. 8:00p.m. Wichers Auditorium. SUNDAY, APRIL 9 Faculty Chamber Recital. 4:00p.m. Wichers Auditorium. Black Coalition Fashion Show. 8:00 p.m. Wichers Auditorium. Admission $1. Senior Art Show. DeWitt Art Gallerx. TUESDAY, APRIL 11 Film: "Lord Lord." DeWitt Main Theater. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. WWMMA^AMML

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^SA C Arts and Crafts Exhibit. Demonstration and Sale.

Kleder appointed students. A 1973 Hope g r a d u a t e . Miss Kleder has been employed at Hope since September, 1973, first as an a d m i s s i o n s r e c r u i t e r and most recently in the alumni office.

AVON can help you pav F y tuition bills. Sell in your spare time. Men and women are invited to call Mrs. Janet Kemp, Avon Manager, 392-6238

Typing Wanted In My HomeTerm Papers, Reports, etc.,. I have over 10-years secretarial experience. Reasonable Rates.

PHONE 772-1214


New York artists exhibit at Hope by Mary Bruins On Sunday afternoon, April 9, in DeWitt Cultural Center art gallery, New York City's art scene comes to Hope. A group of recent prints and not so recent prints of the artists of the Pop Movement of the 1960's will be on exhibit from April 9 through April 22. SOME OF the artists included in the show are Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenburg, Frank Stella and Andy Warhol (including his wellknow Marilyn Monroe and soup can prints.) T h e conception of t h e show resulted from a semester in New York on the GLCA program that Mary B r u i n s , a s e n i o r a r t and business major participated in last fall. S h e was an a p p r e n t i c e at Castelli Graphics gallery on the u p p e r e a s t side of New York. C a s t e l l i ' s h a n d l e s w o r k s of t h e forerunners of the Pop era, the "famous names" you read about during the 60's who are still very much on the art scene today. FROM HER N e w York experience, which ranged from doing the dishes to shipping works to selling art. Bruins has undertaken bringing a print show to Hope. The jobs of finding funding, selecting works, publicity, and cataloging the pieces are being done based on what she learned at Castelli's.

Castelli's is one of the busiest Among Bruins' immemorable g a l l e r i e s in New York.- T h e y New York experiences was a visit handle p r i m a r i l y p r i n t s and to Rauschenberg's home, a four photography. It is run by Mrs. story converted orphanage comA n t o i n e t t e C a s t e l l i . Mr. Leo p l e t e with a c h a p e l and an Castelli operates Castelli Graphics' E g y p t i a n m u m m y . She also Soho c o u n t e r p a r t w h e r e t h e w o r k e d a l o n g s i d e J a s p e r J o h n s p a i n t i n g s and s c u l p t u r e of t h e while hanging a show. He has a artists are shown. r e p u t a t i o n for s o l e m n i t y , but THE WORKS were selected to m a n a g e d a smile w h e n B r u i n s d e m o n s t r a t e t h e evolution t h a t complimented his taste in boots, occurs within a span of time in an which happened to match her own. artist's career-what characterisBRUI NS is i n t e r e s t e d in a tics s t a y t h e s a m e and which career in gallery management. She change. Bruins' goal is for each decided to try to stage a show at viewer to be able to compare these Hope to "test myself to see if I traits for himself. could do it on this scale." To f u r t h e r e x p l o r e t h o s e difBruins has handled all aspects of f e r e n c e s and s i m i l a r i t i e s in t h e o r g a n i z i n g t h e show, including w o r k s in t h e show, Castelli's obtaining funding, selecting the Director of Graphics, Bob Monk works, publicizing the event, and will be on c a m p u s W e d n e s d a y , h a n g i n g t h e s h o w . B r u i n s is April 12 to give an informal gallery majoring in both art and business talk. The talk will be at 8 p.m. in administration. She admits that the gallery. the combination is a bit unusual. BRUINS' p r i m a r y r e a s o n for "MOST ARTISTS aren't manc o o r d i n a t i n g t h e show was her agers. They have little concept of realization oi how little exposure how closely t h e t w o fields a r e this part of Western Michigan had related in the promotion of their with contemporary art. Being so work. far r e m o v e d f r o m a l a r g e a r t "As for me," she adds, "I'm a mecca such as New York, she felt business major because I'm good there was an unfamiliarity with at it. I'm an art major because I the work that "bred contempt" for like it." it b e c a u s e of a lack of basic Also on display in the gallery at knowledge of how to look at the that time will be some prints of old work and enjoy it. masters, new acquisitions of the art department.

Passage to indigestion by Neil Klotz (CPS) - Each y e a r t h e food service industry reaps $2.3 billion from the college and university m a r k e t . In 1975, f o u r t h - q u a r t e r p r o f i t s for AHA S e r v i c e s , t h e l a r g e s t i n s t i t u t i o n a l food contractor were up 13 percent, and Saga's profits were up 50 per cent to a total of $5.5 million for the year. In 1976, t h e s t u d e n t s w e r e rattling their silverware in protest. For instance, at Washington U n i v e r s i t y in S t . Louis, w h e r e students paid $3.46 per day for b o a r d , 60 p e r c e n t of t h o s e surveyed rated the food "poor". At the State University of New York (SUNY) in Albany, students rated

"on c a m p u s food q u a l i t y " t h e i r t h i r d b i g g e s t concern, a f t e r " h a n d l i n g c o u r s e c o n t e n t " and "finances". SUNY students had a little more provocation than most, however. The previous year 200 students there were hit with food poisoning a f t e r e a t i n g in the cafeteria. The year before that, a similar mass incident occurred. As usual, hardly anybody's listening. Many food service managers seem to take student complaints about as seriously as they do the groans f r o m t h e i r mechanical dishw a s h e r s . T h e classic cavalier attitude was best displayed by one food service manager who commented, "The food here can best be described as average. But if a person was very hungry, the food

Right to refuse Treatment" on trial u

BOSTON (LNS) - S e v e n patients at Boston State Hospital in Boston have sued 15 psychiatric personnel for damages and, on the basis of their experiences at the hands of the staff, they are calling on the Federal Court to recognize r e f u s i n g ' ' t r e a t m e n t " as a legal r i g h t of p a t i e n t s in p s y c h i a t r i c facilities. The trial has been going on in Boston F e d e r a l C o u r t since December, 1977. And in its course, has c h a l l e n g e d many of t h e s t a n d a r d f e a t u r e s of c u r r e n t psychiatric practices. The excessive use of powerful, psychoactive d r u g s , t h e s i g n i n g of so-called "voluntary" forms in psychiatric hospitals, and the use of seclusion as r e s t r a i n t h a v e all been questioned in the trial. The case is complicated by the distinction between "emergency" and "non-emergency" situations in a psychiatric hospital. Even if the courts rule in favor of the patients' rights in non-emergency times on a ward a physician might be able to cancel the effect of the ruling simply by declaring a "crisis" or "emergency" in an individual. A b u s e s of p a t i e n t s in non-

emergency times with involuntary drugging have already been cited by t h e p l a i n t i f f s in t h e i r case evidence. The routine involuntary d r u g g i n g of p a t i e n t s has been defined as "assault and battery" by the lawyers for the patients, arguing that this practice violates personal sovereignity. The seclusion feature of the case centers on a young woman who was forced to s p e n d o v e r 2000 hours alone in a barren room at Boston State Hospital. Testimony from several witnesses has questioned the appropriateness of the incarceration. Supporters of the patients' case h a v e e x p r e s s e d t h e hope t h a t Federal Judge Joseph L. Tauro will yield a landmark decision by ruling for the patients' right to refuse treatment. Such a positive step will be a boost to the case of mental patients' liberation.

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m i g h t be classified as a little better than average." C o m m e r c i a l food s e r v i c e contractors know they have a few things going for them. For one, many small schools h a v e been convinced that they can't run their own food service and break even even t h o u g h such an o p e r a t i o n might be more responsive to the students than a meal program contracted to a large outside firm. It's true that schools that run their own food service have increasingly been hit w i t h r i s i n g costs, a c c o r d i n g to Clark D e H a v e n , Administrative Secretary of the N a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n of College and University Food Services. But DeHaven goes on to state that a number of schools have cut costs by i n c r e a s i n g t h e use of selfservice and self-busing. Despite all obstacles, says DeHaven, "any school can run its own" and need not t u r n to a c o n t r a c t o r if it honestly cares about the quality of student food.

