Page 1

Both Room and Board Raised

$100 Fee Increase Announced for Next Yeax A $1()0 i n c r e a s e in student room a n d board fees will go into effect next fall, due to a decision m a d e by the Executive C o m m i t t e e of t h e Board of T r u s t e e s . P r e s i d e n t Calvin VanderWerf announced today. T h e a n n o u n c e m e n t stated t h a t the Executive Committee prescribed a $50 hike in both room and board e x p e n s e s , raising room costs to $,350 per y e a r and board fees to $500 per y e a r . Added to the $950 per y e a r tuition rate, this will bring the total y e a r l y cost of a Hope College education to $1800.

A 20 to 25 p e r cent i n c r e a s e in the u p k e e p cost of d o r m i t o r i e s and dining halls and the cost of employing personnel to m a i n t a i n t h e m m a d e the hike n e c e s s a r y , a c c o r d i n g to Henry Steffens. Vice P r e s i d e n t , f i n a n c e . The last i n c r e a s e in b o a r d c h a r g e s , in 1%2. w a s $50. while t h e latest room e x p e n s e r a i s e w a s $20. in 1963. As stated in the 1966 Hope College Catalog. " T h e College r e s e r v e s the right to i n c r e a s e the board f e e s ai any t i m e it m a y find it n e c e s s a r y to do so." Thus the E x e c u t i v e Com-

Dr. Muilenburg Schedules Series of Five Lectures Dr. .lames Muilenburg. Theologian-in-Residence at Hope College, will begin his s e r i e s of Centennial L e c t u r e next T u e s d a y at 10 a . m . on the s u b j e c t " W h a t It M e a n s to Be H u m a n . " The a d d r e s s will he delivered in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. One of the 32 s c h o l a r s who collaborated on the Revised S t a n d a r d Version of the Bible, Dr. Muilenb u r g was appointed to H o p e ' s staff a s a f e a t u r e of the College's Centennial y e a r celebration. His s e r i e s of Centennial talks will also include a d d r e s s e s on " T h e Biblical Unders t a n d i n g of Man and H i s t o r y , " April 14; " T h e Biblical U n d e r s t a n d ing of Man and Community." April 28: " T h e Biblical U n d e r s t a n d ing of F a t h e r and Son." May 5. and " T h e Biblical U n d e r s t a n d i n g of Dest i n y . " May 19. T h e s e l e c t u r e s will be at 8:15 p . m . on T h u r s d a y s . Dr. Muilenburg is presently teaching the Old T e s t a m e n t course at the College. A recitation period rounding out the c o u r s e is conducted a s discussion groups m o d e r a t e d by faculty m e m b e r s Dr. H e n r y Voogd and Dr. Arthur J e n t z of the Religion and Bible d e p a r t m e n t . Dr. Muilenburg is also serving on the faculty of Western Semin a r y w h e r e he is t e a c h i n g two c o u r s e s . " E x e g e s i s of the Prophe t s " and "Old T e s t a m e n t Theology."

An a l u m n u s of Hope College. Dr. Muilenburg r e t u r n e d to Hope f r o m San F r a n c i s c o Theological Semin a r v at San A n s a l m o . Calif. p r i o r to that he taught for m a n y y e a r s at Union Theological S e m i n a r y in New York. He received an honora r y Doctor of Divinity D e g r e e f r o m Hope in 1956. and h a s been called by Dr. .Jentz " t h e d e a n of Old Testament scholars."

m i t t e e w a s able to m a k e the c h a n g e without the a p p r o v a l of the full Board. The increase c o m e s in the f a c e of the following s t a t e m e n t m a d e by the Board of T r u s t e e s at their a n n u a l m e e t i n g last October: "We feel that any i n c r e a s e in tuition would significantly and substantially c h a n g e the c h a r a c t e r of the College a s we h a v e known it for a c e n t u r y . " The room and board rise will also m e a n a slight i n c r e a s e in the c u r r e n t 86.3 p e r c e n t a g e of the cost of education being paid by Hope students.

When asked if he e x p e c t s a n y f u r t h e r i n c r e a s e in tuition o r r o o m a n d board next y e a r , P r e s i d e n t VanderWerf said. " I do not f o r e s e e any f u r t h e r i n c r e a s e , although t h e decision d e p e n d s on our s u c c e s s in raising the d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n w h a t the student p a y s and the total cost of his education. Since o u r giving h a s g r e a t l y i n c r e a s e d this y e a r , t h e r e is reason to believe t h a t no i n c r e a s e will be n e c e s s a r y . " A new t h r u s t in the a r e a of c h u r c h relations and church giving w a s mentioned by P r e s i d e n t V a n d e r -

Werf a s a potential s o u r c e of f u n d s for r i s i n g costs. U n d e r S t u a r t Post, recently appointed Director of Church and C o m m u n i t y Relations, a p r o g r a m to d e v e l o p close ties with e a c h R e f o r m e d Church congregation by identifying the s t u d e n t s f r o m e a c h " h o m e c h u r c h " is being initiated. At p r e s e n t . R e f o r m e d Church congregations contribute about $75 per student p e r y e a r to Hope College. " I t is hoped t h a t through this p r o g r a m the c h u r c h e s will realize a k e e n e r sense of responsibility." President VanderWerf said.

OPE COLLEGE

anc or

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

7Hth ANNIVERSARY — 211^

Hope College, Holland. Michigan

March 25, 1966

Application Forms for Draft Test Now Available in Records Office Application forms for the Selective Service College Qualification Test, the non-mandatory examination which will be used by local draft boards as a criterion for determining the college student's draft classification, are now available in the Records Office of Van Raalte.

DR. J A M E S M U I L E N B U R G

HOPE

CATALOG

I 3

v . .

f

BULLETIN

In applying for the test, the student must list his test c e n t e r choice for each of the t h r e e test d a t e s : May 14. May 21 and J u n e 3. Selective Service r e s e r v e s the right to a s s i g n one testing d a t e of the t h r e e to the

a p p l i c a n t . The Hope tests will be a d m i n i s t e r e d in G r a v e s Auditorium, w h e r e 200 testees per session will be a d m i t t e d . T e s t e e s will be fingerprinted upon a d m i t t a n c e to p r e v e n t proxy-cheating.

Stuart Post Appointed To Hope Administration

The application deadline for the three-hour. 150-question e x a m is April 23. Official i n f o r m a t i o n concerning the application amd test p r o c e d u r e s as well a s a list of 20 s a m p l e questions a r e a v a i l a b l e for study in the R e c o r d s Office. The College Qualification Test tog e t h e r with the m a l e s t u d e n t ' s class rank will aid local d r a f t b o a r d s in their e f f o r t s to place m o r e men on the I-A list to provide a l a r g e r b a s e for the high monthly d r a f t call due to the w a r in V i e t n a m . It is expected that in g e n e r a l the b o a r d s will use an a l t e r n a t i v e sys t e m : They will use either class r a n k or test s c o r e as the d e t e r m i n ing f a c t o r , w h i c h e v e r is higher. Dean of Men T h o m a s C a r e y said t h a t in d e t e r m i n i n g class r a n k the R e c o r d s Office will probably s u b m i t the s t u d e n t ' s rank based upon e i t h e r his c u m u l a t i v e g r a d e point average or his grade point a v e r a g e for the p r e v i o u s semester, whichever is h i g h e r . Students wishing to know their class rank or to be advised a s to w h e t h e r they should t a k e the test should see Dean Carey in his office in Van R a a l t e .

Beginning M a r c h 1. S t u a r t Post b e c a m e the newest m e m b e r of the Hope College A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . Mr. Post h a s a s s u m e d the position of director for church and c o m m u n i t y relations. In this newly c r e a t e d position Mr. Post will r a i s e f u n d s and m a i n t a i n c o n t a c t s with the churches. Mr. Post has thus f a r been imp r e s s e d with the "close relationship between the college and the c h u r c h . " He feels the p e r s o n a l relationship between faculty and stud e n t s is one of a " r e a l cooperative s p i r i t . " Between the influence of the p r e s e n t Board of D i r e c t o r s and the philosophy of P r e s i d e n t V a n d e r W e r f . Mr. Post c o m m e n t e d . " T h e College c a n go n o w h e r e but up." Before a s s u m i n g his position a s d i r e c t o r , Mr. Post rose f r o m the " j u n g l e of s a l e s " while working with the g r a p h i c a r t s industry for 15 y e a r s in s a l e s and sales m a n a g i n g .

STUART POST

Fine Arts Calendar TODAY

9:45 p . m . Dutch

Film

I

on

Dutch

Literature

Miss

B r a a k m a n , Miss de J o n g , D u r f e e Lounge. R e a d i n g of D u t c h C h i l d r e n ' s L i t e r a t u r e Music Building, R o o m

11:00 a . m . S e m i n a r on Dutch Art — F e r r i n g a , Miss

de J o n g , P h e l p s Lounge.

7:15 p . m . L e c t u r e :

de

Looper,

Dutch

Dutch

P h y s i c s - M a t h 118. Music—commentary

van

Dutch D r a m a , d r a m a t i z e d story by Her-

Willebeek-Le-

m a n Heijermans and "Everyman"—Little Theater. 9:45 a . m . Dutch

r i n g a — V a n Zoeren L i b r a r y . of

of

by de W a a r t and T a k , G r a v e s 102.

M a i r , Toon W e g n e r , G a l l e r y talks by F e r 8:30 p . m . P r o g r a m

" D u t c h Church A r c h i t e c t u r e " —

D r . Donald Bruggink, 8:30p.m. Program

Music Building, R o o m 101.

Bipllaart,

"Raid"—Physics-

m a n , Miss de J o n g , P h e l p s Lounge.

3:00 p . m . L e c t u r e F i l m .

den

Film:

10:00 a . m . S e m i n a r on Dutch L i t e r a t u r e , Miss Braak-

S e m i n a r on D u t c h Art — F e r s i n y a , Miss

6:30 p . m . Dutch F i l m S h o r t s — P h e l p s . 7:30 p . m . Opening of Art E x h i b i t — w o r k s by

is found on the cover of the new Hope College Bulletin, which contains

Feature

de J o n g , P h e l p s Lounge.

102.

3:30 p . m . S e m i n a r on Dutch Music—de W a a r t , T a k

NEW CATALOGS—The above photomontage, done by John Killmaster,

9:30 a . m . Dutch

M a t h 118.

S c h o f f e r , D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel. 2:00 p . m . S e m i n a r

Auditorium.

