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APRIL 6. 2011 • SINCE 1887

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Andrea Gibson t o read

Ra Ra Riot headiines Knick Concert

Tennis, track kick off seasons

Poet a n d activist t o g r a c e Park Theatre stage

The Hope College Concert S e r i e s w e l c o m e s Ra Ra Riot t o t h e Knlckerbocher April 1 1 .

Spring s p o r t s begin their s e a s o n s a f t e r spring training.

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Cesar Chavez lecture raises awareness of child labor

Campus mourns beloved professor Madalyn Muncy CAMPUS N E W S CO-EDITOR

The H o p e c o m m u n i t y received tragic n e w s u p o n b e g i n n i n g its spring break. Professor Jennifer Young Tait of t h e English dep a r t m e n t suddenly passed away M a r c h 19 following complications d u e to p r e m a t u r e childbirth. She was 35 years old. Provost Richard Ray broke the news in an email to s t u d e n t s , stating, "Though it is h a r d to see God's will in s o m e t h i n g like this, m a y b e we can find s o m e c o m f o r t in t h e fact t h a t Professor Young b r o u g h t into this world a baby boy n a m e d Solomon. H e is small and early, b u t t h o u g h t t o be healthy with good prospects." Her f u n e r a l took place Friday, M a r c h 2 5 at G r a c e Episcopal C h u r c h in Holland. Young Tait was full of laughter a n d radiated joy to all w h o m e t her. Any s t u d e n t visiting t h e t h i r d floor of L u b b e r s Hall can attest to hearing her "inside" voice b o o m i n g f r o m her office. "Jenn was t h e f u n n i e s t , most d o w n - t o - e a r t h professor that I have ever had. She had a passion a b o u t teaching her s t u d e n t s t h a t was u n m a t c h e d and loved to share her knowledge and m a n y experiences with her classes,"

said Kara V a n O o r d t ('13). Young Tait m a d e an i m p r e s sion o n s t u d e n t s f r o m all disciplines. Even s t u d e n t s w h o had limited c o n t a c t with h e r have c o m m e n t e d about her bubbly p e r s o n a and fun-loving attitude. "I would always hear her laughing f r o m her office across the hall f r o m t h e English D e p a r t m e n t . Plus, she had t h e coolest s h o e collection, o n e a girl could admire," Celeste N o r l a n d e r ('13) said. Part of t h e H o p e faculty since 2002, Young Tait co-delivered the 2004 c o n v o c a t i o n address, w a s a recipient of t h e 2008 H.O.P.E. Award, t a u g h t b o t h literature a n d creative writing classes and was c o m m i t t e d to engaging conversations in cultural diversity o n c a m p u s t h r o u g h her prior involvement in s t u d e n t g r o u p s like Black S t u d e n t Union. She was a respected scholar, delving into aspects of African A m e r i c a n literature f r o m Phillis W h e a t l e y to hip-hop. "I've always been interested in innovative scholarship — things t h a t n o o n e is doing or has even t h o u g h t a b o u t doing," Young Tait said in t h e 2005-06 H o p e College Catalog. "There are so m a n y ways you can m o v e with English. I c o n -

c e n t r a t e d o n A m e r i c a n literature and 18th c e n t u r y literature, but n o w o n e of m y loves is hiph o p literature and h o w m u s i c is literature," Young Tait said. N o t only was Young a distinguished scholar, b u t she w a s also c o m m i t t e d to teaching. Students w h o c a m e in c o n t a c t with h e r said t h a t she was always excited a b o u t w h a t e v e r she was teaching and was excellent at engaging her s t u d e n t s in h e r class topics. Her colleagues agree with s t u d e n t s . In t h e press release following Young's death. Professor Julie Kipp said, "Jennifer was a d e v o t e d scholar w h o loved to do research, and w h o was always juggling multiple writing projects, including creative writing projects. She was a gifted teacher w h o started classes off with musical j a m sessions as a way to create good energy and always t h a n k e d s t u d e n t s for their c o m m e n t s in discussion." Her legacy lives o n in her son S o l o m o n Arthur, w h o is doing well after being treated at DeVos Children's Hospital. According to h e r colleagues and students. Young Tait was anticipating m o t h e r h o o d with e n t h u s i a s m . "She was so excited about being a mother, and that passion carried over to every area of h e r

Chris Russ CAMPUS N E W S CO-EDITOR

In Michigan and in eight o t h e r U.S. states, M a r c h 31 is n o t only t h e birthday of Cesar E. Chavez. It is also t h e C^sar E. Chavez Day of Service and Learning. This day is designed to celebrate what Chavez accomplished by w o r k i n g as an advocate for t h e nation's m i g r a n t f a r m w o r k e r s to protest t h e unfair working conditions to w h i c h t h e y were Jennifer Young Tait subjected. Each year, H o p e College celelife. She glowed with her excitebrates this day with t h e Cesar E. m e n t and e n t h u s i a s m for life Chavez Lecture Series, an a n n u and for her w o r k , and it will b e al event with n o cost of a d m i s dearly missed on this c a m p u s sion that is o p e n to t h e general and in every place t h a t she had public. been," V a n O o r d t said. "I think it's fittingly a p p r o p r i The H o p e c o m m u n i t y conate that we take t i m e o n t h e last tinues t o grieve this loss of such day of M a r c h to r e m e m b e r the a d e d i c a t e d teacher and v i b r a n t legacy of w h a t I believe is o n e of person. Campus ministries t h e m a j o r figures in t h e U n i t e d is planning a m e m o r i a l event States," said A l f r e d o Gonzales, w h e r e s t u d e n t s and faculty will dean for International and M u l : r e m e m b e r Young's life and t i m e ticultural Education at H o p e . at H o p e t h r o u g h prayer and The event began with an introsong. Details will be released as d u c t i o n by Gonzales, which was soon as they b e c o m e available. followed by an original p o e m Students are e n c o u r a g e d t o f r o m Cecilia Jaime ('11) w h i c h visit Hope's counseling center or expressed her p e r s o n a l belief c a m p u s ministries office if they that t h e c u r r e n t c o n d i t i o n s expewish to talk about their grief. rienced by Hispanic f a r m workers in America was c o m p a r a b l e or equivalent to genocide. This led to t h e presentation by the keynote speaker. N o r m a Flores Lopez. Lopez works as t h e director of t h e C h i l d r e n in t h e Fields C a m p a i g n as a p a r t of t h e Association of Farmworker O p p o r tunity P r o g r a m s . She is w o r k i n g to spread w o r d of this campaign and raise awareness for t h e state of child labor in t h e United States. She also h a s m a n y personal ties t o the issue w h i c h she incorporated extensively in her presentation. From shortly before her twelth birthday, Lopez worked in fields with her family until she g r a d u ated f r o m high school. She is a PHOTO BY HOLLY EVENHOUSE graduate of t h e University of SUSHI CELEBRATION AND FUNDRAISER—Monday was Texas P a n - A m e r i c a n in EdinSushi Night, an event t h a t celebrated Japanese cuisine and also burg. W h i l e s h e was there, she raised money for t s u n a m i and earthquake relief. received a B.A. in c o m m u n i c a tions and spent t i m e studying at m a n y people's lives to this day. I the Universidad d e Salamanca in "I a m looking forward for Spain. all of t h e events of course. If I a m also excited to see Dr. Dai Sil The p r i m a r y a m b i t i o n of her Kim-Gibson," Vice President of was to c h o o s e one, it would be organization, and t h e focus of h e r HAPA A n n i e Jang said. t h e film and discussion event

Asian Awareness Week focuses on Japan relief Chris Russ CAMPUS N E W S CO-EDITOR

H o p e College is t e e m i n g with organizations full of passionate s t u d e n t s who o f t e n apply their creative energy to c o o r d i n a t e and organize c a m p u s events. Almost always these events are f u n and o f t e n educational, and s o m e t i m e s they serve to s u p p o r t a very i m p o r t a n t cause. Asian Awareness Week at H o p e College is looking to fulfill all t h r e e of t h o s e criteria. The event r u n s t h r o u g h April 8 and consists of f o u r events organized by Hope's Asian Perspective Association, in conj u n c t i o n with o t h e r c a m p u s organizations. "We are trying to educate t h e c o m m u n i t y o n n u m e r o u s Asian issues, history and experiences, and also to i n t r o d u c e t h e m t o a few examples of Asian culture. We w a n t to e n c o u r a g e people to b e c o m e m o r e globally aware and use Asian Awareness Week as a starting point," said H A P A W H A T ' S INSIDE

president M e l o d i e Gan. " W e have also taken this o p p o r t u n i t y to raise awareness of what is h a p p e n i n g in Japan and h e l p raise f u n d s for p e o p l e in t h e affected areas," G a n said. In light of t h e M a r c h 11 e a r t h q u a k e and t s u n a m i in Japan, a tragedy that has taken over 12,000 lives and has left over 15,000 m o r e missing, H A P A will be taking d o n a t i o n s to raise f u n d s for disaster relief at all events t h r o u g h o u t t h e week. This effort to raise f u n d s for Japan was particularly f o c u s e d d u r i n g Monday's Sushi Night event w h e r e T-shirts were also sold in an effort t o bring in m o r e funds. Tuesday saw a p r e s e n t a t i o n by and discussion with Dr. Dai Sil Kim-Gibson following a viewing of her d o c u m e n t a r y film "Silence Broken: Korean C o m f o r t Women." This film tells t h e story of Korean w o m e n d u r i n g W o r l d W a r II w h o experienced abuse at t h e h a n d s of the Japanese I m p e rial Army. NATIONAL

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o n Tuesday. It is a topic that is rarely talked about. It still affects FEATURES

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Got a story i d e a ? Let u s k n o w a t anchor@hope.edu. or call u s a t 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 ?

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Norma Flores Lopez speaks on child labor, agricultural workers

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

Thursday Biology S e m i n a r

April 7

1 1 a.m.. Science Center 1 0 1 9 .

Concert B a n d P e r f o r m a n c e 7:30 p.m.. Dimnent Chapel.

Friday Chemistry Seminar

Amu 6, 2011

April 8

4 p.m.. Science Center 1 0 0 0 .

C o m e d i a n D a n Nainan 8 : 3 0 p.m.. the Kletz. Sponsored by SAC. HAPA and PSP.

SAC W e e k e n d Movie - "True Grit" 8 p.m., 1 0 : 3 0 p.m.. VanderWerf 102.

Saturday April 9 SAC W e e k e n d Movie - "True Grit" 8 p.m., 1 0 : 3 0 p.m., VanderWerf 102.

IN BRIEF

LECTURE TO FOCUS ON FICTIONAL CHARACTERS The De Graaf Lecture, sponsored by the English department, will be given by Margaret Doody, professor of literature at the University of Notre Dame, and author of a detective novels series. The lecture is entitled "Fiction and People: Making Up and Hanging Out with Characters" and will take place on Tuesday, April 12 at 4 p.m. in the Fried-Hemenway Auditorium. Refeshments will be served in the rotunda beforehand.