Runners rough on knees Campus Digest News Service The long-distance runner has a hard life. N o t only is he lonely, but d o c t o r s a r e now s a y i n g he's tearing up his knees as well. One doctor says the knee is a "fitness freak's" main injury site. But d e d i c a t e d r u n n e r s won't stop, he added. They may stop to see a doctor for quick repairs, but then they're off and running again. Dr. James D. Key of Dallas told the Midwest Clinical Conference of the Chicago Medical Society that more and more runners between 30 and 50 a r e e x h i b i t i n g this "overuse syndrome." P a t i e n t s with knees damaged from overuse were instructed to stop doing the activity in the past. Key ^aid. This usually resulted in the problem's clearing up. H o w e v e r , m a n y p a t i e n t s now will not stop on doctor's orders. Key believes this is a manifestation of t h e c u r r e n t belief t h a t c a r d i o v a s c u l a r f i t n e s s leads to longevity. Running is one of the best ways to improve endurance, lower pulse r a t e , and g e n e r a l l y h a v e a stronger heart. The knee was the main problem among a group of amateur athletes who had to stop their activities for up to two weeks because of pain, according to a survey. Other trouble areas were i n f l a m e d Achilles t e n d o n s , shin splints, pain in foot arches, ankle (continued on page 7)

Summer climbing program offered You stand braced against the granite edge of the mountain top, hung perilously between heaven and e a r t h . The wind r i p p l e s t h r o u g h y o u r clothing, and f a r below the tree tops sway. A heady mixture of fear and exhilaration tingles through your body. YOU LEAN into t h e ropes, and moving your feet cautiously over the rock, back off the cliff edge into the sky. In a moment you find yourself facing the sheer rock of the cliff, and with a rush of elation, you glide down t h e r o p e s earthward. This is one of t h e m a n y e x p e r i e n c e s p r o v i d e d by t h e A d i r o n d a c k I n s t i t u t e in t h e i r summer mountain journeys. Loc a t e d at S k i d m o r e College in Saratoga Springs, New York, the I n s t i t u t e u s e s t h e Colorado Rockies, t h e A d i r o n d a c k mountains, and the wilds of northern Ontario as departure points from the conventional in education by o f f e r i n g t h r e e - c r e d i t hour literature courses where all instruction takes place outdoors. PARTICIPANTS complete their reading on their own before gathering at the field sites for ten days of field instruction-which in t h e m o u n t a i n c o u r s e s includes rock climbing, rappeling, and river fording. T h e p r o g r a m h a s been so successful over the past five years that it has attracted students from over 100 colleges in 25 states. The c r e d i t e a r n e d in t h e I n s t i t u t e c o u r s e s is usually t r a n s f e r a b l e back to t h e s t u d e n t ' s home institution. PROFESSOR J o n a t h a n F a i r banks, creator and director of the Adirondack Institute, explains that "the program is intended to be a variation on the traditional academic courses, and is meant to supplement, not replace them." W h a t is d i f f e r e n t about t h e Institute's summer courses? "Most

literature courses taught in the c l a s s r o o m a r e e s s e n t i a l l y an intellectual exercise," Fairbanks explains. "This program takes l i t e r a t u r e and t e s t s it a g a i n s t experience." WITH EXCITEMENT he r e calls last summer hearing a pack of coyotes yelping along a mountain ridge directly above the group's camp. All of the students were spellbound as they lay in their sleeping bags listening to the wild sounds of coyotes running in t h e moonlight. A f o r m e r O u t w a r d Bound i n s t r u c t o r in C o l o r a d o and in England, Fairbanks' wilderness experience ranges from climbing in t h e N e w Zealand Alps t o c a n o e i n g w h i t e w a t e r in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d C a n a d a . He b e g a n his u n i v e r s i t y t e a c h i n g career in New Zealand and taught E n g l i s h for s e v e n y e a r s at t h e S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y of N e w Y o r k b e f o r e e s t a b l i s h i n g t h e Adirondack Institute at Skidmore. THE ADIRONDACK c o u r s e includes writings by Hemingway, F a u l k n e r , L o n d o n , and F r o s t , while titles such as "Tough Trip T h r o u g h P a r a d i s e , " " T n e Big S k y , " and " T h e C o m a n c h e s " sprinkle the Colorado reading list. The Canadian course emphasizes exploration literature. The groups are co-ed and are comprised of 12 students and two instructors. Dr. Anne LaBastille, noted A d i r o n d a c k guide and a u t h o r of " W o o d s w o m a n , " is among the instructors who assist Fairbanks in the field. T h e p r o g r a m is open t o all u n d e r g r a d u a t e s and o t h e r int e r e s t e d a d u l t s , and welcomes non-credit applicants as well as those seeking credit. Further i n f o r m a t i o n can be o b t a i n e d by writing Adirondack Institute, D a n a Hall, S k i d m o r e College, S a r a t o g a S p r i n g s , New York 12866.

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*50 tuition deposit creates outrage by Tim Griffin I am writing to express my outrage at the recent decision to impose a nonr e f u n d a b l e $50 deposit as a tuition credit in advance of a permit to register.

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to r e t u r n to school in the fall? This a d d e d $50 hassle m i g h t be just e n o u g h to convince a lot of those in turmoil t h a t H o p e isn't the place for t h e m . C o m e onl In these tough times, college students n e d all the e n c o u r a g e m e n t they c a n get f r o m the administration to continue in school. I have only o n e more point to m a k e , but it is the o n e I feel most strongly a b o u t . Hope is a very expensive place to go to school. O h , sure, you can r a m b l e on about t h a t $1000 less t h a t the average G L C A colleges, b u t let's face it - $4,500