TOMORROW

10:30 a . m . P a n e l discussion: " T h e A r t s in the Nethe r l a n d s , " F e r r i n g a , T a k , de W a a r t , P r o f .

Shorts—Snow

Film

Shorts—Snow

Auditorium.

Music—Commentary SUNDAY

a statement of the p u n w s e of the college, financial information, a list-

by de W a a r t , T a k , Snow Auditorium.

ing of all courses offered and a s u m m a r y of academic requirements.

Dutch D r a m a , d r a m a t i z e d story by Her-

The new Bulletin will be distributed in the Blue Key Bookstore begin-

m a n H e i j e r m a n s and " E v e r y m a n ,

ning today.

Theater.

M

Little

2:00 p . m . Dutch Films—Snow Auditorium. 4:00 p . m . V e s p e r S e r v i c e — D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel.


Page 2

Hope College anchor

March 25. 1966

CLUB & CAMPUS FASHIONS By CHIP TOLBERT ESQUIRE'S FASHION EDITOR

E-A-S-T-E-R-T-l-M-E!

The very w o r d begins to echo t h r o u g h the q u a d r a n g l e like a n i g n i t e d s t i c k of d y n a m i t e . W h a t e v e r o t h e r conn o t a t i o n s it m a y hold f o r y o u , E a s t e r V a c a t i o n a l w a y s c o m e s a s a l a s t - m i n u t e a n t i d o t e t h r o u g h w h i c h you e s c a p e — j u s t in t h e n i c k of t i m e — y o u r i m p e n d i n g n i n e t e e n t h n e r v o u s b r e a k d o w n a n d t h e b r e a k n e c k p a c e of a c a d e m i c l i f e . So, on y o u r m a r k , g e t s e t , G O ! C h a n c e s a r e you'll be g o i n g S o u t h w h e r e t h e S p r i n g g r a s s is g r e e n a n d t h e t r o p i c s u n s h i n e good a n d h o t . T i m e , t h a t is, f o r t i p s on w h a t to t a k e a l o n g . . .

NASSAU, ANYONE? N o d o u b t T. S. E l i o t w a s n ' t

THE WINNERS—Last Saturday night, the Arcadian Fraternity won the fraternity division of the All-College Sing with their song 'I Hear a Voice A-Prayin' under the direction of Harvey Lucas. The Delphi Sorority won the sorority division for the third straight year with their entry 'Fire, Fire, My Heart' under the direction of Louise Voorhorst. The Civic Cen ter was filled for the annual College event.

Rieck Lecture

t h i n k i n g of t h e C a r i b b e a n w h e n he l a b e l e d A p r i l t h e c r u e l e s t m o n t h — n o t by a l o n g s h o t . T h e r e ' s

Grads in Chaotic Wfarld

B e r m u d a , s i t t i n g like " a n e m e r a l d in a s a p p h i r e s e a ; " there's Ft. Lauderdale, where the girls are and w h e r e the boys follow a f t e r . On the W e s t Coast, t h e r e ' s L a Jolla, or f o r t h e way out s w i n g e r s , N e w p o r t R e a c h . A n d if you r e a l l y w a n t t o g e t a w a y f r o m it all, t h e r e ' s M e x i c o C i t y . B u t w h e t h e r you find y o u r p i p e - d r e a m u n d e r a v o l c a n o o r u n d e r a s w a y i n g p a l m , r e m e m b e r to p l a y it s a f e . T a k e a l o n g a t l e a s t o n e d a r k s u i t , a l i g h t w e i g h t p o l y e s t e r a n d wool o r a c o t t o n b l e n d . You n e v e r k n o w w h e n you m i g h t be i n v i t e d u p t o t h e G o v e r n o r ' s m a n s i o n f o r d r i n k s on t h e p a t i o .

FOR THAT SMART, y o u n g m i l l i o n a i r e look, you

c o u l d n ' t do b e t t e r

On April 12, (the day classes begin following spring vacation), at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Norman Rieck will deliver an educational Centennial Lecture. "What Kind of a Peg are V o u 0 " in Graves Auditorium. Dr. Rieck commented concerning the topic of his speech, "In a world of square pegs and round holes, where does a graduate of a Christian liberal a r t s college fit, particularly that graduate who in-

tends to spend the rest of his life teaching?" Following the completion of this y e a r ' s Centennial Lecture Series a book will be printed containing all the speeches given by the m e m b e r s of Hope's faculty for the series. Dr. Rieck c a m e to Hope in 1962 following teaching experiences at the Temple University Medical School in Philadelphia, Pa., and the University of Michigan Medical

School at Ann Arbor. Dr. Rieck graduated cum laude f r o m Hope in 1953 and received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. Speakers for the Centennial Lecture Series have come f r o m all departments of the college, representing as many aspects of the teaching

t h a n s e l e c t y o u r d r e s s - u p r e s o r t w e a r in N a v y b l u e . D a r k g r a y ' s o k a y , a n d olive will do, b u t r o y a l N a v y h a s a r i c h , c r i s p look college m e n like. A n d , i n c i d e n t a l l y , t h e r e ' s n o t i m e like t h e p r e s e n t to look

Fris'

f o r a P e r m a n e n t P r e s s s u i t . It'll k e e p t h e w r i n k l e s o u t a s S u m m e r c o m e s s a i l i n g in.

WEAR WITH IT,

*

* * »*

%

>1

a w h i t e or pale t o n e b u t t o n d o w n s h i r t . It m a y be s t r i p e d ( a n d h e r e t h e

i

color s c h e m e of t h i n g s is g e t t i n g b o l d e r a n d

m a

b r i g h t e r e v e r y d a y ) , o r a solid color. B e s t b e t s :

« . <* *

* * * i -3 * *;

f % ) i * M 8$ t * '* $ IfcT-ilfl + ** k* #'« H

EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOL Plus

p a l e blue, p a l e l e m o n , p i n k , o r a c r e a m y t a n shade. The new P e r m a n e n t Press dress shirts

Western Michigan's Largest Greeting Card Department

a r e g r e a t f o r t r a v e l f o r o b v i o u s r e a s o n s : you wash them out at night, and the next morning, without ironing

Yes, we carry the complete line of

(or puckered s e a m s ) t h e y ' r e

b a c k in p e r f e c t s h a p e . T a k e a l o n g a c o u p l e of Swingline Staplers

t i e s : a b r i g h t , bold p a i s l e y , a r e p p s t r i p e , a n d make sure they sport the new, fashion-right, wider widths.

"Downtown

- Next

DR. NORMAN RIECK

to Penney's"

profession. The series was initiated with an address by Dr. Calvin VanderWerf. The planning for the lectures is under the direction of the chairman of the education department, Dr. Robert DeHaan.

MAKE THE CASUAL SCENE

in a M a d r a s o r polyester/cotton seersucker sport jacket. Here,

C

y o u r color a n d p a t t e r n c h o i c e m a y b e a s w i l d a s y o u r t a s t e p e r m i t s . You'll need a p a i r of d a r k , m e d i u m , or light g r a y d r e s s slacks, and y o u r

0

c h o i c e s h o u l d d e p e n d on c o o r d i n a t i o n w i t h t h e j a c k e t . J e a n s o r c h i n o s , t h r e e o r f o u r p a i r s , lowr i s e , h i p - h u g g i n g , a n d t a p e r e d in f a d e d b l u e o r a w h e a t color, a r e m a n d a t o r y . M a k e s u r e t h e y have built-in wash-and-wear capabilities. Ditto w i t h y o u r s p o r t s h i r t s . S e l e c t t h r e e o r f o u r in t h e p o p u l a r H e n l e y s t y l e in l i g h t w e i g h t w o v e n

F

U S

COLLEGE GROUP

f a b r i c s , a n d a c o u p l e of c o t t o n / p o l y e s t e r k n i t s .

ON THE BEACH

let y o u r i m a g i n a t i o n d r i f t a r o u n d t h e s a n d c a s t l e s . B u t b e f o r e you m a k e t h e b e a c h s c e n e , be s u r e y o u ' r e e q u i p p e d

W h a t is a " C h r i s t i a n Q o l l e g e ? "

Is it o n l y a n " I d e a " ?

H o w objective can we be at H o p e ?

Is F a i t h f u n d a m e n t a l

with several new swim shorts. Big. splashy H a w a i i a n s u r f e r t r u n k s (usually available with m a t c h i n g s h i r t s ) , and the new Basketball s w i m s h o r t s t y l e s will be a m o n g t h e m o s t p o p u l a r t h i s s e a s o n . M o s t y o u n g m e n p r e f e r t h e m in t r i m , a t h l e t i c , f o r m - f i t t i n g m o d e l s , a n d t h e w o r d f o r s u r f i n g 'GG is C O L O R . B r i g h t , b u r n i n g r e d s , v i v i d yell o w s , flashy g r e e n s , a n d w i l d p r i n t s a r e t h e t o p c o n t e n d e r s .

lor

education?

These

and

other

questions

will

be

ap-

p r o a c h e d t h i s w e e k by o u r g u e s t s p e a k e r . D r . J o h n H . P i e t . D r . P i e t is at p r e s e n t a n i n s t r u c t o r a t W e s t e r n T h e o l o g i c a l S e m i n a r y a n d h a s h e l d classes in r e l i g i o n h e r e a t t h e c o l l e g e .

T h i s editorial has been sponsored exclusively for the m e n of H o p e C o l l e g e by t h e

P l a n t o a t t e n d as D r . P i e t h a s u n u s u a l l y p r o v o c a t i v e n o t i o n s on religion a n d

( o r vs.) e d u c a t i o n .

Don't Forget: Sunday, March 27, 7:00 P.M. at Hope Church

AMBASSADOR Shop 37 East 8Hi St.

Dr. John H. Piet

"What Is a Christian College?"

Holland, Mich. All Are Urged to Attend

YOUR THIRST


March 25. 1966

Hope College anchor

Joins History

Staff

Yugoslavian to Teach Here Dr. P a u l Fried, c h a i r m a n of the Hope College history d e p a r t m e n t , today announced the addition of a >oung Yugoslav historian to the staff of the d e p a r t m e n t . Michael Petrovich, who holds a M a s t e r ' s deg r e e f r o m the University of Chicago, c o m e s to Hope College with five y e a r s of e x p e r i e n c e as a StateD e p a r t m e n t i n t e r p r e t e r and escort officer for distinguished East European visitors to the U.S. His appointment to the Hope faculty und e r s c o r e s the interest of the college in the expansion of its offerings in this i m p o r t a n t a r e a of (he world.

