Page 1

COLLEGE

Next anchor issue will be published Friday, April 17

anc or

OLLAND, MICHIGAN March 26, 1964

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

76th Y e a r - 4 4 3l S'

Senate Candidates Prepare Campaigns

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT — Two foreign students display some of the culture of their countries at International Night Saturday.

Campus To Read 'Fall' As Part of Intellectual Life 3 " T h e F a l l " by Albert C a m u s , labeled as ,4 a highly provocative novel" by Intellectual Life Comm i t t e e c h a i r m a n David Hollenbach, will be the subject of c a m p us - wide discussion following spring vacation. The novel is now a v a i l a b l e in p a p e f b a c k f o r m in the Blue Key Book Store in order t h a t s t u d e n t s m a y be able to r e a d it during vacation. The companion e s s a y to " T h e F a l l , " " T h e Myth of S i s y p h u s . " will also be available in mimeographed form. Students will h a v e the opportunity to discuss the book in i n f o r m a l student- and faculty-led s m a l l

group discussions on Thursday, April 9, at 8 p.m. in G r a v e s Building. Intellectual Life Committee is also planning to present a panel discussion following the s m a l l group m e e t i n g s . In addition. Dr. A. J . Prins, associate professor of English, reviews "The F a l l " on page 4.

Stafford To Read Selections From Own Works of Poetry " S t a f f o r d ' s world is quiet, patient, c'ose at hand, and his extraordinarily clear i m a g e r y moves

Oil Companies Donate Money Hope College today w a s presented wi'h a cash g r a n t of $726 for unrestricted use f r o m GuH Oil Corporation by W. D. B a r b o u r , Area Gulf Sales R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , and Herbert J . K a m m e r a a d of Ottawa Oil Company in Holland. P r e s i d e n t Ca 1 vin VanderWerf accepted the gift on behalf of the college.

In addition to c a p ; t a l grants, the other phases of G u l f ' s comprehensive Educational Assistance prog r a m i n t f u d e direct g r a n t s : Gulf m e r i t scholarsh : ps to children of e m p ' o y e e s a n d a n n u i t a n t s : employee g i f t - m a f c h i n g to colleges: dep a r f m e n t a l assi^tanre g r a n t s ; g r a d u a t e feUowshios: and faculty supplementation g r a n t s . Direct grants, such as the one r e c e : v e d by Hope Co 1 lege, a r e calc u ' a ' p d on the ba^is of a f o r m u l a which t a k e s into account the quality of t h e school's c u r r i c ^ u m , the e f f e c t i v e n e s s of its p r o g r a m and the a m o u n t of financial support provided by the alumni. InstiHitions eligible for d i r e c t g r a n t s a r e those wh ; ch a r e priv a t e l y ooerated and controlled, and which obtain a m a j o r portion of their financial support f r o m non-tax sources.

in Winants Auditorium, Stafford will p r e s e n t poetry f r o m his collection. A coffee will be held in his honor at 2:00 p . m . Several classes will be p r e s e n t and t h e entire student body is invited to participate. Stafford grew up in the s t a t e of K a n s a s and received his B.A. and M.A. d e g r e e s at the University of K a n s a s and his doctorate at the State Un'versity of Iowa. His poetry h a s a p p e a r e d in many m a g azines and is included in anthologies as t h e " N e w Pocket Anthology of A m e r i c a n V e r s e " and "New P o e m s by American P o e t s . " "West of Your City," his first poetry collection, was published in 1960 wh'le " T r a v e l i n g through the D a r k , " winner of the 1963 National Book Award, w a s published in 1962.

For Hope's Use

The grant was one of 692 a w a r d s t o t a i r n g $500,000 that Gulf will distribute this y e a r a s direct, unrestricted grants to as m a n y universities and co'leges under its Aid-To-Education P r o g r a m .

The c a m p a i g n is on. Election slate for this year's Senate and c l a s s presidency h a s been set and Carol Mogle, substituting for vice-president M a r y Klein, h a s announced the following people racing for offices. F o r Student Senate president, the Cosmopolitan f r a t e r n i t y h a s nominated Bruce Neckers. N e c k e r s now s e r v e s as t r e a s u r e r of Senate, was t r e a s u r e r of his f r e s h m a n class. F r o m the Knicks, Bob Anderson now act s as president of the junior class. In this capacity he has reppresented the c l a s s in the Student Senate. F o r t h e office of Senate vicepresident, five of the six sororities h a v e m a d e nominations. F r o m Sorosis, P a m Dykstra h a s begun the climb. Linda Munro will run against h e r , nominated by Sibylline sorority, as will Kappa Chi's Betty Lou Dietch. Delphis have selected Wenche Nilson to represent t h e m , as h a v e Dorians, Billie Chain. All of t h e c a n d i d a t e s running a r e juniors. F o r class presidencies each of the f r a t e r n i t i e s has nominated a c a n d i d a t e ; in the senior class an independent, J i m Chesney, has also e n t e r e d the r a c e . lEntering the r a c e f r o m the Aradian f r a t e r n i t y is L a r r y H a v e r k a m p . Cosmos h a v e n o m i n a t e d Rog Abel. Jeff Meuller f r o m the Knickerbockers is also running. F r o m the E m e r s o n i a n s is J a m e s Boeringa; Cal Poppink of F r a t e r s c o m p l e t e s the ballot. F o r junior class president, t h e Arkies h a v e nominated Dennis

WILLIAM E. STAFFORD through the mind of the r e a d e r , without r e t a k e s , and in exact step w ; th the exquisitely controlled music of the v e r s e , " s a y s the Washington Post. Willam E . Stafford will be prese n t on Hope's c a m p u s Tuesday. April 7. In two sessions of poetry r e a d i n g at 9:30 a . m . and 1:00 p . m .

Since 1948 Stafford h a s t a u g h t EngMsh L i t e r a t u r e and composition at Lewis and Clark College in P o r t l a n d , Oregon, with leaves of absence to teach at Manchester College in Indiana and San Jose State College in California. Stafford lives in Oswego, Oregon, with his wife and four children.

Essay Contest Begins A fifty-dollar prize essay competition is announced b y the History D e p a r t m e n t . The Rolf Italiander Award will be m a d e to a J u n : o r who submits the best essay concerned with the question: "Does the United States p r a c t i c e Neo-colonialism?" The tooic for the Italiander annual a w a r d is chosen on the basis of the donor's wish that the competition e n c o u r a g e " t h e b e t t e r m e n t of international and interracial u n d e r s t a n d i n g . " In addition to the first prize of fifty-dollars in cash, second and third prizes will be books written by M r . Italiander, a noted G e r m a n journalist and historian who h a s b e e n visiting lecturer at Hope Co'lege. The competition is open to all Juniors. E s s a y s m u s t be submitted in typed copy to the History D e p a r t m e n t office not later t h a n Monday, May 4.

Sturgis; John Simons f r o m t h e Cosmos has been selected. J o h n Wormouth f r o m the Knicks and Bob E d w a r d s from the E m m i e s and t h e F r a t e r s ' Bob White will run. F r e s h m e n r u s h e e s nominated for sophomore c l a s s president a r e : Arkies, Wes Michaelson; Cosmos, Tom Griffin; Knicks, Mike B a r endse; E m m i e s , Dean De M a s t e r ; F r a t e r s , Gene P e a r s o n . Schedule f o r compaigning h a s been c o m p a c t e d into a short f i v e days time, April 20-24. The week a f t e r spring vacation and preceeding the c a m p a i g n week is the " G e t Out and Vote C a m p a i g n . " S a r a h

Ann E m e r s o n is in c h a r g e of this section of election. On Monday, April 20 at 6 a.m., actual c a m p a i g n i n g will begin. In chapel at 8:00 a . m . the c a n d i d a t e for Student Senate president and vice-president will speak. 6:30 p.m. will b r i n g class m e e t i n g s , with s p e e c h e s of c a n d i d a t e s for president. On Wednesday WHTC will broadcast d e t b a t e between Senate presidential candidates at a t i m e to be announced Other c a m p a i g n i n g includes candidates sponsoring discussions and conferences. Active c a m p a i g n i n g ends that night at midnight.

Dr. Brink Awarded Grant For Chemical PurityStudy Dr. Irwin J . Brink, a s s o c i a t e professor of Chemistry at Hope College has been a w a r d e d a $20.420 r e s e a r c h g r a n t f r o m the P e t r o leum R e s e a r c h Fund of the American Chemical Society. Announcement of the award w a s m a d e today by D r . K a r l D i t t m e r , Director of R e s e a r c h G r a n t s and Fellowships Division of the A m e r ican chemical Society. The three-year grant was m a d e to Brink as a result of his work in the area of very p u r e chemical substances done last s u m m e r at the National B u r e a u of S t a n d a r d s , also with the h e l p of a P e t r o l e u m Research Fund grant. The grant is intended to cover three s u m m e r ' s work, the m a j o r portion to be used in p u r c h a s i n g equipment needed for e x p e r i m e n tation. Hope chemistry s t u d e n t s will s e r v e as r e s e a r c h a s s o c i a t e s for t h e project. Dr. Brink will begin his r e s e a r c h on the Hope c a m p u s this s u m m e r . Simply stated, the p r o j e c t will involve the purification of a l r e a d y existing c h e m i c a l s and procedures for analyzing t h e chemicals to det e r m i n e the e x t e n t of their purity. In o r d e r to find an outlet for his refined " p r o d u c t s " Brink hopes to m a k e connections with other scientific personnel who h a v e a n e e d for very pure c h e m i c a l s in t h e i r work.