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T h i s new rule serves no good purpose. ' o r a n eight m o n t h stay is a lot of money T h e excuses for it are shaky, if not Ind.v.duals paying that m u c h money for ridiculous. O n e is that the rule is being t u . t i o n in a year deserve to have a little put into effect to cut down o n the n u m b e r security associated with it. T h e y should be able to have a placed of students who sign u p for a class, they can count on to stay, study, andT" never show u p , a n d consequently rob learn. But the administration wants to another student of the rijght to be in t h e take away this confidence that we all class. This s t a t e m e n t is p u r e malarkey. deserve. W h a t they are saying is, "Okay, W h a t on e a r t h is the d r o p - a d d period you c a m e this year, b u t what a b o u t the for? It is d u r i n g this time that a student next? W e don't trust you, and just so who originally w a n t e d to be in the class you don't cause us a little grief a n d p i m p but was closed out can get into a class us, we're g o n n a m a k e you put a little where one of the "thoughtless premoney on it this t i m e . " registerers" has left a vacancy. T h e existing I don't know about others, b u t t h a t system that handles all drop-adds c a n kind of c r a p does not sit with mel also handle those who don't show. Hey other students, r e m e m b e r t h a t $50 Another excuse for the rule is t h a t " c o m m i t m e n t " deposit we all paid before o ^ - • J dormitory o c c u p a n c y a n d distribution of enrolling? Well, now we are all being O A L j COtltlTlllGCl " p r i m e living a c c o m m o d a t i o n s " is hurt by considered high school seniors. O u r past those who register a n d don't bother to years of presence a n d support have done at 4:00 in the b a s e m e n t of Van R a a l t e . come to school. This sounds as if the n o t h i n g to e n h a n c e our standing or priO u r average m e e t i n g lasts an h o u r a n d administration is waving dorm assignments vileges. T h a t is truly disgusting! 45 minutes or m o r e . It is here we organize like they were really lucrative. Hahl Of course, there is an alternative to activites, assign people to be in charge of a Anyone who has been a r o u n d knows paying the deposit-register last. A n d lose specific event, finalize details, evaluate the that living off c a m p u s , while lacking in all priority rightly earned in your college past week's activities a n d m a k e decisions some aspects, is m u c h c h e a p e r t h a n living career. W h a t an insult! for the f u t u r e . in the d o r m , a n d , m o r e importantly, W h a t it all boils down to is t h a t the provides a m o r e responsible a n d free top brass is forgetting who is paying their environment that adults are entitled to. salaries. T h e students are what m a k e this A lot of things can h a p p e n in a college go, the students are the ones who person's life in the m o n t h s between rethe place was intended for, a n d yet their gistration a n d m a t r i c u l a t i o n . No one c a n legitimate rights and needs are being underw o u j ^ venture to say t h a t each tell the f u t u r e . It would be grossly u n m i n e d . This k i n d of thing cannot conm e m b e r spends 2 to 5 hours additionally fair, or m o r e correctly, cut-throat, to tinue, a n d the best time to stop it is getting things ready. O n t h e eac^ impose a n o n - r e f u n d a b l e deposit on a now * . , r i average, in a two week period, each one of person who suddenly found himself strongly I would appreciate others who also feel u s ^ devote a Friday or Saturday compelled not to come back to school strongly about this to let their voices be • activity. On ht to su isin a S A C because of some course of events in his h e a r d . I, for one, know that I f u ly ^ m e weekends, certain m e m b e r s spend life. intend on both registering and a t t e n d i n g a n d S a t u r d a y nights at SAC Here's a n o t h e r point. How about those a 50 de classes next fall-without paying » activities. students who, for financial or other PosltHow m a n y of you are willing to d o reasons, aren't sure whether they want that to give your fellow students something to do? It may a p p e a r the last c o m m e n t was a little strong. In an a t t e m p t to explain let us move on to the f o u r t h M - Morale. Many of you are thinking that $15,250 G r o u p m o r a l e boosts a n d reinforcement All of a sudden it stopped. During o u r looks like a lot of money. Well it is from outside sources is almost nonexistent, weekly SAC meeting, discussion of acunless you consider some costs. T h e average All the c o m m e n t s we receive seem to be tivites ceased a n d the conversation t u r n e d cost of a Pit act is $400. You get negative and come to us through the gossip toward the trials a n d tributes of being in free - therefore, that's p u r e expense, grapevine. m e m b e r s of SAC. It is our purpose h e r e T h e average band for a dance is paid about It is our belief t h a t we would have a to explain 5M's a n d I P concerning t h e $400. You pay a $1.00, average attendance g r o u p faint if anyone ever d r o p p e d us a Social Activities C o m m i t t e e . is 200, a loss of $200. note a n d said t h a t SAC was doing a good In the long r u n SAC uses your $7.00 j o b . Unlike other c a m p u s student staff to keep your cost down a n d to offer we receive n o m o n e t a r y reward to per"free" entertainment. p e t u a t e our e n t h u s i a s m . At times we look Many laughed at us when we determined at one another a n d say "I don't underFirst let us consider 2M's - Myths a n d our loss on the M a y n a r d Ferguson concert stand how we've kept going? How d o Money. T h e reason we consider the two to be over $1000. Maybe now you will we p u t u p with it? Doesn't anyone have together is because most myths are a b o u t realize that each one of you helped m a k e anything good to say?" SAC money. Students have often ext h a t loss. If the SAC m e m b e r s pooled This may sound like we dislike criticism, claimed to us: "How come you charge their entirp portion of the activities fee Criticism is good when it says " W e did for dances? Don't we pay an activities it would only e qua l $170. It was not our not like t h a t event, how about trying fee?" It is t r u e you pay a $25.00 per year loss (SAC) b u t your loss (Hope). this next time" or " T h e organization Myth n u m b e r two: SAC m e m b e r s are seemed a little shaky, I will be gald to activities fee. p a i d . It is difficult to explain how m u c h h e l p next t i m e . " If you like something O u t of t h a t a m o u n t (for the 77 - 78 school year) SAC received about seven t h a t hurts. Student Congress officers a n d write us. If you have some extra time or their secretaries are p a i d , anchor staff a suggestion please let us know. dollars per student for a total budget are paid, W T A S staff are p a i d , Milestone W e are supposed to represent you, b u t of $15,250. T h i s figure includes projected staff are paid. SAC staff m e m b e r s are not how can we if we a r e unsure of what you income f r o m dances, etc. If you want to paid. want? know where the r e m a i n d e r of the fee This brings us to our third M- Members. It is our u n d e r s t a n d i n g t h a t the college goes contact your student congress reT h e r e are 10 of us. W e meet each Monday desires to keep t h e directorship of SAC presentative.

SAC deserves recognition

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a p a r t time position ( M a n a g e m e n t fifth M). As a c o m m i t t e we feel this will d a m a g e the p r o g r a m o f f e r e d to the student body a n d kill SAC m e m b e r s as if they are e x p e n d a b l e . O h great b o a r d of trustees in t h e sky, we are students in your college. W e are h e r e to learn. T h e r e are only 24 h o u r s in a day. A p a r t time director c a n only d o so m u c h as we can only do so m u c h . In order to offer a good p r o g r a m at stand a r d s as high as previously set the work load on the students would be tremendous. W e could increase the membership, but it seems to work best at this size. W e could have stronger sub c o m m i t tees b u t again we r e t u r n to t h e question of r e w a r d . Sub committees seem to falter d u e to lack of r e i n f o r c e m e n t . A fulltime director is a m u s t . Lastly our p r o g r a m (the P). We c a n n o t please all of you all of t h e time. W e a t t e m p t to p u t variety into our prog r a m m i n g . W e a t t e m p t to b r i n g you the best at the smallest a d d i t i o n a l cost. W e want to expose you to t h e new ways of s p e n d i n g your free t i m e . W e want you to enjoy what we sponsor. Do you realize t h a t t h e r e would be no Pull, n o Nykerk, H o m e c o m i n g , May Day or W i n t e r Fantasia without SAC. No d a n c e s (which you say we never have e n o u g h ) , no p e r f o r m e r s in t h e Pit a n d no movies. A b o u t the movies. W h e r e are all of you who raked us over t h e coals about last semester's lack of a movie series. W e listened. T h e reason we h a d no series is because we were losing your money on a project that previously p a i d for itself. W e have m a d e a n e f f o r t to correct o u r "mistake" by b r i n g i n g back a film series. T h e series is being f i n a n c e d on a "pray we break even because there's no b u d g e t " b u d g e t . So f a r we have lost m o n e y on every movie. A r e we wrong again? R e m e b e r it's your m o n e y . W e are asking f o r your support a n d und e r s t a n d i n g . W e a r e asking t h a t you take o u r word seriously. W e are a part of you. W e a r e 10 students d o i n g o u r best to give you what you will enjoy. T h e Social Activites Committee A n n - M a r i e H e l m us, Eileen Doyle, Steve Peachey, Bob Glover, Alan Murray, Paul Hayes, Deb V a n Hoeven, P a u l a N u t t e r , Gaye van d e n H o m b e r g h , Kathleen Francis.

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Page 5

Wanted: Servants

A "free" gift by Rick Vanderbie (Editor's note: This is the first of a series of articles on the free enterprise ILcl *system.) J Upon reading the above, you've idi p r o obably a o i y p r e-pr -a r e d yourself to become informed of how you can get something for nothing. You've searched for the little coupon or t h e proof-of p u r c h a s e seal, b u t found none. Why? Because this is not an offer that will give you a gift free of charge. T h i s h a s been w r i t t e n and placed here for the sole purpose of directing you towards a gift that you have already been given. The Free Enterprise system is a gift that has been bestowed upon all Americans, whether they know it or not. F r e e Enterprise is not actually "free" in the monetary s e n s e b e c a u s e it does, i n d e e d , generate certain costs for those involved in it. When applied to Free Enterprise, the word "Free" means that American businesses are allowed freedom in which to operate and

cate with us! So now you know our purpose, our goals, our reasons and our fears. What will be our subject matter? Servanthood. For the rest of the semester we wish to dwell on the topic of being a servant. This column will talk about Jesus as our example of a servant; about we as Christians being called to serve; about what it means to be a servant; and finally, about how to serve. It is truly our hope that you gain as much from our writing as we do in researching this subject which we feel is vital to t h e Christian life. Your servants, Larry & Reid

