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Hope College •

Holland, M i c h i g a n • A s t u d e n t - r u n n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n •

S e r v i n g t h e Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 117 years

Campus focus turns to Asian culture, awareness Jordan Wolfson SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

A s i a n A w a r e n e s s W e e k is intended to be more than just a ceremonial experience around H o p e ' s campus. Many Hope students have had prior experience with the multitude of cultures present in Asia, but many others have not.' T h e c o n t i n e n t of A s i a o f f e r s m a n y different cultural and educational experiences for those interested in investigating the numerous societies that live beneath its u m brella. The name Asia can be somewhat misleading at limes, since all p e o p l e h a v e d i f f e r e n t v i e w s and opinions on the eastern part of the world. T h i s is part of the reason w h y H o p e ' s Asian Perspectives Associa-

tion, the J a p a n C l u b , and the Multicultural Center plan an Asian Awareness Week every April for the students and faculty of Hope College. " F o r as long as H A P A has existed, there has been an Asian A w a r e n e s s W e e k at H o p e " said A m y Otis, the Assistant Director of

Asian Awareness Week will run f r o m April 5 to April 9. D u r i n g these days, m a n y e v e n t s will be held to help educate H o p e ' s student body about the multifaceted Asian

International Education at Hope. HAPA's mission is to aid in "promoting the diversity of the c a m p u s through the experiences, issues, and perspectives of Asians and Asian Americans that live on and off cam-

culture. On Monday, April 5 there will be a panel discussion on the subject " W h o A m I?" T h e panel will consist of H o p e students and A n n i e D a n d a v a t i , p r o f e s s o r of political science and advisor of HAPA. T h e discussion will f o c u s on the individuality of those w h o have been forced into the larger g r o u p known

pus". HAPA w e l c o m e s everyone w h o wishes to learn about the cultures and experiences of Asian Americans to join t h e m , not only those w h o are Asian or Asian A m e r i c a n .

as Asians. "The Asian identity is very c o m plex. S o m e put t h e m all together, when in fact they are a very diverse group," said Dandavati. ' T a k e India, for instance. T h e r e are several

d i f f e r e n t d i a l e c t s , and d i f f e r e n t foods for North and South India." Dandavati will be speaking about h e r e x p e r i e n c e s a s an I n d i a n w o m a n in A m e r i c a . S h e a l s o t e a c h e s c l a s s e s on C h i n e s e a n d Japanese politics. "There are many classes and activities out there that students can get involved in to increase their k n o w l e d g e of Asia and its cultures. Life is just more interesting when you can learn about such diversity," said D a n d a v a t i . T h i s d i s c u s s i o n will take place in the M a a s Center at 4 p.m Monday. On Tuesday, Takashi Saigo, the descendant of the legendary "Last S a m u r a i " Takamori Saigo, will be c o m i n g to speak about his greatgrandfather and the history revolv-

ing around him. Takamori Saigo was the Samurai w h o stood u p to the Meiji government. He led his army of samurai, numbering 3,500, against the a r m y of the ruling g o v e r n m e n t , w h o had not only e m b r a c e d the western technology of firearms but also had as m a n y as 35,000 troops. Takamori Saigo was honored after his death when the government pardoned his actions. A statue of the f a m o u s samurai walking his dog now stands in U e n o Park in Tokyo. T a k a s h i S a i g o will s p e a k in the M a a s Center at 7 p.m. During dinner on Wednesday, Phelps Dining Hall.will be serving authentic Asian dishes, f r o m countries all over Asia.

m o r e AWARENESS o n 2

Tennis teams off to slow start, improve with time Men's Tennis Coach: Steve G o m o Captains: Kevney Dugan ( ' 0 4 ) & Derek Phelan ( ' 0 4 ) Overall record: 2-7 League record: 1 -0 Next home meet: Today, 3 p.m. Friday. 7 p.m. Season

Wrap-up: Spring Break in Texas, 1-6 overall L o s s to Aquinas, 8-1 Win over Alma, 9 - 0

Women's Tennis Coach: Karen Page Captain: Stephanie Springer ( ' 0 4 ) Overall record: 7-4 League record: 1-1 Next home meet: Saturday, April 17, 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 21, 1 p.m. Season ANCHOR

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

The Flying Dutchmen (far side) take on a pair of Alma players in Saturday's men's tennis doubles match at home. Hope took all three doubles, as well as all six singles, beating the Scots 9-0. The men's record stands at 1-0 in league play.

Visiting prof to speak on Vietnam

Campus Briefs

T h e French Cultural Studies Colloquium at Hope College will host the address "Vietnam: T h e F r e n c h C o n n e c t i o n " tomorrow at 4 p.m. in the Herrick Room of the DeWitt Center. T h e address will be presented by Janet Solberg, associate professor of romance languages and literature at Kalamazoo College. Solberg, w h o has participated in research in Vietnam, will speak on the historical, political and cultural aspects of the French colonization of Vietnam.The public is invited and admission is free.

Wrap-up: Spring Break at Hilton Head, 6 - 3 overall L o s s to Saint Mary's, 4-5 W i n over Olivet, 8-1

Hope Accreditation renewed Hope College recently received official notice that T h e Higher Learning C o m m i s s i o n has continued the accreditation of the college through 2014. On Feb. 9, the Institutional Actions Council approved the continuing accreditation, which took effect on Feb. 13. Hope will not have to file progress, monitoring or contingency reports until the next evaluation in the 2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4 school year. Richard Ray, professor of kinesiology, chaired the committee responsible for ensuring this renewal of H o p e ' s accreditation.

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Inside A n c h o r ® Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

T:

Contemporary Arts, page 5

Motion

Baseball earns win Sports, page 8

Women in authority Features, page 3

/HOP ministry Features, page 4


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CAMPUS BEAT

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M a r c h 31, 2004

U.S. lawmakers consider new form of draft security and for purposes."

Justin Sobania S T A F F REPORTER

other

O n J a n . 7, 2 0 0 3 , S e n . E r n e s t

Recently, $28 million

Hollings, D-S.C, introduced the " U n i v e r s a l N a t i o n a l S e r v i c e Act o f

h a v e b e e n a d d e d to the Selective Services Sys-

2 0 0 3 " . T h i s bill, w h i c h w a s also

t e m b u d g e t in o r d e r t o

i n t r o d u c e d in the H o u s e of R e p r e sentatives b y Rep. C h a r l e s R a n g e l , D - N . Y., w o u l d , if passed essentially reinstate the d r a f t .

p r e p a r e f o r a d r a f t that c o u l d start as soon as J u n e 2005. T h e S S S is r e q u i r e d to report to the p r e s i d e n t a y e a r f r o m t o d a y that the s ys t em is ready f o r o p e r a -

service

service

the national

or a period

in furtherance

defense

and homeland

e n o u g h to b e d r a f t e d .

c o m p l e t i n g their service. "1 think that it is absolutely terri-

"In junior high school we used to

f y i n g t o think a b o u t the d r a f t starting again, especially if it w a s go-

g a t h e r in the cafeteria the day a f t e r the n u m -

ing to b e used f o r m e n and w o m e n .