Dr. Brink was quick to credit Dr. E d w a r d Wichers, who for 40 y e a r s was a r e s e a r c h c h e m i s t and executive for the National B u r e a u of Standards, Washington, D.C., for his p a r t in obtaining the g r a n t

IRWIN J. BRINK for this r e s e a r c h p r o g r a m . Wichers, the b r o t h e r of Hope P r e s i d e n t - E m e r i t u s Dr. Wynand Wichers and Hope a l u m n u s of 1913, originally invited t h e Hope chemistry d e p a r t m e n t to become involved in this r e s e a r c h , spending considerable time working in this a r e a himself.

Scholarships for Vienna School Awarded to Seven Hope Students Seven Hope College s t u d e n t s were notified today t h a t they h a v e been a w a r d e d scholarships to attend t h e college's Vienna Summ e r School this year . Mr. Clarence Kleis, c h a i r m a n of the Scholarship Committee, announced t h a t $500 scholarships were p r e s e n t e d to S a n d r a C a d y , Arlene Deitz and Carla R e i d s m a . $250 scholarships were a w a r d e d to L a r r y H a v e r k a m p and P a u l Hesselink. Two special scholarships w e r e also announced by Kleis. One, a $500 s c h o l a r s h i p designated for a s t u d e n t m a j o r i n g in science, aw a r d e d to J e a n n e F r i s s e l ; t h e other s c h o l a r s h i p of $500, contributed by a f o r m e r student of the Vienna S u m m e r School and designated for a history m a j o r , presented to William C a t h c a r t . T h e scholarship winners, along with 28 other Hope students who, as of this date, h a v e 'been a c c e p t e d as p a r t i c i p a n t s in this y e a r ' s prog r a m . m e t for dinner on T u e s d a y e v e r i n t h e Phelps Hall Confeic.: ^oom for their first briefing sesbm. with Dr. P a u l F r i e d , y director of Uk a program. Also on hand w Dr. E d w a r d Savage, who will conduct the Rom a n c e L a n g u a g e stu^y-tour,

E s t h e r Snow, f o r m e r w o m e n ' s counselor for the s u m m e r sessions. Mrs. M a r i a n Stryker, who will be the w o m e n ' s counselor this y e a r , J e r r y Kruyf, who h a s done public relations in Vienna for two of the sessions, and Mrs. Alma Scarlett, s e c r e t a r y for the Vienna S u m m e r School. During briefing sessions, held regularly prior to d e p a r t u r e for Europe, students a r e given insight on what to expect a s they b e c o m e involved in other c u s t o m s and cultures. They receive i n f o r m a t i o n on what clothing to t a k e , inoculations, passports, currency exchange, background books to read and other items which t h e y need to know in order to m a k e a smooth transition between living in the U.S. and lEurope. Following the dinner a coffee w a s held in P h e l p s Lounge with thirty previous m e m b e r s of the V.S.S. who a r e still on c a m p u s or living in the a r e a as additional guests This is the ninth season f o r the Vienna S u m m e r School which w a s organized in 1956 by Dr. P a u l F r i e d c h a i r m a n of the history departm e n t at Hope College.


Hope Collefe anchor

Pafe 2

March 26, 1964

Stegink Gets Fellowship To Study Comparative Literature David J . Stegink, senior, was notified recently t h a t he has been awarded a National Defense Education Act Fellowship in Compar-

DAVID STEGINK

ative Literature f r o m the University of Arkansas. The announcement was m a d e by Dr. Clarence De G r a a f , c h a i r m a n of the Hope English D e p a r t m e n t and Stegink's m a j o r adviser. The three-year fellowship c a r r i e s a stipend of $6600 and will enable Steg nk to complete requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Stegink will begin the p r o g r a m this fall and plans eventually to teach English or c o m p a r a t i v e lite r a t u r e in college. Stegink graduated from Western Michigan Christian High School in 1960. At Hope he is president of the F r e n c h Club, a m e m b e r of the Student Christian Association,the Chapel Choir, Messiah Chorus, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia — National honorary music fraternity and Pi Delta Phi—National Honorary F r e n c h Society. His brother, Gordon, a 1961 Hope g r a d u a t e , won a similar fellowship to study m a t h e m a t i c s at Washington University in St. Louis.

Be A College Town Doll Make Your Selection a t . . .

The Outer World

.V V

Foreign Policy: A Crisis? by Robert Donia

It has been pointed out by several prominent s t a t e s m e n , most of t h e m Republican candidates for the Presidency, that the Johnson Administration is having its probl e m s in the a r e a of foriegn policy. It is the purpose of this column to highlight these problems, so that when President Johnson receives his weekly copy of the anchor he will be more fully a w a r e of the problems he is facing, as well as be spiritually enriched by reading "Dilettante." P a n a m a s e e m s to be having special problems. Recently the government there declared a " F l y Your Own F l a g " day in which all local residents were urged to take down the flags of both the U.S. and P a n a m a and fly the family coatof-arms. This way no one was offended. even the government of P a n a m a , since the g o v e r n m e n t is mostly run by one family anyway. Incidentally, the U.N. Security

Council reports that P a n a m a is now in close oompetition with Cuba for first place in raising cain. If the U.S. ever loses control of the P a n a m a Canal, Lyndon has two possible courses of action: 1» he can send Billie Sol E s t e s down and steal the C a n a l back, or 2) he can send H a r r y T r u m a n down to tell the P a n a m a n i a n s w h e r e to go. Chances a r e the latter will happen anyway. On the other side of the world in South Viet N a m , our ambassador there is faced with a Lodge problem. We m u s t , at all cost, prevent South Viet N a m f r o m falling into the h a n d s of the Communists, (But no one is quite sure why.) We have sent our finest fighting men to Viet Nam, including Robert M c N a m a r a , but to no avail. The trouble is in the government. Another coup is scheduled for May 16 (this is a semi-annual event) in which the Pro-Apathy

FRENCH CLOAK 3 0 E. 8th St.

EX 3 - 9 0 0 6

Fris WESTERN MICHIGAN'S LARGEST GREETING CARD DEPARTMENT F e a t u r i n g : C o n t e m p o r a r y & S t u d i o C a r d s , Ring B o o k i , P a p e n , Pern

"EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOL" Downtown — Next to Penney's A t our River A v e n u e S t o r e New and Used Typewriters — Rentals — Expert Repair Service

/,

Save 2 0 % On All Portable Typewriters "COCA-COLA" AND "COKE" A»c HCOISTMCO TftADC* MARK| WHC IH IDIHTirv ONLV THC PBOOUCT Of THE COCA-COL* COM^ANT.

BROTHERS FOUR — Student Senate will present the well-known folk singing group April 20 at 8 p.m. in the Civic Center. Tickets are now on sale in Van Raalte lobby for student prices of $1.40 and $1.75.

Miss Holland Contest Holland J a y c e e s are presently looking for candidates for the Miss Holland contest which will be held as part of the Miss Holland P a g e a n t on May 2. All girls between the ages of 18 and 28 who have talent in a n y field may participate. College contestants need not. be residents of Holland. According to the official rules, " E n t r a n t must be of good c h a r a c t e r and posses poise, personality, intelligence, c h a r m and beauty of f a c e and figure." Any girl interested in becoming the 1964 Miss Holland m a y call Mr. or Mrs. J a c k Westrate at EXport 6-3614.

HERFST STUDIO AND PHOTO SUPPLY PORTRAITS —

PICTURE FRAMES — CAMERAS

Singing goes better refreshed.

PROJECTORS — FILMS — PHOTO FINISHING

And Coca-Cola — with that special zing

We Give S&H Green Stamps

but never too sweet —

7 West 8th Street

better.i

^.with

Coke IRACeUA>iK0

P a r t y is scheduled to t a k e over (exiensive r e s e a r c h has turned up no connections with the m a j o r i t y p a r t y on Hope's c a m p u s ) . This, say p a r t y leaders, is proof that apathetic citizens a r e a t last getting organized and doing something about their apathy. The U.S. Government is powerless to prevent this sort of thing and there a r e even reports that a foreign power, the Central Intelligence Agency, is behind the scheduled coup. Incidentally, H e n r y Cabot Lodge has m a d e a real hit with the Viet Namese, walking the streets and sloshing through rice paddies m a k i n g friends. Unfortunately for Mr. Lodge, the Vietnamese cannot vote in American elections. Meanwhile in F r a n c e , General De Gaulle has hauled out his "I love m e " sweatshirt f r o m high school days and is now sticking his nose into others people's business — which has gotten r a t h e r bothersome due to the size of that e x t r e m i t y . Mr. 'De Gaulle has great plans for the f u t u r e and he has been out beating the d r u m s for the Glory of F r a n c e , Charles De Gaulle and Motherhood. Don't believe the r u m o r that he will hire Casius Clay for the purpose of bragging about F r a n c e — De Gaulle is doing quite an a d e q u a t e job himself. Anyone interested in joining his m o v e m e n t m a y pick up their "Go C h a r l i e " buttons at t h e nearest Red Chinese e m b a s s y . Cuba seems to have dropped out of the spotlight somewhat, ever since it was announced th^t the Cubans have ceased production of their latest b r a n d of cigars—they w e r e 90 feet long and exp 1 oded. T h e r e were r u m o r s t h a t Castro m a y shave off his beard—he's waiting for an offer from Gillette, but that firm r e f u s e s to p a y the 30 pieces of sPver he d e m a n d s . Other problems exist, too, but we a r e confident ^he S t o t e Departm e n t will h e a r about t h e m sooner or later. If not, it's certain that Senator Keating will know, and he'H turn the information over to the House Rules C o m n r t t e e . which is the group t h a t really r u n s the country.