Bulgarian. Macedonian and F r e n c h . Mr. P e t r o v i c h ' s interests in s p o r t s and hobbies a r e equally varied. He is an expert skier, h a s played soccer in Yugoslavia and in the U.S.. and likes table tennis and chess, a s well as painting and sculpture. At Hope Mr. Petrovich will t e a c h courses in Russian history and European Civilization both this summ e r and next fall. During the summ e r he will also take part in the special s u m m e r session for inter-

A Yugoslav by birth, Mr. Petrovich attended e l e m e n t a r y and seco n d a r y schools in Serbia, then began his studies at the University of L j u b l j a n a < w h e r e Bob Donia spent the past s e m e s t e r ) . At the age of 21 Mr. Petrovich left his home in Eastern E u r o p e and c a m e to the U.S. He enrolled at Shepherd College, served as IRC president for his school, e a r n e d a varsity letter on the s w i m m i n g t e a m and logged some 100 hours as a gli;ler pilot. He also met the a t t r a c t i v e young lady who is now Mrs. Petrovich. b e c a m e a U.S. citizen and g r a d u a t e d with high distinction. At the University of Chicago his m a s t e r ' s thesis dealt with Yugoslav-Soviet relations. He speaks English and Russian fluently, also Serbo-Croation, Slovene, Czech.

MICHAEL PETROVICH

Have Alternative to Draft

The above s t a t e m e n t f r o m the D r a f t Act m a k e s provision for thos'j young m e n who. being opposed to w a r for r e a s o n s of conscience, m a y apply for classification as a conscientious objector — a C.O. — to avoid possibility of military service precipitated by the Vietnam conflict. This can be done by writing the local d r a f t board, and requesting t h e m to send SSS F o r m 150. the special f o r m for C.O.'s. If a student is reclassified I-A due to low class s t a n d i n g or to a low g r a d e on the c o m i n g d r a f t tests, he must appeal to his local board within 10 days of the d a t e when the notice of classification w a s sent out if he wishes to be given a C.O. classification. The student who is opposed to w a r and then finds that he is no longer eligible for a 2-S d e f e r r m e n t h a s four a l t e r n a t i v e s f r o m which to choose: he can grit his teeth and, in compliance to the ethics of the m a j o r i t y , submit to military service; he can a t t e m p t to get 1-A-O status, for non-combatant military duty; he can seek a 1-0 position, which calls for a l t e r n a t i v e civilian service for the duration of his normal military s e r v i c e ; or he can re-

Dr. Marcus Bloch L-Hy PRESIDENT Eastern Magical Society P.O. Box 118 New York 9, N.Y.

fuse to cooperate with the d r a f t law, and face a m a x i m u m fine of $10,000 a n d / o r five y e a r s in prison. Men getting 1-A-O ranking a r e usually trained for medical service and occasionally for office work or a military band. 1-O's typically serve as hospital attendants, or g o v e r n m e n t and social welfare personnel either in the U.S. or a b r o a d . Non-cooperators' prison sentences tend to be less t h a n the m a x i m u m . The World Council of Churches, the world's largest P r o t e s t a n t organization, has delineated t h r e e Christian attitudes toward w a r : ' 1' that while w a r may be a Christian's duty in peculiar c i r c u m stances. modern w a r f a r e can never be justified: <2) t h a t it is the Christian's duty to defend the law, whose ultimate sanction is war; '3) that w a r is absolutely wrong, a n d an absolute witness for peace is the Christian's duty. Any student who is considering or evaluating the C.O.'s position may confer with Chaplain Hillegonds. While Rev. Hillegonds does not s h a r e the C.O.'s viewpoint, he is willing to counsel others to help t h e m construct their personal view?

In his " L a s t C h a n c e " talk to the student body of Hope College, Dr. L a r s G r a n b e r g spoke about educational vaccinations and their relation to Christianity. Titled "My Vaccination Didn't T a k e , " the address dealt with how m o r a l i s m inhibits the educational process. Education, he said, is a vaccination against a closed mind. An openminded person, one with a capacity to reconcile and synthesize ideas, is (he truly educated m a n . F u r t h e r more. it is not one's stand on an issue, but r a t h e r his a p p r o a c h to it, that m a r k s an open mind. Thus, personality f a c t o r s p r e s e n t before education begins s o m e t i m e s a f f e c t the e f f e c t i v e n e s s of the vaccination. The " r e g r e s s i v e cycle of morali s m " is the factor that most often closes a m a n ' s mind. The m o r a l i s t can be seen in the b r o t h e r of the Prodigal Son. whose a p p r o a c h to

Miss Tina F e r r i n g a . first secretary for p r e s s and cultural a f f a i r s of the Netherlands E m b a s s y at Washington, D. C., one of the few women diplomats in the Netherlands F o r e i g n Service, will a p p e a r as a panelist at Hope College's F i n e Arts F e s t i v a l and in several semin a r s on a r t . •

m e n t to study oboe with the solo oboist of the Concertgebouw Orchest r a . He w a s one of the winners in the Dimitri Mitroplous Competition for conductors in New York a few y e a r s ago. •

*

*

Max Tak, o r c h e s t r a conductor who h a s a p p e a r e d as violin soloist with the A m s t e r d a m Concertgebouw O r c h e s t r a , will p a r t i c i p a t e in a panel discussion and s e m i n a r s in the Fine Arts Festival and will be c o m m e n t a t o r of a p r o g r a m on Dutch music. Author of four books, he b e c a m e U.S. correspondent for one of the i m p o r t a n t weekly publications in the N e t h e r l a n d s . * • •

life is purely negative, and who views goodness merely as a set of p r a c t i c e s to be avoided. His love is conditional — offered as r e w a r d to sheer bargaining. He therefore lives his life striving to a p p e a r good, to be accepted by others and himself and tries to keep up the rules of life so he might win. In this land of s y s t e m , he is skeptical oi any new position that might change these rules and thus is close-minded. According to Dr. Granberg, Christian education as presented at Hope College is intended to be a vaccination against m o r a l i s m . and thus to foster teachability. The gospel is not merely outward obs e r v a n c e s . but inward commitments. which a r e seen now "through a glass d a r k l y " and therefore m u s t be constantly re-examined. This requires an open mind, which is supplied by Christianity.

Dr. Howard Slenk, professor of music at Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights, 111., will speak on " T h e G e n e v a n P s a l t e r " at a vesper service at 4 p.m. Sunday in the chapel, to conclude the Fine Arts Festival. Several selections of Genevan worship songs will be presented by a c h a m b e r choir of the Hope College faculty. •

Dr. Donald J . Bruggink, assistant professor of Historical theology at Western Theological S e m i n a r y , will give an illustrated lecture on cont e m p o r a r y c h u r c h a r c h i t e c t u r e in the N e t h e r l a n d s . A g r a d u a t e of Central College, Dr. Bruggink e a r n e d his P h . D . d e g r e e at Edinburgh and served as lecturer of s y s t e m a t i c theology at New Brunswick Theological Seminary before coming to Western.

NOW AVAILABLE!

Pianist David Renner will p r e s e n t a piano recital next Tuesday at 8:15 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Mr. R e n n e r , a m e m b e r of the piano faculty at Michigan State University, is a g r a d u a t e of Eastm a n School of Music. He w a s a pupil of Cecile G e n h a r t . The vCinner of a Fullbright grant, he spent two y e a r s a b r o a d in Munich and was also a student of F r a n k Mannheimer. Before joining the faculty at Michigan State, he w a s a m e m b e r of the faculty at E a s t m a n . The p r o g r a m will open with a p e r f o r m a n c e of Bach's " C a p r i c c o on the D e p a r t u r e of a Beloved Brothe r " in six p a r t s . Mr. R e n n e r will then p e r f o r m Beethoven's " S o n a t a in C Minor," Op. I l l in two movements. He will conclude the p r o g r a m with a p e r f o r m a n c e of Chopin's " S o n a t a in B Minor," Op. 58 in four movements.

"Competition

Dola d e J o n g , author of several Dutch books, will e n g a g e in semin a r s and a p a n e l discussion of " T h e Arts in the N e t h e r l a n d s " at the festival. Born in A r n h e m . Miss d e J o n g now lives in New York. Some of her books a r e "And the Field Is the World," "The Tree and the Vine," " T h e Whirligig of T i m e , " and "The House on Charlton Street."

Edo d e W a a r t , who begins work in S e p t e m b e r as assistant director r)f the A m s t e r d a m Concertgebouw O r c h e s t r a , will conduct s e m i n a r s and p r o g r a m s on Dutch music at the Fine Arts Festival. Dr. deWaart began piano lessons at age 8 and oboe lessons at 13, and a f t e r high school received a four-year scholarship f r o m the Dutch govern-

David Renner Presents Recital

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'wet-look' windbreakers

MEENGS & DEBOER Standard Oil Products

Mr. P e t r o v i c h . who visited Hope twice during the past s e v e r a l months when he w a s still escorting East European V I P's for the State Department, is eagerly looking forward to his u o r k at Hope College. "I believe that there are tremendous opportunities for growth h e r e . " he explained. "1 have found the faculty very friendly and the students e a g e r to l e a r n . "

Many Important Figures In Hope's Arts Festival

Dr. Granberg Speaks on Moralism for Last Talk

Conscientious Objectors "No person shall be subject to . . . t r a i n i n g and service in the a r m e d forces . . . who, by reason of religious training and belief, is conscientiously opposed to participation in w a r . . .

national s t u d e n t s which will bring eight Yugoslav students to our c a m pus as p a r t of the GLCA YugoslavA m e r i c a n S e m i n a r p r o g r a m initiated last y e a r .

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March 25, 1966

anchor editorials

EASTER. 1966

On Rising Costs T

ODAY T H E

HOPE COLLEGE BUL-

L E T I N is b e i n g h a n d e d o u t in t h e B l u e Key Book Store, a n d o n e of t h e a l t e r a t i o n s in t h e B u l l e t i n is t h e fee foi r o o m a n d b o a r d lor t h e n e x t a c a d e m i c y e a i . T h e s e two items have been increased a total ol S I 0 0 . so t h a t n e x t y e a r t h e l a r g e m a j o r i t y ol H o p e C o l l e g e s t u d e n t s will be p a y i n g $1,800 l o r t h e i r e d u c a t i o n . A c t u a l l y t h e m o v e by the E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e ol t h e B o a r d ol T r u s t e e s c o m e s as l i t t l e s u r p j i s e to us. Last y e a r t h e anchor d e v o t e d c o n s i d e r a b l e s p a c e to a series on t i n f i n a n c i a l s t r u c t u r e ol t h e C o l l e g e , a n d o n e of t h e m a r k s ol u n i q u e n e s s of t h i s C o l l e g e was its a b i l i t y to o f f e r t h e q u a l i t y of e d u c a t i o n t h a t it d i d â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a t a t o t a l cost to t h e s t u d e n t of less t h a n m a n y o t h e r s c h o o l s of e q u a l or inferior academic standing.