If the p e n d i n g bill w e r e ratified,

bers were d r a w n and talk about w h o

I think f i g h t i n g f o r y o u r c o u n t r y s h o u l d b e a c h o i c e that requires a lot of t h o u g h t , " says Z e p h y r Miller

w o u l d h a v e a low n u m b e r , " said C h u c k G r e e n , p r o f e s s o r of psychol-

C06). T h i s feeling s e e m s t o b e wide-

T h e d r a f t has b e e n in stasis since the early 1970s, w h e n the Vietnam

f o r m e d s e r v i c e s or s o m e f o r m of

ogy-

s p r e a d o n c a m p u s , a s m a n y stu-

civil service. U n l i k e the d r a f t that

c o n f l i c t d r e w to a close. B e g i n n i n g

T h e p a s s a g e of the current bill would have a huge effect on Hope

d e n t s d o not w i s h to h a v e to interrupt their studies in order to per-

College. S t u d e n t s w h o are not seniors w o u l d only b e a b l e t o finish their

f o r m their y e a r of service.

including civilian

b e a b l e t o finish the year, b e f o r e

w o u l d have a high n u m b e r and w h o

by requiring that all young persons (age 18-26) in the United States, of military

Vietnam, although s o m e w e r e not old

m e n a n d w o m e n b e t w e e n the a g e s

tion.

a period

current semester, and seniors would

of 18 and 26 w o u l d serve m a n d a t o r y t e r m s w i t h i n e i t h e r t h e uni-

T h e bill states that its p u r p o s e is "to provide for the common defense

women, perform

I think fighting for your country should be a choice that requires a lot of thought. —Zephyr Miller ('06)

m e m o r i e s of the w a r in

of

at the a g e of 18. y o u n g m e n w e r e

took p l a c e d u r i n g the Vietnam c o n flict, higher education w o u l d not be

of

d r a f t e d t h r o u g h a lottery s y s t e m to

a valid reason for d e f e r m e n t .

j o i n the a r m e d forces.

Many faculty members have

"I hope o u r kids n e v e r h a v e to d o that a g a i n , " G r e e n said.

A W A R E N E S S from 1 T h e Sushi B r o t h e r s will also be there, to p r e p a r e food f o r s t u d e n t s w h o w a n t to try

L e e ' s first c o m i c , written w h i l e she w a s a s o p h o m o r e at the U n i v e r s i t y o f C a l i f o r n i a -

s o m e t h i n g different. T h e m o v i e ' B e n d it L i k e

Berkeley, w a s e n t i t l e d Angry

B e c k h a m ' will also b e s h o w n d u r i n g dinner. O n T h u r s d a y n i g h t , S c o t t Hall a n d t h e

Girl. S h e w a s told there w a s no market for

P h e l p s S c h o l a r s P r o g r a m will host a Battle of the D o r m s in the Scott Hall b a s e m e n t at

L e e w a s i n c e n s e d at the c o m m e n t , but she w a s supported b y other m e m b e r s of her c o m -

8 : 3 0 p . m . It will i n c l u d e k a r a o k e a n d o t h e r

munity, both Asian a n d n o n - A s i a n . S h e w e n t

f u n activities.

on to c h a n g e the c o m i c to i n c o r p o r a t e characters of all races, calling ii Angry Little Girls,

T h e s e e v e n t s are i n t e n d e d to raise a w a r e n e s s of Asian and A s i a n - A m e r i c a n culture, but they are also here t o get p e o p l e interested in the m a n y d i f f e r e n t c u l t u r e s and traditions Asia p o s s e s s e s . In fact, last w e e k e n d H A P A c a m e t o g e t h e r with its sister g r o u p at G r a n d Valley S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y at the " R e a l i z i n g & A d d r e s s i n g

Little

A s i a n s and w a s t u r n e d d o w n for publication.

and a c c o m p l i s h i n g h e r goal of getting it published. T h e m a n y s e s s i o n s at the R I C E C o n f e r e n c e a l l o w e d t h o s e w h o a t t e n d e d to get a better g l i m p s e into the lives of A s i a n s , A s i a n

is

m y w a t c h — 4 : 3 0 a.m. W h y h a d no o n e found m e ? W h e n I found my under-

Hope student's

account of being raped when she was in high school. She has agreed to write

p a n t s and pants in a heap, I b e g a n to cry.

about her experience

a n d then I t h r e w up. I ran u p to t h e h o u s e and my f r i e n d s

anonymously

in

I w a s so scared. M y legs w e r e s h a k i n g

He w a s the star of the basketball t e a m , a n d I w a s only 17. I n e v e r e v e n

all r a c e d t o w a r d m e , w o n d e r i n g w h e r e I

thought t o be c a u t i o u s . It w a s a

f o u n d . T h e n I l o o k e d d o w n at m y shirt

weekend, and my friend's parents were

and s a w that it had his s e m e n all o v e r it. I b e g a n t o cry a g a i n a n d m y

lish a larger m e m b e r s h i p in the s u r r o u n d i n g areas. H A P A also p l a n s to attend the R I C E C o n f e r e n c e next year, and any H o p e students w h o

and higher education". T h e k e y n o t e speaker of the c o n f e r e n c e w a s

h a v e an interest in l e a r n i n g m o r e a b o u t the

a w o m a n b y the n a m e o f Lela Lee, a car-

c a n s in A m e r i c a are w e l c o m e t o attend. All o f t h e e v e n t s s c h e d u l e d f o r A s i a n

h o o d b e c a u s e of her g e n d e r a n d her ethnicity.

courageous

this column:

w o r k s to m e r g e their m e m b e r s h i p , s o that the g r o u p itself will b e a b l e to g r o w and estab-

toonist, actress and graphic novelist. S h e w a s t o r m e n t e d and h u m i l i a t e d d u r i n g h e r child-

Like last week, the following

adopted Asian children.

f e r e n c e , held at the D e V o s C e n t e r at G V S U ,

a n d i n c r e a s e a w a r e n e s s of issues that A s i a n s a n d Asian P a c i f i c A m e r i c a n s f a c e in society

Another woman tells her story of hurt

Americans, and Americans w h o have H A P A a n d t h e A S U h a v e p l a n s in t h e

ture. T h e R I C E c o n f e r e n c e a i m s to " h i g h l i g h t

Columnist

another

Issues in o u r C u l t u r e a n d E d u c a t i o n " c o n to i n c r e a s e their k n o w l e d g e a b o u t A s i a n cul-

M E N , W O M E N AND R A P E

Asian

issues s u r r o u n d i n g A s i a n s and A s i a n - A m e r i -

friends knew something was

It took a long time to admit what had happened. It was an acquaintance rape — he's in my yearbook. out of t o w n . S h e w a s h a v i n g a b i g party with lots o f a l c o h o l , and practically

Warm weather brings out Frisbee golfers at Hope

w r o n g . E v e n t hough p e o p l e w e r e still p a r t y i n g , all I w a n t e d to d o w a s s h o w e r and w a s h him o f f of m e . I felt so dirty and s o c o n f u s e d . M y inner thighs had b r u i s e s and I d i d n ' t w a n t t o k n o w w h a t he had d o n e — I d i d n ' t think

A w a r e n e s s Week are f r e e to students, a n d the public is invited as well.

had b e e n . " H e " w a s n o w h e r e t o b e

I c o u l d stand it. T h e next d a y I w e n t h o m e and ray

e v e r y o n e w e k n e w w a s invited.

raom k n e w s o m e t h i n g w a s n ' t right. I

W h e n w e g o t there, I ' d already b e e n drinking and was giggly and dancing

told her w h a t h a d h a p p e n e d and she took m e to the doctor. I g o t the m o r n i n g

with m y f r i e n d s to m u s i c blaring f r o m a

after pill a n d an S T D test j u s t in c a s e .

stereo o u t s i d e . I d o n ' t r e m e m b e r m u c h

But that w a s n ' t the hardest part. I had to g o b a c k t o s c h o o l . It w a s the

of the n i g h t — j u s t bits and pieces. I remember him bringing me a d r i n k — h e w a s c o m p l e t e l y sober. M y f r i e n d s say it w a s m o r e like six d r i n k s — o n e a f t e r another, s t r o n g e r and

g o s s i p of the w e e k — I w a s a "slut," a "party girl." I w a s " e a s y " a n d m y g u y f r i e n d told m e in the l o c k e r r o o m b e f o r e b a s k e t b a l l p r a c t i c e " h e " told e v e r y o n e

s t r o n g e r until I c o u l d n ' t taste t h e m at all—I don't even remember drinking

h e h a d gotten " s o m e " f r o m m e .

t h e m . I d o n ' t r e m e m b e r m u c h a f t e r that

star of t h e basketball t e a m — h e w a s practically g l o r i f i e d . I d i d n ' t tell a n y o n e

e x c e p t w a l k i n g u p near a tree w i t h o u t

He b r a g g e d a b o u t it. T h i s w a s the

any pants on. I w o k e up feeling sore all over,

else until I w a s 19. It took a l o n g t i m e

w o n d e r i n g w h a t h a p p e n e d and w h y I

a m okay. It w a s an a c q u a i n t a n c e r a p e — h e ' s in m y y e a r b o o k .

w a s a l o n e out in the grass. I looked at

t o a d m i t w h a t had h a p p e n e d , but n o w I

Level O r a n g e H o p e College S e n i o r A r t Show ANCHOR

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Jeff Wheeler ('04), left, and Will Zeigenhuger ('04) toss Frisbees behind President Bultman's house Tuesday. As the weather warms, Hope students are asked to remember the new Frisbee golf rules instated last fall. Play is allowed only during hours while class is not in session, and players should be in groups of four or less. Frisbee golf continues to be a popular hobby on campus. Students are also reminded that the two holes near Dewitt have been altered. Maps are available on the Student Development website.