Scholarships Change for Needy Students Changes in the p r o c e d u r e of awarding scholarships have been announced by Dr. John W. Hollenbach, vice p r e s ' d e n t of the college. Beginning this year all scholarships awards will be continuing annual awards for all who h a v e met the established academic criteria during the y e a r . Students must have a grade a v e r a g e of at least 2.9 in the f r e s h m a n y e a r and at least 3.0 in the sophomore and junior years. Students . meeting these requirements will not have to apply for the renewal of their scholarships. Students who are receiving grants-in-aid m u s t still reapply annually, however. Applications m a y be obtained f r o m the office of the t r e a s u r e r and m u s t be filed before May 15.

Phone EX 2 - 2 6 6 4

refreshes best. things g O

DU SAAR PHOTO and GIFT SHOP

SWEAT SHIRTS

Everything Photographic

ALL SIZES NOW IN STOCK

Holland, Mich. EX 2 - 2 2 3 0

NEW - Short Sleeve, Laden Green NEW - Long Sleeve, Sand PLACE

Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by:

COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY Grand Rapids., Mlchlgah

l .

BLUE KEY BOOK STORE — Your Book Store —


Pafe s

Hope College anchor

March 26, 1964

Tiramer To Retire as Admission Director by Barbara F r e g g e n s Beginning in S e p t e m b e r , f u t u r e Hope s t u d e n t s will find a new f a c e behind the desk of Director of Admissions. After 16 y e a r s in t h e position of signing admission notices, Mr. Albert H. T i m m e r is r e t ring a s director, a n d will be s u c c e e d e d by Roger J . Rietiberg, the p r e s e n t Associate D i r e c t o r of Admissions. Also to b e included in t h e a d m i s sions staff will b e f o r m e r Hope g r a d u a t e , M r . L a r r y T e r Molen. o c c u p y : n g t h e position of Assistant Director. In leaving Hope College, T i m m e r a n t i c i p a t e s a " w o n d e r f u l admissions p r o g r a m " for t h e c o m i n g y e a r s u n d e r the n e w l e a d e r s h i p of Rie^berg. " I n l e a v i n g Hope, m y finest t h o u g h t s go t o t h e relationship w : t h t h e s t u d e n t s a s t h e y plan for college a n d the g r e a t i n t e r e s t of their p a r e n t s . " In t h e t i m e t h a t he h a s been in t h e a d m i s s i o n s office, T i m m e r f e e l s t h a t the g r e a t est c h a n g e h e h a s s e e n in admissions policy is the t i m i n g of appiication for e n t r a n c e to college. " T o d a y t h e s t u d e n t is o u r f i r s t conc e r n . M a n y s t u d e n t s a r e now accepted to college a f t e r their j u n i o r y e a r in high school w h e r e a s in 1948 thoy did not ev^n aoply to co'lege until a f t e r g r a d u a t i o n . " The college is v e r y conscious of the f a c t t h a t the s t u d e n t s a r e r e a d y to e n t e r college, said Timm e r . T h e policy h a s b e e n to m o v e f r o m hastily e n t e r i n g s t u d e n t s , to external testing before e n ^ a n ^ e to college s o t h e s t u d e n t will not be o v e r t e s t e d the f i r s t week on campus. The new d i r e c t o r of a d m i s s i o n s is not a s t r a n g e r to Hope s t u d e n t s . R i e t b e r g h a s been w i t h t h e admis-

sions office for a y e a r a n d previously t a u g h t o r g a n at H o p e since 1954 and w a s d i r e c t o r of t h e M e n ' s Choir. A 1947 Hope g r a d u a t e , R i e t b e r g w a s a m e m b e r of the E m e r s o n i a n F r a t e r n i t y , Blue Key, a n d a c t i v e in the Chapel Choir. He and his wife, a Calvin g r a d u a t e , h a v e three children.

In a s u m m e r S e m i n a r on College C h a n g e at H a r v a r d University R i e t b e r g worked on a f o r m u l a with 35 other college personnel in t r y i n g to d e t e r m i n e w h a t factors contributed the m o s t to a successful college e x p e r i e n c e . The f a c t o r contributing t h e g r e a t e s t to the s u c c e s s of a s t u d e n t in college, w a s how well he did in hi"h school in relation to his c ' a s s r a n k . "College B o a r d s a r e i m p o r t a n t but only to indicate f u r t h e r potential of the s t u d e n t , " a d d e d R i e t b e r g . Hope College does not h a v e any cut off score on the b o a r d s for entrance." Helping R i e t b e r g in his new position will be Mr. L a r r y T e r Mo'en. A biology m a j o r while at Hope, T e r Molen r e c e i v e d his M a s t e r s D e g r e e in Political Science at the U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan in 1962. He then worked f o r the C e n t r a l Intelligence Agency until M a r c h of this y e a r in Washington D.C. While a s t u d e n t at Hope, t h e new a s s i s t a n t d i r e c t o r w a s c a p t a i n of the football t e a m , a merriber of Blue Key and t h e F r a t e r n a l F r a t e r n i t y . He m a r r i e d E d n a Ho 1 1and e r , also a Hope g r a d u a t e . T h e y h a v e one boy.

MR. LARRY TER MOLEN Mr. Rietberg feels that ". . . the p r e s e n t policy in a d m i s s i o n s inc l u d e s m o r e a c t i v e r e c r u i t i n g of good s t u d e n t s f o r Hope C o l l e g e . " R e c e n t l y , t h e college h a s done m u c h r e c r u i t i n g by s e n d i n g r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s to d : f f e r e n t sections of the country t o talk to i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s . Also, some of t h e high schools f r o m which a l a r g e p e r c e n t a g e of Hope s t u d e n t s c o m e a r e c o n t a c t e d , and letters a r e sent to g u i d a n c e counselors.

T e r M o a n ' s new job will e n t a i l some t r a v e l i n g around the country to m e e t with s t u d e n t s . H o w e v e r , when on the c a m p u s h e wPl corr e s p o n d with high schools and help to e v a l u a t e s t u d e n t s w i t h the Admissions C o m m i t t e e . Although t h e A d m i s s i o n s Office is in Holland, Michigan, one cannot e s c a p e t h e f a c t • h a t Hone stud e n t s a r e the unofficial a g e n t s of the college in h e ' p i n g to r e c r u i t s t u d e n t s , e m p h a s i z e d the t h r e e m e n . " T h e personal touch is still very i m p o r t a n t . "

Dean s List... Continued (Editor's note: The following Dean's List concludes the list of students which began in last week's anchor.) M Walter M a g a n s , P r e s t o n M a r i n g , Dolores M a r k s , J o h n M a r s t e l l e r , John Martin, Judy Martin, Bruce M o s s e l ; n k , S a n d r a M a s t , Ronald M a t t h e w s , J o s e p h M a y n e , Donald McOlow, K a r e n M c F a l l , R i c h a r d M c F a l l , Blaine M c K ; n l e y , T h o m a s McNeil, J o h n M e e n g s , William Meengs, Carol Me:er, Charles Menning, Wesley Michaelson, Allen M i e d e m a , J u d i t h M i e d e m a , R a n d a l l Miller, B a r b a r a Momeye r , Gloria Mooi, S u s a n Mooy, G a r y Morton, David Mouw, Dirk Mouw, Regina Mueller, D e l w y n M u l d e r , J o h n M u l d e r , Ronald M u l d e r , Jeff r e y Muller, R i c h a r d M u l l e r B r u c e N e c k e r s , J o y c e iNelson, Jacob Ngwa, Roger Nietering, Wenche Nilsen, Linda Nilsson, Stephen N o r d s t r o m , J o n Norton, Chris N o t e b o o m , L i n d a Nott, M o h a m m a d Nozari David O a k l e y , T h e o d o r e O e g e m a , iDaniel Ogden, M a r t i n Ondrus, M a r i a Oossee, Ann Osbon, F r a n c e s Osborn, D e b o r a h Osborne, Ellen O s t e r h a v e n , M a r c i a O s t e r i n k , Dean O v e r m a n P R o b e r t P a n g l e , Vivie P a o , Amzie P a r c e l l , S a n d r a P a r k e r , Kathleen P a y n e , M a r j o r i e P e c k , William Peacock, Arthur Pearson, Judith Pell, B a r b a r a Petersen, Glenn P i c k a r d , W a l t e r P i c k u p , Ronald P l a s m a n , Philip P l u i s t e r , Gene Poll, William P o p p i n k , Avelyn Postma, Julie Postmus, P e t e r P r a a m s m a , Suellen P r i n s , S a r a Puehl, Marcia P y l m a n Robert Raatjes, Bradford Race, Su zan n e R a d l i f f , C a t h e r i n e Ratm e y e r , David R e a r d o n , C a r l a Reidsma, Leora Remtema, Norma R e n s , K e n n e t h R e y n e n , Cheryl Richardson, Leanne Ridderhoff, J a m e s R i e m e r s m a , Ruth Rikkers, Donald R i l l e m a , C a r o l R o b e r t s , Alan R o b e r t s o n , J a m e s R o n d a , Gayle R u i s a r d , Ly n n Rundle, E l g a Rusins, G a y l e R y p s t r a , D o n n a Rynbrandt, Margaret Rynbrandt Arthur Schaap, M a r y Scherpen-

isse, M a r t i n Scholtens, P a t r i c i a Schoonmaker, Susan Schrandt, Bourgi Schregardus, Jacqueline S c h r o t e n b o e r , J a n i c e Schulz, Linda S e l a n d e r , F r e d e r i c k G. Shanholtzer, E d n a S h a w , Kenneth S i m m e link, J o h n Simons, P a t r i c i a Simpson, J a m e s Slee, Lila S l i n g e r l a n d , Alan Smith, P a t r i c i a S m i t h , S u s a n Sonneveldt, S h a r o n S p e n c e r , Darrel S t a a t , J o h n S t a m , David Steh o u w e r . L a n c e Stell, P e n n y Stone r , T h o m a s S t r a a t s m a , D a v i d Stryk e r , Rolland S w a n k , J o h n S w a r t . M a r c i a Swets, Betty S w i n e h a r t . K a r a Smith

Lois Wohlers, A r i k k a Woldsen, Lucille Wood, K a r e n Woodley, J o h n Wormuth,

Ruth

Wozney,

Martha

Wyatt, Ann Wylie, T h o m a s Wombwell. Ruth Y z e n b a a r d Aileen Zeller, R u t h Z i e m a n n , J o n a t h a n Zophy, J e r r y Z w a r t , N a n cy Z w a r t

GIFTS — Mr. Peter Cook, center, a Grand Rapids automobile importer, has presented the Athletic Department with two Volkswagen Microbuses. Accepting the gifts are Athletic Director Gordon Brewer, Coach Russ DeVette, President VanderWerf and chairman of the Board of Trustees Mr. Ekdal Buys.