W

E A R E , O F C O U R S E , S O R R Y t o see the increase. However, a l t h o u g h the i n c r e a s e is s i / e a b l e , H o p e C o l l e g e cont i n u e s t o o f f e r a l i b e r a l a r t s e d u c a t i o n of g e n u i n e q u a l i t v at b a r g a i n prices. W e recogn i / e t h a t t h e B o a r d i n s t i t u t e d t h e a c t i o n rel u c t a n t l y : we a p p r e c i a t e its c o n t i n u i n g c o n c e r n for o f f e r i n g a H o p e C o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n to as m a n y s t u d e n t s as possible, w i t h o u t s h u t t i n g t h e d o o r t o m a n v b e c a u s e of a n e x h o r b i t a n t t u i t i o n , r o o m a n d b o a r d fee. W e also r e c o g n i / e t h a t tin's i n c r e a s e will not be t h e last. P r e s i d e n t V a n d e r W e r f is q u o t e d in t h e a r t i c l e o n paire o n e as s a v i n g t h a t if c h u r c h a n d c o m m u n i t v s o u r c e s support t h e C o l l e g e as a n t i c i p a t e d n o t u i t i o n h i k e will be necessarv. However, although t h e C o l l e g e h a s m a d e g r e a t s t r i d e s in m o r e

f u l l y u t i l i z i n g its o u t s i d e s o u r c e s of r e v e n u e , we a r e s o m e w h a t s k e p t i c a l t h a t H o p e ' s low S I . 8 0 0 c o m p r e h e n s i v e fee will r e m a i n at its p r e s e n t level f o r t o o m a n y m o r e years.

O

l S C O U R A G I N G L Y , T H E R E IS L I T T L E the College can do. If it wishes t o c o n t i n u e t o e x p a n d its enr o l l m e n t , if it wishes to m a i n t a i n , i m p r o v e a n d s u p p l e m e n t t h e p r e s e n t f a c u l t y , if it wishes t o offer a b r o a d e r a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m t o s t u d e n t s , o n e of t h e p r i m a r y s o u r c e s of r e v e n u e m u s t be f r o m t h e s t u d e n t s t h e m selves. A n d t o d a y w h e n o p e r a t i o n a l costs of all businesses a r e r i s i n g , it c o m e s as n o g r e a t s h o c k to us t h a t H o p e C o l l e g e is a f f e c t e d as well.

H e n r y S t e f f e n s , Vice P r e s i d e n t , F i n a n c e , g a v e a m p l e e v i d e n c e of t h i s w h e n he s t a t e d t h a t in t h e past t h r e e years w h e n t h e r e has b e e n n o i n c r e a s e at all in t h e c o m p r e h e n s i v e fee, m a i n t e n a n c e of h o u s i n g a n d f o o d costs h a v e risen 20 t o 25 p e r c e n t . T h i s i n c r e a s e in cost c a m e w i t h o u t a n y c o r r e c t i o n in t h e ( o m p r e h e n s i v e fee. T h u s , it is m o r e s u r p r i s ing t o us t h a t t h e i n c r e a s e was n o t g r e a t e r or t h a t it d i d not c o m e e a r l i e r . W e a r e g r a t e f u l to P r e s i d e n t V a n d e r Werf for his e f f o r t s to k e e p t h e p r i c e of t h e H o p e C o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n l o w : we a p p r e c i a t e t h e B o a r d ' s a t t e m p t t o g u a r a n t e e as m a n y s t u d e n t s as p o s s i b l e t h e o p p o r t u n i t v of a H o p e C o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n . W e see t h e i n c r e a s e as a n i n e v i t a b l e m o v e in light of t h e r i s i n g costs. A n d we will n o t be s u r p r i s e d if a n o t h e r c o r r e c t i o n is m a d e s o o n in o r d e r t o p r e s e r v e a n d c o n t i n u e t h e e d u c a t i o n a l e x c e l l e n c e of this C o l l e g e .

On Dutch Culture 'CRUCIFIXION* by ROGER VAN DER WE YD EN

T

H I S W E E K E N D H o p e C o l l e g e is h o l d ing its a n n u a l F i n e A r t s Festival, a n d in c e l e b r a t i o n of t h e C e n t e n n i a l y e a r t h e t h e m e is " T h e P e r s i s t e n t V i r i l i t y of D u t c h Culture."

F I F T E E N T H C E N T U R Y DUTCH ARTIST

The Last Time Out' Spear had been, and the scratches O n His torehead where the T h o r n s were, a n d they S a i d , " S a d , M a n , real s a d . [ust G o . . . s o m e p l a c e el s e. " O n l y H e w o u l d n ' t go, So t h e y c r u c i f i e d H i m a g a i n A n d H e just h u n g there. T h e y laughed and knew H e was f a k i n g , b e c a u s e T his t i m e H e d i d n ' t Say, " F a t h e r , f o r g i v e t h e m . . ."

One day, while everyone Was sitting a r o u n d d o i n g nothing, C h r i s t c a m e in. E v e r y b o d y said, " N o , Man, not again. We're really n o t u p to it. W h y d o n ' t you g o s o m e p l a c e else?" H e l o o k e d at t h e m a n d s h o w e d T h e m the nail marks on His hands A n d feet, a n d t h e y s a i d , " M a n , t h a t ' s real t o u c h i n g . N o w t^o s o m e p l a c e else." He showed them His side where the

William

W. Savage,

Jr.

Reprinted from "motive" m a g a z i n e , J a n u a r y , 1962.

W i t h a b u d g e t of n o t m o r e t h a n s e v e r a l h u n d r e d d o l l a r s , t h e Festival C o m m i t t e e h a s b r o u g h t to t h e c a m p u s a n u m b e r of fine repr e s e n t a t i v e s of D u t c h c u l t u r e . In a d d i t i o n , c a m p u s g r o u p s s u c h as t h e L i t t l e T h e a t e r and the Motet Choir have spent long hours in p r e p a r a t i o n f o r t h e i r p a r t i c i p a t i o n in t h e Festival this w e e k e n d . It s e e m s s t r a n g e to us t h a t in s u p p o r t i n g a n a c t i v i t y s u c h as t h i s we a r e f o r c e d t o s o u n d a l m o s t a p o l o g e t i c . In past w e e k s seve r a l cynical c o m m e n t s h a v e b e e n m a d e a b o u t t h e t h e m e of t h e F e s t i v a l , a n d it is c e r t a i n l y n o n e w t r a d i t i o n at H o p e for t h e D u t c h a n d t h e i r h e r i t a g e to b e held in s o m e d i s d a i n . As D r . H e n r y ten F l o o r p o i n t e d o u t in t h e F a c u l t y F o c u s c o l u m n last w e e k , t h i s cynicism and mockery stems f r o m a failure

t o u n d e r s t a n d a n d a p p r e c i a t e t h e past c o n t r i b u t i o n ol t h e D u t c h t o c u l t u r e a n d t h e i r continuing contribution. C e r t a i n l y s o m e aloofness f r o m o n e ' s h e r i t a g e is v a l u a b l e in t h a t it p r e v e n t s us f r o m b e i n g tied t o t h e p a s t . H o w e v e r , it is i n d e e d f o o l i s h f o r us to cont i n u e to t h i n k of t h e D u t c h as d i k e - j u m p e r s a n d w i n d m i l l - b u i l d e r s or - i m p o r t e r s a n d not artists, a u t h o r s , a n d m u s i c i a n s w h o are maki n g c o n t r i b u t i o n s t o t h e fine a r t s of this century.

I

I S E E M S T O US that this year's Fine A r t s Festival h a s a fitting t h e m e for a college, w h i c h is c e l e b r a t i n g its 100 years of e x i s t e n c e , w h o s e r o o t s a r e s o l i d l y a n c h o r e d in t h e D u t c h h e r i t a g e , a n d w h o s e e n r o l l m e n t is m a d e u p p r e d o m i n a n t l y of t h o s e w h o h a v e h a d at least n o m i n a l c o n t a c t w i t h t h a t heritage. W e e n c o u r a g e all s t u d e n t s t o a t t e n d t h e e v e n t s ot t h e F e s t i v a l in o r d e r t h a t t h e i r u n d e r s t a n d i n g of D u t c h c u l t u r e m i g h t b e increased.

Readers Speak Out

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Dear Editor...

l OLLAND, MICHfOAN

They said it couldn't be done . . . Published ination under

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Dick Shiels Lynn Archambeau Margo Hakken Harriet Heersrhap Zelda Skaglanii Headlines Jim Pohl Cartoonist Murk Menning Photographers Dick An^stadt Corliss Nelson Reporters Genrae Arwad\, Darlene Bentz Paul Bleau, Kitty Davis, Linda Den Besten, Marian Greiner, Tom Hildebrandt,, Linda Kloole, Rich Roster, Donna Leerh. Glen Jooman, Marty Luther, John Renwick. Mike O'Rinrdan, Mary Schakel, Bob Sonnrreldt. Bellie Verwey. Bill Wichers.

But WE did IT. A f t e r m a n y m o n t h s of a r d u o u s l a b o r , t h e 1966 M i l e s t o n e h a s b e e n put to b e d . A f t e r t h e all too f r e q u e n t m e e t i n g s l a s t i n g t o 3:30 a . m . w e h a v e f i n a l l y put t h e f i n i s h i n g t o u c h e s on w h a t p r o m i s e s to b e t h e b e s t M i l e s t o n e in t h e school's historv. (At l e a s t in o u r u n b i a s e d opinion.) N e e d l e s s to s a y , the 1966 M i l e s t o n e h a s : : neorDorated s e v e r a l n e w f e a t u r e s a s well a s k e e p i n g s o m e of t h e b e t t e r f e a t u r e s f r o m last y e a r ' s book. N e w t h i s y e a r will b e the public a t i o n of a s p r i n g s u p p l e m e n t . T h i s will b e a 16-20 p a g e edition t h a t will a t t a c h in t h e r e a r of the r e g u l a r M i l e s t o n e a n d will c o v e r t h e e v e n t s t h a t will o c c u r a f t e r the sing. B e c a u s e t h e M i l e s t o n e will b e d i s t r i b u t e d in t h e s p r i n g ( b e f o r e e x ^ m s ) it h ^ s b e e n n e c e s s a r y to h a v e t h e book c o m p l e t e d b e f o r e e n d of t h e y e a r . T o c o v e r t h e rem a i n d e r of t h e y e a r , w e will p r o -

d u c e the s u p p l e m e n t . T h i s will b e m a i l e d to t h e s e n i o r s , a n d will be a v a i l a b l e to u n d e r c l a s s m e n in the f a l l of n e x t y e a r .

one of t h e m o r e important contributions t o w a r d s relieving poverty in A m e r i c a of t h e W a r on P o v e r t y program.