• LECTURE, f r o m p a g e 1 injured children, and statistics, large p o r t i o n s of t h e school year. p r e s e n t a t i o n , w a s t o gain supThe Fair Labor S t a n d a r d s Act, such as t h e figure t h a t w o r k e r s W h e n they d o m a n a g e to stay passed in 1938, allows children p o r t for a bill she is w o r k i n g in a school, they t o pass, t h e will o f t e n be reChildren's q u i r e d to work Act for Renearly full t i m e sponsible w h e n they are E m p l o y not in class. ment, more Some of t h e opcommonly position against k n o w n as t h e t h e CARE act is C A R E act. d u e t o issues it "We've peripherally imb e e n trying pacts. F a r m e r s t o push for have argued that t h a t bill, and p r e v e n t i n g chilyou would d r e n f r o m workhave t h o u g h t ing will p r e v e n t t h a t all of their neighbor's these facts, children from figures and helping out o n pictures a n d the f a r m . testimonies, O t h e r s have it wouldn't KOTO BY ARLSON argued that if be t h a t diffiRAISING AWARENESS— Norma Flores Lopez spoke on t h e Children's A c t for Responsible children can't cult t o pass. Employment, which would help curb child labor In agriculture. w o r k , the povWe've b e e n erty m a n y f arm trying to get w o r k e r s live in will be m a d e even in agriculture are e x p o s e d t o a t h e bill to pass for 10 years a n d b e g i n n i n g at t h e age of 12 to billion t o n s of pesticides each w o r s e b e c a u s e their children will work in an agricultural setting we haven't b e e n able to. In t h e n o longer be able to c o n t r i b u t e . with m a n y fewer restrictions year. To s u p p o r t h e r a r g u m e n t past, t h e m o s t we got w a s 2 3 coLopez e s t i m a t e d that an e n t i r e t h a t this situation i m p a c t s t h e t h a n y o u n g children have in o t h s p o n s o r s and n o w we have 107," e d u c a t i o n of w o r k i n g children, family with children w o r k i n g er a r e a s of e m p l o y m e n t . Lopez Lopez said. will already only be able to m a k e she cited t h e 50 p e r c e n t d r o p argued t h a t this law results in C o - s p o n s o r s include u n i o n s , a r o u n d $15,000 a year. o u t rate of child agriculture ladangerous working conditions e d u c a t i o n a l p r o g r a m s a n d civil Shortly b e f o r e she c o n c l u d e d borers. for y o u n g children. She also arrights p r o g r a m s . The facts and h e r presentation, Lopez q u o t e d O f t e n , families w h o w o r k as gued that this system p r e v e n t s figures s h e refers to are t h e Chavez: agricultural w o r k e r s struggling children w h o work in agriculs t r e a m of n u m b e r s she read in " W e c a n n o t seek achievement t o pay for e x p e n s e s will work ture f r o m receiving t h e p r o p e r her a r g u m e n t t h a t agricultural for ourselves and forget about with their children in the fields education. w o r k e r s in t h e United States are progress and prosperity for o u r to bring in extra money. Each She cited personal a c c o u n t s of grossly m i s t r e a t e d . community. Our ambitions child is e s t i m a t e d to bring in m u s t b e broad e n o u g h to inan additional t h o u s a n d dollars clude the aspirations and n e e d s per year for their w o r k . of others, for their sakes and for Because of the h a r v e s t i n g our own." season a n d the fact t h a t families need to m o v e o f t e n to find n e w jobs, children miss

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The d o c u m e n t a r y and discussion was c o - s p o n s o r e d by t h e Office of MulticulturalEducation, International Education, Residential Life, t h e History D e p a r t m e n t and t h e English D e p a r t m e n t . The Asian Food Festival o n W e d n e s d a y , April 6 features a variety of Asian dishes. It will take place f r o m 4:45 p.m. to 7 p.m. in b o t h C o o k and Phelps dining halls. Those a t t e n d i n g t h e event w h o do n o t have a meal plan will b e charged $ 5 at Phelps Hall for their meal. H A P A collaborated with dining services for the event. The final event is a perform a n c e in t h e Kletz by D a n Nainan, a comedian who has p e r f o r m e d On NBC's "Last C o m i c Standing" as well as t h e D e m o c r a t i c National C o n vention in Denver in 2008. He also a p p e a r e d in c o m m e r cials for Apple c o m p u t e r s . His show will take place o n Friday at 8:30 p.m. This event was c o o r d i n a t e d with Student Activities C o m m i t t e e and the Phelps Scholars P r o g r a m .

Additional help in organizing t h e week c a m e f r o m Sara Frye, Latoya Gates, Elizabeth Burks a n d Professor David Cho. By hosting a c o m e d y night and serving Asian f o o d and s h o w i n g challenging d o c u m e n taries, H A P A aims to e n c o u r a g e p e o p l e to explore Asian c u l t u r e while also accomplishing s o m e thing significant. "The message of Asian Awareness W e e k is t o provide t h e c a m p u s a starting point to learn and experience various Asian history, issues and cultures," lang said. " W e want the c a m p u s to get a h a n d s - o n experience of the Asian culture f r o m o u r perspective rather than w h a t you see t h r o u g h t h e media." "We h o p e that t h e s t u d e n t s o n c a m p u s will try to use this week as an o p p o r t u n i t y to get o u t into our c o m m u n i t y at H o p e and b e c o m e m o r e globally aware, w h e t h e r it b e about t h e h i s t o r y or what is going o n today. W e also h o p e that t h e c a m p u s will seek m o r e knowledge of t h e Asian culture by asking questions," Jang said.


THE ANCHOR

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Japan: Engineers hopeful new BP to restart drilling strategy will stop the leaking in Gulf of Mexico Matt Lee CO-NATIONAL EDITOR

TOKYO - Engineers are hopeful that a combination of chemicals, sawdust and newspaper will prevent highly radioactive water f r o m pouring into the ocean f r o m Japan's tsunami-devastated nuclear plant. Concrete already failed to prevent the radioactive water from leaking from a crack in a maintenance pit, and so far the new mixture does not appear to be working, but the engineers said they were not abandoning it. Fox News reports that the Fukushima Da-ichi plant has been leaking radioactivity since the March 11 tsunami carved a path of destruction along Japan's northeastern coast, killing as many as 25,000 people and knocking out key cooling systems that kept it f r o m overheating. People living within 12 miles of the plant have been forced to abandon their homes. The government said Sunday that it will take m o n t h s for the radiation to stop, and even after it ceases there will be years of

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work needed to clean up the complex and surrounding areas. "It would take a few m o n t h s until we finally get things under control and have a better idea about the future," said Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency spokesman Hidehiko Nishiyama "We'll face a crucial turning point within the next few months, but that is not the end." His agency also told Fox N e w s the timetable is based on the first step - p u m p i n g radioactive water into tanks being completed quickly, and the second - restoring cooling systems - being d o n e within a matter of weeks or m o n t h s . Each day brings new complications, and workers have to constantly evacuate the facility due to dangerous levels of radiation, resulting in slow progress. Fox News reports that o n Saturday, workers discovered an eight-inch crack in a maintenance pit at the plant and said they believe water f r o m it may be the source of s o m e of the high levels of radioactive iodine that has been found in the ocean for m o r e than a week. This is the first time they have

found radioactive water leaking directly into the sea. A picture released by T E P C O shows water shooting s o m e distance away from a wall and splashing into the ocean, though the a m o u n t is not clear. N o other cracks have been found. Engineers tried to seal the crack with concrete on Saturday, but the attempt failed. O n Sunday they went further up the system and injected sawdust, three garbage bags of shredded newspaper and a polymer that can expand to 50 times its normal size when c o m b i n e d with water. According to Fox News, the polymer mix in the passageway leading to the pit had not stopped the leak by Sunday night, but it also had not leaked out of the crack along with t h e water, so engineers were stirring it in an attempt to get it to expand. According to MSNBC, "The leak is a symptom of the primary difficulty at the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex: Radioactive water is pooling around the plant and preventing workers from powering up cooling systems that would stabilize overheating reactors."

Matt Lee C O - N A T I O N A L EDITOR

As the o n e year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, British media reported on Sunday that BP plans to | p p C O \ \ u restart drilling in the Gulf of Mexico this PHOTO COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED PRESS summer. BP plans to STRICTER REGULATIONS- BP has restart drilling on 10 . ^ . . .... w . ... . r begun t a l k s to resume drilling In 10 wells in exchange for . wells In the Gulf of Mexico In exchange tougher restrictions. for stricter regulations and tighter secuThe Sunday Times of London reported A source close to BP told the that BP has promised UK Press Association that the to abide by rules that have been m a d e stricter following the April company "is hoping to resume drilling in the summer once it 20, 2010 blast on the Deepwater Horizon rig that killed 11 shows it can satisfy applicable regulatory conditions, as set out workers and caused devastation by the U.S. offshore regulator." to the Gulf. The accident leaked The oil slick pr oduced by last almost 200 million gallons of oil year's accident was estimated to into the Gulf of Mexico and is be 130 miles long and brought the largest marine spill in U.S. devastation to the coasts of history. Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi BP has been cooperative and and Florida. agreed to follow all of the new MSNBC reports that regulations. U.S. regulators will BP is spending at least now have 24-hour access to any $41 billion to clean up the of the company's deepwater and cover damages, wells. For now, BP has also spill agreed to not begin any new exploratory drilling.

PERSPECTIVES

"America at Not-War": Should the US provide Libya arms?