Kuiper, Korf, Paulsen Win At State Oratory, Extemp Contests J a m e s Korf, Delia R a e Kuiper and P e t e r P a u l s e n won top honors at t h e a n n u a l Michigan Intercollegiate P e a c e O r a t o r y a n d Ext e m p o r e Speaking Contests held F r i d a y and S a t u r d a y at t h e Univ e r s i t y of Michigan. Korf took f i r s t p l a c e in t h e m e n ' s o r a t o r y division f r o m a field of six c o n t e s t a n t s . His o r a t i o n w a s entitled " A n d Hate Walked on T h r o u g h T i m e . " T a k i n g second place h o n o r s in the w o m e n ' s oratory division, Delia Kuiper spoke on " S o Y o u ' r e An A m e r i c a n , A r e n ' t You?" In the m e n ' s f i n a l s of t h e Ext e m p o r e c o n t e s t P a u ' s e n took first p l a c e s p e a k i n g on t h e g e n e r a l topic, " P e a c e , P o v e r t y and P o p u l a t i o n . " Korf and P a u l s e n a r e now eligible to c o m p e t e in the N a t i o n a l P e a c e O r a t o r y and E x t e m p o r e contests. S t u d e n t s f r o m ten of M i c h ; g a n ' s colleges and u n i v e r s i t i e s c o m p e t e d

A&W ROOT BEER Olive King Burger

in t h e v a r i o u s c o n t e s t s : A d r i a n . Calvin. C e n t r a l Michigan, Detroit I n s t i t u t e of Technology, E a s t e r n Michigan, Olivet, U n i v e r s : t y of Detroit, W a y n e S t a t e , U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan and Hope College. C a s h prizes of $25 for f i r s t p l a c e , $15 for second and $10 for t h i r d w e r e provided by t h e Knights of P y t h i a s G r a n d Lodge of Michigan.

Dedicated to a mort effective witness for Christ in our generation... open to college juniors, graduates, international students, Christian ministers and laymen desiring additional training.

YOUNG LIFE INSTITUTE COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO

Two Patties of Choice Beef Melted Cheese, Lettuce-Tomato a n d Our O w n Olive Dressing Served on a Rusk Bun

1964 FACULTY

45c

MODEL LAUNDRY

Itmts Daant

Jamtt H. Jtckson Paul K. Jtwttt

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING J o h n Tanis, Nelson T e C r o n e y . Sharon Tein, J a m e s Tell, J e a n T e n Brink, N o r m a n T e n Brink, J o a n ten Hoor, Glen T e r Beek, Donald T e Roller, N a n c y T e Winkle, J u d y t h T h o m a s , L a n a Ten Brink, R o b e r t T i g e l a a r , H e r b e r t T i l l e m a , C a r o l e T i m k o v i c h , Douglas Toxopeus, M a r g a r e t T r a x l e r , D o r o t h y T r o i k e , Donald Troost, Linda T u r i n s k y , Carol T u r k s t r a James Vaccaro, J a m e s Van D a m , T h e o d o r e Van D a m , L y n n e V a n d e Bunte, J e a n Van D e P o l d e r . Ronald Vander Beek. R i c h a r d V a n d e r Borgh, J o a n V a n d e r Veen. David V a n d e r w e y , William Van Hoeven, Lois V a n Hoff, C a r o l Van L e n t e , F r e d e r i c k Van L e n t e , C h r i s V a n L o n k h u y z e n , Carol V a n Midd l e s w o r t h , S u s a n Van O u w e r k e r k , Shirley Van R a a l t e , J o a n V a n S l a g e r e n , R u t h Van W i t z e n b u r g . Ronald Venhuizen, P a u l V e r d u i n , Charles Veurink, Joanne Visscher, M a r y Vollink, Louise V o o r h o r s t , J o h n Voorn, K a r e n Voskuil, J o h n Voss, J o h n V a n d e r R o e s t

W Paul Wackerbarth, Kathleen W a l s m a , C h a r l e s Walvoord, Douglas Walvoord, Dirk Walvoord, Lind a Walvoord, J o h n Wang, Wesley Wasdyke, Elbert Watrous, Dennis Wegner, Peter Weidenaar, Robert Welmers, Richard Wepfer, Robert Werge. B a r r y W e r k m a n , L a r r y W e s t r a t e , R o b e r t White, J a m e s Wiegerink, Marjorie Wiegman, D e n n i s Wilcox, Bonnie Wissink,

Free Pickup and Delivery To All Dorms And Fraternity Houses

Jal McNtil lam«t P. Martii

A. Btrkalay Mickaltan

DAILY PICKUP and DELIVERY AT KOLLEN HALL — 5:30 P.M. 9 7 East 8th Street

Phone EX 2 - 3 6 2 5 lad K. Turakian

Paul Woollay

Ronald F. Tiwgiliii

Two four week terms, June 21 through Hope Church invites you to a M a u n d y Thursday Service of Holy Communion a n d Tenebrae Service. This service of worship will begin at 7:45 p.m.

August 14. Meeting on the campus of the Fountain Valley School near Color a d o Springs. Chartered by the State of Colorado to grant t h e master of arts degree. Courses offered include: McNeil: Christian and Society. WooUey: Church History. Turekian: Science and Christian Faith. Jewett: Doctrine of C o d and Man.

''Keep our faces, O God, toward the coming of thy kingdom; and grant us, against every re-

Adventure

peated assult, to choose thy way, and not our

EXCELLENCE

own, that we may rest in the certainty of thy triumph.

Through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen."

in

All who desirt to increaM their effectiveneta Ib a world that urgenUy needs Christian leadership are invitea to consider a count of •tudy at The Yoong Life Institute. For catalog and application form writtt Ifea Yeeog Ufa Intltute, Boi 395, Paniiaa, CaHt

HOPE CHURCH torn

7 7 W . l l t h Street

Udraw

cn».

.Stan.


Page 4

Hope College anchor

March 26, 1964

'The Fall:' Guilty or Not Guilty? by J a m e s Prins (Albert Camus' "The Fall" will be the subject of a campus-wide discussion on April 9. The book was first published in France as 4 'La Chute." In the U.S. It was published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. The Vintage Books paperback edition contains the original Justin O'Brien translation. Mr. Prins, who recently received his Ph.D degree from the University of Michigan, is an associate professor of English on the college faculty. His courses include the American, the English, and the European novel.) T h e setting of C a m p u s ' '"The F a l l " is a sad and sunless A m s t e r d a m , u n d e r a gray Dutch sky. The dark a t m o s p h e r e of t h e city, the s y s t e m of canals, the Zuider Zee ( " a dead s e a " ) are m e a n t to suggest a dank hell of the souQ, a nether-land, to which t h e n a r r a t o r h a s descended. " A r e you f a m i l i a r with D a n t e ? " he asks a silent listener. T h e whole n a r r a t i v e is a monologue, or series of monologues addressed to this m u t e companion by a m a n who calls himself " J e a n Baptiste G a m e n c e , play a c t o r , " " a double f a c e , a c h a r m i n g J a n u s . " To his shadowy auditor G a m ence r e l a t e s the a d v e n t u r e s t h a t h a v e brought him f r o m a loftier role in P a r i s to the foggy streets, the dingy b a r s , the bleak little room he h a u n t s in A m s t e r d a m . C a m p u s cleverly plants the ideas t h a t C l a m e n c e is talking to no one but himse 1 !. an idea t h a t t u r n s to our realization that he is talking to no one in p a r t ; c u b r b e c a u s e he is talking to everybody — cond e m n i n g the whole world in his profession of " i u ^ e - p e n i + e n t . " His n a m e is significant: t h e Christian n a m e . J e a n - Baptiste. suggests John the Baptist, p r e a c h i n g " r e p e n t a n c e for the remission of s i n s ; " the sound of t h e s u r n a m e , f l a m e n c e . suggests not on 1 y the French for r r v i n e and shouting ( ' c l a m a n t ' ) but also the F r e n c h for c 1 emency and m e r c y Cclemence'). Confession of Guflt C l a m e n c e ' s recitall is a confession of euilt: the o r o ^ r e s s of his monologue is a " f a l l , " a descent into a hell of private introspection. Once, he tells his listener, he lived blissfully in a kind of E d e n of self-complaoency, one of the most respected l a w v e r s in P ^ r i s . the pro 4 ec f or of wHows and orphans, in his own estimation. He had been