Opening Reception Friday, April 2, 5-7 p.m. Exhibition runs April 2 - May 2


^Anchor

FEATURES

M a r c h 31, 2 0 0 4

Women at Hope College faced persecution Female faculty share their personal story of gender discrimination while in the workplace S P O T L I G H T Erin L'Hotta INFOCUS EDITOR

Lei it be known. In recognition of Women's History Month, n u m e r o u s Hope f e m a l e faculty and staff said they have e n c o u n t e r e d hardships while being a woman in the working world. % Yes, during times past, many w o m e n at Hope have encountered discrimination, generalization and persecution simply because of their gender. Not long ago, Hope College w a s a place w h e r e w o m e n w e r e scarcely found as faculty and staff m e m b e r s . For exa m p l e , f e w e r than 2 0 y e a r s ago, not o n e woman received tenure while teaching in the natural science field. W o m e n were regulated to roles such as a l i b r a r i a n o r s e c r e t a r y . In f a c t , D e b o r a h Sturtevant, professor and current chair of the sociology and social work department, w a s frequently thought of as the department secretary w h e n she first started teaching. Sturtevant, w h o j o i n e d the faculty in 1988 after graduating from H o p e in 1975, said she " w a s o n e of the f e w h a n d f u l s of w o m e n on f a c u l t y " w h e n first hired. Even now, she is o n e of the few f e m a l e department chairs at Hope. Sturtevant gradually worked her way u p to this leadership position. B e f o r e arriving at Hope, Sturtevant was left jobless because of her gender. While applying to be a school teacher, she was told not to work if she planned to have children.

Sturtevant applied to be a middle school principle only to receive a letter of rejection stating, "A man would make a better disciplinarian than a w o m a n . " A f ter these discouragements, Sturtevant was hired as a social w o r k p r o f e s s o r at Hopfe. T h r o u g h the consensus of her de' partment colleagues, Sturtevant was choAHCHOR PHOTOS COURTESY DEBORAH STURTEVANT sen to serve as chair. Deborah Sturtevant Joanne Stewart " O v e r the past 15 years, there has been a strong emphasis on cent of full-time chemistry professors are fehiring w o m e n and minorities, and I think that male. Twenty-six percent of associate chemw e are finally in a position to stand u p and istry professors are female. Because of these be r e c o g n i z e d f o r o u r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , " odds, S a n f o r d has encountered challenges Sturtevant said. "I used to think that I would within her chosen career path. Sanford rehave to leave Hope College and go to a larger ceived the recognition to research and teach university in order to be considered f o r a leadChemistry once she arrived at H o p e in 1994. ership role, but I believe n o w that the opporHowever, she has had to fight f o r this recogtunities are here and that my career goals can nition throughout her life. be realized at H o p e College." While S a n f o r d studied chemistry at Smith A l o n g w i t h S t u r t e v a n t is E l i z a b e t h College, the nation's largest liberal arts colSanford, o n e of H o p e ' s three full-time, felege f o r w o m e n , she met female friends that male chemistry professors. e n j o y e d her interest in science. After graduA c c o r d i n g to the A u g . 2 0 0 3 e d i t i o n of ating, Sanford went to graduate school at the Chemical & Engineering News, only 12 perU n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a in L o s A n g e l e s , transitioning f r o m a college of w o m e n to a large university dominated by male, not feThere was blatant sexual male, chemists. harrassment by my proS a n f o r d explained that the a d j u s t m e n t to a male-dominated field was hard at times. fessors. "I had a core group of w o m e n studying —Joanne Stewart, prochemistry at Smith. The p r e d o m i n a n d y male classes at U C L A did affect the atmosphere. I fessor of Chemistry did often question the system I was part of,"

S a n f o r d said. "Decisions w e r e often made about my future and career that weren't gender neutral, and I was purposely c o n scious of that." Joanne Stewart, another Hope chemistry professor, said she faced persecution from her p r o f e s s o r s , not c o l l e a g u e s , while at graduate school at the University of California, Berkeley. "There was blatant sexual har a s s m e n t b y my p r o f e s s o r s while in graduate school. All the female students had to stick t o g e t h e r , " s a i d S t e w a r t , explaining that even at Hope she s o m e t i m e s feels excluded being a w o m a n . "Since moving into the Science Center, I ' m the only f e m a l e office on the second floor. Sometimes it's lonely," Stewart said. At Hope, there are 38 female chemistry m a j o r s and 10 female math majors. Sanford and Stewart agreed that their advice for these w o m e n , working in a field of men, is to be prepared for their gender to be challenged. "I would like to tell female students to rigorously prepare academically at H o p e for graduate school. Talk to f e m a l e faculty bec a u s e t h e r e are m a n y social c h a l l e n g e s . W o m e n are usually left behind because the tricks of the trade are passed d o w n by word of mouth a m o n g the m e n , " Sanford said. T h r o u g h these stories, the Hope c o m m u nity m a y see that w o m e n at H o p e h a v e struggled and still struggle in the work place because of their gender. W o m e n working in the Hope c o m m u n i t y aren't an exception to gender discrimination, even during this time period and even at a place such as Hope College.

s

"Dcvtlopm&fit' o f Woi*ie4'v«» J-ImHoty MtvitVi Women's history was virtually unheard of in America until the 1970s. In 1978, the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County Commission in California created a "Women's History Week."

Rosa, California,

in the U.S. Senate.

Hundreds of female volun^ teers visit schools as Community Resource Women through NWHP.

In 1997, Madeleine Albright was sworn in as U.S. Secretary of State. She became the highest ranked woman in the U.S. government.

An annual Real Women Essay Contest drew hundreds of entries.

The following year, U.S. Congress issued a resolution for "Women's History Month".

In 1981, the week of March 8 was officially declared "Women's History Week" in America.

By 1980, the National Women's History Project was established in Santa

In 1993, Carol MoselyBraun became the first African American woman

In 2000 March became recognized as "Women's History Month," Women's history is marked througout the world on the declared "International Women's Day" on March 8. International Women's

A

Diversity Meeting On Thursday If you are interested in knowing more about Hope's new plan to create a diverse college, please attend one of the two open meetings which will be held on Thursday, April 1 or Friday April 2 at 3 p.m. in the Multicultural Lounge of Phelps Hall. If you have any questions please contact Vanessa Greene, director of Multicultural Life at greene @ hope.edu.

women. In 2001, Condoleezza Rice became the first woman to serve as the national security advisor.

Santa Rosa, California hosts an annual women's history parade.

An International Women's Day, on March 8, commemorates women's rights and peace.

Currently there are 58 women who hold seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. A total of nine women hold seats in the senate.

"Women Inspiring Hope and Possiblity" is this years Women's History Month theme.

Nine million small business in America are owned by

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OWLIWE MAGAZINE

AWAKEhlim VENTS

Day is meant to celebrate the multicultural perspective of women in the work force, while commemorating their rights.