0

Aftan Snyder C O - N A T I O N A L EDITOR

In the sarcastic words of Jon Stewart, when has arming rebels ever gone wrong? Let's think. In the '80s, America a r m e d the mujahedeen in Afghanistan in order to bring about an overthrow of Soviet forces. The mujahedeen became the Taliban. W e were so focused on the containment of C o m m u n i s m that we were willing to e m p o w e r a group that turned out to be just as dangerous as the Soviets. A n d oh yeah, the Taliban sponsors terrorist groups like al Qaeda, groups that we have pledged to fight today in our global "war on terror." We also sold arms to Saddam Hussein in Iraq during the Iran/ Iraq war. This occurred despite staunch public reassurances from the White House that it would never approve such a thing; America claimed "neutrality." I guess "neutrality" m e a n t that instead of arming just one side of the conflict, we would a r m both,

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NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

THISWEEK IN NEWS

APRIL 6 , 2 0 1 1

Impasse over new budget; Congress must decide by April 9 or face government shutdown get spending u n d e r control is creating uncertainty for o u r job creators," Boehner said in The H o u s e and Senate have the weekly Republican address. " I t s discouraging i n v e s t m e n t in until midnight on April 8 to agree on a new budget. W i t h o u t small businesses a n d eroding confidence in our economy. To that a g r e e m e n t , the c u r r e n t f u n d i n g resolution will expire p u t it simply, the spending binge and the federal g o v e r n m e n t will in W a s h i n g t o n is holding o u r c o u n t r y back a n d keeping o u r shut d o w n . e c o n o m y f r o m creating jobs." A government shutdown involves the closure of certain President Barack O b a m a weighed in on this issue Saturday, urging C o n g r e s s to reach a decision quickly. In separate p h o n e calls both t o Boehner and to Senate Majority Leader H a r r y Reid (DNev.), h e e m p h a s i z e d his s u p p o r t for the $33 billion compromise, while insisting that a government closure would be harmful "to our economic recovery," according to a description released by the W h i t e House. According t o the PHOTO COURTESY OF ASSOCIATED PRESS budget law of 1974, the COMPROMISE ON THE HILL? — House Speaker John Boehner (ROhlo) talks to reporters on March 31 about the standoff between Re- n e w budget is s u p p o s e d t o be approved by the publicans and Democrats over the new budget. last day of the fiscal year. This deadline passed Sept. federal offices and services, such roughly $61 billion in spending. According to some 30. as m u s e u m s , m o n u m e n t s and D e m o c r a t s , both parties have This is n o t the only t i m e the parks, health services, veterans' federal g o v e r n m e n t has faced a services a n d other selected "nonagreed on the $33 billion cut, s h u t d o w n . Between fiscal years b u t Republicans say n o deal essential" jobs. This year, n o o n e 1977 a n d 1980, a s h u t d o w n has b e e n m a d e . H o u s e Speaker is exactly sure w h a t services o c c u r r e d six times, as well as an John Boehner (R-Ohio) faces will be affected; according to a challenge in getting the additional nine times b e t w e e n n e w s sources, the Office of fiscal years 1981 and 1996. f r e s h m e n of his p a r t y - w h o M a n a g e m e n t and Budget has S h u t d o w n s have lasted anywhere m a k e up m o r e t h a n a third of o r d e r e d agencies n o t t o publicly f r o m three t o 17 days, according disclose any details. Republicans in the House - t o t o the Congressional Research agree on lessened s p e n d i n g cuts. Several agencies that will Service. The longest s h u t d o w n M a n y of t h e m have m a d e the likely r e m a i n f u n c t i o n i n g are stretched 21 days, f r o m midthose that provide for national fight against deficit s p e n d i n g a D e c e m b e r 1995 to early January t o p priority. security, critical foreign relations a n d the safety oflife a n d property. "Washington's inability to 1996.

Aftan Snyder

"They're in a s t a l e m a t e . I t h i n k t h e r e is a g e n eral r e a l i z a t i o n t h a t t h e s y s t e m is s t a g n a t i n g . There's n o f r e s h b l o o d , f r e s h b r a i n s . It's all built around one figure - the president." - P r o f e s s o r Nargis Kassenova of the European Union Central Asia Advisory Group, discussing April 3 Presidential elections in Kazakhstan that were not expected to be free or fair.

" N o t all r a d i a t i o n is created equal." - Jim Walsh, MIT, describing the radiation effects and spread throughout Japan and the world.

"I'm in, you're in, w e will take this b a c k in 2012." - Michelle Bachmann, potential G O P candidate for president, at a rally in Iowa.

"Google, in all t h e b e s t ways, h a s p u t itself in a v e r y difficult p o s i t i o n - that no matter what t h e y do, t h e y have t o d o it biggest a n d best." - Karen North, director of a University of Southern California program that studies online privacy, describing Google's latest face recognition app.

C O - N A T I O N A L EDITOR

This includes U.S. military operations, air-traffic controllers and the T r a n s p o r t a t i o n Security Administration and Federal Emergency Management Agency personnel. Congressional leaders are currently debating a m e a s u r e that would cut a b o u t $33 billion f r o m the federal budget, although several G O P m e m b e r s continue t o favor a bill that c u t s

BP explores options for drilling in Gulf * Drilling, from page 3 but investigations and lawsuits could add t o its costs. BP h o p e s t o r e s u m e drilling in July, and the c o m p a n y will seek approval t o r e n e w exploratory drilling later in 2011. Environmental campaigner G r e e n p e a c e said that, if true, the report is "a poke in the eye, n o t only t o the e n v i r o n m e n t , b u t to investors," a n d a sign that despite m a n a g e m e n t changes at BP little had f u n d a m e n t a l l y changed at the oil giant since the disaster. "It has b e e n a year n o w and 80 percent of that oil is still s o m e w h e r e in the sea," G r e e n p e a c e spokesman Charlie Kronick told M S N B C . "There is nothing different a b o u t the situation now other t h a n regulators may keep a slightly

66 [The proposed drilling] is a poke in the eye not only to the environment but to investors. GREENPEACE SPOKESMAN

99 beadier eye on operations." The r e p o r t c o m e s d u r i n g c o n t i n u i n g pressure on the White House to reduce d e p e n d e n c e on foreign oil a n d deter the impact of higher oil prices, which are climbing d u e to d e m a n d in C h i n a and instability in oil p r o d u c i n g countries in the Middle East.

US should avoid arming Libyan rebels • Perspectives, from page 3

"Enlightened despots are m y t h i c a l c r e a t u r e s ; real d e s p o t s s e e m m o r e interested in stealing m o n e y or installing t h e i r s o n s a f t e r them." -Elliot Abrams, senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, discussing what Egypt means for the future of U S . Foreign Policy.

" T h e Internet is but the latest tool for people disenfranchised by autocratic leaders w h o seek what those in free societies take for granted - access to the truth." - Walter Isaacson, C E O of the Aspen Institute, a nonpartisan educational and policy studies organization.

In u n d e r - t h e - t a b l e - also k n o w n as highly illegal - deals, we facilitated the sale of a r m s to Iran. (Maybe by giving t h e m w e a p o n s , they w o u l d let o u r hostages go?) R e m e m b e r the I r a n - C o n t r a scandal? We t u r n e d a r o u n d a n d used the m o n e y f r o m the Iranian a r m s sales t o f u n d rebel forces in Nicaragua. W i t h U.S. s u p p o r t , hopefully the N i c a r a g u a n c o n t r a s would o v e r t h r o w the country's C o m m u n i s t g o v e r n m e n t . Turns o u t the c o n t r a s terrorized their o w n people just as m u c h as t h e government. In Chile, C I A o p e r a t i o n s aided in A u g u s t o Pinochet's military c o u p - but he was later a r r e s t e d as a war criminal for m a s s m u r d e r and torture. Sadly, history provides a plethora of examples showing how U.S. s u p p o r t of rebels has horribly backfired. O f t e n the people w e s u p p o r t t u r n o u t to be m o r e brutal than those replaced. O r the people w e s u p p o r t are n o t unified a m o n g s t themselves a n d t u r n against o n e a n o t h e r in

even m o r e violence. Either way, distributing a r m s is a d a n g e r o u s g a m e - we have n o g u a r a n t e e of w h a t t h o s e a r m s will later be used for. Because of these uncertainties, and b e c a u s e of America's long b o t c h e d history in this area. President O b a m a should firmly refuse to agree t o an a r m s deal for Libyan rebels. Actually, UN Resolution 1970 prohibits such a deal. The resolution created an a r m s e m b a r g o against Libya, which m a k e s it illegal for any nation t o give arms. However, the later U N Resolution 1973 allows for "all necessary m e a s u r e s " to p r o t e c t civilians and civilianp o p u l a t e d areas. According to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, "It is our interpretation that 1973 amended or overrode the absolute prohibition on a r m s to anyone in Libya, so that there could be a legitimate transfer of a r m s if a c o u n t r y should c h o o s e t o d o that." This is a dangerous interpretation because it creates

a convenient loophole in w h i c h politicians can maneuver to intervene any way they want, because they can spin it as a "necessary measure." This includes providing arms. Britain and France have already stated that they are willing t o d o so. O b a m a has so far r e m a i n e d vague. "I'm not ruling it out, b u t I'm also not ruling it in," h e said an N B C n e w s conference. To me, what this really m e a n s is, "I haven't decided yet if I w a n t to give a r m s or not, and I won't m a k e any s t a t e m e n t that boxes m e into a corner." A wise political move, perhaps, b u t o n e that m a k e s m e c u r i o u s a b o u t what's going on b e h i n d the scenes, or u n d e r the table. N A T O is c u r r e n d y in charge of operations in Libya. Thus far, they have ruled o u t a r m i n g the rebels: " W e are there to p r o t e c t the Libyan people, not t o arm people," N A T O said in a statement. It's c o n c e r n i n g that w h a t Clinton has said (and w h a t several other Security Council nations have said) does not

m a t c h what N A T O has said. It's alsoconcerning that A m e r i c a n leaders - without t h e s u p p o r t of this constituent - may choose to act on their own, having America take the lead in a role that should not b e ours. If policy in Libya changes, then it m u s t change multilaterally, within the context of the United Nations. What is m o s t concerning, though, is that once again America is involved in a conflict that lacks a clear objective. (Iraq, anyone?) According to Clinton and other Western leaders, the goal in Libya is to remove Gadaffi. However, the U N Resolution never stated that; it says that the goal is to "protect civilians in [the Libyan] domestic conflict."

I foresee conflict as different leaders vary in their interpretation of "protection." Is it taking o u t Gadaffi? Is it a r m i n g rebels? Is it a c o m b i n a t i o n of other procedures, like e c o n o m i c pressure and asset freezes? It's n o t clear. The only t h i n g I know for sure is that Libya will be a test of A m e r i c a n foreign policy, and our international reputation rides on the result.


ARTS

APRII 6 , 2 0 1 1

T I in A N C H O R

Park Theatre welcomes poet Andrea Gibson Caitlin Klask ARTS CO-EDITOR

If you're looking for an e m p ow eri ng p o e t r y reading this weekend, look n o further. Poet a n d activist A n d r e a Gibson is c o m i n g to t h e Park Theatre in Holland o n Sunday, April 10. Her message is equality for LGBT as well as w o m e n ' s rights and social justice. The event begins at 7 p.m.

5

THIS WEEK IN A R T

Thursday April 7 Concert Band P e r f o r m a n c e

and e n d s at 8 p.m., a n d t h e cost is $5. All p r o c e e d s go to H o p e is Ready. G i b s o n h a s w o n awards such as t h e 2008 W o r l d Poetry G r a n d Slam, as well as placing in the International G r a n d Slams. Her book, "Pole D a n c i n g to Gospel Hymns," is critically acclaimed. She h a s been f e a t u r e d o n CSPAN, NPR, t h e BBC, and m o r e .

The concert band, which Is a m i x of Hope students and c o m m u n i t y m e m bers f r o m Holland and Zeeland, will p e r f o r m at Dimnent Chapel at 7:30

/ \

p.m. Admission Is free!

Thursday April 1 4 Visiting Writers S e r i e s The next Visiting Writers Series will Include non-fiction and poetry by Diana Joseph and Kevin McFadden.