at the height of his powers, successful, assured of his own righteousness and virtue — until one night he had failed to risk his life to save the life of another. He had failed to plunge into the icy w a t e r s of the Seine to s a v e a d e s p e r a t e young woman f r o m suicide. He failed in an encounter with h u m a n misery and t h e r e a f t e r he h a s been plagued by an unidentifiable laugh t h a t follows him e v e r y w h e r e , the ironic laughter of self-judgment. He confesses: " I . I, I is the r e f r a i n of my whole life, which could be heard in everything I s a i d . " "Modesty helped m e to shine, humility to conquer, and virtue to o p p r e s s . " " I n short, for m e to live happily it was essential for the c r e a t u r e s I chose (to dove) not to live at all. They must receive their life, sporadically, at m y bidding." C l a m e n c e ' s f u r t h e r discoveries about himself a r e even m o r e shattering to his c o m p l a c e n t self righteousness. He rips off layer a f t e r layer of duplicity: " A f t e r all I h a v e told you, w h a t do you think developed? An aversion to myself? Come, it w a s especially with others t h a t I w a s fed up. The prosecution of o t h e r s went on constantly, in m y h e a r t . " T h e t r u t h is that the whole purpose of Clame n c e ' s confession of guilt is selfish — to gain f r o m his listener a recognition of the l i s t e n e r ' s c o m m o n involvement in h u m a n guilt and thereby lift the b u r d e n of guilt f r o m himself. C l a m e n c e is a " j u d g e • p e n i t e n t " : he tells his story so that h e can a c c u s e and judge through confession and penitence. T h e r e t a k e s place in his recitation a gradual shift f r o m " I " a m guilty to " w e " a r e guilty: "Covered with ashes, t e a r i n g m y h a i r , m y f a c e scored by clawing, but with piercing eyes, I s t a n d bef o r e all humanity r e c a p i t u l a t i n g m y s h a m e s without losing sight of the effect I a m producing and saying: 'I was the lowest of the low.' Then imperceptibly I pass f r o m the T to the 'we.* When I get to 'This is what we are,* the trick has been played and I can tell them off. I a m like t h e m , to be sure; we a r e in the soup together. However, I I n v e a superiority in t h a t I know it and this gives m e the right to speak. You see the a d v a n t a g e , I a m s u r e . The m o r e I accuse myself, the m o r e I h a v e the right to judge vou. E v e n b e t t e r , I provoke you into judging yourself, and this relieves m e of that much of the b u r d e n . " With self-satisfaction, Clamence s t a t e s :

Greek Week

" I a m for any theory that r e f u s e s to g r a n t m a n innocence and for a n y p r a c t i c e t h a t t r e a t s h i m as guilty." Guilty or Not GuDty? Because " T h e F a l l " is a monologue delivered just f r o m the point of view of C l a m e n c e and b e c a u s e it quite possibly is completely ironic, it is t h e most puzzling of C a m u s ' novels, with an ambiguity, probably intended, at the very h e a r t of it. It is possible to look a t the

novel as a f f i r m i n g the idea of m a n ' s guilt; it is also possible to regard it as denying the ideas of m a n ' s guilt. According to the first view, C l a m e n c e ' s descent is something like w h a t h a s been called in the Christian tradition, or at least in the criticism of Milton's " P a r adise L o s t , ' ^ a " f o r t u n a t e f a l l " That p h r a s e is intended to suggest t h a t the fall of A d a m (the fall of m a n ) proved to be f o r t u n a t e for m a n k i n d since it m a d e n e c e s s a r y t h e extending of divine g r a c e through t h e e n t r a n c e into h u m a n history of God as m a n ; it m a d e necessary the Incarnation. The p h r a s e " f o r t u n a t e f a l l " also suggests t h a t the fall f r o m innocence or virtue can h a v e a fortunate, a providential ( d e t e r m i n i s m is implicit in both adjectives) effect in the fallen individual's new recognitions as to the n a t u r e of evil and his own guilt. Thus, by his fall, J e a n - B a p t i s t e Clamence becomes t r u e prophet for m a n : his 'clam a n t , ' his crying in the wilderness, is a proclamation of m a n ' s wickedness and guilt, m a n ' s need for penitence and g r a c e Cclemence,' c l e m e n c y . ' ) S t r a n g e l y though, the doves t h a t circle in the dark Dutch sky never descend: " t h e r e is noth-

ing but the sea and t h e c a n a l s , roofs covered with shop signs, and n e v e r a head on which to a l i g h t . " The only g r a c e t h a t Clamence off e r s is the innocence of universal guilt. Irony The idea t h a t C a m u s is s t r e s s i n g the guiltiness of m a n goes against the grain of the rest of his work. The c o n t r a r y view is t h a t " T h e F a l l " is pure irony: f a r f r o m seriously expressing a view of universal wickedness and guilt, C a m us is satirizing this belief. Concerning the doctrine of original sin, C a m u s once said: " P e o p l e h a v e insisted too much upon the innocence of creation. Now they w a n t to c r u s h us with feelings of o u r guilt." Note t h a t the two e x t r e m e s a t t a c k e d h e r e contain t h e course of Clamence's "fall." C l a m e n c e s p e a k s of his original condition of self-assurance as a s t a t e of E d e n , of innocence. He is a m o n s t e r of pride in his own perfection. When he is struck by a s e n s e of guilt, when h e loses faith in his own virtue, when he can no longer look down on other people, he s u b d u e s t h e m by m a k i n g t h e m feel guilty, d r a w i n g t h e m into a q u a g m i r e of r e m o r s e and self-abasement f r o m which they cannot rise — so t h a t he m a y judge t h e m , satisfy his cont e m p t for t h e m to r e c a p t u r e his pride. According to this second interpretation of the novel, C a m u s is a t t a c k i n g a view t h a t s t r e s s e s the d o m i n a n c e of evil, t h a t r o b s

m a n of his c a p a c i t y for m o r a l choice, t a k e s a w a y his f r e e d o m and asks h i m to wait till the doves of s o m e e x t e r n a l g r a c e alight upon him to r e s c u e him f r o m his hell of d e p r a v e d h u m a n i t y for some other world t h a n the one in which he lives. C l a m e n c e is thus a false prophet: his ' c l a m a n t , ' his crying in the wilderness, is a weeping m o a n of self-pity and hypo-critical pride. His ' c l a m e n c e , ' his clemency of grace is justification by guilt, a new kind of innocence that props his pride in an alienation of condem nat i on: if e v e r y o n e is equally wicked and guilty, everyone is equally good and innocent ~ and no one is personally responsible. Devil? I think the second interpretation of the novel is n e a r e r to being correct. When Mile. G e r m a i n e Bree, close friend, critic and biog r a p h e r of Albert C a m u s , spoke on this c a m p u s two y e a r s ago, I approached h e r on the question of Clamence. Her reply was emphatic: " C l a m e n c e is the devil!" She m e a n t t h a t Clamence, f r o m beginning to e n d , is a m o n s t e r of selfpride, his guilt j u s t another f o r m of p e r v e r t e d ego, hypocritical pride of self t h a t seeks to enslave men. This is t h e kind of devil Clamence is, and this, I think, is the image of c o n t e m p o r a r y m a n that C a m u s deplores. But take your choice. Guilty or not guilty?

Traveling Through the Dark Traveling through the d a r k I found a deer dead on the edge of the Wilson River road. It is usually best to roll t h e m into the canyon; that road is n a r r o w ; to swerve m i g h t m a k e m o r e dead. By the glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car and stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing; she h a d stiffened a l r e a d y , almost cold. I d r a g g e d h e r off; she w a s large in the belly. My fingers touching her side brought m e the reason her side w a s w a r m ; her fawn lay ther waiting, alive, still, never to be born. Beside that mountain road I hestated. The c a r a i m e d a h e a d its lowered parking lights: under the hood purred the s t e a d y engine. I stood in the g l a r e of the w a r m exhaust turning r e d ; anound our group I could h e a r the wilderness listen. I thought h a r d for us all — my only swerving —, then pushed her over the edge into the river.

William E . Stafford

by Carole Timkovich As s u r e l y as the blooming of t h e tuMps is the first sign of a Holland Spring, the flood of smiles and small talk and sorority parties m e a n s RUSH has begun again. Rushees a n d actives a r e caught in the colorful crush of teas, coffees, and literary m e e t i n g s . . . . "Impressions," " N e w York," " T i m e O u t " and the r e s t . After a general m e e t i n g last Monday, at which P a n Helenic Board clarified rush procedures, rushees attended "opening s p r e a d s " of all of the six sororities on Saturday. The s p r e a d s paved the way for lit. meetings this week, w h e r e actives presented p r o g r a m s typical of their weekly meetings.Rushees w e r e required to attend two literary meetings. After spring vacation, the r u s h p r o g r a m will continue with informal coffee b r e a k s . No rules govern a t t e n d a n c e at these functions and r u s h e e s should feel f r e e to come and go as they please. The schedlue for c o f f e e s is as fo^ows: April 8: Sib, 7 p.m. Sorosis, 8:15 April 9: Dorian, 7 p . m . April 13: K a p p a Chi, 7 p . m . ; Delphi, 8:15 April 15: A^pha Phi, 7 p . m . April 20: Dorian. 7 p . m . ; Alpha P h i , 8:15

April 21: Delphi, 7 p . m . ; Chi, 8:15

Kappa

April 22: Sib, 7 p.m.; Sorosis, 8:15. Interspersed with the coffess will be a series of m i x e r s — at which each sorority tries to show its uniqueness. Sibylline sorority s t a r t s the m i x e r s with a b e a c h brunch on the shores of Lake Michigan (7:30 a . m . , S a t u r d a y , April 11). On the s a m e d a y , at 3 p.m., Dorian will p r e s e n t a tour of the World's F a i r , and Sorosis a glimpse at the Brothers G r i m m at 7 p.m. S a t u r d a y evening. The following w e e k e n d , Alpha Phi holds its m i x e r on F r i d a y , April 17, at 8:30 p . m . ; K a p p a Chi on S a t u r d a y at 10 a . m . ; and Delphi at 3 p.m. Saturday. Final teas will be held on Saturday, April 25 f r o m 9 until 10:10 a . m . Following a t t e n d a n c e a t two final teas, rushees mus* go to Boyd Cottage where they will list their t h r e e sorority p r e f e r e n c e s in the order d e s ' r e d , and the n a m e of a fellow r u s h e e they would like as a sorority sister. Bids will b e distributed by P a n Hellenic Board fo 1 lowing clearing house, and m u s t be accepted or r e j e c t e d by the t i m e designated by Pan-Hell.