by Reid Thurston and Larry Mannino

We have seen that there is a prise and see how informed we that the American public has been great need for a Christian column granted room in which to move really are. in t h i s p a p e r . In t a l k i n g with Truthfully now, how much do when making financial decisions. f r i e n d s and a f t e r r e a d i n g last Due to the changing views of you know about Free Enterprise? week's letters to the editor, we A r e you able to point out its society during the past two decades, the freedom contained in components? More importantly, if both have decided that we are you were asked to explain how it willing and hopefully able to meet F r e e Enterprise has been severely this need. For we firmly believe works, could you do it? challenged. The saddest part that going to a private Christian Most Americans couldn't! They about it is that the situation isn't might be able to indicate that it's college doesn't mean that we are getting any better. Free Enterto be private Christians. prise remains under constant fire played a key role in helping So, in our concern for Christian A m e r i c a t o become one of t h e from Washington. g r o w t h in t h i s c o m m u n i t y , we Our political system, by continu- world's richest nations, but that's would like to share our thoughts not enough. It's most important ing to pass legislation restricting that the American public maintain and experiences with you. We are it, is slowly nickel-and-diming the not experts at theology nor do we effectiveness of F r e e Enterprise to its u n d e r s t a n d i n g of how F r e e Enterprise works if the system is consider it our job to present it. death. You might be tempted to say "so to remain healthy and in opera- Nor is our's an expert opinion or the final word on any issue". what" or "what difference does it tion. We are just growing Christians This article, and especially those make?" This sort of attitude is the willing to share our joys and our that will follow, will shed light on v e r y s y m p t o m of t h e second i g n o r a n c e s with you. So our largest problem that F r e e EnterF r e e E n t e r p r i s e ' s dilemma and p r o v i d e i m p o r t a n t i n f o r m a t i o n a t t e m p t will not be t h a t of prise faces. By dealing with a public that is pertaining to it. Hopefully, those teaching doctrine but of sharing what we have found to be true in u n i n f o r m e d or m i s i n f o r m e d , it of you who w e r e not y e t b e c o m e s v e r y . easy for F r e e acquainted with Free Enterprise our Christian walk. Our goal in this is for you to E n t e r p r i s e t o c r e a t e f r i c t i o n will be given a better understandgrow, for us to grow, and to make between the public and itself. To ing of how it works. public Christ's word. We cannot For free i n f o r m a t i o n , w r i t e to: As for t h o s e of you with avoid this, we m u s t t e s t each D R U N K D R I V E R . Box 2 3 4 5 emphasize enough our desire for revious knowledge of the subject, other's knowledge of Free EnterRockville. Maryland 20852 . hope t h a t t h e s e a r t i c l e s will f e e d b a c k , w h e t h e r p o s i t i v e or negative. If you feel we are wrong, further your understanding and p l e a s e feel f r e e to c o r r e c t us stimulate you to do all that you can publicly or pirvately. We wish not to help preserve Free Enterprise. to offend anyone. So please, in an Watch for next week's article: effort to give us a chance at a PROFITS greater quality article, communiA Misunderstood Concept society. T h e g r o u p m e e t i n g s a r e not meant to be therapy sessions, but it is believed that being able to talk freely about common concerns is therapeutic. If you believe yourself to be 1 ' j : i ^i ^ • • J 1 « t -1 I I V . M I . - I I . i v . r T v h o m o s e x u a l (it's a m a t t e r of degree, not either/or), you may find this group worthwhile. For too long t h e main p r o b l e m of h o m o s e x u a l i t y has been t h e isolation and u t t e r lack of preparation for it. Now open discussion is available to ameliorate that situation. There is no need to suffer alone when supportive understanding is available. If this group could be for you, contact Bill Hillegonds (2400) or Sarah Schendell (2110) who have agreed only to serve as contact persons. Requests for information are confidential.

HOW TO KEEP THE LIFE OF THE PARTY ALIVE.

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Homosexuals at Hope: Do they exist? Due to a g e n e r a l lack of u n d e r s t a n d i n g and a c c e p t a n c e , a t t e n d i n g Hope can be an extremely painful experience for h o m o s e x u a l s . E v e n t h e homosexual who can talk openly with a compassionate heterosexual roommate or friend will find it awkward and difficult to express what he or she is going through emotionally. P e r h a p s only a n o t h e r homosexual can fully comprehend the occasional f e e l i n g s of loneliness and anguish that come from not being a member of Hope's heterosexual majority. A group of concerned students known as The Frontrunners have begun meeting weekly to share in discussion what it means to be homosexual. Persons attending are gaining a greater awareness of t h e v a r i o u s m e a n i n g s of b e i n g h o m o s e x u a l in a h e t e r o s e x u a l

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The House refused even to consider the Administration's middle-income student-aid bill March 20 because it was brought up on s h o r t notice u n d e r a p r o c e d u r e which precluded any amendments in an effort to avoid attachment of a tuition tax-credit amendment. By a vote of 218-156 the House refused to second a motion to call up the bill under suspension of the r u l e s - a p r o c e d u r e which limits d e b a t e , b a r s a m e n d m e n t s , and r e q u i r e s a t w o - t h i r d s v o t e of approval. THE NO-AMENDMENTS s t r a t e g y was r e q u e s t e d by t h e White House and agreed to by the house Democratic leadership after the House agenda for the week of M a r c h 20 a l r e a d y had been announced. The agenda put the bill (HR 11274) on the House calendar March 22 under the usual rules. Republicans, who had planned to offer a tuition tax-credit amendment, denounced the strategy as "a b l a t a n t political m a n e u v e r , " "chicanery, and "an out-of-bounds end run," among other things. The House vote did not kill the bill, which can be b r o u g h t up u n d e r a r u l e for c o n s i d e r a t i o n approved by the Rules Committee. The committee reportedly was set to grant a rule allowing tax-credit amendments. Meanwhile, the H o u s e W a y s and M e a n s Committee scheduled consideration of tax-credit bills pending before it on April 10 and 11. Some of the bills allow credits only for posts e c o n d a r y t u i t i o n , while o t h e r s provide credits for private element a r y , s e c o n d a r y and vocational schools as well. T H E MIDDLE-INCOME s t u dent-aid bill conUins a $1.4 billion expansion of existing student-aid programs and is a revised version of President Carter's proposal. As

approved by the House Education and Labor Committee March 8 the bill would m a k e s t u d e n t s f r o m middle-income families eligible for Basic E d u c a t i o n a l O p p o r t u n i t y Grants, authorize additional funds for Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and the College Work-Study program, and remove the present family income limit on stuaents' eligibility for interest subsidies on Guaranteed Student Loans (see Vol. XXVII, No. 10). The A d m i n i s t r a t i o n s t r o n g l y opposes the tax-credit approach to aiding middle-income families as too costly and not based on need. In another development. Attorney General Griffen B. Bell sent an opinion on t h e constitutionality of t a x c r e d i t s March 17 to H E W Secretary Joseph A. Califano, Jr. Bell stated that "in the light of e x i s t i n g S u p r e m e C o u r t preced e n t s , " he believed tax c r e d i t s would be held u n c o n s t i t u t i o n a l i n s o f a r as t h e y p r o v i d e aid at elementary and secondary school levels, but would be constitutional at the college level. The opinion cited two Supreme C o u r t decisions which held unconstitutional state tuition relief for parents of parochial pupils. BOTH A tax-credit bill and an e x p a n d e d s t u d e n t - a i d bill a r e pending in the Senate, but are not expected to be brought up until after the close of debate on the Panama canal treaty. The Finance Committee Approved a tax-credit bill F e b . 23 and t h e H u m a n Resources Committee approved a v e r s i o n of t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s student-aid proposal the following day (see Vol. XXVII, No. 8), There were these other developm e n t s of i n t e r e s t t o h i g h e r education before Congress started its Easter recess.

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Zimmer plays the poet, and more in The Zimmer Poems by Kate Solms Editor's note: This review is of The Zimmer Poems, an anthology of Paul Zimmer's work published by the Dryad Press. It is available in the Hope-Geneva Bookstore. This review was published in the anchor in the spring of 1977. Who is Paul Zimmer? He is his own best character, that's who he is. In the anthology The Zimmer Poems, the reader can have a good look at Zimmer the poet studying, singing and celebrating Zimmer t h e c h a r a c t e r in a set of remarkably diverse and talented poems. ZIMMER is a c h a r a c t e r of almost legendary proportions. He

faces love, d e a t h , fishing and elephants with equal aplomb. He is the subject of such famous poems as " T h e D e a t h of t h e Hired Zimmer," "A Zimmershire Lad," and " Z u m e r is I c u m e n I n . " Obviously, he is a man who not only leaps centuries with a single bound, but survives the landings as well. But Z i m m e r - t h e - p o e t never loses sight of Zimmer-thecharacter's humanity. HE IS NOT S u p e r m a n ; he wakes in the middle of the night and a s k s q u e s t i o n s of t h e darkness, like all of us. Zimmer is not only a poet with a fine vocabulary and a good sense of timing, he is also a man who is not a f r a i d of f e e l i n g s , of r e c o r d i n g feelings, of u n d e r s t a n d i n g feel-

The Runner'''' continues rehearsal process

ii

Feelings or beliefs? Comfort or c o n v i c t i o n s ? Milan S t i t t has w r i t t e n a play which c o n s i d e r s m a n ' s r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . . . i s he primarily responsible to "humanity," and t h e i n s t i t u t i o n s and n o r m s which define it? Or is it man's place first to respond to humans, to the needs of the persons with whom he comes in contact each day? The Runner Stumbles is a play about convictions and the sense of being they provide. But more than t h a t , it is a play a b o u t t h e suffering which arises from the realization that convictions are not of necessity valid or true, simply because they are our convictions. Stitt has chosen to write his play about the lives of a Catholic priest and nun in a small parish in

northern Michigan. He begins by posing the question: What does a priest and a nun experience when t h e y realize t h e y a r e falling in love? Then, through the other chara c t e r s , p a r t i c u l a r l y the p r i e s t ' s housekeeper, Stitt considers what e f f e c t t h i s "fall of the C h u r c h " might have on the parishioners. Finally, he considers the suffering of the priest as he realizes he is failing not only his people and the church, but violating the will of God, as he perceives it. The Runner Stumbles- will be p r o d u c e d in D e W i t t ' s S t u d i o Theater. It will be running April 27-29 and May 3-6. For further information, call the Department of Theatre, ext. 3131.