Not n e w t h i s y e a r , b u t i m p r o v e d f r o m l a s t y e ^ r is t h e a m o u n t of color u s e d . T h i s y e a r ' s M i l e s t o n e will c o n t a i n f o u r t w o - p a g e s p r e a d s of color p i c t u r e s t h r o u g h o u t t h e book. Also i n c r e a s e d f r o m last y e a r is t h e size. We h a v e a d d e d 16 p a g e s to t h e book (280) a n d with the supplement, the total n u m b e r of p a g e s will b e a I m o s t 300. T h e p a g e s h a v e b e e n a d d e d so t h a t stud e n t a c t i v i t i e s would r e c e i v e b e t t e r coverage.

M i s s R a j s k y ' s d e s i r e to s e e u s use poverty money for povertys t r i c k e n p e o p l e is m o s t c o m m e n d a b l e . H e r b a s i c c o n c e r n is o n e I heartily share. The problem emerges when we ask the question, how c a n w e b e s t s p e n d t h i s m o n e y ? U n f o r t u n a t e l y b e h a v i o r a l s c i e n c e is not so well d e v e l o p e d a s t o p r o v i d e easy answers. E v e r y p r o g r a m m u s t be somet h i n g of a n e x p e r i m e n t . B e f o r e w e go on y e a r a f t e r y e a r s p e n d i n g m o n e y on t h e s a m e e x p e r i m e n t a l p r o g r a m , it s e e m s d e s i r a b l e to t r y to f n i d o u t if t h e p r o g r a m w o r k s or n o t .

We of t h e Milestone h o p e t h a t in i n c o r p o r a t i n g t h e a b o v e c h a n g e s , w e h a v e p r o d u c e d a Milestone t h a t will a d e q u a t e l y c a p t u r e t h e highl i g h t s of t h i s , t h e 100th y e a r of H o p e College. J o n W i e g a n d , Milestone E d i t o r

The m o n e y which Mr. Clelland will r e c e i v e "to s t u d y poverty" ($6,000, not $18,000) will constitute

Mr. CJelland's r e s e a r c h , therefore, is d e s i g n e d to test the e f f e c t i v e n e s s of an e x p e r i m e n t a l p r o g r a m . Such r e s e a r c h will b e highly e f f e c tive in guiding u s to k e e p poverty m o n e y out of "rat h o l e s " and in putting it w h e r e it will do the m o s t good. E a r l Hall


March 25. MM

Page 5

Hope College anchor

de Gaulle Carefully

Studied

Historical Work Views Occupied and Freed Paris By Gretchen Steffens S P A R I S BURNING?** is t h e JL i n t e r w e a v i n g of m a n y incid e n t s , o c c a s i o n a l l y too m a n y , a r o u n d e n o u g h t h e m e s to g a i n f o r one a n a c c u r a t e a n d r e a l i s t i c und e r s t a n d i n g of o c c u p i e d a n d libera t e d P a r i s f r o m J u n e 14, 1940 until f i n a l l i b e r a t i o n on A u g u s t 25, 1944. It t e a c h e s o r s h o u l d t e a c h t h e r e a d e r t w o l e s s o n s , of m a n ' s a d a p t a t i o n a n d r e a c t i o n u n d e r s u c h conditions, and a b r o a d e r u n d e r s t a n d ing of political c o n d i t i o n s in postw a r F r a n c e a n d of its v o l a t i l e leader General de Gaulle. In all of h i s t o r y t h e loss of P a n s h a s i n e v i t a b l y m e a n t t h e loss of F r a n c e . Adolf H i t l e r , f u l l y a w a r e of t h i s f a c t , d e m a n d e d t h a t P a r i s be d e f e n d e d a t all c o s t s . His c o m mand was simple: " P a r i s must n o t fall into t h e h a n d s of t h e e n e m y , o r , if it d o e s , h e m u s t f i n d t h e r e n o t h i n g but a field of r u i n s . " This c o m m a n d w a s t h e responsibility of D i e t r i c h Von C h o l t i t z , t h e m a n p e r s o n a l l y c h o s e n by- Hitl e r to d e f e n d P a r i s , w i t h w h o m one c a n n o t h e l p b e i n g s y m p a t h e t i c . Trained as a P r u s s i a n soldier and well q u a l i f i e d f o r his h i s t o r y - m a k -

ing r o l e , h e n e v e r t h e l e s s r e f u s e d to b e c o m e k n o w n a s t h e m a n w h o had destroyed Paris. B e c a u s e of h i s r e f u s a l , all t h a i P a r i s r e p r e s e n t s to m a n k i n d rem a i n s , l e a d i n g t h e r e a d e r to conc l u d e t h a t a t l e a s t one m a n f e l t t h e h e r i t a g e of c u l t u r e a n d civilization to be s t r o n g e r t h a n t h e c o m m a n d of his s u p e r i o r .

G a u l l e ' s d e t e r m i n a t i o n t h a t Paris be l i b e r a t e d by t h e a l l i e s a n d t h a t his g o v e r n m e n t b e i n s t a l l e d , t h e c o m m u n i s t l e a d e r s of t h e R e s i s t a n c e could well h a v e g a i n e d control t h r o u g h i n s u r r e c t i o n .

Gretchen Steffens, a senior from Holland, Mich., is a political science major who also participates actively in the speech departrnent. "Is Paris Burning?", by l.arry Collins and Dominque la pierre was published in l%.r) by Simon He Schuster, Inc., N. Y., $6.95, 376 pages with photos. EDITOR'S

NOTE:

A n d so u l t i m a t e l y all t h e F u h r e r could do was s c r e a m , " B r e n n t P a r i s ? I w a n t t o know. Is P a r i s B u r n i n g ? Is P a r i s B u r n i n g r i g h t now?"

t a i n i n d i v i d u a l s a l s o d i s p l a y the c o n c e r n , t h e s t r e n g t h a n d the leade r s h i p t h a t e v e n t u a l l y b e n e f i t s afl men.

An e s s e n t i a l f e a t u r e of t h i s book is t h e f o l l o w i n g of v a r i o u s m i n o r c h a r a c t e r s during the four y e a r s of o c c u p a t i o n . T h e only d r a w b a c k to t h i s m e t h o d is t h a t o c c a s i o n a l l y t h e r e a d e r g e t s lost t r y i n g to follow t h e m e a n d e r i n g a n d f a i l s to realize their skgnificance. Yet t h e i r s a r e t h e s t o r i e s of m a n ' s r e a c t i o n s to w a r ; a n d f r o m t h e s t o r ies of b o t h G e r m a n s a n d F r e n c h m e n , o n e c a n d r a w t h e s e c o n d conc l u s i o n : Most m e n , a t l e a s t u n d e r w a r t i m e conditions, are interested a b o v e all in t h e m s e l v e s a n d in t h e i r own well-being. P a r a d o x i c a l l y , cer-

F i n a l l y , a r e a d i n g of " I s P a r i s B u r n i n g ? " c a n g a i n f o r o n e a bett e r u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e s t r u g g l e s b e t w e e n t h e allies a n d d e G a u l l e iind t h e s t r u g g l e w i t h i n F r a n c e f o r political s u p r e m a c y a f t e r the w a r . T h e s t r u g g l e between g e n e r a l s Eise n h o w e r a n d d e G a u l l e should b e c a r e f u l l y s t u d i e d , f o r it h e l p s in understanding de G a u l l e as F r a n c e ' s leader and f o r m s a basis for h i s a n t i - A m e r i c a n policies tod a y . (A f u r t h e r e x p l a n a t i o n of de Gaulle's association with A m e r i c a n p o l i c y m a k e r s a s it r e l a t e s to his p r e s e n t a t t i t u d e c a n b e f o u n d in

iAnd s o it is: P a r i s d o e s n o t b u r n , c i v i l i z a t i o n is n o t d e s t r o y e d , m a n f i g h t s f o r h i m s e l f and d e G a u l l e controls France. T h e f i l m of " I s P a r i s B u r n i n g ? " b e g a n in P a r i s by P a r a m o u n t s h o r t l y a f t e r t h e book w a s publishe d e a r l y in 1965. I n t e r e s t i n g l y enough, de Gaulle has been anyt h i n g b u t u n c o o p e r a t i v e in r e g a r d to t h e f i l m i n g of t h e m o v i e .

GRETCHEN STEFFENS Robert Murphy's "Diplomat Among Warriors.") A s t u d y of t h e book also h e l p s understand the c o m m u n i s t struggle f o r c o n t r o l of F r a n c e a f t e r t h e libe r a t i o n . H a d it n o t been f o r de

'Everyman' and 'Gran'ma' Study Man And His Relationships to Others 'Gran'ma' Will Convey Story Of Alcoholic By Barb Kouw H e i j e m a n ' s short story " G r a n ' m a " is the s o u r c e of a p l a y of the s a m e n a m e , a d a p t e d f o r s t a g e prod u c t i o n a n d d i r e c t e d By J a n e Riso. " G r a n ' m a " will b e p r e s e n t e d a t 8:30 p . m . on F r i d a y a n d S a t u r d a y in t h e Little T h e a t e r . T h e title c h a r a c t e r of t h e p l a y , p o r t r a y e d by M a r i a P i z z a r o , is a 90-year-old w o m a n w h o h a s a c e r t a i n l i k i n g f o r alcoholic b e v e r a g e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y gin. G e o r g i e , p l a y e d by six-year-old J i m m y T i m m e r m a n , is t h e i n n o c e n t p r o c u r e r of G r a n ' ma's "medicine." T h e a c t i o n of t h e p l a y is c e n t e r e d a r o u n d an i n c i d e n t in w h i c h Gran*m a ' s 85 proof m e d i c i n e c a u s e s h e r to fall into a s t a t e of i n e b r i a t i o n a n d to p a s s f o r a t i m e out of t h e c o m p a n y of h e r f a m i l y . T h e p l a y r e v e a l s the a t t i t u d e s of t h e r e l a t i v e s t o w a r d t h e old w o m a n , a n d t h e s i t u a t i o n is one in w h i c h e v e r y one is a w a r e of t h e p r o b l e m b u t w a n t s to a v o i d t a l k i n g a b o u t it. G r a n ' m a ' s daughter-in-law, playe d by Leslie B r u g g e m i e r , is g e n e r ally f e d up w i t h t h e w h o l e s i t u a t i o n , a n d Alice M e e n g s a s H e l e n d i s p l a y s a n a t t i t u d e s i m i l a r to h e r m o t h e r ' s f e e l i n g t h a t G r a n d m a is a n u i s a n c e a n d t h a t she does n o t h i n g b u t u p s e t t h i n g s . G r a n d m a ' s s o n , p l a y e d by D o n B a t t j e s , is t o r n b e t w e e n loyalty to h i s m o t h e r a n d t o t h e o t h e r m e m b e r s of h i s f a m i l y . Mary typical remains to t h e Hansen