The Dilettante

Quicksand by David Von Ins Sterling Ennui w a s not r e a d y to die. He was just 21. His h e a l t h had always been good. Money w a s the least of his worries and he w a s e n g a g e d to a beautiful girl. A week before, he had been elected president of his college class. Was this all to end? T h e quick-sand w a s inching up to his waist. Overhead a flight of a l b a t r o s s hit the s u n . " C r u m m y a l b a t r o s s , " said Sterling. " T h e y ' r e supposed to be good luck." Sterling Ennui w a s an English m a j o r . He looked furtively about him for symbolism. " W h a t does it M e a n ? " he asked. There w a s no a n s w e r . It was m e r e l y a rhetorical question. The quicksand w a s filling his navel. It tickled. F o r g e t t ' n g his plight Sterling l a u g h e d . The quick-

sand w a s rising. Sterling E n n u i had once seen a movie in which the hero was about to c r a s h in a fighter plane. As the p l a n e was falling, the hero s a w his whole life p a s s b e f o r e him. As the quicksand n e a r e d his a r m pits Sterling realized this was not going to h a p p e n to h i m . " C r u m m y movie a n y w a y , " said Sterling. He w a s in a bitter mood. (Let m e point out, D e a r R e a d e r s , t h a t Ennui is not by n a t u r e a 'bitter p e r son. You yourself m i g h t be p r e t t y g r u m p y if you w e r e being covered by quicksand). On a b r a n c h above him, Sterling s a w a Robin. "A h a r b i n g e r of S p r i n g , " he m u s e d . T h e b r a n c h w a s only a foot above his h e a d . It would be an easy thing to r e a c h up and g r a b it. Why had he l e f t his h a n d s in his pockets? He tried

to s h r u g off his displeasure, but the quicksand was u p to his shoulders. Sterling thought about his friends back at the d o r m . His room-mate had told him he w a s cutting too m a n y classes.-Sterling had laughed at him. "Why should I worry about c l a s s e s , " Sterling had joked. "I m a y fall into a pool of quicksand before t h e s e m e s t e r is o v e r . " It didn't s e e m so f u n n y to him now. The quicksand w a s u p to his chin. It w a s n ' t a p l e a s a n t feeling. A few m o r e m i n u t e s and he would be covered. Sterling composed himself. He was r e a d y to accept his fate. "All r i g h t , " he said to his friend on shore, "pull m e out and you can use m y c a r t o n i g h t . "


March 28, 1964

n m

Hope College anchor

uelljt

m i , iBT'i

it

see, iW mK i a p

60lH&cP 6eoR6eJ a u m curs

h

PATlEWT.

Ai^ep

'PR.

OU5.

A R\TiEWr M

I

?

STOW

12 mu

i€ out of m

AW&t06RIW6 WAtCK ME AfJP 5AM4 MCOMB^e

\jb&

A4lC.'"W0:THf 6IRL AUia i £ R 6 , " 6 U T HE6AKS H f t e e a o iw A m i e t e AUTO-

\

M

me

/

ww/e

e n

o m who CWlMSe pyiN6.'-

MOBILE

Pace S

" m t L . m OOe^T H566T HI5 CWN COCTOtf'l &Y m e e c w s e we sms M J 0 9 C 1 D R 14 IM Hl^ (OUM

w . W H E R E PIP H f e e T i w |0AH£riA^HER'HE6AW5 HE^ WOR w m g , HARl/Eq; THE 6IRL AW^WEP^.AUP I

ACARJL® AWP

ACCI;. peK)T.

v

^ - 9 U ; I T

CAN T BE HARVEff HARVE1

UXMT

ME."

KNWftl uei/£R m e HOUSE CAU3,'

(D WOMDcR-

w

Fut

IT W A S HARVef. /

tm

s

our

eeo&e!

65B,

Tm

wucuijusTBeLm

I W R M E P THf MIP-

eeme tarn,

MI6Hr OIL TRW

ro

woRicwr m

AMD m T P qoacoMe y p WITH, e e m ? 7

I FINAtW HAP TO A9<

neu,Mo!

MmF-'AM

ACkPULCOl

' r

m

w

H£^ W I , ,

8W,IM

fXACTW WHAT I 6AIP.'

61AP IM W5T IM HOURBlfel

BR0WI&

mdieM

|0E% GEOR^

POCTOR?'

<D

t/OJ 6ET P$EP TO IT. THESE THII066 COME i'OPAi-1' THE JIME.

iimvep.

(P

7^2

ANCHOR MAIL

In Pursuit of Excellance

R e s p o n s i b l e letters, r e g a r d l e s s of opinion, are w e l c o m e d and will be published. T h e y s h o u l d be n o longer than 200 words, s u b m i t t e d by noon W e d n e s d a y , and sipned. T o conserve s p a c e , e d i t o r s have right t o edit. At a r e c e n t m e e t i n g of t h e Cosmopolitan

Fraternity

it

was

de-

cided not to p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e curr e n t Ugly M a n On C a m p u s contest. We w e r e curious to note t h e resumption had

of

this

assumed

contest

as

we

last y e a r ' s c o n t e s t

to b e the end of t h e Alpha P h i O m e g a sponsored U.M.O.C. competitions. We received this i m p r e s sion f r o m t h e s h a r p c r i t i c i s m s t h a t had b e e n r a i s e d a g a i n s t this m e a n s to an h o n o r a b l e end. D u r i n g t h e past two y e a r s Cosmopoliton h a s m a i n t a i n e d a sporadic

participation

in t h e

compe-

tition. L a s t y e a r w e r e - e n t e r e d t h e contest a f t e r h a v i n g w i t h d r a w n t h e y e a r before; our entry was m a d e with r e s e r v a t i o n s . Our objections h a v e r e a c h e d t h e point

where

they

are

trite,

Bomb

'but

to j u s t i f y o u r s t a n d w e m u s t rei t e r a t e t h e m . We feel to pose a

Much h a s been said and w r i t t e n in the l a s t w e e k s and

m o n t h s about the

p r o b l e m s which

exist at Hope College. Most of what h a s been written and aired on these p a g e s h a s been in t h e hope t h a t w h e r e p r o b l e m s and f a u l t s and contradictions do exist they

can be changed;

it h a s been done with a pride in a college which is c a p a b l e of b e t t e r i n g itself. But while the criticism a n d evluation h a s not been a t t e m p t e d in a spirit of n e g a t i v e and destructive t e a r i n g down, a c h i e v e m e n t s in m a n y a r e a s can be too easily overlooked; the m e a n ; ng and implications of even t h e obvious honors which t h e college and s t u d e n t s h a v e e a r n e d m a y be neglected. F o r all t h e p r o b ' e m s it m a y have, t h e college shows t h e excellence of t h e education available to its s t u d e n t s through t h e s c h o l a r s h i p s and a w a r d s which g r a d u a t i n g seniors e a r n . This y e a r s e n i o r s h a v e been honored wi'h a M a r s h a l l Scholarsh : p, two Danforth Fellowships, seven Woodrow WPson Fellowships p l u s five honorable m e n t i o n s and m a n y v a l u a b l e a s s i s t a n t s h i p s and teaching positions.

t h e devotion and the inspiration of our faculty. Recalling that wo plan to add a second t e a c h e r of philosophy to our faculty n e x t y e a r , I rem a r k e d to Dr. D. Ivan D y k s t r a y e s t e r d a y that L y n n e Vande B u n t e ' s h gh honor will probably s t a n d throughout history as t h e only M a r s h a l l F e l l o w s h i p in philosophy of all t i m e to b e a w a r d e d to a senior g r a d u a t i n g f r o m a college with a one-man philosophy d e p a r t m e n t . " The seven Wilson Fellowships e a r n e d this y e a r a r e also quite an a c h i e v e m e n t , c o n s i d e r n g t h e fact that Hope h a s had eight f o r m e r Wilson fe'lows and t h a t only five s u c h a w a r d s w e r e m a d e to s t u d e n t s at o t h e r p r i v a t e , liberal a r t s colleges in t h e s t a t e of Michigan. T h r e e went to Calvin s t u d e n t s and two to K a l a m a z o o College. Such a c h i e v e m e n t s i n d i c a t e s e v e r a l t h i n g s : 1' Hope is a college of which s t u d e n t s can be proud. 2» Hope o f f e r s an excellent liberal a r t s educa-

Published

tion in most a c a d e m i c a r e a s , with m a n y good

year except

extra-curricular

Last

examination

periods

Chance Talk to be given on April 17 by Dr.

the students

of Hope

events

such

as

the

Edward Savage.

land.

P e r h a p s one of t h e most r e m a r k a b l e a w a r d s is the M a r s h a l l Scholarship, e a r n e d by 20 y e a r old philoshophy m a j o r L y n n e Vande Bunte. Only 24 s u c h scholarships a r e given y e a r l y to s t u d e n t s in the e n t i r e country.