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FEATURES

M a r c h 31, 2004

International House of Prayer offers food for the soul |SPOTLIGHT|

about

six

It was amazing how much people just loved getting hugs, and it was so awesome to be able to show people the love of Jesus and to hug them. — Jenn Stults ('07)

months after his g r a d u a tion from

Becky Lathrop

H o p e ,

STAR REPORTER

T h o s e looking f o r a place l o seek the heart of J e s u s a n d p r a i s e the L o r d with a g r o u p of C h r i s t i a n be-

Henderson teamed up with Vogel t o

d o n ' t h a v e to look very far to find

f o r m IHOP. Previously

t h e m . In fact, they can f i n d j u s t that right d o w n the r o a d at t h e local

located in the Lincoln school, I H O P recently

I HOP. N o , not the p a n c a k e p l a c e ,

m o v e d t o a n e w location on 16th

the International H o u s e of Prayer.

street w h e r e e v e r y o n e is invited to

C o - f o u n d e d b y Jared H e n d e r s o n C O l ) a n d the late A l i c e Vogel, the

w o r s h i p a n d pray. It is their goal t o c r e a t e a place

w o r s h i p , f o l l o w e d by t e a c h i n g at

I n t e r n a t i o n a l H o u s e of P r a y e r

w h e r e C h r i s t i a n s of all d e n o m i n a -

s t e m s f r o m a w e e k l y p r a y e r meet-

tions j o i n t o g e t h e r t o w o r s h i p G o d

w h i c h is a t i m e d e v o t i o n and m e d i tation. O n e T h i n g is a t i m e w h e r e

ing t h a t H e n d e r s o n f o r m e d with some of his f r i e n d s during his fresh-

in a n u m b e r of d i f f e r e n t w a y s all day, e v e r y d a y until C h r i s t ' s return.

a n y o n e d e s i r i n g to s e e k J e s u s

m a n year at H o p e . A s t i m e w e n t o n ,

T h o u g h they a r e n ' t yet a b l e to

ing c a n j o i n with others t o d o j u s t

H e n d e r s o n b e g a n to add m o r e a n d

k e e p it o p e n 2 4 h o u r s a day, I H O P

m o r e m e e t i n g s and t i m e s of w o r -

c u r r e n t l y p r o v i d e s the c o m m u n i t y

that. A n o t h e r m i n i s t r y that I H O P or-

s h i p to his s c h e d u l e , a d o p t i n g a vision for s o m e t h i n g m o r e than j u s t

w i t h a p r a y e r r o o m that is o p e n

g a n i z e s is the local f o o d distribu-

nearly 6 0 h o u r s e a c h w e e k , and of t h e s e 6 0 hours, a l m o s t 2 0 a r e led

tion that has b e e n the f o c u s of giv-

lievers f r o m around the c o m m u n i t y

once-a-week prayer meetings, and

b y a live w o r s h i p team which may

T h e p r o g r a m b e g i n s at 7 p.m. (a shuttle is available at 6 : 5 0 f r o m t h e D e W i t t f l a g p o l e ) w i t h a t i m e of 8 : 3 0 and the night w a t c h at 9:30,

t h r o u g h prayer, worship, and teach-

ing t h r o u g h the K e p p e l H o u s e for the past c o u p l e w e e k s . J o n O m e e , a n intern f o r C a m p u s M i n i s t r i e s ,

/J.

A N C H O R PHOTO COURTESY JARED HENDERSON

People of all ages help with the food distribution sponsored by IHOP and the Keppel House.

s u g g e s t e d the I H O P f o o d distribu-

ceries, getting t h e m r e a d y for the

singers, dancers,

tion p r o g r a m f o r the g i v i n g f o c u s

f a m i l i e s w h o arrive a r o u n d 5 : 3 0 .

J e s u s a n d to h u g t h e m . " F o r those w h o are u n a b l e t o vol-

artists a n d / o r inter-

because of it's productivity and p r o x i m i t y to the H o p e c o m m u n i t y .

N o special skills or talents are

u n t e e r b u t w o u l d still like to help, e a c h g i f t of m o n e y g o e s a l o n g w a y

include musicians,

When a worship t e a m is not avail-

" I t ' s important that the giving f o -

n e e d e d in o r d e r t o volunteer. W h e n there are enough volun-

cus be s o m e t h i n g that the s t u d e n t s

teers that the actual f o o d d i s t r i b u -

t o w a r d s providing f o o d for the c o m m u n i t y . All g i f t s c o l l e c t e d d u r -

able, the remaining

c a n get involved w i t h , " O m e e said,

tion is t a k e n car e of a h u g line is

ing chapel and the Gathering or

h o u r s o f f e r a quiet

and I H O P ' s f o o d distribution pro-

f o r m e d by all of the remaining help-

t h o s e d r o p p e d o f f at t h e K e p p e l

\ i y

atmosphere where

ers, g i v i n g t h e m a c h a n c e t o l o v e on the f a m i l i e s in need. T h e f a m i -

H o u s e t h r o u g h the rest of this w e e k

* ^

p e o p l e are f r e e t o worship, pray, or

g r a m d o e s j u s t that. O n the first T u e s d a y of e v e r y month a truck carrying 5,000 p o u n d s of f o o d pulls u p at the cor-

lies line up to r e c e i v e the f o o d that they need, receiving c a r i n g h u g s all

while worship mu-

ner of 11th Street a n d C o l u m b i a ,

the w a y to the truck, s o m e g o i n g

sic plays softly. O n e of the n e w -

w h e r e f a m i l i e s in need c a n c o m e

back t h r o u g h the line again, s o m e -

rently p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h I H O P in m a n y d i f f e r e n t w a y s , as they w o r k

t o r e c e i v e groceries at no cost. Each

t i m e s j u s t to get a s e c o n d r o u n d o f

to e x t e n d their h o u r s and build wor-

est programs, the

hugs. " A t first I w a s a little bit a f r a i d

s h i p t e a m s for their c u r r e n t h o u r s

cessors.

study the Word

Friday

night

prayer

watch,

100 to 2 5 0 f a m i l i e s that live in the

of h u g g i n g a w h o l e b u n c h of people

called OneThing, is g e a r e d t o w a r d s

area s u r r o u n d i n g H o p e .

that I d i d n ' t k n o w , but it t u r n e d o u t

A n y o n e a n d e v e r y o n e is w e l -

to be a really great e x p e r i e n c e " said

the c o l l e g e age

c o m e t o h e l p o u t with this m i n i s try, w h i c h t a k e s p l a c e o n l y o n c e

Jenn Stults ( ' 0 7 ) , w h o has h e l p e d with the ministry. "It w a s a m a z i n g

n u m b e r of H o p e

e a c h m o n t h . Volunteers arrive at 5

h o w m u c h p e o p l e j u s t loved getting

l e a d e r f o r w o r s h i p or prayer, c a n find information about I H O P and

students

p.m. o n the day of the d e l i v e r y t o

h u g s , and it w a s s o a w e s o m e t o b e

their events on their website

h e l p u n l o a d and o r g a n i z e t h e g r o -

able to show p e o p l e the love of

www.ihopholland.com.

each

week.

& &

^

Heara n

Seen ; -vyr ^eard

•ir"

m o r e and m o r e p e o p l e are n e e d e d t o h e l p in a n u m b e r of d i f f e r e n t ways. A n y o n e interested in getting inv o l v e d , be it as a n a t t e n d e r o r a

Heard

How has the lockdown affected your daily life?

Seen

T h o u g h a great ministry is cur-

truckload costs I H O P only $250 and is a b l e t o h e l p a n y w h e r e f r o m

crowd and draws a

The IHOP food distribution program helps up to 250 families per truckload.

will g o d i r e c t l y to I H O P t o h e l p with t h e f o o d distribution ministry.

Heard

&

mw Httk

' > w*>fi I B

. s* r r T. r t h»,.