( B e t s y A a r d s m a ) is t h e high school student who detached and indifferent family problem. Darlene a s t h e m a i d J a n i e is not

d i r e c t l y i n v o l v e d with t h e f a m i l y , b u t s h e is q u i t e a w a r e of t h e r a t h e r t o p s y - t u r v y condition of t h e household. T h e son K e e s ( S t a n l e y Slinge r m a n ) w a n t s no p a r t of the situa t i o n and s p e n d s m o s t o j h i s t i m e simply observing. T h e t a l e n t s of M i s s R i s o a s w r i t e r a n d d i r e c t o r , a s well a s the notew o r t h y p e r f o r m a n c e of the c a s t m e m b e r s , c o m b i n e to m a k e " G r a n ' m a " not only a n e n t e r t a i n i n g production but also a potentially revealing s o c i a l c o m m e n t a r y .

Morality

Play

'Everyman'1 Uses Creative

Set

S t u d e n t D i r e c t o r Alan J o n e s , in his p r o d u c t i o n of t h e 16th c e n t u r y morality play " E v e r y m a n , " has e m p l o y e d a set of f l a t s a n d s t a i r s to r e p r e s e n t t h e w o r l d , a n d h a s his c h a r a c t e r s d r e s s e d in m o d e r n cost u m e s for the two p e r f o r m a n c e s in the L i t t l e T h e a t e r , F r i d a y and S a t u r d a y a t 8:30 p . m . T h e E n g l i s h v e r s i o n of " E v e r y m a n , " w h i c h is b a s e d upon a n e a r l i e r D u t c h m o r ality p l a y , is b e i n g p r e s e n t e d a s a p a r t of t h e F i n e A r t s F e s t i v a l . T h e o p e n i n g m o m e n t s of t h e p l a y a r e m a r k e d by t h e slow a n d delibe r a t e p l u c k i n g of a s t r i n g b a s s ( R i c h a r d W o l t e r s ) and t h e sounding of a gong. The audio effect shifts abruptly when the messenger, played by T o m C o l e m a n , m a k e s his e n t r a n c e f r o m the audit o r i u m b e f o r e a d d r e s s i n g t h e audie n c e . T h e b a s s then c o n t i n u e s a s a n e f f e c t i v e a c c o m p a n i m e n t to the o p e n i n g lines of God, p l a y e d by Rob Werge. When Death (Carole Osterink) c o n f r o n t s E v e r y m a n ( J o h n Cox),

t h e m o v e m e n t of t h e o t h e r c h a r a c t e r s on s t a g e t e n d s to be slightly d i s t r a c t i n g , but t h e u l t i m a t e e f f e c t is n o n e t h e l e s s i m p r e s s i v e . Mel And r i n g a is e x c e l l e n t in his p o r t r a y a l of Fellow ship, a n d K i n a r e d ( . f a y H i n e s ) a n d Cousin ( J a n e t A r n o n e ) , w h o c a n ' t go with E v e r y m a n bec a u s e s h e h a s a c r a m p in h e r toe, a d d a d e l i g h t f u l t o u c h of h u m o r . Dennis Jones maintains a casual a n d c o n f i d e n t a i r in d e m o n s t r a t i n g a c o m f o r t a b l e c o n t r o l o v e r his r o l e a s Goods. Good D e e d s , who lies d o r m a n t on the s t a g e until b e i n g s u m m o n e d by E v e r y m a n , e m e r g e s a s a polished c h a r a c t e r p o r t r a y a l on the p a r t of J e n n i f e r M c G i l v r a y . G o r d y K o r s t a n g e is c o n v i n c i n g a s t h e old m a n F i v e Wits, and adeq u a t e s u p p o r t is p r o v i d e d by the remaining characters, including Carol Rowe as Knowledge, Rob Werge as Strength, Donna Leech as Discretion, Elga Rusins as Beauty, T o m Coleman as Doctor and Anne DeVelder as Confession. With t h e possible e x c e p t i o n of one s c e n e , J o h n Cox is c o n s i s t e n t l y c o n v i n c i n g in his l e a d role a s E v e r y m a n . T h e s c e n e in question is t h a t of the s c o u r g e of p e n a n c e in which t h e a c t i o n is stylized a n d obviously r i t u a l i s t i c a l m o s t to a point w h e r e it is i n c o n s i s t e n t with the t o t a l mood of t h e p r o d u c t i o n ; t h e d i f f i c u l t y s e e m s to lie in t h e d u r a t i o n of the s c e n e w h i c h dem a n d s t h a t E v e r y m a n r i s e to a level of i n v o l v e m e n t which is beyond his r e a c h . R e p e t i t i o n of t h e initial t e c h n i c a l e f f e c t s a t the close of t h e play a c t s as a unifying device. The juxtaposition of old a n d n e w is f o r t h e m o s t p a r t e f f e c t i v e , a n d the q u a l ity of t h e p r o d u c t i o n a s a w h o l e is o u t s t a n d i n g to t h e point w h e r e minor difficulties a r e overshadowed. Mr. Jones, his cast and c r e w s deserve p r a i s e for their fine c o n t r i b u t i o n to t h i s y e a r ' s F e s t i v a l .

PEANUTS

10 6lV£ AN1/THIN6 TO BE ABLE TO TALK WITH THAT LITTLE KED-HAIRED6IRL.

Review of the News By J a c k L. Schrier In V i e t n a m t h e B u d d h i s t d e m :£ o n s t r a t i o n s a g a i n s t P r e m i e r Ky continued as Buddhists c h a r g e d X; t h a t Ky h a d c a l l e d t h e m t r a i t o r s this p a s t w e e k e n d . T u e s d a y , Ky said t h a t h e h a d n e v e r believed jv B u d d h i s t d e m a n d s w e r e illogical S or u n p a t r i o t i c a n d t h a t h e alw a y s p a i d a t t e n t i o n to the legitim a t e c o m p l a i n t s of his p e o p l e . T h e w a r a g a i n s t the c o m m u S n i s t s w e n t on w i t h six p l a n e s *: lost on M o n d a y alone. In the g r o u n d p h a s e of t h e w a r m o r e S t h a n 1000 U. S. M a r i n e s b a t t l e d *: the c o m m u n i s t s 400 m i l e s n o r t h rj:- of S a i g o n . O v e r 34 c o m m u n i s t s •x w e r e b e l i e v e d s l a i n . S £: :j:;' •:>

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T h e U. S. S e n a t e a p p r o v e d a $13.1 billion V i e t n a m Money Bill which a p p r o p r i a t e s f u n d s to buy military h a r d w a r e . In a n o t h e r d e v e l o p m e n t of n o t e , the U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d South V i e t n a m s i g n e d an agricultural a g r e e m e n t whereby South V i e t n a m will i m p o r t $52,310,000 of A m e r i c a n - p r o d u c e d rice, w h e a t , f l o u r , t o b a c c o and r a w cotton.

Indonesia's strong m a n , General Suharto, is taking no :£ c h a n c e s . His a r m y u n i t s c r a c k e d down o n t h e Air F o r c e , o c c u p y J; ing all a i r p o r t s , s l a s h i n g a i r c r a f t t i r e s a n d r e m o v i n g vital p a r t s S f r o m p l a n e e n g i n e s to p r e c l u d e their use. In a d d i t i o n , P r e s i S d e n t S u k a r n o w a s r e f u s e d per-y. m i s s i o n by t h e n e w g o v e r n m e n t •S to r e t u r n to his b i r t h p l a c e in S e a s t e r n J a v a . T h e n a t i o n ' s new S foreign minister, A d a m Malik, left no d o u b t s a s to his v i e w s w h e n h e w a r n e d o f f i c i a l s of his S m i n i s t r y to follow his a n t i - c o m m u n i s t policy o r quit. V.

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T h e film should, a s does the book, vividly r e c r e a t e t h e s t o r y of t h e l i b e r a t i o n of P a r i s a n d its p a r t i c i p a n t s . C o - a u t h o r s L a r r y Collins, t h e P a r i s B u r e a u Chief of " N e w s week"' m a g a z i n e , and Dominique L a p i e r r e , t h e s e n i o r e d i t o r of " P a r is M a t c h , " h a v e told m o r e t h a n just a story. T h e y h a v e involved in t h e i r h i s t o r y a n a n a l y s i s of m a n ' s behavior, a moving account of s t r u g g l e , c o n f l i c t and c o n c e r n , a s well a s a c o n t r i b u t i o n to a n und e r s t a n d i n g of w o r l d politics.