Humanities colloquium considers writing On March 8 Hope's Humanities Division held its second colloquium of this academic year. The topic was "The Teaching of Writing," Dr. Bernard Van't Hul was the featured speaker. Dr. Van't Hul is the Director of Freshman Writing and a consultant to the English Composition Board at the University of Michigan. HIS ADDRESS described the r e q u i r e m e n t in English composition to be i n i t i a t e d at t h e University of Michigan this fall. A f t e r an a s s e s s m e n t of t h e entering student's writing, the student is either required to take a t u t o r i a l in p r e p a r a t i o n for t h e introductory composition course or is exempted from the course. The introductory composition course is taught in the English department. The requirement in E n g l i s h composition will also include, however, a course in the j u n i o r and senior y e a r which would concentrate on improving t h e q u a l i t y of s t u d e n t w r i t i n g according to the special standards of the area of concentration chosen by the student. THIS COURSE would not be taught within the English department but within each of the other

departments. The program thus s y s t e m a t i c a l l y involves d e p a r t m e n t s b e s i d e s E n g l i s h in t h e responsibility for the quality of student writing. Dr. Van't Hul also described the p r o c e s s by which t h i s p r o g r a m won faculty approval. He emphasized t h e i m p o r t a n c e of t h e administration's insistence on improving the quality of writing and of its financial support enabling and e n c o u r a g i n g m e m b e r s ol d e p a r t m e n t s b e s i d e s E n g l i s h to provide courses concentrating on composition. THE PRESENTATION was not intended as a model for Hope, but it did challenge the Humanities Division to continue its emphasis on w r i t i n g and to s h a r e t h e responsibility for improvement of composition with t h e E n g l i s h department. T h e f i r s t colloquium of t h e H u m a n i t i e s Division had concentrated on research conducted by members of its faculty. The spring colloquium will feature the research of students within the division. That event, to which the whole college c o m m u n i t y is invited, will be held this month.

Editors to be selected

SAC seeks new members

Student Communication Media Chairperson, Mrs. Nancy Taylor scheduled a meeting earlier in the week with the heads of the anchor, Opus Milestone, and WTAS staffs. The group was called to discuss and reassess the selection proced u r e for t h e new o r g a n i z a t i o n heads. Suggestions were elicited from current editors Bob Baker, Jane Visser, Dave VanHoven, and radio manager John Hoekstra. Information concerning the applications for these positions will be printed in an upcoming issue of t h e anchor and b r o a d c a s t on WTAS 610 AM.

T h e Hope Social A c t i v i t i e s Committee (SAC) is in the process of looking for and selecting new members for the 1978-1979 school year. Information and applications are available in the SAC Office, b a s e m e n t of Van R a a l t e Hall. Applications are due on Friday, April 14, at 5:00 p.m. Applicants will have an opportunity to give input into the program for n e x t y e a r a n d u n d e r g o an interview as a part of the selection process. Membership on the SAC committee is open to all presently enrolled Hope students who plan on attending Hope next year. SAC m e m b e r s h i p is limited t o t e n students.

ings.

Never for a moment do we lose sight of Zimmer to admire a nice phrase or a good title. Zimmer, and Z i m m e r ' s p e r s o n a l i t y , a r e there every minute. The reader finished the book with a knowledge that he will never finish with Zimmer - Zimmer is a personality beyond the fifty-eight pages. THE POET is more diversified than I think many people who have h e a r d his p o e m s may realize. Many of Z i m m e r ' s poems a r e humorous; they are playful and exuberant. And the freshness and joy of t h i s p o e t ' s a p p r o a c h is woven into all of his work. But Paul Z i m m e r is not a man of unceasing smiles; he has a serious side too. One or the other would have been e n o u g h to e a r n him a reputation of no little distinction. Both together - the serious and the comic - prove that Zimmer is not limited to, or satisfied with, one approach only. The reader must not suppose that just because this set of poems are all about the same character that Zimmer can only do one thing well. ZIMMER'S p a r o d i e s of o t h e r poets are exact and funny. His imitation Blake ( " Z i m m e r , who m a d e y o u ? / D o you know who m a d e you?") is good, and his Whitman ("You Zimmer! Whimpering, heavy, mumbling, lewd;/ Does A m e r i c a sing you a sad song?") is even better. But the poet that he has bagged from the

greatest success in these parodies is Robert Frost. " T h e D e a t h of t h e Hired Zimmer" is full of Frost details: "She sat watching the moth at the candle", "You sit and watch the moon slide/Through that patch of clouds", "He went,/Came back, too soon, it seemed to her ..." I think t h a t F r o s t would h a v e been s a t i s f i e d with t h e s t y l e . Ogden N a s h wold h a v e loved t h e punchline. ZIMMER WRITES well also about his childhood; an existence filled with t h e Catholic c h u r c h , guilt, and wonder. Here the detail is also precise, and the emotions carefully and beautifully delineated: "The first Sunday I missed Mass on purpose/I waited all day for Christ to climb down/Like a wiry flyweight from the cross a n d / C l u b me on my i r r e v e r a n t t e e t h . . . " " F a t h e r A n i m u s asked who b r o k e / T h e window in t h e s a c r i s t y , / I w e n t head-on into e v i l / L y i n g t h r o u g h my new incisors." " 'Fix and fix, you're all b e t t e r , ' / ! would say/To the neighborhood wounded/As we fought the world war/Through the vacant lots of Ohio..." Here is a good memory, and a lunchbox full of elementary-school feelings, undoctored by the adult. This is Zimmer the child speaking. He is a direct child, sensitive and honest. BUT NO MORE so than Zimmer the adult, a man who still retains a child-like h o n e s t y in f a c i n g a battalion of difficult, painful, or

ecstatic experiences. He is often f o r c e d to look at his " p e c u l i a r emptiness:" "Everything is plumb and solid in the night,/The corners of l a m p l i g h t f a s t e n i n g t h i n g s d o w n , / W h e r e v e r I move the darkness moves,/Because I have become my own shadow." He sees people who he dislikes, and fears: "Their faces are like fine watches/ Insinuating jewels./Their movements can buy or sell you./When the legs of the gentry dance for c h a r i t y , / M e a t s p l a s h e s in t h e soups of the poor." BUT THERE are also days or moments of joy. Zimmer wisely does not consider them rewards for the times of suffering, and that is his most admirable quality. Joy is not a gift, a rarity - it is only the r e v e r s e side of t h e pain; both together are a unity. When he writes "I feel my cells divide in fragile ecstacy," he is feeling and understanding fully. But he is also f e e l i n g and understanding when he is rejected, or has his face bashed in by the town bully. This whole-view vision gives his poetry a lovely sanity. In a d e c a d e w h e n it is fashionable to be a neurotic poet, Paul Zimmer is plodding the path of h e a l t h , f a c i n g t h i n g s w i t h a b r a v e r y and a h u m o r t h a t p r o d u c e s good p o e t r y . T h i s anthology will give you Zimmer - and whether he is laughing at himself, over-reacting, crying, or celebrating, he is a person you will not regret knowing.