" I t ' s m a d e m e feel safer, but

"I

mind

"(Lockdown) hasn't affected

daily l i f e in that it's m a d e it

I ' m also very f o r g e t f u l so it's

lockdown. It's usually a

m e a w h o l e lot, I j u s t h a v e to

h a r d e r f o r m e t o get a r o u n d to m y f r i e n d s a n d w h a t n o t .

b e e n a bit of a n i n c o n v e n i e n c e

s*. g o o d thing. O t h e r c a m p u s e s h a v e to d o it 11 t h e til

" L o c k d o w n has a f f e c t e d m y

Granted, I think it's good, that

in f o r g e t t i n g m y card a n d m a k i n g s t i r e i h a v e i t With m e

w e need to b e safe, b u t it's

all the t u n e t o b e a b l e to g«

still a W s s l e . - J o s e p h P e j e t i n ( '06)

&

—Rachel VanTii

don't

really

carry m y card a r o u n d . " - P e t e Mattson ('07)

S

e n j o y : t h e l o c k d o w n bec a u s e ncftv I can get into m y f r i e n d s d o r m s without h a v i n g to call t h e m a n d h a v e t h e m o p e n it u p or h a v i n g to w a l k all the w a y a r o u n d t o find the

it can be a h a s s l £ T kind of i n d i f f e r e n t . " —Aislinn U m m e l ( ' 0 7 )

right d o o r to o p e n . "

77.

&

-Ashley J o ^ n s Q n ( p 7 )


V^ncHor Contemporary Motions crosses culture and dance ARTS

M a r c h 31, 2004

a u d i e n c e m e m b e r s m a y even be able to c a t c h a g l i m p s e of the p i e c e ' s third and final sec-

Hope's in residence dance company enters its 14th season Friday

tion, w h i c h is still in the w o r k s . Rivera is also w o r k i n g on t w o pieces with f e l l o w cast m e m b e r Erica Nelson. T h e first,

Maureen Yonovitz

/

A R T S EOITOR

C o n t e m p o r a r y M o t i o n s is b a c k , this y e a r c o m p l e t e with several original p e r f o r m a n c e s , n e w additions to old favorites, a guest artist

" K a l e i d o s c o p e , " is also a w o r k in p r o g r e s s that e x p l o r e s m o v e m e n t at the gr ound level. T h e s e c o n d , "Inside O u t s i d e , " w a s c h o r e o g r a p h e d b y E l i z a b e t h de M o r a e s , a 1993

>

H o p e g r a d u a t e and c u r r e n t m e m b e r of the C o n t e m p o r a r y M o t i o n s cast, w h e n she w a s

f r o m M e x i c o and m u c h m o r e . T h e p e r f o r -

a senior here at H o p e . "I liked it,' Rivera said. " L o n g story short, I ' m b r i n g i n g it back w h e n s h e ' s h e r e so she

m a n c e takes place at 8 p . m . on Friday a n d S a t u r d a y at the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t r e . " W e h o p e to get a lot of p e o p l e , " said J u l i o Rivera, f o u n d e r and artistic director o f C o n -

can look at it." De M o r a e s m a y also b r i n g back w h a t w a s , a c c o r d i n g to Rivera, a c r o w d pleaser w h e n

t e m p o r a r y M o t i o n s . " T h e t h e m e this y e a r is c o m e a n d bring t w o f r i e n d s . " G r o s s o M o d o , a d a n c e c o m p a n y b a s e d in

she first p e r f o r m e d it in a p r e v i o u s C o n t e m porary M o t i o n s c o n c e r t . " S h e w e a r s this dress that s p a n s the e n t i r e

H o l l a n d ' s sister city o f Q u e r e t a r o , M e x i c o , has p l a y e d a central role in H o p e ' s d a n c e department throughout the past several years. T h r o u g h a cultural e x c h a n g e p r o g r a m , the

s t a g e , " Rivera said. " I t ' s a really e n j o y a b l e Contemporary Motions returns for its 14th consecutive season at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday in the Knickerbocker Theatre. Both previous and original pieces, as

piece, very h u m o r o u s . " A n o t h e r d a n c e in this y e a r ' s p e r f o r m a n c e

Theater, m a d e an a p p e a r a n c e o n c a m p u s t w o years ago, and n o w it is C o n t e m p o r a r y M o -

well as several works in progress, will be presented at this year's concert.

c e n t e r s a r o u n d t h e story of an old w o m a n

tions' turn t o take part in the e x c h a n g e . F o r

g r a m alive in Q u e r e t a r o , " R i v e r a said. "In

" H e ' s n o t e v e n l e t t i n g m e s e e it y e t , "

this y e a r ' s c o n c e r t , guest artist a n d m e m b e r

the spirit of diversity, w e are glad to b e do-

of G r o s s o M o d o E v a P a r d a v e will p e r f o r m a

ing this p r o g r a m . " T h e s e c o n d guest artist in this y e a r ' s per-

Rivera said. Rivera has c h o r e o g r a p h e d " H i s t o r i a de un

g r o u p , t e a m e d up with H o p e ' s Aerial D a n c e

d u s t i n g statues r e p r e s e n t i n g m u s e s . T h e old w o m a n is sad b e c a u s e the m u s e s are eternally young and beautiful while she has

A m o r " ( " S t o r y of a L o v e " ) , a n e w m a l e s o l o

g r o w n old with t i m e w h e n t h e m u s e s s u d d e n l y c o m e to life and the old w o m a n her-

f o r m a n c e is a little c l o s e r t o h o m e . R a y Tadio, a m e m b e r of the original C o n t e m p o -

that i s ' a c t u a l l y the s e c o n d installment of a t h r e e p a r t w o r k in p r o g r e s s , " I n o l v i d a b l e

self also b e c o m e s a m u s e . " T h e e n d is a mystery," Rivera said. " Y o u

rary M o t i o n s cast a n d currently on the H o p e

H i s t o r i a . . .duo e n silueta y d o s a l m a s a p a r t e "

A f f a i r s C o m m i t t e e t h r o u g h the D e a n of Arts

d a n c e faculty, will p r e s e n t a u n i q u e s o l o that

( " U n f o r g e t t a b l e story.. .duet in silhouette and

h a v e to see it t o u n d e r s t a n d it." T i c k e t s f o r C o n t e m p o r a r y M o t i o n s are $7

and H u m a n i t i e s . " P r o f e s s o r S t e v e n l a n n a c o n e and m y s e l f h a v e b e e n w o r k i n g to k e e p a n e x c h a n g e p r o -

u s e s p a p e r instead of w o o d as the s u r f a c e of the d a n c e floor. A c c o r d i n g t o R i v e r a , the

t w o s o u l s apart"). " I n o l v i d a b l e , " the first part, f e a t u r i n g the f e m a l e portion of the tril-

for adults a n d $ 5 f o r senior citizens, students

p i e c e is s o m e w h a t of a secret.

ogy, will also b e p r e s e n t e d . If l i m e a l l o w s .

at the door.

solo piece entitled " E s c a p e " b y M e x i c a n c h o r e o g r a p h e r F e d e r i c o C a s t r o . P a r d a v e ' s app e a r a n c e is m a d e p o s s i b l e b y grants f r o m the H o l l a n d A r e a A r t s C o u n c i l and the Cultural

Women's choir and a capella groups combine Erin L'Hotta INFOCUS EDITOR

Senior art featured F o u r y e a r s of hard w o r k h a v e finally paid o f f for the s e n i o r s of H o p e C o l l e g e ' s art d e p a r t m e n t .

AS/CHOR PHOTO BY. ROB ONDRA

a n art s h o w that will f e a t u r e the

and installations; s o there should be something for everyone.

to 7 p . m . in the f o y e r of D e P r e e w h e r e interested m e m b e r s of t h e

on Monday. The performance will also feature Hope's a capella

p u b l i c a n d the c o l l e g e will h a v e an opportunity to m e e t the artists. A c c o r d i n g to J o h n H a n s o n ,

c a l S h o w c a s e in G r a n d R a p i d s ,

m u s i c as they p e r f o r m their final

great deal of t i m e on, essentially

w h e r e they sang " O r l a n d o Gibb o n s " a n d ' T h e Silver S w a n . " T h e

c o n c e r t at S t . F r a n c i s d e S a l e s

c r e a t i n g o u r o w n interpretation of

s h o w c a s e also f e a t u r e d o t h e r m u -

Catholic Church. T h e c o n c e r t , w h i c h starts at 8

it f r o m m u s i c a l f r a g m e n t s on the p a g e . W e h a d to d e c i d e w h a t o r d e r

sical e n s e m b l e s a n d soloists f r o m

p.m., will f e a t u r e n i n e traditional, spiritual a n d c o n t e m p o r a r y s o n g s

t o sing the f r a g m e n t s in, h o w o f t e n to repeat t h e m , h o w to o v e r l a p t h e m and m o v e f r o m section t o section. I t h i n k I can s p e a k f o r the c h o i r

l o w e d by a m i x t u r e of sacred and

w h e n I say that w e f e e l a real s e n s e of o w n e r s h i p of this p i e c e , " W o l f e

secular pieces. The sacred songs i n c l u d e t w o light spiritual s o n g s

said. " A i n ' t that N e w s " is a n A f r i c a n

a l o n g with t w o songs of d e d i c a t i o n to the b e a u t y of the Virgin Mary.

including photography, paintings, sculpture, d r a w i n g s , video,

The Women's Chamber Choir rehearses for its upcoming concert groups, 12th Street Harmony and Luminescence.

a student-run production. A h u g e variety of media will b e featured,

O n Friday they will be o p e n i n g b e s t of their w o r k . F o l l o w i n g will b e a reception f r o m 5 p.m.