Andrea Gibson

" ( i i b s o u s v c i s c is p e r s o n a ! & p o l i t i c a l , IVniinist & iinivcrsal, lillcd with inciiHTatin^ verbs cV j u g t i i p h o i ' s , deliv(TCHI w i t h j*ut p i m c h i i i ^

ii

Andrea Gibson

"

-Park Theatre -Saturday, April 10 - 7 - 8 p.m. -$5 general admission

ni'gency." — METAPHOR MEDIA

w

Andrea Gibson

Critic's Comer 'Yuck' a throwback to '90s rock Joel Hofman STAFF W R I T E R

s o u n d , yet these kids (all u n d e r 21), have c r a f t e d a r e c o r d that is a f u n listen with practically n o filler to speak of. The a l b u m kicks off quickly w i t h a noisy, slacker rock vibe in w h i c h a wall of distinctive guitars layer t h e s o u n d to give it t h a t Dino Jr. vibe of old. (Not t o

i n s t r u m e n t a l unit. Following "Get Away," c o m e s t h e catchiest song o n t h e a l b u m titled "The Wall." O n c e again, "The Wall" is a fitting n a m e given t h e fact t h a t t h e s o n g relies on t h e thick guitar c h o r d s t o set u p a f u z z y f o u n d a t i o n for t h e

G u i t a r rock has a n d always will be a staple of t h e indie genre. T h o u g h t h e g e n r e is tough t o truly define, noise has always been a strong force w i t h i n t h e genre going back t o t h e rise of legends such as Sonic Youth and D i n o s a u r )r. London-based b a n d Yuck work to c h a n n e l t h e energy of gui-" tar h e r o e s like J M a s c i s of D i n o saur Jr., T h u r s t o n M o o r e of Sonic Youth a n d Stephen Malkmus of P a v e m e n t o n their self-titled d e b u t LP o n Fat Possum records. Lead singer M a x Bloom even m e n tions in a Rolling Stone piece t h a t he w a s first inspired by m u sic u p o n listening t o D i n o s a u r FEELING THE 4 90S V I B E S - G u i t a r i s t and Jr's 1987 classic "You're Living All Yuck leads t h e c r e w In a set f u l l of lo-fl Jams. Think Dinosaur Jr. and Sonic Youth. O v e r Me." After many listens, t h e record m e n t i o n t h e Lou Barlow-esque ultimately feels like a t h r o w b a c k bass breakdowns.) t o '90s rock. W h i l e their guitar T h e lyrics are sad and y e a r n s o u n d a n d s o n g textures s o u n d ing yet s o u n d h o p e f u l at the stunningly similar to this bygone s a m e t i m e as lead singer M a x era, Yuck polish their s o u n d off Bloom claims that "I w a n t you, 1 can't get this feeling off my with melodies that will stick in mind." T h o u g h Yuck isn't necesyour h e a d for h o u r s after you're sarily k n o w n for their lyrics, t h e d o n e listening t o t h e record. minimalist a p p r o a c h they take It m a y be easy to criticize in their s o n g w r i t i n g only amplitheir four m e m b e r s for their lack fies their s t r e n g t h as a tight-knit of creativity given t h e t h r o w b a c k

th e ir c a r e e r given their knack for s h o r t b u r s t s of noisy pop, the slow chugging seven m i n u t e closer "Rubb e r " was t h e track that initially d r e w m e to this a l b u m . The track s t a r t s in a very lethargic m a n ner w i t h a m o n s t r o u s t w o - c h o r d shift that s e e m s t o build and build until s c r e e c h i n g guitars c u t in and out of t h e s o u n d amidst s o m e c y m b a l heavy d r u m m i n g f r o m Jonny Rogoft. As t h e s o n g presses f o r w a r d , t h e disson a n c e of t h e layered lead mixed with t h e wailing s e c o n d a r y guitars create a s y m p h o n y of noise that s e e m s to keep building until t h e PHOTO FROM BROOKLYNVEGAN.COM track fades o u t to close singer M a r l k o Dol of Indie r o c k band t h e a l b u m . Just l i k e t h e glory days of t h e 1 9 9 0 s . As with o t h e r tracks, the lyrics are minimal, but it's t h e noise that d o e s t h e talking, and "Rubber" m a y b e t h e finest excircular s o n g s t r u c t u r e to repeat a m p l e of Yuck clicking together itself for four m i n u t e s . as a y o u n g band. Despite t h e fact t h a t t h e s o n g T h o u g h this a l b u m won't is c o m p r i s e d of a singular c h o c h a n g e your life f r o m a lyrical rus, t h e c h o r d progression is s t a n d p o i n t , Yuck's d e b u t record c h a r m i n g a n d c o m f o r t a b l e until is a highly enjoyable listen with it is i n t r u d e d u p o n by a squalling t o n s of replay value. If you are a guitar break, giving the s o n g t h e fan of the '90$ alternative scene signature noise t h a t Yuck heavily (Especially D i n o s a u r Jr.), this alrelies o n t h r o u g h o u t t h e LP. b u m is a great way to kick off t h e W h i l e Yuck may be identispring season. fied as a singles b a n d later in

r/ .

'

IN BRIEF

S E N I O R A R T EXHIBIT: ' I N H A B I T ' O P E N S AT DEPREE FRIDAY A P R I L 8 "Inhabit" opens in the D e P r e e Art Gallery Friday, April 8. The s h o w features artwork from H o p e s graduating studio art m a j o r s . The s h o w will last until Sunday, May 8. This years artists include: Amy Devrou, Jessica Early, Kellee Kortas, Betsy Melchers, Emily Otto, Katie Schewe, Leah Schreiber, Jilli Schuler, S a m m y Shank and Chelsea Tarnas. G r a d u a t i n g art h i s t o r y m a j o r s will be p r e s e n t i n g their final p a p e r s o n April 27. Thjs years art history m a j o r s are Rebecca Bethard a n d Nicole Buccella.

RA RA RIOT AT THE KNICKERBOCKER Ra Ra Riot, the five-person group out of Syracuse, N.Y., will be featured at the Knickerbocker Theater on Monday, April 11. The show will begin at 8 p.m. Admissions is $7 for students and $15 for the general public. Ra R a Riot offers a mix of pop vocals, cello and bass melodies. Ra R a Riot has found their own unique fit into the indie rock scene. Other performers include Generationals and Scars on 45, a quintet from Leeds, England who will open the night.

THE ILLUSIONIST' PLAYING ATTHE KNICKERBOCKER The next of t h e Knickerbocker film series - " The Illusionist" will b e playing t h r o u g h this weekend. The last day for the show is Saturday, April 9. The s h o w plays nightly at 7 p.m. "The Illusionist" is a b o u t a French illustionist w h o suddenly finds himself o u t of work. He travels to Scotland w h e r e he m e e t s a y o u n g w o m a n . The a d v e n t u r e s that a c c o m p a n y the t w o of t h e m will c h a n g e their lives forever. The film is rated PG a n d is 90 m i n u t e s long. Don't miss your final c h a n c e t o see t h e film!


6

ARTS

THE ANCHOR

WTHS: album reviews By Paul Rice & Laura Helderop, WTHS music directors

H e a r their shows! L a u r a : M o n d a y s at 9:30 a.m P a u l : M o n d a y s at 10 p.m.

APRIL 6 . 2 0 1 1

Bella Ruse - 'Kuhzoo'

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Bella Ruse are a couple of young H o p e College graduates,Kay Gilette, singer and Joseph Barker guitarist. They play around here pretty often, and they play short, jazzy, folksy songs with a wide variety of atmospheres, from cute to spooky, dark to sunny. Their debut full-length album shows a wonderful expansion of their sound. Most songs feature some quirky i n s t r u m e n t s and unique attributes, and it's their consistent quality paired with that new variety that really makes this album great. Their gorgeous cover of Radiohead's "Like Spinning Plates" doesn't h u r t either. Support your alumni!

Toro Y Moi 'Underneath the Pine' Last year, the internet indie moguls created their own genre for this guy and a few other like-minded electronic acts. They called it chillwave. Toro Y Moi is the first of t h e pack to release an album since the chillwave thing started, and it's pretty good, but embodies all of the strengths and weaknesses of chilli*1 - • wave as a m o v e m e n t . At its best, it is Toro Y Moi's "Still Sound," a soft, m i d t e m p o dance beat with soft falsetto vocals and the coolest bass line of 2011. At its worst, it is m u c h of the rest of this album; s m o o t h and pretty, filled with slinky grooves and fresh textures, but it is the sort of stuff that can be playing for an h o u r without grabbing your attention. But if this makes you curious or you need s o m e non-distracting h o m e w o r k music, check it out. Also, we find the album art deeply unsettling.

Lvkke Li wounded Rhymes' Lykke Li is a Swedish musician whose candid, honest lyrical style became famous after her inclusion on the Twilight soundtrack. On her newest album. "Wounded Rhymes", her strengths are evident throughout. The songs on this album are sincere and heavy as Lykke Li expresses her post-breakup laments with a guileless attitude. The heaviness of the darker stuff leaves listeners wanting a light. Stylistically, this is a pop album, but it is sad.

The Dodos 'No Color' The Dodos are a b u n c h of rascals. O n their breakthrough album "Visiter," the d u o s t r u m m e d and bashed their way through fourteen mostly-frenzied acoustic songs, s o m e of which were catchy enough to soundtrack T V commercials, others challenging and weird enough to d e m a n d repeated listens. Its energy and odd beauty were addictive. O n their follow-up, "Time To Die", The Dodos added another member, got a glossier production, and somehow lost their edge, that intimidating rawness that m a d e "Visiter" so unforgettable. Their newest album, "No Color," is a step back from that. They've returned to a simpler recording style and becoming a d u o again, but they aren't trying to retread Visiter's ground. "No Color's" songs are winding and challenging, a worthwhile step in a new direction.

|FFM201l|

•

FEA

J Mascis 'Several Shades of W h y '

The Civil Wars Matisyahu My Brightest Diamond Jon Foreman Vienna Teng ALSO * G r e g o r y Wolfe * Luke Powery * Tom B e a u d o i n * David D a r k * Ken H e f f n e r * A g e n t s of Future * Jessica H o p p e r * Just Pete * Sarah M a s e n * Brett M c C r a c k e n * Jessica Misener John Van Sloten * Daniel W h i t e H o d g e * . . . a n d more!

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During their original run in the '80s, Dinosaur Ir was massively influential on indie rock, originating many of the distinctive qualities o f 90s indie rock (loud/soft dynamics, loud and fuzzy guitars, honest and self-deprecating lyrics, intentional avoidance of melodrama and cliche). I Mascis was their songwriter/guitarist/singer ( m u m bler) and only original m e m b e r for a while until the original line-up's 2005 reunion, which has produced some of their best work to date. But J's new solo album is completely different. Primarily acoustic, he retains his effordess ability to play melodic leads and full chords simultaneously, and his lyrics convey the same apathetic slacker character as usual, but the songs hardly resemble Dinosaur's hard rock. These are the acoustic ballads of a seasoned indie rock veteran.