Invitation to space QUEST/78 has reserved room for an experiment aboard an early flight of the U.S. Space Shuttle. P u r p o s e : to h e l p m a k e t h e program accessible to deserving experimenters who lack resources to d e v e l o p and f i n a n c e such projects on their own. Q U E S T / 7 8 i n v i t e s g r o u p s or i n d i v i d u a l s to s u b m i t i d e a s for t h e b e s t use of t h e S h u t t l e reservation and will donate it to the winner, in addition to sharing t h e e x p e r i m e n t e r ' s N A S A fees and developmental costs, according to financial need. The winning project can be in

a l m o s t any field, r a n g i n g f r o m a s t r o p h y s i c s t o medicine, economics to molecular biology. But it must be an experiment that can be d o n e ony a b o a r d t h e Space S h u t t l e , fit into a c o n t a i n e r m e a s u r i n g five cubic f e e t , and weigh less than 200 pounds. Most important, QUEST/78 will give special c o n s i d e r a t i o n to p r o p o s a l s t h a t p r o m i s e some t a n g i b l e , s i g n i f i c a n t b e n e f i t to humankind (e.g., the eradication of disease, more efficient energy use, etc.). Sheer commercial or military projects will not be considered. D e a d l i n e for t h e Q U E S T / 7 8

Summer jobs in Europe Hundreds of U.S. students will find jobs in France, Ireland and Great Britain this summer t h r o u g h t h e Work in Europe program sponsored by the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE). For the past nine years, this p o p u l a r p r o g r a m has p r o v i d e d students with the direct experience of living and w o r k i n g in another country and, at the same time, helped them reduce the cost of their trip abroad. The Work in Europe program virtually eliminates the red tape that students faced in t h e p a s t w h e n t h e y wanted to work abroad. Participants must find their own jobs b u t will h a v e t h e help of cooperating student travel organizations in each country. In France t h e y may w o r k d u r i n g t h e s u m m e r ; in G r e a t B r i t a i n t h e y may work at any time of the year for up to six months; in Ireland they may work at any time of the

year for up to four months. The jobs are usually unskilled in factories, department stores, hotels, etc. Salaries are low, but students generally earn enough to pay for their room and board while they work. A typical job would be that of chambermaid in a hotel in L o n d o n ' s W e s t E n d . But last summer one enterprising student found w o r k as an a p p r e n t i c e jockey for one of Ireland's racing stables. To qualify for CIEE's program, s t u d e n t s m u s t be b e t w e e n t h e ages of 18 and 30 and must be able to prove their student status. To work in France, they must also be a b l e to s p e a k and u n d e r s t a n d French. F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n and application forms, contact CIEE, Dept. PR-A, 777 United Nations P l a z a , N e w York, New York 10017; or 236 North Santa Cruz, No. 314, Los G a t o s , California 95030.

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Space Shuttle Experiment Competition is September 1, 1978. If you h a v e s u f f i c i e n t b a c k g r o u n d to design and construct an appropria t e p r o j e c t , w r i t e a succinct d e s c r i p t i o n of y o u r idea in 500 w o r d s , enclosing any n e c e s s a r y diagrams together with a resume of any o t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n t h a t would i n d i c a t e y o u r a b i l i t y to carry out such a project. Send your proposal and credentials, with a s t a m p e d , selfaddressed envelope to: QUEST/78 Space Shuttle Experiment Compet i t i o n , 1133 A v e n u e of t h e Americas, New York, NY 10036. For additional information see the March/April issue of QUEST/78.

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Power struggle predicted on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (The following report is compiled from dispatches from Candy Hamilton, LNS correspondent on the Fine Ridge Reservation.) P I N E RIDGE, South Dakota ( L N S ) -- In t h e w a k e of a p r i m a r y election for t r i b a l chairman of the Pine Rid^e Reservation, many Oglala Sioux Indians fear that t h e i r t r i b e is a b o u t to be set back s e v e r a l y e a r s t o t h e p e r i o d of violent and c o r r u p t rule under f o r m e r c h a i r m a n Dick W i l s o n . Wilson r e s o u n d i n g l y voted out of o f f i c e t w o y e a r s ago, h a s now placed first in t h e F e b r u a r y 21 p r i m a r y . W i l s o n had b e e n t h e t a r g e t of i n t e n s e opposition which r e a c h e d a h e i g h t in 1973 when after he h a d blocked four i m p e a c h m e n t a t t e m p t s Oglala Sioux r e s i d e n t s and their American Indian M o v e m e n t s u p p o r t e r s took o v e r t h e village of W o u n d e d K n e e on the r e s e r v a t i o n . In this y e a r ' s runoff election, s c h e d u l e d for March 21, Wilson will r u n a g a i n s t t h e m a n w h o f i n i s h e d s e c o n d in t h e p r i m a r y , E l i j a h W h i r l w i n d Horse. Whirlwind H o r s e has worked for more

t h a n 20 y e a r s f o r t h e F e d e r a l B u r e a u of Indian Affairs, long a t a r g e t of criticism by p r o g r e s s i v e N a t i v e A m e r i c a n s . Oglala Sioux c i t i z e n s feel t h a t t h e choice b e t w e e n W h i r l w i n d H o r s e and Wilson puts t h e m " b e t w e e n a rock and a hard place." " T h e only real d i f f e r e n c e , " one w o m a n r e s e r v a t i o n r e s i d e n t said, "is t h a t at least Whirlwind H o r s e isn't a m u r d e r e r . " She was r e f e r r i n g t o t h e p r e v a l e n c e of s e r i o u s violence d u r i n g Wilson's previous chairmanship from 1972-76. " P e o p l e are really worried," another resident added, "that u n d e r e i t h e r one of t h e m , Wilson or W h i r l w i n d Horse, the land and n a t u r a l r e s o u r c e s will g e t s o l d out."

The People Stand to Lose T h e whittling a w a y of Oglala Sioux lands, facilitated by federal legislation, has gone on for over a c e n t u r y . But Tribal C h a i r m a n A1 T r i m b a l l had begun to r e v e r s e this t r e n d since he took office in 1976. L a n d s w e r e bought back which had e a r l i e r been sold out of t h e

t r i b e , to w h i t e r a n c h e r s , f o r e x a m p l e , and to one of t h e m a n y missionary c h u r c h e s of the reservation. And Trimball initiated plans for d e v e l o p i n g t h e r e s e r vations^ considerable resourcescoal, n a t u r a l gas, industrial gravel, u r a n i u m and u n d e r g r o u n d w a t e r . O t h e r lands rich in r e s o u r c e s , such as t h e Black Hills with their gold, have long been taken from t h e Oglala Sioux. Now t h a t o t h e r r e s o u r c e s a r e known to lie b e n e a t h t h e i r land, t h e federal g o v e r n m e n t and e n e r g y c o r p o r a t i o n s clearly would not like to see t h e m used for t h e b e n e f i t of the N a t i v e Americ a n s of P i n e Ridge who have lived in e x t r e m e l y poor conditions for decades. "I think t h a t ' s one reason t h a t t h e r e ' s been such a s t r u g g l e over this r e s e r v a t i o n , " noted one r e s i d e n t , "and so much opposition from t h e f e d e r a l g o v e r n m e n t to h a v i n g t h e people h e r e have any control over this r e s e r v a t i o n . " W h e t h e r Wilson or Whirlwind H o r s e a r e elected, Oglala Sioux p e o p l e s t a n d to l o s e p o l i t i c a l c o n t r o l o v e r t h e r e s e r v a t i o n as well as the land itself. Both have s t a t e d t h e i r o p p o s i t i o n to t h e

" c o n t r a c t i n g " that h a s proceeded u n d e r Trimball. Although Tribal Councils a r e a n s w e r a b l e to. and s o c i a l s e r v i c e s on I n d i a n r e s e r v a t i o n s a r e a d m i n i s t e r e d directly by t h e B u r e a u of Indian Affairs ( B I A ) , a n a g e n c y of t h e U . S . federal g o v e r n m e n t , the tribe itself can " c o n t r a c t " out any function it w a n t s to take over. U n d e r t h i s p r o v i s i o n , a locally elected board was able to take c o n t r o l of t w o s c h o o l s on t h e r e s e r v a t i o n f r o m t h e BIA in 1976. And in 1977 t h e t r i b e took over the BIA police, health p r o g r a m and a foster grandparent program. Both w e r e seen a s significant d e v e l o p m e n t s s i n c e t h e BIA schools a r e widely viewed as the main tool of forced assimiliation and t h e police t h e main tools of r e p r e s s i o n on P i n e Ridge. The newly locally-run schools have been teaching Sioux l a n g u a g e and c u l t u r e and s t r e s s a positive view of Indian people in h i s t o r y . And police o p e r a t i o n s h a v e been decentralized throughout the large r e s e r v a t i o n with t h e police r e v i e w board made up of elected, rather than appointed m e m b e r s . Police officers m u s t live in t h e district w h e r e t h e y work, so t h e y a r e well known and available w h e n n e e d e d . P r o g r e s s i v e s , AIM s u p p o r t e r s and w o m e n now hold k e y p o s i t i o n s in t h e p o l i c e department. Both Wilson and Whirlwind H o r s e had p l e d g e d to e n d c o n t r a c t i n g and r e v e r s e t h e s e c h a n g e s t h a t have b e e n m a d e .