C h o i r o f f e r s the H o p e c o m m u n i t y t h e c h a n c e to a p p r e c i a t e the art of

O n e o f these s o n g s is s u n g to the m u s i c a l h a r m o n y o f cello a n d or-

if necessary, but the show is truly

STAFF REPORTER

performed. ' T h i s is a p i e c e that we spent a

the s o n g " L e t t h e r e b e m u s i c , " f o l -

m e m b e r s are available t o assist

Joe Turbessi

O n April 5 W o m e n ' s C h a m b e r

sung by the eleven-woman group. T h e p e r f o r m a n c e will o p e n with

and chi l dr en o v e r 12. T h e y will b e available

D e P r e e Gallery director, the stud e n t s t h e m s e l v e s a r e m ai nl y responsible f o r the show. Faculty

Jill D e V r i e s ( ' 0 4 ) will h a v e f o u r e i g h t - b y - t e n paintings disp l a y e d in the gallery. D e V r i e s ' w o r k s are photo transfers, which t h e r e p o r t e r u n d e r s t o o d to b e printed p h o t o s in c o m b i n a t i o n w i t h o t h e r art f o r m s , s u c h as painting and figure drawing. D e V r i e s c o m m e n t e d that all f o u r pieces w e r e a u t o b i o g r a p h i c a l . "You take a lot of pride in your w o r k , but it's also a little scary

Hope. T w e l f t h Street Harmony, the

[to h a v e y o u r w o r k d i s p l a y e d to the public]. You're sharing a

popular men's a cappella group,

p a r t of y o u r s e l f , " c o m m e n t e d

and L u m i n e s c e n c e , the n e w l y f o r m e d w o m e n ' s a c a p p e l l a group,

DeVries. Laura M o o r e ('04) agrees. " Y e s , I ' m a little n e r v o u s [to

are s o m e of the s h o w c a s e d ens e m b l e s w h i c h will also p e r f o r m at the W o m e n ' s C h a m b e r C h o i r April

h a v e h e r w o r k displayed] but it's

A m e r i c a n spiritual s o n g , f e a t u r e d

6 concert. T h i s will be the first c o m b i n e d p e r f o r m a n c e that the 12 m e n

a g o o d t h i n g , " said M o o r e . M o o r e will h a v e f o u r paint-

in the cultural m e l o d i e s . " W e ' l l b e d o i n g so m a n y things w e ' v e n e v e r

and eight w o m e n will sing together, h a r m o n i z i n g t o the s o n g " L o v e the

ings a n d a sculpture o n display

d o n e b e f o r e . I think the a u d i e n c e

O n e Y o u ' r e W i t h . " T h e y will also p e r f o r m separately, f e a t u r i n g the

gan c o n t i n u o a l o n g with soloists. J e n n i f e r Wolfe, director of

will e n j o y o u r spiritual s o n g " A i n ' t That N e w s , " Wolfe said. "Ain't

W o m e n ' s C h a m b e r Choir, said that

That N e w s " is also the s o n g Chrysti Agre ( ' 0 5 ) , is most looking f o r w a r d

at the s h o w . E a c h painting features a b l u e bottle. T h e sculpture is s o m e w h a t u n u s u a l a n d will b e first featured at the open-

1960s tune " U n d e r the Board W a l k , " the Scottish m e l o d y " L o c h

ing reception, w h e n M o o r e will

L o m m o n d , " and classic songs f r o m D i s n e y ' s " T h e Little M e r m a i d " and

b e w e a r i n g her art. All H o p e students are e n c o u r -

spiritual f e e l w i t h s u c h a s t r o n g

" B e a u t y and the B e a s t . " All t h o s e interested in attending

aged to support their c o l l e a g u e s in the art d e p a r t m e n t b y attend-

h y m n s is a m i x t u r e o f c o n t e m p o rary songs. U p b e a t m e l o d i e s of

m e s s a g e , " said Agre. A g r e and t h e rest o f W o m e n ' s

W o m e n ' s C h a m b e r Choir's final performance, accompanied by

ing the s h o w a n d the reception. T h e g a l l e r y is o p e n M o n d a y

praise will b e s u n g f r o m the pers p e c t i v e of three d i f f e r e n t cultures,

C h a m b e r C h o i r are p r e p a r i n g f o r their final musical p e r f o r m a n c e

Twelfth Street H a r m o n y and L u m i n e s c e n c e , are a d m i t t e d f r e e . T h e

with these new selected songs. W o m e n ' s c h a m b e r choir a p p e a r e d

c o n c e r t is at St. F r a n c i s d e S a l e s Catholic C h u r c h , w h i c h is located

at the fall C o l l a g e C o n c e r t and the spring concert at the D e v o s M u s i -

at 171 W . 13th St in Holland, at the c o m e r of 13th St and M a p l e Ave.

musical i n str u m e n ts add w o n d e r f u l support t o the w o m e n ' s voices that t o u c h the a u d i e n c e ' s heart. A c c o m p a n y i n g these tradition

r e c o g n i z i n g Christianity across the w o r l d . " R i a w a n n a " is a T a s m a n i a n s o n g , m e a n i n g " c i r c l e s " and "great M o t h e r Earth," that the w o m e n will

to s i n g i n g at the c o n c e r t . "I l o v e the s o n g b e c a u s e it has a

A N C H O R PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

t h r o u g h Saturday f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1

A trio of photos by Sharon

p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free, a n d the s h o w will run until S u n -

Gutowski ('04).

day, M a y 2.


Anchor ititor

O P I N I O N s poici

Editor's voice

M a r c h 31, 2 0 0 4

Your voice

Your voice Your voice ^ V

P / i i f n r 'c 7>,

You are not your grades

'We're getting closer, Hope, we're getting closer' To the editor:

As the end of the year approaches, I notice many people getting caught up in keeping up. As the weather gets warmer, we get increasingly less motivated - after all, we just survived another Michigan winter - who wouldn't want to enjoy the sunshine? But with the end of the semester only a few weeks away, I find myself worrying about even the 15 minutes I spend on a break in the Pine Grove, the six hours I take to sleep. With classes drawing to a close, papers, tests, presentations and projects take the majority of my worry even as 1 crave s u m m e r and the welcome three months of break ahead. I worry about balancing out the time I spend on classes, papers and homework with friends, the beach, and my increasing sense of procrastination. And then I begin to obsess over grades. I want the A's. 1 want to not just do well, as far as academics are concerned, I want to do spectacularly. And I abandon my friends for the library. I abandon my cigarettes for the sterile environment of the study room. Excepting my books, I abandon everything but soda, a bag of chips and a C D player. Throughout the year, emphasis is put on our grades, but at the end of the semester, our professors remind us to turn in assignments, I hate feeling as though my study for tests GPA is the culmination of and keep our marks in the my learning experience. back of our minds. And, to be completely honest, I hate it. 1 hate feeling as though my GPA is the culmination of my learning experience. The sentiment of many students seems to be: "Study for this lest, but as soon as it's done, you may forget all about it. Just make sure you cram the week before it." W h y ? W h y not focus on learning and enjoying what we learn? What good is it to prove that I know the exact dates when appreciation of Gothic literature was at its peak, to prove that I can scan dactylic hexameter with the accuracy of a poetic guru? Instead, I want to be able to grasp the subject while absorbing most of the details. I don't want to get so caught up in the trees that I can't see the forest. In the same way, I don't want to get so caught up in my grades that I can't see my college experience for exactly what it is - an opportunity to grow and learn about what interests me. So my goal for these last few weeks of the semester is to take a deep breath and step back from this grade-driven society that is Hope College. I ' m not going to stop studying or stop trying to finish out my classes, but I ' m going to make a conscious effort to put more emphasis on my learning and my appreciation of this time I have at Hope rather than losing sleep over my GPA.