3 1 Many of those who f e e l t h a t they a r e " n o t

As P r e s i d e n t VanderWerf s t a t e d in a letter to the a l u m n i , " . . . (these a w a r d s a r e ) e^oquent testimony, also, to the skill, the c o m p e t e n c e ,

P r o b l e m s a t Hope still exist. But in evalua t i n g the p r o b l e m s we m u s t continue to k e e p t h e a c h i e v e m e n t s of the college in mind.

being s t i m u l a t e d enough a t H o p e " a r e letting themselves

down,

rather

than

making

fraternities are

weekly

of the college

vacation,

Mich.,

under

of the Student

holiday

and

by and

for

College, Holthe

authority

Senate Publications

Hoard.

use Entered

of the possibilities a v a i l a b l e . at

competition a m o n g f r a t e r n i t i e s , in which

Following spring vacation, the Student Christian Association will be sponsoring the annual mission drive with this year's Southern Normal School in t h e m e "Back Our Mission: (BOMB), in the effort of aid Brewton, Ala., which is supported with the help from the Reformed Church. An open meeting will be held on Thursday, April 9, at 8 p.m. in Winants Auditorium to " . . . explain the mission, opportunity and responsibility of Hope students to help B r e w t o n through thoughts and inner involvement and through any financial aid to help purchase needed sc'ence equipment and materials for the high school," according to SCA m e m b e r Lois Huisjen.

the m a i n ,

the

as second post

Michigan, postage

at

office the

provided

class matter of

Holland,

special for

in

1101 of Act

of Congress,

1917. 1918.

authorized

and

rate

of

section Oct., Oct.

3, 19,

if not t h e sole p a r t i c i p a n t s , is inc o m p a t i b l e with the p u r p o s e of t h e contest

and

therefore

creates

a

mood f a r f r o m the mood of a gift given for the s a k e of giving a gift. It h a s b e e n o u r

past e x p e r i e n c e

to r e a l i z e t h a t we, a s well a s t h e other f r a t e r n i t i e s , a r e giving m o n ey m e r e l y for the s a k e of giving m o n e y to win a contest and gaining f u r t h e r prestige for t h e f r a ;

t e r n i t y . T h s in f a c t is the u n d e r lying goal of the drive for w i t h o u t t h i s i n t e n t we would not find ourselves

holding

our

money

until

t h e l a s t m i n u t e in o r d e r to m a i n t a : n question over which f r a t e r n i t y will win. We r e s p e c t the d e s i r e s of other f r a t e r n i t i e s to p a r t i c i p a t e in t h i s c o m p e t i t i o n . F o r our p a r t we shall r e t a i n our p r e r o g a t i v e of m a k i n g contributions a s individuals, and t h e n , a s a f r a t e r n i t y when t h e circ u m s t a n c e s d e e m such n e c e s s a r y . The Men of Cosmopolitan

It h a s b e c o m e a p p a r e n t to m e f r o m various sources ^hat Mr. Butl e r ' s honest and thoughtful a n a l y sis of a Christian ba^is for m o r a lity in his series on " T h e A m e r i c a n

Sexual R e v o l u t i o n " has b e e n mismiderstood by m a n y of its r e a d e r s . After attend ng the discussion group, to which only s e v e n other people c a m e , I a s k e d s o m e of m y f r i e n d s . " W h a t do you think Bryce Butler was t r y i n g to s a y in his a r t i c l e s ? " The replies showed an astonishing f a i l u r e to g r a s p the m a i n points of his a r t i c l e s . T h e r e a r e m a n y r e a s o n s why people m i s i n t e r p r e t e d the series: ( D f a i l u r e to r e a d all f i v e of t h e a r t i c l e s ( m i s s i n g t h e last o n e would be especially d i s a s t r o u s b e c a u s e it g a v e Mr. B u t l e r ' s c o n ^ u s ' o n ) , (2> f a i l u r e to r e a d e a c h one well, which c a u s e d m i s c o n c e p t i o n s , (3) a p p r o a c h i n g the s e r i e s with prejudices which blinded t h e m to the r e a l intent of t h e series, and (4) m i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of s o m e unfortunately o b s c u r e p a s s a g e s . I would like to a n s w e r s o m e of t h e c h a r g e s leveled against t h e series b e c a u s e of m i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . F i r s t , people h a v e c h a r g e d t h a t Mr. B u i e r is m e r e l y a d v o c a t i n g the rejection of the m o r a l codes set up by soc ety. This a s a g r e a t m i s u n d e r s t a n d i n g . He is basically saying that b e c a u s e society's m o r a l codes can n e v e r be absolute, and in our m o d e r n society a r e in danger of b r e a k i n g down c o m p l e t e l y .

each person should a t t e m p t to c r e a t e his own s y s t e m of m o r a l ity to sustain him w h e r e society's has f a i l e d . As Christians, w e should b a s e our m o r a l i t y on fundem e n t a l Christian principles, " T h o u shalt love the Lord thy G o d , " and "Thou shah love thy neighbor a s t h y s e l f . " This involves s e e : n g the individual worth of e a c h person in his relationship to God and adjusting o n e ' s act a c c o r d i n g l y . Another c h a r g e w a s t h a t this kind of solution l e a v e s one f r e e to do a n y t h i n g at all. On the cont r a r y , it puts m o r e responsibility and r e s t r a i n t on o n e ' s actions t h a n any e x t e r n a l r u l e s could. Rejection of society's m o r a l codes constitutes a sin in the e y e s of s o c e t y alone. But if a p e r o n c o n s t r u c t s a personal code of m o r a l t i y b a s e d on t h e t e a c h i n g s of Chirst, he is forced to consider e v e r y possible result of his actions and to ask himself, "Will this b e a sin in God's e y e s ? Am I using a person for m y own m e a n s r a t h e r t h a n t r e a t i n g him a s a child of God? B e c a u s e I d a i m to be a Christian, will m y actions turn anyone a w a y from C h r i s t i a n i t y ? " T h e s e questions involve f a r m o r e responsibility t h a n "Will I be c o n d e m n e d by society?" Nancy Erickson

Van Zyl Joins Science Fellowship Dr. G e r r i t Van Zyl, c h a i r m a n of the Hope College C h e n r s t r y Dep a r t m e n t h a s been elected a Fellow of the A m e r i c a n Association for the A d v a n c e m e n t of Science it w a s announced t o d a y b y Mr. Dale Wolfle, E x c u t i v e Officer of the Association. Van Zyl's election a s a F e P o w is in recognition of his s t a n d i n g as a scientist. "I know t h a t this expression of e s t e e m on t h e p a r t of your fellow scientists will inspire in you g r e a t er e f f o r t s in behalf of science and its position in o u r civPization," Mr. Wolfle said in m a k i n g his announcement. Dr. Van Zyl h a s held his p r e s e n t position at Hope for the p a s t 41 y e a r s . In 1955 h e received t h e Scientific A p p a r a t u s M a k e r s Award in C h e m i c a l E d u c a t i o n . He w a s elected a Fellow in the New York A c a d e m y of Science in 1957. In 1962 h e w a s a w a r d e d t h e Manufacturing Chenvsts' Association prize in C h e m i c a l E d u c a t i o n . Actively e n g a g e d in c h e m i c a l re-

s e a r c h Van Zyl h a s r e c e i v e d seve r a l g r a n t s for his work. F r o m 1957-1963 h e received $5,000 annually f r o m the P e t r o ' e u m Res e a r c h F u n d . F r o m 1947 to 1957 he w a s g r a n t e d an a v e r a g e of $3,500 per y e a r for r e s e a r c h b y t h e F r e d e r i c k G a r d n e r Cottrell G r a n t R e s e a r c h Corporation. Van Zyl c a n b e found a m o n g o u t s t a n d i n g e d u c a t o r s listed in Who's Who in A m e r i c a , Who's Who in A m e r i c a n E d u c a t i o n , Who's Who in C h e m i c a l E d u c a t i o n , Who's Who in t h e Midwest, A m e r i c a n Men of Science, C h e m i c a l Who's Who and L e a d e r s in A m e r i c a n Science. He is a m e m b e r of t h e A m e r i c a n C h e m i c a l Society, S i g m a Xi, t h e national c h e m i s t r y h o n o r a r y society, Phi L a m b d a Upsilon, The A m e r i c a n Assn. for t h e Advancem e n t of Science, M i d r g a n CoUege C h e m i s t r y T e a c h e r s Assn., Midw e s t e r n Assn. of College C h e m i s t r y T e a c h e r s and the N e w York Acad e m y of Sciences.


Rope College anchor

fate €

March 26, 1964

Winter Sports Around Country Extend into Spring Schedules

To the Hoop

by James Mace Last F r i d a y was t h e first day of spring, but in the world of sport the sounds of the winter season can still be h e a r d .

Cassius vs WBA by J a m e s Mace

"A d e t r i m e n t to the youth of the world." So s a y s the World Boxing Associp^on of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay, but who a r e they to m a k e such a s t a t e m e n t . Granted they a r e authorities on the world of boxing, but few, if any, WBA m e m b e r s can claim to know how Cassius Clay is affecting the youth of the world. It would s e e m that this staid body of s p o r t s m e n h a s co me out with a highly irrational and unfounded s t a t e m e n t . Their timing turned out to be p e r f e c t also, for next T u e s d a y the S e n a t e is beginning an investigation into the s p o r t , of boxing. With the publication of this statement, Clay, along with m a n y other people, was e x t r e m e l y surprised and rightfully so. Clay can be held responsible to the WBA only for his actions in t h e ring and anything he does outside of the ring is his own personal business. To m y mind, and I feel t h a t I echo the s e n t i m e n t s of others, r a t h e r than being a d e t r i m e n t to boxing, Clay has b e c o m e one of the greatest a t t r i b u t e s to t h e sports world in m a n y a y e a r . Many of the world's youngsters h a v e idealized

Clay and very few know, yet c a r e about the fact, t h a t Cassius h a s become a m e m b e r of the 'Black Muslims.' T h e r e s e e m s to be nothing at all t h a t Clay h a s done which h a s h u r t the youth of the world, but the WBA still seriously considers removing his title. Seemingly it boils down to t h e fact t h a t a few idealistic, old P u r i t a n s have brought it upon themselves to d e c l a r e that Clay is unfit to be the heavyweight c h a m p and in the s a m e light they a r e r e a d y to divest him of his crown. What can be m o r e in opposition to t h e principles of American d e m o c r a c y t h a n this? If, however, eleven men (11 votes is all t h a t is needed to t a k e the title f r o m Clay) do find t h a t Clay is unfit to be t h e champ, one of the biggest m e s s e s in sports history m a y c o m e about. The problem of filling the v a c a t e d championship could easily b e solved but repercussions f r o m such an action could and probably would s p r e a d around the world. The plan, however, for filling the crown would go as follows: t h e No. 1 contender would fight the No. 4 contender.