I'M NOT THE GREATEST PERSON U)H0 EVER LIVED, OF COURSE, BUT AFTER ALL, UH0 15? I'M JUST A NICE SORT OF 60^ U)HO...,

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January 17 a n d l o c a t e d j u s t last w e e k a f e w m i l e s off the Spanish c o a s t , is g r a d u a l l y slipping i n t o g r e a t e r d e p t h s while bad w e a t h e r a n d t h e t r i c k y position of the w e a p o n f o r c e t h e U. S. to s u s p e n d r e c o v e r y o p e r a tions. In Taipei ( F o r m o s a ) G e n e r a l i s s i m o C h i a n g K a i Shek w a s ree l e c t e d to his f o u r t h t e r m a s N a t i o n a l i s t C h i n a ' s p r e s i d e n t by a n o v e r w h e l m i n g m a j o r i t y of the n a t i o n a l a s s e m b l y . Other i t e m s of interest: N o r t h China w a s h i t b y f o u r e a r t h q u a k e s , o n e of w h i c h w a s a m o n g the strongest evei recorded; Congo P r e s i d e n t M o b u t u seized all t h e n a t i o n a l l e g i s l a t i v e powers of h i s c o u n t r y ; a s h o r t circuit in G e m i n i 8 w a s t h e proba b l e c a u s e of t h e wild g y r a t i o n s which b r o u g h t t h e flight to a p r e m a t u r e e n d ; A b b a E b a n of Israel expressed his country's r e g r e t a n d s u r p r i s e at t h e l a c k of c o u r t e s y , n o r m a l l y g r a n t e d to a v i s i t i n g h e a d of s t a t e , shown by t h e I n d i a n G o v e r n m e n t toward Israeli President Zalman Shazar; Columbia's extremists • r i g h t a n d l e f t ) a c q u i r e d 45 of t h e 106 S e n a t e p o s i t i o n s to 61 for the r u l i n g L i b e r a l - C o n s e r v a tive coalition w h i c h h a d hoped to a c q u i r e t w o - t h i r d s c o n t r o l of congress; and the U. S. a n d R u s s i a s i g n e d a n e w two y e a r a g r e e m e n t continuing their cultural-exchange program at a b o u t t h e s a m e l e v e l a s it h a s b e e n in t h e past. In t h e sports world, b a s k e t b a l l h a s d r a w n to a c l o s e with T e x a s Western, ranked n u m b e r three, upsetting top-ranked Kentucky f o r t h e NCAA t i t l e , a n d Brigh a m Young defeating New York U n i v e r s i t y f o r t h e N a t i o n a l Inv i t a t i o n a l T o u r n a m e n t title.

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Page 6

Hope College anchor

Call E d i t o r ' s note: M r s . R o b e r t Cecil, a 1946 child psychology m a j o r grartu a t e of V a s s a r College, is the dir e c t o r of the Higher Horizons prog r a m at Hope. Since its inception t h r e e y e a r s ago. the college-sponsored p r o g r a m to p r o v i d e " b i g brothe r s " and " b i g s i s t e r s " for g r a d e schoolers h a s grown f r o m 40 to 175 children. M r s . Cecil began with H i g h e r Horizons a s voluntary l b son to the e l e m e n t a r y schools last y e ? r . She and her h u s b a n d , associa t e p r o f e s s o r of m u s i c at Hope, s e r v e d last s u m m e r a s a d v i s o r s for (he Vienna s u m m e r p r o g r a m . By M r s . Robert Cecil Dick is a k i n d e r g i r t e n e r whose b r o t h e r s and s i s t e r s a r e all in Higher Horizons. The y o u n g e s t of five, he whines, clings and t h r o w s tant r u m s when the o t h e r s leave on e x c u r s i o n s with their " b i g s i s t e r s or b r o t h e r s . " His f a t h e r left h o m e two y e ^ r s ago and h a s r e m a r r i e d . His m o t h e r is doing the best she c a n and m e e t s most of t h e children'.? p h y s i c a l needs. Dick is a bright child and r e s p o n s i v e to attention a n d interest. J u a n is 13. His l a r g e family is closely knit and the p a r e n t s a r e v e r y interested in t h e i r children. They spend a s m u c h t i m e with t h e m as they c a n . although both w o r k . J u a n needs to b e c o m e a p a r t of the c o m m u n i t y , to m e e t new people, and to feel s o m e o n e c a r e s a b o u t what he thinks. Next y e a r he will be in the seventh g r a d e in a l a r g e junior-high school w h e r e his limited b a c k g r o u n d will put h i m at m o r e of a d i s a d v a n t a g e . He is a fine, likeable boy with m u c h potential. T h e s e a r e brief d e s c r i p t i o n s of r e a l boys ' w h o s e n a m e s I h a v e c h a n g e d ) . T h e r e a r e 30 others, in s i m i l a r c i r c u m s t a n c e s , who need " b i g b r o t h e r s . " H i g h e r Horizons is not for boys only, h o w e v e r . This y e n r we h i v e had 210 children rec o m m e n d e d to us ' m o s t of the req u e s t s c o m e f r o m schools), a n d

95 of these a r e girls, a l m o s t of ail ot whom h a v e "big s i s t e r s . " The one-to-one r e l a t i o n s h i p of a child with a young adult is the f r a m e w o r k of Higher Horizons and the volunteer is the b a s i s of the prog r a m . Our p u r p o s e is to p r o v i d e cultural, social, and a c a d e m i c exp e r i e n c e through a f r i e n d s h i p with a Hope College student that will help a child to gain b r o a d e r intere s t s and to learn v a l u e s in addition to ideas and skills. Higher Horizons is n e i t h e r a tutorial p r o g r a m nor a r e c r e a t i o n a l one. Our local school s y s t e m f e e l s that t u t o r i n g would be an infringem e n t on the p u p i l - t e a c h e r relationship: a c a d e m i c c o a c h i n g or help with h o m e w o r k is often r e q u e s t e d by the t e a c h e r s and m a n y activities car. be a c a d e m i c a l l y e n r i c h i n g . Re( r e a t i o n a l activities, such a s s p o r t s or a r t s and c r a f t s , help the s t u d e n t and child to b e c o m e b e t t e r a c q u a i n ted and a r e a way to put the friendship on a f i r m e r basis while h a v ing fun t o g e t h e r . " T h i n g s to do tog e t h e r " should be p l a n n e d with t h e child's i n t e r e s t s , needs and a g e in mind. A s t u d e n t is often t e m p t e d to rush a child into an " e n r i c h i n g " experience before considering the child's willingness or r e a d i n e s s for it. For one little boy and his " b i g b r o t h e r , " last y e a r ' s a t t e n d a n c e a t his first f o r m a l c o n c e r t w a s u n s a t isfactory. This y e a r the s a m e child h a s visited college o r c h e s t r a a n d band r e h e a r s a l s with his " b i g brot h e r " and a t t e n d e d the Indianapolis S y m p h o n y concert this m o n t h . Higher Horizons b e g a n a s a student activity and is still one. We h a v e an a d v i s o r y b o a r d , and two Hope s t u d e n t s a r e m e m b e r s . My role a s d i r e c t o r is to c o o r d i n a t e the p r o g r a m : to m a t c h children with s t u d e n t s ; to talk with p a r e n t s , t e a c h e r s and social a g e n c i e s ; to find things to do; to a r r a n g e for professional help when n e c e s s a r y ; to keep up-to-date r e c o r d s on the

D e o . " by O r l a n d o de L a s s o , and " P r e s o n t a t i o n of Christ in the T e m p l e , " bv J o h a n n e s E c c a r d . T h e Choir will also sin^ f r o m P s a l m 42. two v e r s e s in English and one in Dutch. Dr. H o w a r d Slenk. p r o f e s s o r of music at Trinity Christian College. P a l o s Heights, 111., will speak on "The Genevan Psalter." A chamber choir c o m n o s e d of m e m b e r s of t h e Hope College faculty, will p r e s e n t s e v e r a l e x a m p l e s of the s e r v i c e cf worship of the G e n e v a n p e r i o d . The R e v . L a m b e r t J . P o n s t e i n will p r e s i d e , with the S c r i p t u r e being read in both English and Dutch.

The STUDENT CHURCH Dimnent Memorial

Relationship Between Local Children and Thefts Feared

Commitment

Dutch Fine Arts Festival Concludes With Vesper Service The Hope College Centennial Y e a r F i n e Arts F e s t i v a l will conclude with the Vesper S e r v i c e Sunday at 4 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Dutch c h u r c h m u s i c will be used 'n ^ e servioe. R o p e r Davis. Hope College o r g a n ist. will p r e s e n t a work by Hendrik Andriessen. " T h e m a m e t Vari a t i e s " as the prelude, and " R i c e r c a r B r e v K " by J a n P i e t c r Sv^eelinck. as the postlude. B e f o r e t h e p r e l u d e p s a l m tunes will be p l a y e d on the tower c h i m e s . T h e Chapel Choir, u n d e r the direction of Dr. Robert C a v a n a u g h will present two a n t h e m s . " J u b i l a t o

March 25, 196«

Chapel

p r o g r a m and to a r r a n g e workshops for students. Without Hope s t u d e n t s , H i g h e r Horizons would not exist. Most students who t a k e a " c h i l d " h a v e had s o m e e x p e r i e n c e working with children, but m a n y of them a r e unp r e p a r e d for the depth of the experience. We ask all v o l u n t e e r s to sign a pledge that they will give one or two h o u r s weekly and will lei the child know if they c a n ' t keep a p p o i n t m e n t s . S o m e t i m e s the time can be longer t h a t t h a t ; often the student is s u r p r i s e d by the w a y the child d e p e n d s on him. In s p i t e of this, the m a j o r i t y of s t u d e n t s find the t i m e , love and p a t i e n c e to e n d u r e what to s o m e m i g h t be disadvantages. A student can find m e e t i n g with a child r e l a x i n g or s t i m u l a t i n g — d i f f e r e n t f r o m his college life: Its fun to h a v e a snowfight or m a k e popcorn. He can look f o r w a r d to a child throwing open the door with a h a p p y s m i l e : " W h e r e a r e we going t o d a y ? " The p e r s o n a l s a t i s f a c tion he gets f r o m his r e l a t i o n s h i p with the child is his r e w a r d . And what a b o u t Dick. J u a n a n d all the o t h e r s ? It s e e m s to m e t h a t here is a c h a l l e n g e to Hope students. here is a " c a l l to c o m m i t m e n t . " To be a volunteer in H i g h e r Horizons is to realize the m e a n i n g of the w o r d s of St. F r a n c i s : " F o r it is in giving that we r e c e i v e . "

The

President, Western Theological Seminary

Mr. T i m m e r m a n s u g g e s t e d that /residents t a k e t e m p t a t i o n a w a y f r o m a n y o n e who m i g h t steal in the d o r m s by k e e p i n g their doors locked at all t i m e s . Mrs. Cecil said t h a t s t u d e n t s should keep their c a r s locked also. In addition, she noted t h a t if incidents continue, it m i g h t be n e c e s s a r y to look into the possibility of h i r i n g a c a m p u s policeman.

Recently a r a s h of t h e f t s h a s o c c u r r e d in the d o r m i t o r i e s , s o m e of which h a v e been a t t r i b u t e d to these children. In the Knick House several BB guns w e r e p i l f e r e d by y o u n g s t e r s , who w e r e c a u g h t leaving the house. Another child w a s found going through a F r a t e r ' s c a r in the p a r k i n g lot. A radio w a s stolen in Z w e m e r but later recove r e d . Mail in the Knick house h a s been t a m p e r e d with and a check r e m o v e d . Money is m i s s i n g f r o m

Shirley

Lawrence

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to

the S e n a t e that s o m e f o r m of recreation

program

be

created

to

k e e p t h e m occupied a f t e r d a r k and p e r h a p s to c h a n n e l their e n e r g y in a c o n s t r u c t i v e direction.