Conflict Ahead " E v e r y o n e s a y s , ' T h i s is t e r rible!' ' W h a t a r e we going to do?' 'It's h a r d to think t h e y h a v e so much support.' E v e r y o n e was m a d a n d u p s e t . B u t s t i l l it h a p p e n e d , " one r e s i d e n t told LNS. A c c o r d i n g to t h e unofficial tally, Wilson had 972 v o t e s . Whirlwind

.-•»»

H o r s e had o v e r 500, and incumbant A1 Trimball c a m e in third. T h e r e a r e 100 challenged votes. A p r i m a r y election held in J a n u a r y had basically the s a m e r e s u l t s proportionally, though each candid a t e had a smaller total. That p r i m a r y w a s v o i d e d b e c a u s e of i r r e g u l a r i t i e s in v o t i n g p r o c e dures. The latest primary was m o n i t o r e d by t h e A m e r i c a n A r b i t r a t i o n Association and can not be re-challenged. S o m e i n s t a n c e s of v o t i n g by n o n - t r i b a l m e m b e r s , a s well a s b r i b e r y by Wilson a r e known, but not e n o u g h t o a d d up t o t h e n u m b e r of votes won by Wilson and W h i r l w i n d H o r s e . "No one really has a full explanation y e t , " said one resident immediately after the primary. To add to the a n t i c i p a t e d conflict, some of t h e c a n d i d a t e s who won p r i m a r y votes for Tribal Council s e a t s w e r e p r o g r e s s i v e s , including American Indian Movement l e a d e r s Russel M e a n s and active community organizer G e r a l d i n e J a n i s . S o m e AIM m e m b e r s and s u p p o r t e r s t a k e an a c t i v e p a r t in the Tribal governm e n t a s a way to move t o w a r d s r e f o r m and self-determination, though AIM does not run c a n d i d a t e s as a p a r t y and gives s u p p o r t to t h e L a k o t a T r e a t y Council, as their legitimate g o v e r n i n g body. Wilson has been k n o w n to t r y to c i r c u m v e n t his Council, composed of s e v e r a l elected m e m b e r s from e a c h of t h e r e s e r v a t i o n ' s n i n e districts, and he often r e f u s e s even to call a C o u n c i l m e e t i n g . B u t given t h e p r i m a r y r e s u l t s , " t h e r e ' s b o u n d to be a p o w e r s t r u g g l e b e t w e e n t h e Council and t h e C h a i r m a n , " one r e s i d e n t predicted. "One t h i n g I know is t h a t people h e r e a r e n ' t going to sit back a n d let t h e c h a i r m a n g i v e t h e reservation away."

The Puffin fare for youths. llifflil

Greeks turn Irish W e r e you a w a r e t h a t m e m b e r s t r o h p y " pin. L a r g e q u a n t i t i e s of q u a r t e r s , nickles and d i m e s w e r e of t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r F r a t e r n i t y and theCSigma Iota Beta S o r o r i t y ^ collected with a n u m b e r of dollar collected $3UD for M u s c u l a r D y s T bills in t h e g r e e n shamrock-clad canisters. trophy. P o s t e r s of J e r r y Lewis, National On F r i d a y , M a r c h 17, S t . C h a i r m a n , with the Muscular Patrick's Day, the Muscular D y s t r o p h y p o s t e r child w e r e put D y s t r o p h y Association s p o n s o r e d up with t h e SIBs and Knicks n a m e " S h a m r o c k s for M u s c u l a r Dyson t h e m . All w o r k e r s w o r e n a m e t r o p h y . " Both SIBs and Knicks tags to identify them with the positioned t h e m s e l v e s d o w n t o w n charity. in f r o n t of b a n k s , s t o r e s a n d E v e n though it was a s u n n y but restaurants. r a t h e r cold day, Knick P r e s i d e n t E a c h person d o n a t i n g to this T h o m a s P i e r s o n said, "I j u s t can't annual charity was given a help b u t feel good a b o u t this." " S h a m r o c k s for M u s c u l a r Dys-

Runners

FOR SALE: Mayima Sekor 3 5 m m Camera plus all lenses and filters, flash and close-up k i t . Phone 396-1016 after 5:00 S U M M E R JOB? Stop by and discuss your plans and needs w i t h us. O f f Campus Jobs, Phelps l o b b y . JOB O P E N I N G S NOW: For any of the f o l l o w i n g , see Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps l o b b y . L T . T R U C K D R I V E R - Route delivery, 8 a.m. - noon, M - F . Will split w o r k week between t w o students. $3/ hr. Job open u n t i l end of the term and/or through summer. L U M B E R Y A R D W O R K E R S , Fri. night and Sat., up to 30 - 35 hrs./wk. if desired. Three openings, $ 2 . 6 5 / h r . to start. Need o w n transportation. M A I L R O O M W O R K ERS, 1:30 - 4 p.m., M - F . Will split w o r k week between t w o students. $ 2 . 7 5 / h r . Close t o campus.

One of the first things young Puffins learn to do is fly Icelandic. Beginning April 1, 1978, Icelandic will fly any youth (Puffin or person) from 12 thru 23 years old roundtrip from New Yorit to Luxembourg for just $400. $430 from Chicago. Return tickets are good for a full year. Fares are subject to change. Book anytime.

But there's more to Icelandic than just low fares. You 11 get a great dinner and A excellent service on your trip. And Icelandic will set you down right in the middle of the European Continent, :: where youH be just hours away by train from Europe's most famous landmarks. So take a travel tip from Iceland's favorite bird. Learn to fly Icelandic. See your travel agent. Or write DepL #C352, Icelandic Airlines, P.O. Box 105, West Hempstead, N.Y. 11552. Call 800-555-1212 for • toll-free number in your area.

(continued from page 3) i n j u r i e s , foot f r a c t u r e s and pain in calf m u s c l e s , h i p s , t h i g h s a n d m a j o r leg bones. H o w e v e r , t h e lower back, often called " t h e soft u n d e r b e l l y of t h e j o g g e r , " was not p r o m i n e n t in t h e poll, K e y said.

In

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Running,, J a m e s E. Fixx, a c o n f i r m e d r u n n e r , w i n n e r of t h e C o n n e c t i c u t a g e - g r o u p 10,000 m e t e r c h a m p i o n s h i p and Boston

m a r a t h o n p a r t i c i p a n t , says t h e s e t r o u b l e s a r e o f t e n d u e to i m p r o p e r or insufficient w a r m i n g up exercises. A m a t e u r r u n n e r s often t r y to do too m u c h too fast, Fixx says. T h e a v e r a g e r u n n e r can p r o t e c t h i s b o d y by w a r m i n g u p s u f ficiently and not t r y i n g to push himself beyond his p e r s o n a l limits. The loneliness is another problem.

I A M A L O N E L Y PRISONER w h o desires t o correspond w i t h anyone w h o is w i l l i n g t o share a few moments of their time. I have lost all ties w i t h the free w o r l d and n o w w i l l be released in 18 months -- H E L P ! A n y o n e wishing t o w r i t e can do so t o ; Ricardo Ochoa 22801-149, Box 1000, O x f o r d . Wl 53952. W A N T E D : A p a r t m e n t for the year beginning after graduation. 2 b e d r o o m , close to campus. Contact Marcia at ext. 4871.

Roundtrip 14-45 day APEX fare from N-Y.*

$400 Icelandic to Europe Roundtrip Youth Fare. G o o d t h r u age 23.

*$295 from Chicago. Tickets must be reserved 45 days prior to departure and paid for wdhm 8 days of reservation. Add $15 each way far travd on weekends.


Hope College anchor

PageS

Baseball faces rebuilding season T h e Dutchmen face a m a j o r rebuilding job in their bid for a t h i r d s t r a i g h t winning season. Hope won its f i r s t league championship under Bultman last sprin? behind a 14-11 record, the only MIAA team to finish above .500 in overall competition. Bultman is beginning his eighth season as coach. An all-MIAA shortstop himself while at Hope in the eO's, his teams have compiled a 75-112-1 record. Bultman m u s t replace four all-MIAA performers, including p i t c h e r Bill F o b a r e who was chosen the league's most valuable p l a y e r . Other all-leaguers t h a t must be replaced include catcher Tony Terracciano, outfielder Jeff W a t e r s t o n e and s h o r t s t o p Rick McLouth. Seniors Bill Harrison of Grand R a p i d s and Paul S t e a r s of Fennville will be the heart of the pitching staff. Stears was Hope's most active pitcher last spring, throwing 55 innings in 10 games. J u n i o r Bob Angle of Allegan should also see considerable action and the addition of junior college transfers Brian Boss, a junior from Zeeland, and Kevin Watson, a s o p h m o r e from S t . Louis, Mo. gives the staff depth. Watson posted a 5-0 record at F l o r i s s e n t J u n i o r College, St.