APRII 6 . 2 0 1 1

FEATURES

T I IF A N C H O R

7

C o m i n g s o o n t o a K n i c k e r b o c k e r near you! Ra Ra R i o t set t o p e r f o r m at H o p e

The Hope College Concert Series Presents

RA RA RIOT

Ra Riot has an impres;ive track record. The band id in 2006, playing shows in a place near and ear m many JJope students |oLPs

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with; Generationals / / Scars On 45 many different venues, including late night TV with David Letterman and Jimmy Kimmel. Their roots are in festivals like SXSW, Seaport Music Festival and even the Iceland Airwaves Festival. Given that fact, the tw at the Knickerbocker is •und to be a personal and energy-filled one. The band released its second al-

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7. of the re los and hauntin tched sonantly (if pleasing with triumphant rhythms and exultant melodies, resulting in a record that is at once grand and intimate." Ra Ra Riot has performed

a very g^^Hpfng!). If you didn't already Rnow, Hope College Concert series is proud to be hosting Ra Ra Riot

in the Knickerbocker Theatre on April 11! Also performing will be the Generationals, an indie rock duo formed in New Orleans, Louisiana. SPIN magazine says that their 2009 LP, is good, neurotic fun." You might have heard one of their songs on television recently, as they have been played on a 2009 Bloomingdales holiday ad and a Reese's peanut butter cup commercial, as well as featured on an episode of Chuck. They have even traveled with indie sensation Broken Social Scene. Scars On 45, a quintet from Leeds, England, will be opening that night. Tickets will be $7 with a ope I.D. and $15 for public attendees. For public tickets, the kket office is open weekdays om 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the eVos Fieldhouse and can be led at (616) 395-7890. Any reaining tickets will be sold at the door. The doors will open :30 p.m. the night of the no

B a c k g r o u n d / P o s t e r b y C h r i s t o p h e r Cox. A l b u m Art courtesy Barsuk Records


Aprii 6, 2011

Paradoxical perspectives

Outside iooking out

The end

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Karen Patterson Co-Editor-in-Chief "Why did you c o m e to Hope College?" It's a question that I heard n u m e r o u s times freshman year and not often since. The question has become, " W h a t comes next?" Unless something radical changes between me writing this and you reading it, I have absolutely no idea. It's the first time in 22 years that I haven't had a plan. But the fear of the unknown doesn't prevent me f r o m appreciating all I've learned from Hope. If s o m e o n e told me orientation weekend that by the end of college I'd be pursuing sports journalism, have the best friends beyond anything I deserve and d o n e everything from volleyball to Pull to Alpha Phi Omega, I'd have w o n d e r e d what was in their m o r n i n g coffee. But looking back, I can't believe that it's nearly time to go. I've been wrestling with d o u b t this semester (thank you, senior sem class), and also thinking about the impression and, dare I use this word—legacy—that I'm leaving behind me. I would not say I'm a particularly wise or p r o f o u n d person, so it's difficult for me to accurately articulate h o w special H o p e has been without sounding cheesy. W h e n I think about H o p e College, I think first and foremost of the amazing friends I've found—the sense of c o m m u n i t y so many of us praise. My beautiful housemates, my friend f r o m orientation w h o I've stayed close to the whole way through, my amazing ex-roomie who've I traveled to hell and back with, the boy who's been with me since f r e s h m a n year, my friends f r o m Alpha Phi O m e g a and The Anchor... the list goes o n and on. These people have impacted me for the better, standing with m e t h r o u g h the good and the bad. W h e n I c a m e here, absolutely n o b o d y knew me. In s o m e ways it was a blessing (I shed that stupid "volleyball player" reputation I'd earned in high school), but in s o m e ways it was a curse. People didn't know my high school, didn't know the city I c a m e from. I still have to explain that no, Rockford is

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The other day, 1 was sitting in chapel listening to s o m e o n e (I can't quite r e m e m b e r who) give a message. I'd just pulled one of those late college nights, so my mind was wandering a little bit (forgive me, dear c a m p u s ministry staff). I'd gotten there late, so there wasn't room for me in my usual pew, and the wall I was leaning against as I sat on the floor m a d e a great headrest. Because of where I was sitting, I had a clear view of the stained glass windows opposite me, and in my sleepy state, I was struck by h o w lovely they looked as they tinged the sunlight streaming through with blue and red, yellow and purple. It wasn't the pictures themselves, the exact outlines and shapes, that m a d e them so beautiful. It was m o r e the way they dappled their brightness against my sleepy brain: that was what left the imprint. I couldn't tell you just who was in that window I was staring at. It might have been the o n e with Mary holding a young Jesus in her arms. O r it could have been somebody else. But I can tell you that until the sun went behind a cloud, as it d o e s all too often in winter (and early spring) in Holland, my gaze was glued to the windows. And then they stopped glowing. The jeweled colors faded, losing their luster, turning dark and dull. W i t h o u t the sun to light them up from outside, they lost the vibrancy that had caught my attention. I didn't think much of it at the time (chalk it up to my lack of sleep) b u t later, w h e n I stumbled u p o n this quote f r o m Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, the image of those gleaming c a s e m e n t s sprang back into my mind: "People are like stained glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light f r o m

not a Chicago suburb, yes there is life in Illinois outside of Chicago and no, I didn't drive a tractor to school. But as I've moved closer to D-day (read: Graduation) I care less about explaining where I came f r o m and m o r e about sharing why H o p e has been important. Obviously we're not all best friends and we have disagreements, but I have f o u n d people w h o care about me and accept me, quirks and all. I've had professors w h o challenge me to

U Absolutely nobody knew me. In some ways it was a blessing...but in some ways it was a curse.

V think but also accept my criticisms and differing viewpoints. Could I have f o u n d all of the things I'm most grateful for elsewhere? Probably. It sounds super cheesy, but I honestly believe that I could not have b e c o m e the young w o m an I am today at any other school. The class of 2011 has had a rough go of it in s o m e ways, but we haven't let the o d d s get us down. Seniors are supposed to impart nuggets of wisdom, right? Well here's mine: love Hope, love each other, don't close doors because you think it's a stretch and when all else fails, beat the odds. Sure it's idealistic, but did you really expect anything else f r o m me? Goodbyes are so bittersweet and this one is no different. I have full faith and assurance, though, that this c o m m u n i t y will continue to thrive. So thanks for the memories, H o p e College. It's been one heck of a ride.

within." An image like that puts a whole new spin on the idea of being beautiful inside and out, doesn't it? It makes the internal kind of goodness a whole lot m o r e impressive if people can tell it's there f r o m the outside. And the window in chapel that caught my attention? R e m e m b e r how I said can't tell you what form was pictured there, only that the bright beauty of it is b u r n e d into my thoughts? It's just like that with people. W e differ in form, but we've got this awesome connection that locks us all together. N o matter what image we are, we've got a light somewhere in us, because we are all m a d e after G o d himself. I love thinking this way. And I've been looking at people a little differently since then. I've been looking for the sparkle of color f r o m s o m e inside light. It's hard to tell, sometimes, if the light I'm looking at is a product of their surroundings (like sunlight through stained glass) or if it comes f r o m s o m e flickering beauty all by itself. O u r day-to-day situations have a huge effect o n h o w we act. It's easy to be happy in good times: we all shine then. It's the joy t h a t is persistent even in the tough times that gives off the sparkling light of a person beau-

Karen is grateful beyond words to James, Kathy and the rest of The Anchor staff. It's been a real joy to work with each of you.

tiful on t h e inside, too.

Hardly in the margins; another senior speak-up Reality of the farewell John Donkersloot Guest Columnist For the senior class, it is the time of the "lasts." Just two weeks ago, it was the last spring break. It just was the last April Fool's Day. It will soon be the last week of school, last class, last weekend, graduation will happen, and then everyone will leave. The anomaly of an undergraduate education, finished. A n d for many, it will be the last time that they see some of their acquaintances, teammates and friends. Ever. Over the course of four years at Hope, o n e comes into contact with an incredibly large a m o u n t of wonderful people. As a matter of fact, four years is far too short a time to spend among such people. People w h o lived down the hall in the dorms; people f r o m classes; people f r o m clubs; people f r o m teams. From within all of these

groups, there is a core: those who are not just people, but friends, in the truest and best sense of the word, those indispensable few who seem to know you better than you know yourself. Realistically, these are the p e o ple w h o you will keep in contact with after graduation. No, not just writing on their Facebook wall every m o n t h with a brief, "What's up?" Phone calls. Letters. Weekend road trips. Graduation will be a goodbye, not a farewell. The physical place called H o p e College is not what binds t h e friendship together: it is a mutual appreciation of that other person, simply for who they are. If truth be told, it is to the acquaintances, t h e relationships which are no deeper than a "hello," to w h o m the "ever" applies. If in t h e future, by happy coincidence, you and that other person happen to b u m p into each other, it will be a joy. You will have a brief five-minute conversation and then continue walking down the sidewalk and continue living your life, but no special effort will be made to maintain contact. Time is limited and life is busy: maintaining contact with everyone is an im-

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possibility. W h e t h e r or not it is said, with the majority of people, a farewell is in order. W h a t is t h e best way to say farewell? No, not to say goodbye, for goodbye carries the sense that on s o m e distant day you will meet again. Farewell has an air of permanence, for paths are diverging, perhaps forever. This is sad: so many happy memories contain so many different people. Nearly everyone denies this reality when parting, the reality of the farewell: "I'll talk to you later." "There's always the holidays; we'll catch up." "We'll stay in touch." In some cases these exchanges are honest; in many they are not. Rather than embrace falsehood, there is an alternative: acceptance. Acceptance of the fact that four years were allotted to share with some people and that a bittersweet parting of ways is inevitable. In light of the inevitability of parting, the absolute best way to say farewell is this: it was a blessing knowing you for a time, and I truly hope that you have a wonderful life.