Anchor Staff editor-in-chief managing editor arts editor infoous editor sports editors copy editor photo editor business manager distribution manager production assistant advisor

Anjey Dykhuis Mackenzie Smith Maureen Yonovitz Erin L'Hotla Brad Vanderberg Andy Borozan Kirsten Winek Rob Ondra Danielle Koski Kit Nykamp Sean Daenzer Mark A. Lewison

Senior Staff Reporters: Jenny Cencer, Jordan Wo/fson Staff Reporters: Neil Simons, Becky Lathrop, Justin Sobania Columnists: Me ridith De A viia Phi! Waaikes Photo Assistant: Liz Farmer The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the Anchor

2004 spring semester, Issue #22 of 25

1 ;

This letter is not meant to directly address the prior letter "of the nondiverse," but to address the increasingly negative connotation of the word "diversity" at Hope. When we hear diversity, our first thought is white people out, people of color in. That is not, and should not be, the goal of diversity. Diversity means "a variety": a variety of men, w o m e n , races, ethnicities, b o d y types, religions, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic status, just to name a few. One of the reasons students relentlessly appeal for more diversity at Hope is some of the intolerance that they, or those they know, encounter at the hands of a smattering of Hope students. Those stu-

dents, either knowingly or accidentally, offend other students out of their ignorance. Ignorance is unavoidable; we all have it, like the common cold. Although there is no cure for the common cold or ignorance, we can relieve the symptoms. At one time, we believed the Earth was flat, we viewed women as the property of their husbands, and we even justified the lynching and enslavement of a race for h u n d r e d s of years. What made us change our minds? It was not accomplished by surrounding ourselves with individuals who held the same views. We had to immerse ourselves in the unknown in order to accept what was d i f f e r e n t . We u n k n o w i n g l y believed in many fallacies partly because we did not have an opposing

voice to argue against our claims. Diversifying Hope does not mean the college devalues the current students attending Hope, or the future students. Diversifying Hope means giving the other side of the e q u a t i o n — w h e t h e r that includes those of different races, ethnicities, sexual orientation, or religion. We need to take the initiative to c h a n g e . I a p p l a u d the c a m p u s ' growing awareness of diversity at Hope. Discussion is the only way we will hash out this problem and c o m e to a resolution. Frederick Douglas, a famous black abolitionist, once said, "Without struggle, there is no progress." We're gettihg closer Hope, we're getting closer.

—Cheryl Jacobs ('07)

National media services should not be above criticism To the editor: After reading "'typos, misquoting unacceptable in college publication" (Anchor 3/10), I put down the paper with a few questions in my head. This letter was all too familiar, since I was on the Anchor staff for three and a half years and was the editor for a year and a half of that tenure. My first instinct is to tell Stephanie Koenke to become part of the Anchor staff. All you have to do is look at the small staff box every week to know how much everyone on staff has to work to get this publication out. When you add in classes and a social life, it is no wonder why a few minor errors sneak in. The paper needs help; why don't you offer yours? After my original reaction, a much larger concern came to me. On campus, the Anchor is regularly criticized for the occasional misspelling, but almost nobody in the nation has publicly denounced Fox News or C N N for their transgressions, which tend to be much larger. In 2000, for example. Fox News announced that George W. Bush had won the election before they had any proof one way or the other, which prompted all the other major news networks to announce the same so they didn't seem behind. Much more recently, two news networks reported the Martha Stewart verdict incorrectly because they were in such a rush to be the first to report it. Throughout the Iraq war, all major news networks were forced to keep the civilian body count, which www.iraqbodycount.net n o w places it at between

8,790 and 10,369, away f r o m the eyes of the American public. Similarly, the embedded reporters could not show any of the horrors of the war, painting a rosy picture of our aggressions. Despite all of these problems, which are on a much larger scale than a simple copy editor's oversight, the major news conglomerates have drawn next to no fire, no criticism. But I do understand this a little bit. Taking down a major media outlet is daunting and seems impossible. Silencing something like Clear Channel is not an easy task and may prove to be impossible, but I a m willing to do my part, even if I gain nothing more than a clear conscience. So where would one start? Well, a good beginning is coming up this April 19 through 25. That week is Adbusters ' T V T u m o f f Week" (www.adbusters.org/ testing/psycho/tvturnoff/index. html). To show these media monsters that think they are above the law that we are the ones in charge, just turn off the TV. By not giving your time and attention to them and their advertisers, you are wasting their energy. This event also supports Adbusters' "Media Carta" movement {www.mediacarta.org)y which demands the return of important media outlets to the people, where they rightly belong. Once again, a wave of apathy has gripped our nation by the throat. Let us now prove that we can rise above our indoctrinated laziness and dependency and really make a difference in our world. —Nick

Denis COS)

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e within t h e college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t to edit d u e to s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s No p e r s o n a l a t t a c k s , p o o r taste o r a n y t h i n g potentially libelous L e t t e r s chosen o n a

first-come-first-serve

basis, o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n

N o a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y verify identity of w r i t e r T h e A n c h o r reserves t h e r i g h t to r e f u s e p u b l i c a t i o n of any letter s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s o v e r 500 w o r d s in length will n o t be c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind WTHS), or e-mail Anchor@hope.edu

LISTEN TO

Liked the Lord of the Rings movies? Dr. T . A . S h i p p e y o f St. L o u i s U n i v e r s i t y

W T H S 89.9,

presents

THE VOICE OF

"From Page to Screen: Problems Tolkien Set for Jackson 1 '

HOPE COLLEGE

T o m o r r o w at 4 p . m . in t h e Maas conference center


I I

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I I

Wnchor

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

M a r c h 31, 2004 I

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April 5veiA/ts

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WANTS YOU! Have you ever wanted to see your name on the front page of the paper? Here is your chance! Come to our meeting at 9 p.m. tonight in the Anchor office...It's in Dewitt behind the radio station and Student Union Desk. Come find out what it takes to be part of the newspaper staff here at Hope College!

616-546-8858

/

H-fl^vtbu^er w e e f e .

d i f f e r e n t

nonftiucswT TflMT

T H E ANCHOR

^ L 0 h t

for oi'vUjJ^ ce^vts! _r

Room For Rent: Unfurnished bedroom and sitting room in lower level of 4 yr. old North Side Holland tri-level home. Quiet area near Riley Ridge. $100.00/Week Available immediately. Contact Jeanne 616-6543810 Free Mumia!!

ARE YOU A JUNIOR OR SENSOR THINKING ABOUT GRAD SCHOOL?

Nick- So what if I played a textbased RPG? I'm still not as big of a dork as you!!-Anjey

Graduate Record Exam Information Session

7:00 - 8:00p.m. Science Center 1000 Ud by Prvfessor Charles Behensky, Dtpcrtmtnt of Psychology • mechanics of the GRE • what students might do to prepare for the exam • chance to ask questions about GRE

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d i r e c t o r s : T o j a y

For OAs: April

5

JUNIORS THINKING ABOUT GRAD SCHOOL? Grad School Panel Discussion: Tuesday, April 6 11 -11:50 a.m, Otte Room, Phelps Hall

N - 1 totally dominated your high score on heli attack2... I brought at least 143 helis down...beat that!! -A

www.miniclip.com/heli2.htm Co-spcntortd by Hope Pew Society and Of/Ice of Career Services

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Caddie- Post on ANLMB when you are coming home...don't get kidnapped. -Ruh-sood

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O r i e n t a t i o n 2 0 0 ¥ is l o o k i n g f o r s t a < # e n t ( e a t e r s +0 t e a j r i r + a n t d i r e c t o r s o r o r i e n t a t i o n a s s i s t a n t s . '

Mondays 8-10 on WTHS: Tune in for a sensible blend of Organ. Classical, and Homestar Runner.