Tennis to be a contender

Louis, Mo. last year and as a high school senior e a r n e d all-state honors a f t e r r e c o r d i n g a 10-1 mark. Boss had a 6-2 record last y e a r at Grand Rapids J u n i o r College. Senior Mike Wojda of Alpena and sophomore Gary Hutchins of Flint are returning veterans in the outfield. Wojda carries a lifetime Hope batting average of .342. J u n i o r A1 W a t s o n of South Haven appears ready to assume the catching chores. Watson was a regular as a freshman. He will be challenged by senior Steve Lorenz of Whitehall, Mich, who will also see action at shortstop. Three veterans return to the infield, but inexperience at shortstop is a major concern. Infield returnees include two-time all-MIAA second baseman Terry Lock of Grand Rapids, third b a s e m a n John V a n d e G u c h t e of Fond du Lac, Wise, and first baseman Jeff Welch of Allen Park. Lock owns an impressive .346 career average and last spring was fifth in the MIAA batting race with a hefty .389 average. He was also outstanding on defense last year, committing just one error in 25) (james. games MIAA action g e t s u n d e r w a y April 12 against Olivet.

Other r e t u r n i n g p l a y e r s who were among the team's leading scorers last year are Helmus who netted 17 points and sophomore Henry Loudermilk of Norfolk, Va. who had 16 points. Hope's L a c r o s s e Club is the product of t h e work of many individuals at the College, both students and administration. The idea came from f o r m e r s t u d e n t Bob Klein. In the spring of 1973 Klein and o t h e r i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s sold light bulbs as a fund-raising project to purchase uniforms and support the team. With matching support from the College, the Club took to the field for the first time in the spring of 1973 and beat Albion College and t h e N o t r e Dame Jayvees enroute to a 2-3 record. The Club's best season was in 1976 when they broke even at 6-6. Last season the Club made its first spring trip. A highlight of the 3-6 season was an overtime triumph over the Notre Dame varsity. The regular season begins April 8 at Albion. Home games will be against Notre Dame JV (April 12), Purdue (April 15), Lake Forest (April 29) and Michigan S t a t e (May 3).

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S p o r t s r e p o r t e r s a r e desperately needed to cover all of the Spring sports. It doesn't require a lot of time but one person can't do it all. Get involved. This is your paper, make of it what you will! Interested parties contact Karl, ext. 4757 now! Thank you.

The Alpha Phi Omega Service Fraternity will be sponsoring a Faculty Auction tonight, Friday, April 7, at 7:00 in the Kletz. No, we are not auctioning off professors, but items the faculty have donated. Some of t h e s e i t e m s are: an afternoon of sailing for four on a 30 foot yacht from Dr. Tharin, six dozen chocolate chip cookies from J o y c e Lewis, a $10.00 gift certificate for two to Mr. Steak f r o m Mr. S t e k e t e e , and an a f t e r n o o n of w a t e r s k i i n g from Vicki-Jo Van Hervelen. Chaplain Hillegonds will be the auctioneer. The proceeds from the auction will go to the Community Action House. Hope to see you there!

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Yes, winter is almost over, and spring is nearly here. But first, there s a little known season that falls between them; the season of potholes. Some of the more historical, or h y s t e r i c a l m o m e n t s from this season include: -Richard Gaskill of Glenview, Illinois, who while driving to work one w i n t e r ' s day felt a sinking sensation. Result: two blown tires, two b e n t wheel rims, a lost hubcap, and a bill for $191.14. -Boston Patrolman William Mahoney and his 1,000 pound horse, who while patrolling a p a t h w a y in t h e city's Public Gardens, found themselves in a 3 foot-by-3 foot crevasse. It took 20 men to extricate patrolman and his horse. -In Manhattan, city officials watch as claims briskly mount up against the city as a result of damaged roadways.

After a frigid season of record snows, t h e nation's potholes appear to be of record size and q u a n t i t y . The House of Representatives has already votea to spend $250 million to fill them. Joseph Ewing, research director of t h e T r a n s p o r t a t i o n Road Inf o r m a t i o n P r o g r a m in Washington, estimates the grand number of potholes to be filled at 116.4 million. Many wonder how Ewing arrived at such a number, and so he explained it: first, add the total tons of asphalt mix purchased by public works departments across the country; 6.4 million. Second, divide by the amount required to fill t h e a v e r a g e pothole: 110 pounds. The resulting figure is no more than an elaborate guess, of course. But by simple magic, E w i n g estimates Americans will consume an extra $626 million of gas to swerve around the potholes. Then there's Massachusetts Tuft University physics professor Jack Tessman, who, to win a local television station contest, calculated the number of snowflakes to fall on Boston during February's snowstorms. His formula: multiply the average snowfall depth (27 inches) by the area of Boston (43 square miles), then divide the result by t h e volume of an a v e r a g e s n o w f l a k e (one-ten t h o u s a n d t h cubic inch). Tessman's answer, 50 quadrillion snowflakes, won nim a Tessman family portrait-in-snow.

S t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in world a f f a i r s a r e invited to an I n t e r national Relations Club meeting on Thursday, April 13, at 8 p.m. in the D e W i t t F a c u l t y Lounge. A student committee will be selected at t h a t t i m e to plan f u t u r e meetings of the Club. The Hope IRC was established in 1946. P r o f e s s o r M e t t a Ross, who taught history at Hope from 1926 to 1960, was instrumental in the formation of the club here. Hope faculty members who have served as advisors to the IRC are D r . Paul F r i e d , D i r e c t o r of International Education, and Dr. R e n z e H o e k s e m a , P r o f e s s o r of Political Science. All students are invited to the Thursday night meeting. Refreshm e n t s will be s e r v e d . S t u d e n t s who wish additional information may call extensions 3265 or 2170.

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Mich.; John Neville, a sophmore f r o m F r a n k l i n , Mich.; Bruce V a n d e r S c h a a f , a junior from Westmont, 111.; and captain Greg Van Heest, a senior from Delmar, N.Y. Van H e e s t tied for t h e best singles record last spring with a 14-6 mark while VanderSchaaf was 13-6, Neville 11-8 and Hodgman 8-9. Neville won the consolation championship in the first flight of t h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t while VanderSchaaf was consolation champ in t h e sixth flight. The doubles team of Neville and Van Heest posted a 9-6 record. "As many as half of our front line players could be freshmen," predicts Green. F r e s h m e n p r o s p e c t s on t h e re-season roster include Delwyn ozeman and Steve Elman, both of Holland, Douglas Ruch of Zeeland and Mark S t e v e n s of South Holland, 111. Rounding out t h e t e n - m e m b e r t e a m is sophomore Gordon Herwig of Fairlawn, N.J.

Pothole season in full swing by Sidney Jay Lazarus Campus Digest News Service

LaCrosse optimistic The Hope Lacrosse Club enters its fifth year filled with optimism. The 35-man pre-season r o s t e r includes 13 seniors. Seniors Hank Heneveld of Alton, Joe DeVette of Holland and Dave Wrieden of Phoenix, Ariz, provide experience at the mid-field positions, while seniors Brad H e l m u s of Grand Rapids, Scott Morey of Downers Grove, III. and Tom K a m p e r s of Roch, Minn, control the attack. Leading d e f e n s e m e n include Rick Van Hassel of Wyckoff, N.J. and Dale Van Dahm of Elmhurst, III. Key areas for coach Tim Van Heest to fill will be the second midfield line and the crucial goalie position. High scoring j u n i o r s Don Williams of Wayzata, Mn. and Gale Easton of Jackson will be pursuing club founder Bob Klein's alltime scoring records. Easton led the team in scoring last spring with 23 points (18 goals and five assists) while Williams had 13 goals and three assists for 16 points. Easton and Williams rank third and fourth on the alltime scoring list with 32 and 31 points respectively. The alltime record is 51 points by Klein from 1974-76.

Five r e t u r n i n g l e t t e r m e n and what v e t e r a n coach L a w r e n c e "Doc" Green describes as the best group of freshman prospects in several years should help the Hope men's tennis team continue their drive toward becoming an MIAA contender again. Green begins his 19th year as head coach. His teams have had only four losing MIAA seasons during that span while posting a 70-38 record against league foes. H o w e v e r , t h r e e of t h o s e losing campaigns have come during the past five years. Last spring the Dutchmen served notice that they are on the way back toward MIAA respectability •ilil by posting a 10-6 overall and 3-3 league dual meet record. They finished right in the middle of t h e s e v e n - t e a m MIAA pack. MIAA action starts April 8 against Alma. R e t u r n i n g l e t t e r m e n include Mark Boelkins, a junior from Muskegon, Mich.; Nick Hodgman, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m Kalamazoo,

IRC meeting scheduled

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LIVE Disco Entertainment WANTED: WAITERS & WAITRESSES, PART-TIME.

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Profile for Hope College Library

04-07-1978  

04-07-1978