COLLEGE GRADUATES TRAINING PROGRAMS LEADING TO INTERESTING CAREER POSITIONS OFFERED BY THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ^Starting Annual S a l a r i e s — $ 5 , 8 0 4 . 6 4 and $ 6 , 1 1 7 . 8 4 Subsantial Increases at End of 6 Months and 1 Year. •Expected 4 % Increase as of July 1, 1964 AREAS: Administrative Analysis Agricultural Budgetary Control Chemistry Economic Research Employment Counseling Forestry Game and Fish Biology Geology Highway P l a n n i n g Institutional Management Insurance Examining Land Appraisal

Library Science Mathematics Parole and Probation Personnel Methods Personnel Technical Processing Physics Property Appraising Psychology Purchasing Right of Way Buying Vocational Rehabilitation

Michigan Civil Service is now recruiting applicants for its current examination program. T r a i n e e positions involving intensive on-the-job development programs will be filled from this examination. Applicants must anticipate college graduation within two months following written test date. Variations in majors required according to class. Write to the M I C H I G A N C I V I L SERVICE COMMISSION, L A N S I N G , M I C H I G A N , 48913, for examination applications. An equal opportunity employer.

while the No. 2 and No. 3 contend e r s would fight and the two winners would fight for t h e title. Such an a r r a n g e m e n t could lead to a Liston-Johannson fight, but the whole thing would c o m e off at t h e e x p e n s e of Mr. Clay. It would s e e m that if the WBA w a n t s to t a k e the heavyweight crown away f r o m Cassius Clay and that s e e m s evident, they should either find a fighter who can b e a t him or shut up.

In such cities as Cincinnati, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and St. Louis the sounds of s n e a k e r s thundering along a hardwood floor, and a ball bouncing against a glass backboard can still be h e a r d . It is the sound of the Naiotnal Basketball Association playoffs, a series of g a m e s which will lead into April. Up north the sounds of a hardened r u b b e r disc can be heard crashing against wooden boards, along with the sounds of slashing s k a t e s and thudding bodies. This is the sound of t he National Hockey

Pitcher Brosman Loses Job Due to Writing Talents by Gordon Korsianje In an effort to spice up the sports page, I have decided to t a k e up the c a s e of one J i m Brosnan, who is f a s t becoming the Evgeny Evtushenko of baseball.

other clubs want him either, and it can't be b e c a u s e he lacks ability. for good relief pitchers a r e h a r d to find. Of course the conservative Detroit Tigers, in d : r e need of a reliefer, h a v e r e f u s e d to take him.

You will r e r m e m b e r E v t u s h e n k o as the Russian poet who defied the K r e w r n and w r o t e what h e wanted to write.

He has been sent into exile. Is it any wonder that baseball is losing f a n s to football, with thinking like this?

Brosnan is a pitcher of s o m e talent (2.83 E R A ) . He h a s worked for ' h e Cincinnati Redlegs and t h e Chicago White Sox, turning in creditable p e r f o r m a n c e s . However, he w a s dismissed f r o m both these jobs b e c a u s e he wrote two books and n u m e r o u s articles which the club h i e r a r c h y did not approve of. Of course, one can m a k e a natural comparison between Nikita K h r u s r h e v and Ed Short (Short is g e n e r a l m a n a g e r of the Whi^e Sox). What is Mr. Short a f r a i d of? I h a v e read some of B r o s n a n ' s work and although it is not g r e a t l i t e r a t u r e , it is quite good. He tells what baseball is really like, on and especially off of the field. Baseball heroes a r e changed f r o m the s u p e r s t a r s they a p p e a r to be to n o r m a l m e n doing a job. Anyway, Short h a s r e f u s e d to let Brosnan play unless he promises not to write. J i m h a s refused to do so and he is now looking for a job. Well, funniest thing, none of the

WE NEED YOUR HEAD IN OUR BUSINESS POST'S BARBER SHOP Tfira* 6orb«ri

Two blocks south of chapel.

Say what ever happened to Evgeny Evtushenko?

In c o n t r a s t to these sounds a r e the sounds of a wooden bat hitting a h a r d covered ball and t h e clash of spikes as a b a s e runner steals second base. This is the sound of baseball in Florida, a s played in the A m e r i c a n and National Leagues. The m a j o r l e a g u e t e a m s h a v e been practicing for n e a r l y a month and two weeks and now the G r a p e f r u i t League is well under way. Here in Florida and Arizona m a n y professional a t h l e t e s a r e j u s t beginning their y e a r s work, while elsewhere m a n y other s t a l w a r t , but extremely tired, athletes a r e just wrapping up another grueling season. Soon such sports s t a r s a s Biil Russell, Oscar Robertson, Wilt Chamberlain and Elgin Baylor of basketball f a m e and Bobby Hull. J e a n Beliveau. Gordie Howe and F r a n k Mahovlich of hockey renown will be hanging up their u n i f o r m s for a couple of months, while other s t a r s like Mickey M j n t l e . Willie Mays, Sandy Koufax and Al Kaline will have yet to use their second uniform of the season. Such is the wonderful and wacky world of sport in America, w h e r e in one day a fan can see a baseball g a m e in Ft. L a u d e r d a l e , a basketball g a m a in Philadelphia and a hockey g a m e in Chicago, provided of course, t h a t he h a s good plane connections and tickets for the g a m e s .

Hopeites Aid YMCA Youth Program, Supervise Sports Activities "A little less sack — a lot of satisfaction!" This is the report f r o m 30 Hope College students who forego e x t r a hours of sleep S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g s to help out wi'h the local YMCA recreation p r o g r a m . Held weekly at the Holland Armory for a p p r o x i m a t e l y 100 elem e n t a r y school children, the Hope men and women assist their c h a r g e s in such sports as basketball, volleyball, tumbling, r e l a y g a m e s and BB gun shooting for boys, and c r a f t s , dancing, t e a m sports and g a m e s for girls. A second phase of the YMCA p r o g r a m using Hope student assistance is the Gra-Y p r o g r a m for boys of g r a d e school age which meet each T h u r s d a y f r o m 3:30 to 4:45 p . m . Seventy boys f r o m Washington and Lincoln schools enjoy swimming. basketball, g a m e s , and t a k e trips to factories, m u s e u m s and t h e a t r e s as p a r t of the Gra-Y program.

First National Bank OF HOLLAND Serving the Holland area since 1872

Benefits Available to State of Michigan Employees: Pay rates well in line with those of other employers Regular salary increases

L e a g u e playoffs for the Stanley Cup, which will also culminate in April.

The m e n of Hope's five f r a t e r n i t ies h a v e shown their interest in these YMCA Youth p r o g r a m s by p u r c h a s i n g much of the physical education equipment used by the boys and girls. Mr. Richard Hofferbert, General S e c r e t a r y of the Holland-Zeeland F a m i l y YMCA c o m m e n d e d the Hope students for their efforts. " T h e A r m o r y and Gra-Y prog r a m s would not be possible," he said, "without the volunteer help of these Hope College students. They form our Hope College Leaders Club and give f r o m their busy schedules m o r e than 70 hours of volunteer time every week. Our debt to them increases with each passing w e e k . " Hope students working with YMCA Youth Director J i m E d g a r at the Holland A r m o r y include: J a n e t A c k e r m a n . Nancy Alexander. B a r b Alhart. K a r e n Beck. J u d y Bell. Sharon C h a p m a n . Cindy Clark, Grace DeGraff, Bob Edw a r d s , Peggy Force, P a t Gleichm a n n . Ken Goodwin, Diane Jold e r s m a . Stuart Levey. Sandy Mitter, Steve Nordstrom, K a t h y Owen, Becky Richards, Bill Smith, F r e d S u m m e r s , J u d y Swieringa, Keith Van Zoeren. Richard Welsh and Carl Wolters. The following students work as Gra-Y l e a d e r s : first s e m e s t e r — G r a m Duryee, Rich Huyler, Ed Klotzberger, Roger M a x a m , Steve Nordstrom, Don Sill and F r e d S u m m e r s ; second s e m e s t e r — Rod B r o m a n , J i m Lohman, R a n d y Miller, Brad Walton. Bill S i m m o n s Bill Smith, Brad Walton and R i c h a r d Welsh.

Portable Stereo Van Raalte's Restaurant Zeeland

T r a n s f e r and promotional opportunities State contributory g r o u p health and life insurance programs — State pays m a j o r share

Complete Dinners

Headquarters special discounts to Hope students

Longevity pay Liberal a n n u a l and sick leave provisions. (Payment of 50% of earned sick leave on retirement or death. N o limit on sick leave accrual.) U n e m p l o y m e n t compensation Excellent retirement plan including social security benefits

Banquets for 20 - 3 0 0

Stoltz Pianos

BRING YOUR DATE, PARENTS, OR FRIENDS!

(Special

Dinners for 95c)

& Organs 3 3 6 River Ave. at 14th


03-26-1964  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you