Recycle The Ancher

Robbo-o-1 must say that I greatly appreciate your addition of The Scorpions-Rock You Like A Hurricane to the Tuesday night music repertoire. -Anjey-o JK- Someday when you don't have to teach, let's go out. -OL

Want a classified ad in the next Anchor? Submit classifieds to anchor@hope.edu

We've gel what yeu want! mi HO

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Panelists: Gloria Tseng (History) Karima Jeffrey (English) Isolde Anderson (Communication) Chuck Behensky (Psychology)

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Flying Dutch and Saints split games Softball splits two games against visiting Aquinas College Andy Borozan S P O R T S EDITOR

The Flying Dutch batted .500 on the day. taking the second game of a doubleheader in non-league play against Aquinas College. Both games came down to the wire and a late surge in the second game gave Hope the win to move them to 6-6 on the season. T h e first game witnessed stunning outings for Aquinas pitchers Kristen Hulst and Marisa Poelman, as they held the Dutch to just three hits on the a f t e r n o o n . H o p e did snatch the early lead in the third after a walk by Lauren Vande Kopple ( ' 0 5 ) and a double by Kara Sayger ('04). But a quick answer in the fourth by the Saints tied it up at one. The Saints then won it 2-1 in the ninth on a run scoring double by Bonnie Spiegelberg. Shortstop

game and then being Kelly Kraft ('04) down 4 to 0 in the had two of second, but we kept Hope's three hits fighting. Kelly's and Sayger home run really drove in her secsparked us, and we o n d run of t h e were able to c o m e y e a r for the through," said third Dutch. baseman Emily The second A d a m s ( ' 0 6 ) after game saw the game. " I ' m glad Aquinas jump w e ' v e picked up our out of t h e g a t e intensity before early, tagging M I A A play begins." Hope pitcher Adams added a A m a n d a Boden hit and scored a run ( ' 0 6 ) for four in the winning effort runs through b a t t i n g in the three innings. cleanup spot. A K C H O R PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA H o p e struggled After splitting Kelly Kraft ('04) drives a pitch in game one against back and put up games with the UniAquinas. Kraft leads the team with 13 RBIs. t h r e e r u n s in versity of C h i c a g o both the fifth and 1 on M o n d a y on the road, the 7 - 7 run in the S" ), scored a run and sixth innings. Aquinas couldn't anFlying Dutch will look forward to drove in four, bringing her total on swer the offensive onslaught and conference play today as it takes on the year to a team leading 13. Hope pulled away with an 8 - 6 win. the Comets of Olivet at Buys Ath"Aquinas is a great team and we Sayger had a pair of hits, scored letic Field in an M I A A doublestuck with them. We could have twice and drove in a run. Kraft kept easily given up after losing the first header beginning at 3 p.m. a hot bat with two hits (one a home

Dutchmen compete with wet grounds Weather postpones Friday's game; split Saturday's games Brad Vanderberg S P O R T S EDITOR

A total of eight runs were scored on a warm Saturday afternoon in Holland as the Flying Dutchmen split its first M I A A doubleheader with the visiting Scots of Alma dropping the first game 3-0 and taking the second 4-1. Coach Stu Fritz's young Dutchmen moved to a 9-7 overall record after F r i d a y ' s single game was postponed due to wet fields. Finally, the weather cooperated on Saturday, as temperatures were in the middle to upper 60s. The warm, spring weather did not help either club's offense in the afternoon, as all four starting hurlers pitched complete games. In g a m e o n e , f a n s w i t n e s s e d a c l a s s i c pitcher's duel as the Dutchmen were not able to figure out Alma sophomore starting righthander Brandon Teenier. Only three Hope hitters could manage a hit against Teenier as he went the distance in seven innings allowing only five Dutchmen to reach base safely and struck out four. Hope starter Kenny Bart ('04) was strong, but not strong enough. Bart also went the distance allowing three runs on six hits and fanning seven Scots. Alma scored a run each in

On Monday afternoon, the Dutchmen and both the second and third innings and added an Scots played Friday's makeup game. Again, insurance run in the top half of the seventh. the Hope bats went silent as the Dutchmen In game two of the doubleheader, the Dutchfell 3-1. men finally Centerfielder and broke the silence lead-off man D a n a at the plate scorGlass ( ' 0 6 ) led off ing three runs H o p e ' s half of the early on one hit. first with a s i n g l e The Dutchmen and scored on managed only M a c K e n z i e ' s R B I two m o r e hits g r o u n d o u t f o r and one run the Hope's only run and rest of the w a y lead. against another The Scots mansophomore aged all three runs Alma starter, Peoff Hope starter Anter Ott. Ott took drew Vlasak ('05) in the tough loss the fifth. Vlasak was while giving up strong in a complete four runs, three game effort allowing A N C H O R PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA earned on three seven hits and two hits and striking Southpaw Kenny Bart ('04) kicks and earned runs striking out two. fires against Alma on Saturday. out six, but fell to 1Hope starter 2 on the season. Jon Deming ('04) was brilliant again as he reThe Dutchmen will look for an offensive mained undefeated on the season at 4-0 shutting spark when it travels to Calvin this weekdown the Scots while striking out five and allowend for another M I A A doubleheader series ing one run, unearned on three hits. with one game Friday afternoon and two Catcher Eric MacKenzie ('04), third baseman games Saturday. The Dutchmen swept the Colin Fry ('07), and outfielder Brian Blanchard Knights at home 17-9,9-1 and 4-3 in 2003.. ('05) each batted in a run in the victory.

Hope in driver's seat of Commissioner's Cup race The M I A A Commissioner's Cup has existed since the 1934-35 school year and again, Hope College is in the driving seat for the 2003-04 school year. As many would guess, Hope and Calvin College are always neck-and-neck during each sports season, and the standings in the M I A A Commissioner's C u p isn't any different. Through the winter sports season, the Flying Dutchmen and Flying Dutch have accumulated 121 points compared to Calvin's 111. Point totals are awarded through M I A A championships, whether won outright or shared. Currently, the points are awarded through five of six m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s sports. After the school year is completed, final standings will be based on eight men's and w o m e n ' s sports. This school year, the Dutchmen have captured a football co-championship and outright championships in swimming and diving, golf, soccer and basketball. The Flying Dutch have won two outright M I A A championships in soccer and swimming and diving. With its 25th Commissioner's C u p already in the books after the 2002-03 school year, Hope would like to capture its 26th in school history after the baseball, softball, tennis and track seasons conclude.

HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR 141 E 12TH ST PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

Softball Schedule Upcoming games M a r c h 31 v s O l i v e t (Doubleheader) April 3 @ Tri-State April 6 @ Adrian (DM) A p r i l 8 vs S t . M a r y ' s (DH) A p r i l 10 v s A l m a ( D H ) A p r i l 14 @ K a l a m a z o o (DH) A p r i l 16-17 @ 111. Wesleyan Tournament April 2 2 @ Calvin (DH)

Spring Sports Wrap-up Baseball Monday's game: Alma 3, Hope 1 Tuesday's game: Hope 8, Grand Valley 5 The Dutchmen broke a 4-4 tie in a four-run seventh in Grand Rapids.

Softball Monday's games: U. of Chicago 2, Hope I Hope 6, U. of Chicago 0 Rebecca Whitman ( ' 0 6 ) threw a complete game onehitter against the Maroons to salvage a split.

Men's Tennis Weekend's matches Aquinas 8. Hope I Hope 9, Alma 0

Women's Tennis Match results: Hope 8, Olivet I Hope 9. Adrian 0

Non-Profil Organization U.S. Postage PAID Hope College


03-31-2004