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9

The preface

Letter to the Editors It is difficult to argue that interpersonal violence in this country hasn't reached startling rates. This issue of violence within our country, however, often gets pushed to the back b u r n e r while we obsess a b o u t wars abroad. W h a t doesn't get talked about is that w o m e n and children are battling their own wars daily in homes around this country. They are not battling some foreign terrorist regime. Rather, they are struggling against husbands, boyfriends and fathers. We often hear this referred to as "domestic violence," and true as that may be, we are failing to put rightful blame on the perpetrators. This isn't just violence. It is men's violence against w o m e n . It is easy for us to think about this as a women's problem. After all, w o m e n are the ones absorbing the b r u n t of the blow. However, this is m u c h m o r e than just a women's problem. Here are some of the brutal facts: m e n commit 85% of murders, 90% of assaults, 95% of domestic violence, and 99.8% of rapes in this country. It is easy for m e n to mentally turn off when they read these facts because they still see it as a women's issue. "Let the feminists deal with it," they might say. Unfortunately, by thinking of this issue as solely women's issues we are missing the biggest part of the problem—men! W e need to think about violence against w o m e n as a men's issue because it is m e n w h o commit the violence and it is m e n w h o should do m o r e to bring an end to it. Studies have shown that m e n are the perpetrators of over 99 percent of the rapes in this country, which means w o m e n perpetuate less than one percent of all rapes. With such an overwhelming majority of the perpetrators being men, h o w is it even possible to think in terms of this being solely a women's issue? Part of the problem is that we don't want to talk about the issue. It is easier for us to write it off as "their" problem. This isn't "their" problem. It is our problem. This is a men's issue. We are t h e ones w h o are perpetrating these acts. W e are the ones that are going to be the ones to stop it. W o m e n play a crucial role in bringing an end to this violence, but it is when m e n decide to tackle is epidemic that lasting change will come. At the core of this violence is h o w we shape and construct masculinity in our society. From an early age we are taught that to be a m a n one m u s t be strong, dominating, tough, powerful and emotionally resilient. W e have to adopt this macho attitude, or else face being called a girl, a sissy, or a pussy. W e are taught

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that violence is not only okay but that it is often condoned. In order to establish our dominance over someone, we learn early on that violence is the easiest way. If s o m e o n e has what we want, then taking it by force is usually the quickest means of obtaining what we desire. The worst part is that we often see this behavior starting in our young boys and we do nothing to prevent it. Instead, we adopt the "boys will be boys" attitude. W e need to d e m a n d m o r e out of our boys and men. W e need to shift the way that we think of masculinity and adopt a healthier model. As Fredrick Douglas once said, "Its much easier to build healthy boys than to repair broken

Sam Tzou Columnist Before you read this, realize the following words were probably the hardest words to ever come from my head and put on paper. Ill tell you why in a bit. Almost everybody has lost something or s o m e o n e close in their life. The most memorable loss for me just h a p p e n e d to take place on my birthday. Talk about a day that's unforgettable. Going f r o m blowing out 18 candles and falling on your knees begging God for someone's life over the span of two hours was unreal. G r a n t had been a dear friend since the beginning of middle school. While we never went to the same school, we were in the same youth group and basketball camps. In our circle of friends, it worked out well: he was the fairly loud prankster but also cared about others, and 1 was the soft spoken, reticent book w o r m . Friendships work like that sometimes you know? Different schools and churches drifted us apart a bit, but the times that we were able to see each other were funfilled. In my mind there was this unspoken bond that I will never forget. It'd be easy for me to make up some sappy story with a bunch of great memories that we had. It'd be easy for me to tell some story of some prank that Grant pulled on me that my friends and 1 laughed about for the rest of the school year. But's it's m o r e than that. The line that should c o m e here is about h o w we never know when our next breath is on this earth. The sentence should suggest that we should live each m o m e n t as if it was your last. But's it's m o r e than that. The reason these words can't come out quite right is because I don't think Grant ever knew or heard from me how much I appreciated him. His smile, his no nonsense and persevering attitude on the basketball court, as well as in life, was one of the true treasures of this world. In our daily lives we often get so entangled in the smallest things and dramas, worrying what others may think of us, that we forget what's most impor-

men." W e all need to take a stand against violence, and the first step to doing so is challenging the macho attitudes and images that are ever-present in the Media and our society as a whole. 1 know that there are m e n and w o m e n on our c a m p u s who, like me, feel passionate about understanding m o r e about how we shape images of masculinity and how to begin to bring an end to the violence against women. If you want to learn m o r e about how to make this a reality then there is a very exciting interactive presentation that you need to be a part of. O n April 14 f r o m 4 p.m. until 5:30 p.m., r e n o w n e d author and activist Dr. Jackson Katz will be presenting in the Knickerbocker Theater. I have had the h o n o r of hearing Katz present previously and have even had the fortune of having lunch with him. His presentations are engaging and insightful. Katz will take a look at the social influences that construct masculinity and the forces that lead to the development of the violent male. This is an event that everyone can learn a great deal from, especially men. The biggest message that Jackson Katz emphasizes isthatwe need t o d e m a n d more out of our men. Let's stop perpetrating the Mr. M a c h o image of masculinity and help to build healthy males. A pledge that 1 took s o m e time ago is one that 1 h o p e that all m e n on our campus will take. It is known as the W h i t e Ribbon Pledge. Please take this pledge yourself: "As a m a n I pledge to never commit, condone or remain silent about men's violence against women. I pledge to not feed into the c u r r e n t image of masculinity and to actively fight to change it." Men, it's time to be real m e n and step up to stop the violence against women.

Correction:

The Anchor may just be able to publish you: HERE. But you've got to let us know. One of your blog posts could be featured as part of a new BLOG COLUMN. As a part of the Hope community-whether male or female, religious or not, whatever race, whatever gender.Jt's a way to let the rest of the Hope community know who you are and what you have to share with the rest of the world.

The Anchor staff would like to apologize to Sports Editor Jolene Jeske, Grapics Editor Emily Dammer and the Hope Community for the incorrect page 8 in the March 30 Ranchor. Our printing company made an error and ran page 8 from the March 9, 2 0 1 1 issue. We did not intentionally overlook the work and efforts of our staff.

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tant. I'm guilty of this and more. Excessive and inefficient club meetings, h o m e w o r k procrastination, and sports practices over the course of four years got in the way of time to tell somebody h o w much I appreciated them. Last m o n t h I wrote about IThessalonians: the importance and challenge of how the words we say or write should be used to praise God. W h a t 1 failed to include in that column was not only h o w hard it would be, but in addition, how this attitude is impossible to maintain without faith. Paul, in 2 Corinthians, lays it out pretty clearly that "we walk by faith and not by sight." Day by day we walk through this path and journey that the Lord has laid for us. For us, our paths and stories have crossed at Hope College. This intersection has created many great times of laughter and fantastic memories. How often do we take the time to show that appreciation to G o d and to each other? I don't know why God took my friend away on my birthday. It's not for me to know. W h a t I would like to suggest is for us to walk each day as if it was our last. Speaking the words that need to be said. Doing the things that need to be d o n e and glorifying G o d through our words, thoughts and actions. I t s not going to be easy. Heck, it's taken me over two years to write the next paragraph. But with faith in Christ, he will grant us victory. So here it goes. Dear Grant, my great friend and brother in Christ, your friendship is something that 1 am always going to cherish. O n top of our wonderful m e m ories, your caring attitude and new perspective on life is forever e m b e d d e d in my heart. Look forward to seeing you up there when this is all done. Oh, and save a spot for me on your five-on-five team, will you? You better be able to dunk when I get there. Take care until

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NEWS National undergraduate research week events April 11-18

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H o p e College is presenting multiple activities open to the public as part of the college's celebration of National Undergraduate Research Week, which begins Monday, April 11. The week will open with the keynote address "Making Explicit the Implicit: Defining Undergraduate Research" by Dr. Nancy Hensel, who is executive director of the Council on Undergraduate Research, on Monday, April 11, at 2:30 p.m. in the DeWitt Center main theatre. The week's subsequent events will include multiple presentations in the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural and applied sciences. The events include concerts in music and dance, an art exhibition, a play, multiple lectures and panel discussions about involvement in research, and the annual Celebration of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance featuring poster presentations on m o r e than 200 projects in which m o r e than 360 students participated. To help inspire the next generation of researchers, H o p e has also scheduled several brief research-activity camps for area children. Except for the play, admission to all of the activities is free, although advance registration is required for the researchactivity camps for children. The week of April 11 has been declared National Undergraduate Research Week by the U.S. House of Representatives. The resolution describes undergraduate research as "essential to pushing the

Nation's innovation agenda forward by ensembles concert at 7:30 p.m. in increasing the interest and persistence Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Thursday, April 14, will feature among young people in the crucial research presentations by three arts and science, technology, engineering, and humanities students at 1 p.m. in the Maas mathematics (STEM) disciplines, and Center conference room; an overview to cultivating the interest of would-be of international research and serviceresearchers w h o pursue a new aspiration learning experiences, "The World Is of graduate education after participating Your Classroom," at 3 p.m. on the second in undergraduate research." floor of the rotunda of the Martha Miller In addition to the opening keynote, Center for Global Communication; and activities on Monday, April 11, will include reflections regarding participation in the presentation "Research O p p o r t u n i t i e s research by four students - representing for High School Students," at 4 p.m. in room 1019 of the SchaapScienceCenter; a the arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural and applied sciences - at 7 p.m. in jazz c o m b o s concert at 7 p.m. in Wichers room 1118 of the Schaap Science Center. Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music; The 10th annual Celebration of and a student dance concert at 8 p.m. in Undergraduate Research and Creative the Dow Center dance studio. Also on Performance will take place on Friday, Monday, and throughout the week, the April 15, from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at gallery of the De Pree Art Center will be the Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse. featuring work by graduating senior art majors; the exhibition r u n s April 8-May 8 The presentations will feature posters illustrating research projects and creative from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through work by students, with many of the Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. on Sundays. students o n - h a n d to discuss their work. Tuesday, April 12, will feature a student The topics range f r o m the aftermath of dance concert at 8 p.m. at the DowCenter Haiti's 2010 earthquake, to a student's dance studio. Hope will also present the CUR-sponsored, national webinar "Transformational Learning Through Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance" at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 13, will feature readings by senior creative writers at 3 p.m. in the Fried-Hemenway Auditorium of the M a r t h a Miller Center for Global Communication; the panel presentation "Inspiration on Life Beyond Hope," focusing on work/life balance, featuring multiple alumni at 6 p.m. in W i n a n t s Auditorium of Graves Hall; and a jazz

work designing costumes for a H o p e play, to security on smartphones. Friday, April 15, will also feature the opening of Hope College Theatre's production of "Gone Missing" at 8 p.m. in the DeWitt Center main theatre. There will also be p e r f o r m a n c e s on Saturday, April 16, and Tuesday-Thursday, April 1921. Tickets are $10 for regular admission, $7 for senior citizens and $5 for students, and are available in the ticket office in the main lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse, which is open weekdays f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and may be called at (616) 3957890. The research-activity camps, ranging in length f r o m one-and-a-half to three hours, will take place on Thursday, April 14, and Saturday, April 16, and will feature dance, communication, kinesiology, literature, television production, and the natural and applied sciences.

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Athletes work, play hard under Florida sun James Rogers STAFF WRITER

The chilly Michigan a t m o sphere t e n d s to linger t o o far into M a r c h . The u n p r e d i c t a b l e w e a t h e r that strikes Holland can be a hassle to t h e training and practicing of Hope's spring sports teams. As we t u r n t h e c o r n e r a n d face t h e m i d d l e of M a r c h , b o t h s t u d e n t s and s t u d e n t - a t h l e t e s are eager for a relaxing break, most likely c o n t e m p l a t i n g taking a relaxing walk o n t h e beach or lying out by the glistening pool. Specifically for athletes, spring break is still work-laden, but t h e trips d o w n s o u t h are n o t remotely unappealing. The t i m e s p e n t b o n d i n g with t e a m m a t e s and developing relationships with o n c e unfamiliar faces are just a c o u p l e reasons w h y t h e s e trips can b e t h e highlight of t h e season. Also, w h o would t u r n d o w n t h e attractive o p p o r t u n i t y to p a r t a k e in practice a n d c o m p e tition in a bright, 80-degree haven? The baseball, softball, tennis and track t e a m s all took their talents t o Florida this spring break. The S u n s h i n e State welc o m e d t h e arrival of n u m e r o u s cold-ridden student-athletes w h o w e r e ready t o j u m p into t h e w a r m e m b r a c e of t h e scintillating sun. The athletes certainly enjoyed t h e t i m e off f r o m school, but b o t h they and their c o a c h e s k n o w that serious business w a s to be attained. " W h e n we have early g a m e s , we'll have t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to d o s o m e f u n t e a m activities," firstyear softball h e a d coach M a r y Vande Hoef stated. "On days t h a t we play it will be pretty s c h e d uled. Eat, t e a m meeting, head to t h e field a n d play o u r games." The softball t e a m h e a d e d to the field quite o f t e n while va-

cationing in C l e r m o n t . From M a r c h 19-25, t h e D u t c h faced 10 different t e a m s f r o m eight different states. After a s t r o n g d e b u t for C o a c h Vande Hoef in h e r first four games, w h i c h w e r e indoors, she is delighted and cleared f r o m any t r o u b l e s o m e emotions. Both Vande Hoef and her players w e r e ready to e m b a r k o n their trip and c o m p e t e in t h e u n deniable weather. "It's

you say Harry Potter World?" Potentially magical trips w e r e a tangible distance away, and t h e track and field t e a m was a n x i o u s to s t e p foot in w h a t s e e m s to be every H o p e athlete's Utopia: Florida. The t e a m had t o wait just a hint longer to m e e t Florida as they m a d e a crucial stop on t h e way d o w n in Emory, G e o r gia for the E m o r y Invitational o n M a r c h 18-19. At the conclusion of t h e meet, t h e wheels kept m o v i n g toward The S u n sh i n e State. Cross country Nationals qualifier and spirited captain N a t e Love ('12) can attest to the inevitable t e a m b o n d i n g and t h e tense relief of t r a i n i n g and c o m p e t i n g in spring s p o r t conditions. "I love that we get an o p p o r tunity to train s o m e p l a c e w a r m . It is really t h e first c h a n c e we get t o d o that, so t h a t is really exciting!" Love said. H e a d coach Kevin Cole k n o w s t h a t this break w a s n o t i m e to slack off and was f o c u s o n relaxing, but r a t h e r a crucial trip consisting- of t h e first t w o o u t d o o r m e e t s of the season and a five-day stretch of hard work and dedication. ,C 0 GBAP* "It is just a good t i m e c o n strong sisting of h a n g i n g out, r u n n i n g c o m p e t i t i o n that b o t h t h e twice a day, reading and lying by m e n and w o m e n faced is also the beach. It is an overall g o o d a great a s p e c t of t h e trip. H e a d t i m e hanging o u t with f r i e n d s coach N a t e Price and t h e w o m and getting s o m e great work in en's t e a m played five m a t c h e s at t h e s a m e time." f r o m M a r c h 21-25. Along with It is n o w clear that Hope's t h e practice and occasional f u n spring t e a m s w e r e quite busy activities, this trip calls for a over t h e d u r a t i o n of spring m e m o r a b l e time. break, but it w a s s p e n t d o i n g "The level of c o m p e t i t i o n will things athletes love: b o n d i n g be extremely high d u r i n g t h e trip as we play several p o w e r f u l with t e a m m a t e s , practicing and relaxing in sunny c o n d i t i o n s and t e a m s f r o m o u r region includbattling against s t r o n g c o m p e t i ing L u t h e r College, University of tion. As t h e persisting u n p r e d i c t W i s c o n s i n - O s h Kosh, and N o r t h Central College (III)," G o r n o said. able w e a t h e r and chilly breezes persisted in Holland, our H o p e "Interspersed with t h e m a t c h e s College athletes worked h a r d will be a lot of practice time, u n d e r the beating of t h e radiant conditioning, and even a little Florida sun. t i m e for s o m e f u n as well. C a n

head men's coach Steve G o r n o was eager for the c o m m e n c e m e n t of t h e trip. "Spring break provides t h e first real o p p o r t u n i t y for the t e a m to b o n d together," m e n t i o n e d G o r n o . " W e spend o n e full week living, practicing, c o m p e t i n g and having f u n with every m e m b e r of t h e team, so it is a great opp o r t u n i t y to build relationships establish n d strong sense of

and

def-

initely exciting to be he ad i n g d o w n to play g a m e s for ourspring break trip. W e get a chance to c o m p e t e in t h e nicest w e a t h e r of o u r season for those 10 g a m e s , and a lot of t e a m b o n d i n g h a p p e n s d u r i n g t h e t r i p as well," said Vande Hoef. Similar to softball, baseball bec a m e familiar with t h e field f r o m M a r c h 18-24. Over t h e course of those days, they battled t e a m s f r o m five separate states. The seemingly hectic g a m e schedule for t h e D u t c h m e n combined with t h e inevitable b o n d i n g experiences and e n j o y m e n t of t h e s o o t h i n g Florida sun. T h e men's a n d w o m e n ' s tennis t e a m s will be residing in O r lando for t h e break. E x u b e r a n t

/

Dutchmen fall to Kalamazoo but stay optimistic Jolene Jeske S P O R T S EDITOR

The D u t c h m e n suffered a tough loss t o t h e K a l a m a z o o H o r n e t s last W e d n e s d a y with a score of 0-9. The H o r n e t s r e m a i n t h e t o u g h e s t c o m p e t i t i o n in t h e M I A A , holding their place at the t o p for over 70 years. T h e D u t c h m e n c a m e into this season with their m a j o r weakness being a lack of experience. Although H o p e College's men's tennis t e a m is m a d e u p of four seniors, two of t h e m r e t u r n e d t o t h e t e a m after injuries last season, so t h e r e w a s a lot t o catch u p on. Even t h o u g h t h e D u t c h m e n lack experience, they m a k e u p for it with motivation and learning f r o m past mistakes. "We've got guys t h a t have great c h a r a c t e r and play hard," said coach Steve G o r n o . "They listen well, learn f r o m their mistakes and r e s p o n d very well t o pressure." A great e x a m p l e of the team's

A

*

t h e six tiebreakers and four out of five three set matches, resulting in a 5 - 4 victory for t h e Dutchmen. Gorno said the d i f f i c u lt PHOTO COURTESY OF HOPE P R s c h e d u l e FOLLOWING THROUGH - Jonathan Lautz ( ' 1 1 ) goes In for t h e s t r i k e at last Wednesday's over spring m a t c h a g a i n s t Kalamazoo College. The D u t c h m e n break p r e s u f f e r e d a t o u g h loss to t h e Hornets w i t h a final p a r e and motivated score of 0-9. his t e a m to c o m p e t e at a higher level in t h e ability t o b o u n c e back u n d e r regular season. pressure was over s p r i n g break. "We l e a r n e d a lot and gained The D u t c h m e n c a m e close in the m a t c h experience that will help first four m a t c h e s over break, us in the M I A A season," G o r n o b u t what really c o u n t e d was t h e last game against Luther, Iowa. said. The m a t c h e s they played Luther was the toughest in Florida gave the D u t c h m e n t e a m t h e D u t c h m e n would play s o m e t h i n g t o fight for w h e n they that week, a n d it was their last c a m e back t o c o m p e t e against m a t c h . The t e a m w o n five o u t of

\

•

w i

- t

Kalamazoo. But Kalamazoo's exp e r i e n c e d t e a m of three seniors and four juniors gave the D u t c h m e n a r u n for their money. "It wasn't m u c h of a surprise," G o r n o said. "They have t h e longest c o n f e r e n c e winning streak in s p o r t s a n d always play strong." W i t h t h e loss to Kalamazoo b e h i n d t h e m , the D u t c h m e n are focusing o n the r u n for second place in t h e M I A A . The m a i n obstacle in t h e way is Calvin College. "We're setting o u r goals for s e c o n d place, only b e c a u s e we realistically k n o w first place is a long shot," G o r n o said. The D u t c h m e n may have c o m e up s h o r t in their first regular season m a t c h , b u t their h o p e s are high for t h e rest of t h e season. W i t h an overall record of 2-9, the t e a m is looking to add s o m e "W's" to their record this Saturday versus D a v e n p o r t and Adrian.

ANCHOR

11

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS

Wednesday M e n ' s Tennis

April 6

vs. Aquinas at 4 p.m.

Thursday W o m e n ' s Tennis

April 7

vs. Davenport at 4 p.m.

Friday M e n ' s Tennis

April 8

GLCA Tournament at Kalamazoo

Baseball vs. A l m a at 2 p.m.

W o m e n ' s Tennis vs. Grand Valley at 4 p.m.

Saturday M e n ' s Tennis

April 9

GLCA Tournament at Kalamazoo

W o m e n ' s Tennis v.s. Saint Mary's at 1 p.m.

W o m e n ' s Tennis v.s. Saint Mary's at 1 p.m.

M e n ' s a n d W o m e n ' s Track Ferris Invitational at 1 1 a.m.

ALL REGION HONORS Women's Basketball Carrie Snikkers ('11) Men's Basketball Will Bowser ('11)

IN BRIEF

MEN'S LACROSSE REMAIN UNDEFEATED The men's lacrosse t e a m rem a i n s u n d e f e a t e d with a season record of 4-1-0. At t h e first g a m e ever played o n the Judson 111. field last Saturday, the D u t h m e n kicked it into gear, defeating Judson 18-5. H o p e lead for the entire g a m e , p o s t i n g a 12-3 led at t h e half. Leading t h e D u t c h e m n in Scoring w e r e Allen C a m p b e l l ('11), Eric W e b e r ('11), John LoVasco ('14), Michael Schofield (14), Caleb Digison (*14), Will Franken ('14), Josh K a m s t r a ('13) a n d Austin Krehel ('14). The D u t c h m e n h o p e to rem a i n u n d e f e a t e d in their g a m e s this week. The m e n play August a n a (III) April 8 at H o p e at 8 p.m. o n April 9. The D u t c h m e n play Ferris State at h o m e starting at 2.p.m.

WOMEN'S LACROSSE SWEEPS WHEAT0N TOURNAMENT The H o p e College D u t c h d o m i n a t e d t h e W h e a t o n tour-j n a m e n t over the weekend. The w o m e n reigned victoriousO in t h e t o u r n a m e n t over Augustana (14-11), D a v e n p o r t (14 C h i c a g o (15-7) and Tpl< 11), m a k i n g their overall 5-2. Top scorers throi t o u r n a m e n t for t h e M a d d i e Ferguson mie B e n j a m i n ( 1 2 ) , each tributing 15 points.


[ 2

THE ANCHOR

SPORTS

APRII 6 , 2 0 1 1

Track and field kicks off outdoor season John D o n k e r sloot ('11) in t h e high j u m p (6-10 Vt); and Steffon Mayh u e ('14) in t h e long j u m p (224%). The Flying D u t c h a n d D u t c h m e n had a jam - p a c k e d spring break of training and competition. Both teams swept t h e c o m petition in t h e E m o r y InvitaPHOTO COURTESY OF HOPE P R tional in AtHIGH JUMP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Co-captaln John D o n k e r s l o o t ( ' 1 1 ) won his lanta, G A t h e weekend high j u m p e v e n t t h i s past Saturday at t h e Grand Valley Open first before heading h o s t e d by Aquinas College w i t h a h e i g h t of 6 - 1 0 1 / 4 . t o Florida for a Charlotte Park week of training. H o p e r e t u r n e d to EmoASST. S P O R T S EDITOR ry t h e following w e e k e n d for the E m o r y University Classic at w h i c h t h e Flying Both t h e men's a n d w o m e n ' s t r a c k D u t c h m e n took first in a 15-team field, t e a m s kicked off their o u t d o o r s e a s o n while t h e Flying D u t c h finished s e c o n d at t h e n o n - s c o r i n g G r a n d Rapids O p e n a m o n g 17 t e a m s for t h e w e e k e n d . h o s t e d by A q u i n a s College o n Saturday. "On o u r spring break trip, t h e sprinters, W i n n i n g for H o p e w a s Nicholas Rinck distance r u n n e r s , j u m p e r s a n d t h r o w e r s ('11) in t h e 1 1 0 - m e t e r hurdles (:15.48) a n d all s e e m e d t o m e s h incredibly well," said 4 0 0 - m e t e r h u r d l e s (:55.25); men's 4X400c o - c a p t a i n Emily Fischer ('11). "I think m e t e r relay of Rinck, Jacob Hurrel ('14), this is t h e best t e a m unity t h a t we've seen Joel Rietsma ('13) and c o - c a p t a i n C a m in a while, w h i c h is exciting." e r o n L a m p k i n ('11) (3:23.94); c o - c a p t a i n

A n e w season brings a n e w set of t e a m goals for Hope's r u n n e r s , including e n d ing the d r o u g h t of losing to Calvin and claiming t h e M I A A C h a m p i o n s h i p title. "In my experience over my four years, I have never ran with m o r e of a s u p p o r t ive t e a m than this year's g r o u p f r o m distance to sprints to t h r o w e r s and j u m p e r s all around," said L a m p k i n . "I h o p e as a t e a m a n d as a captain we all c o n t i n u e to facilitate an e n v i r o n m e n t w h e r e we a r e able to d o o u r best and reach m a x i m u m performance." In regards to t h e m o s t anticipated m e e t s of t h e season, t h e M I A A Jamboree and t h e M I A A Field Day rank high o n Hope's list. "Iliese m e e t s are o u r c h a n c e as a t e a m t o shock t h e M I A A and s h o w h o w m u c h h a r d work pays off," said Lampkin. In addition t o w i n n i n g c o n f e r e n c e , t h e Flying D u t c h m e n h o p e to achieve t e a m c o m r a d e r y as well as limit their injuries this season. "I think t h e biggest excitem e n t is h o w well o u r t e a m s have b o n d e d together," said c o - c a p ta in Emily Kreichelt ('12). "We have a really tight-knit group, a n d this closeness h a s allowed o u r t e a m s t o p e r f o r m exceptionally well, as well as g e n e r a t e t e a m spirit and support." The m e n have four r e t u r n i n g All-MIAA athletes with big h o p e s for t h e i r spring seasons. D o n k e r s l o o t n o t only c a p t u r e d a first place finish in t h e high j u m p but also received N C A A A l l - A m e r i c a n h o n o r s for t h e s e c o n d year in a row. Rinck r e t u r n s

as a 400- m e t e r hurdles c h a m p i o n for t h e t h i r d consecutive year in a row, in addition to Elliott Barney ('13) in t h e 4 0 0 - m e ter dash. C o - c a p t a i n N a t h a n Love ('12) received All-MIAA first t e a m h o n o r s in cross c o u n t r y this past fall, while Lampkin r e t u r n s as MIAA's most valuable r u n n e r and c h a m p i o n in b o t h t h e 100 and 2 0 0 - m e t e r dash events. "My fellow 4X100 m e t e r relay t e a m m a t e s A n d r e w Schofield ('12), Kyle V a n d e r v e e n ('12), Jacob Hurrell ('14) and I h o p e t o p u t up a n e w record a n d m a k e it to t h e national c h a m p i o n s h i p m e e t this season," said L a m p k i n . The w o m e n ' s squad consists of seven r e t u r n i n g All-MIAA h o n o r e e s w h o h o p e t o b o o s t the t e a m t o victory, co-captain Kara Vande G u c h t e ('11) achieved N C A A All-American recognition in t h e H e p t a t h l o n last year with a third place finish at nationals. In addition, c o - c a p tain Heidi G r o o t e r s ('11) r e t u r n s with t h e H o p e r e c o r d in t h e h a m m e r , while Taylor Mattarella ('13) w a s c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p last spring in the 5,000 meter. In addition, Sara Venlet ('13) set Hope's record in t h e 4 0 0 - m e t e r hurdles. Fischer, Sharon Hecker ('13), Kelly Lufkin ('12) and M a t terella also received A l l - M I A A h o n o r s in cross c o u n t r y this past fall. Both t e a m s c o n t i n u e their o u t d o o r seasons away o n Sat., April 9 at t h e Ferris Invitational.

Women's tennis opens season against Kenyon James Rogers S T A F F WRITER

The w o m e n ' s tennis t e a m r e t u r n e d f r o m Florida to t h e u n p r e d i c t a b l e a n d chilly w e a t h e r of Michigan that lingers into April. Saturday, t h e D u t c h traveled to K a l a m a z o o to take o n Kenyon in a m a t c h altered d u e t o w e a t h e r and suffered u n finished singles c o m p e t i t i o n s . D u r i n g spring break, however, t h e D u t c h played well in w a r m , sunny c o n ditions and had satisfying victories over H u n t i n g d o n (Ala), C o l o r a d o College, M e r r i m a c k (Maine) and U W - O s h k o s h . Their only loss of t h e trip c a m e at t h e h a n d s of L u t h e r College, Iowa, o n e of t h e highest r a n k e d t e a m s in Hope's region. D e p a r t i n g f r o m Florida with a 4 - 1 o u t d o o r record, head coach N a t e Price was pleased with his team's p e r f o r m a n c e s ^ n d t h e o p p o n e n t s t h e y were able t o face. "The c o m p e t i t i o n in Florida was exactly w h a t w e n e e d e d after a c o u p l e of losses to very good t e a m s early in t h e year [ W h e a t o n and Ferris]," Price said. "Florida p r o v i d e d us t h e c h a n c e t o build s o m e c o n f i d e n c e by getting s o m e wins. Within

those t e a m victories that a p p e a r e d d o m i n a n t , t h e r e w e r e s o m e h a r d - f o u g h t individual m a t c h e s w h e r e we c a m e o u t o n top." Price also saw positive o u t c o m e s resulting f r o m their loss t o Luther. "I was just as p r o u d of t h e girls in t h a t m a t c h |Luther] as I was in o u r wins," Price indicated. " W e f o u g h t as h a r d as we could a n d w e r e able t o use t h a t m a t c h to learn s o m e things to b e c o m e a better t e a m for t h e i m m e d i a t e f u t u r e . It was just a n o t h e r step in gaining m u c h n e e d e d experience." H e a d i n g back t o Michigan, t h e D u t c h usually have o n e week of practice to prep a r e for t h e annual G L C A T o u r n a m e n t . D u e t o the a b s e n c e of m a n y of t h e usual O h i o t e a m s for this year's t o u r n a m e n t , t h e G L C A w a s canceled, leaving r o o m for a weekend match. H o p e a n d Kenyon College (Ohio) a g r e e d t o play Saturday evening in Kalamazoo. Rainy w e a t h e r a n d a late start c a u s e d a few of the singles m a t c h e s t o go unfinished. " W h e n we m a d e t h e decision to play indoors [bec a u s e of t h e weather], we were more limited on the number of courts," explained Price, "and because we w e r e starting late, Kenyon's coach r e q u e s t e d we play until t h e m a t c h was decided a n d then suspend play after that." After things

PHOTO COURTESY OF H O L L ^ EVENHCUSE

TOP SPIN-

Captain Katherlne Garcia ('11) hits a backhand In her number one singles match versus Kenyon College. Halfway Into her second set, play was suspended due to bad weather. were settled a n d t h e c o m p e t i t i o n c o n cluded, Kenyon prevailed 5-1 over H o p e in a m a t c h played to decision. The singles c o m p e t i t i o n s of Katherine Garcia ('11), Shelby Schulz ('13), and Mallory Smith ('14) all went unfinished, but H o p e w o n a d o u b l e s m a t c h in c o m m a n d i n g 8 - 2 fashion. T h e t a n d e m of Schulz and A n d r e a Pickelman ( 1 3 ) e x e c u t e d simple t e n n i s f u n d a m e n t a l s and displayed impressive volley t e c h n i q u e that led to a D u t c h victory. A l t h o u g h suffering an overall loss. Price believes his t e a m was inspired after they took a d e t o u r o n their way to Kala m a z o o to watch high profile Division I d o u b l e s c o m p e t i t i o n s at Michigan State. "The idea was t h a t we'd w a t c h a Division I m a t c h and n o t just learn, b u t be inspired by t h e high level of play we w e r e

witnessing." Keeping t h i n g s simple and encouraging o n e a n o t h e r are two keys to success that Price teaches his players. Despite this loss c o m i n g off t h e trip to Florida, t h e D u t c h k n o w that they have plenty m o r e o p p o r t u n i t i e s in t h e o u t d o o r season. "The girls a r e always very s u p p o r t i v e of each o t h e r after a t o u g h loss; it is s o m e t h i n g that we as a t e a m talk a b o u t a lot," Price said. " W e also talking about peaking at t h e e n d of t h e year, so even t h o u g h this was a t o u g h loss, we h o p e t o use t h e experience to m a k e u s a better team." The Flying D u t c h a r e set to face Adrian o n April 4 and t h e n t a k e on D a v e n p o r t o n Thursday, April 7.


04-06-2011  
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