B y Rob Werge 1 p . m . Cut fifth hour c l a s s walked to R i v e r Ave. Looked rain. Held out " N e w Y o r k " and waited. Realized I forgot p a p e r b a g full of t e x t books. free.

and like sign my Felt

1:10 p . m . Got ride to Allegan with m i n i s t e r . . . Christian R e f o r m ed. 'Born and r a i s e d in the m i d w e s t . " T a l k e d about God. 2 p . m . Allegan . . . ugh. Still looked like r a i n . Held out sign. 2:15 p.m. R a i n . 2:30 p . m . P i c k e d up wet by s a l e s m a n going to Detroit. Sold a u t o m o bile p a r t s . Told m e how i n t e g r a t i o n and M a r t i n L u t h e r King w e r e c o m munist plots . . . 1 think he w a s ? B i r e h e r . He d r o v e f a s t . . . nice car.

7 p.m. Waited in g a s station and d r a n k t h r e e Pepsis. Still r a i n i n g and now d a r k . A t t e n d a n t who w a s old guy who tried to tell m e to t a k e a bus h o m e . Said he wished he'd gone to college b e c a u s e he'd " a l w a > s liked boaks and s t u f f . " 7:30 p . m . Rode to t u r n p i k e with a guy a n d wife going to Ohio lookins' for w o r k . Old '57 Chevy. Ho liked the S u p r e m e s and played WLS real loud. Wife d i d n ' t say m u c h . 9 p.m. Got a ride onto the turnpike f r o m truck d r i v e r going to P i t t s b u r g h . He rode h u n c h e d o v e r the wheel . . . d e l i v e r e d p a p e r supplies. But he liked poetry and t h e r e w a s a copy of " P a r a d i s e L o s t " on the s e a t . He said it w a s " p r e t t y h e a v y . " but i m p o r t a n t to read. His f a v o r i t e w a s F r o s t . Thought Berlingetti n e e d e d " m a t u r -

SCCC Plans Spiritual Retreat With Taize Monks On the w e e k e n d of April 29, a limited n u m b e r of Hope s t u d e n t s will h a v e the opportunity to a t t e n d a spiritual r e t r e a t at L a k e M e n d o t a . Wis. Led by B r o t h e r s C h r i s t o p h e r , J o h a n n and J a c q u e s , of the T a i z e C n m m u n i t y , F r a n c e , the r e t r e a t will be held in cooperation with t h e c a m p u s m i n i s t e r s of the U n i v e r sity of Wisconsin a n d the Benedictine Sisters of the P r i o r y Fox B l u f f . The w e e k e n d , called a r e t r e a t and not a c o n f e r e n c e , will be s p e n t

K *.

"intensively s e e k i n g the r e n e w a l cf one's own s p i r i t u a l life and dedication to Christ, involved in life and its p r o b l e m s . " T h e r e will be periods of p r i v a t e t a l k s with counselors a n d opportunity to s h a r e views with other P r o t e s t a n t . R o m a n Catholic a n d Orthodox s t u d e n t s . The cost is $15. with a $5 deposit. Interested s t u d e n t s should sign a list posted on the door of the SCCC office in t h e b a s e m e n t of G r a v e s .

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Speaker: Dr. Herman Ridder

Big b r o t h e r s a n d s i s t e r s in the Higher Horizons p r o g r a m h a v e been asked not to allow their y o u n g s t e r s to r o a m u n a t t e n d e d in the dormitories. This is a s m u c h for their protection a s for any other r e a s o n . According to Gordon T i m m e r m a n , Head Resident in Kollen Hall, the y o u n g s t e r s he finds in the halls often c l a i m they a r e in the building 'to m e e t t h e i r big b r o t h e r . " No Higher Horizon child h a s ever been a p p r e h e n d e d a c t u a l l y s t e a l i n g anything to the best knowledge of Mr. Timmerman and Mrs. Dorothy Cecil, h e a d of H i g h e r Horizons.

The Soon Journey

V.

at 10:45 A.M.

The l a r g e n u m b e r s of local children who f r e q u e n t the c a m p u s a f t e r d a r k r e p r e s e n t a p r o b l e m which w a s brought to the attention of the Student S e n a t e last week. Most of t h e s e y o u n g s t e r s congreg a t e in the a r e a of the g y m n a s i u m every night. The girls who reside in Columbia Cottage r e p o r t e d numerous incidents of h a r a s s m e n t which h a v e t a k e n place in recent weeks. Columbia is isolated f r o m most of the other d o r m i t o r i e s , and girls walking b a c k f r o m the library and music buildings h a v e been b o t h e r e d . These incidents h a v e varied f r o m the use of obscene l a n g u a g e to actual a t t e m p t s at " p a s s e s . " During the d a y t i m e t h e s e children h a v e been found in a l m o s t e v e r y m e n ' s d o r m i t o r y and h a v e b e c o m e a considerable nuisance. Men in Z w e m e r noted that their r e s i d e n c e is often used a s a t h o r o u g h f a r e for school children on their w a y to Lincoln School in the m o r n i n g . In Kollen Hall s m a l l children h a v e been found r o a m i n g the building. The s a m e is t r u e in the f r a t houses.

Changeling

%

This Sunday

Kollen, Z w e m e r and the f r a t e r n i t y c o m p l e x . Not all of these t h e f t s c a n be b l a m e d on the y o u n g s t e r s , b u t they often qualify a s likely s u s p e c t s . In a n o t h e r case, o v e r $50 w a s stolen f r o m the lockers of s e v e r a l b a s e b a l l p l a y e r s in the g y m . a c c o r d i n g to Coach D a r y l Sicdentop.

By George Arwady

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in'." We and agreed, w a s evil . . Bought m e at a d i n e r .

t a l k e d about V i e t n a m a f t e r a while, that m a n . " I t ' s all s c r e w e d u p . " a h a m b u r g e r and coke Slept a little.

1 a . m . Left off at t u r n p i k e r e s t stop. 27 f l a v o r s , artificial f l o w e r s a n d w a i t r e s s e s who looked like e v e r y o t h e r w a i t r e s s in all Howard J o h n s o n s e v e r y w h e r e . Had s o m e c o f f e e and two doughnuts. 60c . . . inflation. Thought about the r e f r i g e r a t o r at h o m e . 1:20 a . m . R o d e to next rest stop with a bunch of guys going h o m e f r o m D e P a u w . All c h e m i s t r y m a jors. They laughed a lot a b o u t elements and equations. r a d i o ; he had a New York a c c e n t . Sounded g r e a t . 2:15 a . m . H a d w a i t e d long and sleepy for next ride. D r i v e r w a s s o m e sailor on his way f r o m his h o m e in Iowa to B a l t i m o r e . H a t e d f a r m s ; liked t h e s e a but not the Navy. " A l w a y s telling you to do something and never satisfied." H e figured a w a r w a s c o m i n g and s o m e b o d y had to fight it. Asked m e if I'd join up. "Soon a s I flunk out of s c h o o l . " He r o d e m e a l m o s t to Philly. 5:30 a.m. Sun c a m e up. 5:50 a.m. Got a ride across into Jersey from a retired school teacher. He said the new generation w a s "spoiled." I didn't have to hear because the countryside looked so good, a sort of green-brown. Listened to a newscastor on the 6:30 a.m. Got last ride easily with a family going to the City to visit relatives. Told m e all about Uncle Fred and his kids. I said I thought they w e r e probably very nice. 8 a.m. Got into suburbs. Streets, lamp posts, garbage cans all crowde d together. Soot . . . it was falling beautiful like manna. American Can Co. and U. S. Tire and Standard Oil all lined up by the highway. Beautiful. 9:45 a . m . Got home. I ate breakfast and went to bed. D r e a m t of E a s t e r and of c a r s riding eternally up and down s o m e very Eighth Street.


March 25, 1966

Page 7

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tually the Lowest Prices? ••••••

By Jtlui Renwick A

S T U D E N T CONSIDERS his e m p t y purse, and w o n d e r s why text books cost so much.

Another wonders w h a t the Book Store owner

joes with all his profits—"He doesn't look that rich; he m u s t be D u t c h . " Still a n o t h e r gives up in e x a s p e r a t i o n and begs, borrows and steals his s e m e s t e r ' s texts. And still another tries to resell his old books to pay for new ones, and finds the Book Store won't buy. Why a r e book p r i c e s as high as they a r e ? The consistent policy of Duffield Wade, m a n a g e r of the Blue Key Book Store, is to sell books cheaply.

ably have about $700 left over after the expense of dinners, which a r e held about once a month. The m e m b e r s of the f r a t e r n i t y cannot decide what is to be done with it. Some wish to spend it on themselves, for pins or sweatshirts, but since it is now too late to place these o r d e r s , the money will probably be used for a scholarship.

The following is an e xc e r pt f r o m an article

on the Book Store published in the anchor, F e b r u a r y 26. 1960: "It is ' M r . W a d e ' s ) task to opera t e the store for the students. His text-books, and g r a d u a l l y it expolicy h a s a l w a y s been to sell the panded to other books and miscellaneous i t e m s . As this happened, Book Store i t e m s at the lowest posthe operation of the store b e c a m e sible prices. too complex to be handled by stu"Blue Key sells college text dents, and a full-time m a n a g e r was books at the r e g u l a r p u b l i s h e r ' s hired by the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . And text price. This text price is usuat some point in this development, ally m u c h less t h a n the r e g u l a r the administration b e g a n to absorb t r a d e price of the Books. the profits which c a m e of the expansion. Now, a c c o r d i n g to Hope's " O t h e r items, it is usually obVice P r e s i d e n t , F i n a n c e , Henry s e r v e d . a r e priced less t h a n other Steffens, the administration hires schools ask for t h e m . two employees, one full-time and " F u r t h e r , it is the policy of Mr. one p a r t - t i m e to m a n a g e the store. Wade to be a l e r t for any knowledge Currently Blue Key sales run bare-

L a s t Y e a r ' s Profits Last y e a r , then, the College gained between $8,000 and $10,000 f r o m the operation of the Blue Key Book Store. However Mrs. Steffens pointed out that the college does not c h a r g e the store for rent, heat, light, telephone, janitor services or interest on the o p e r a t i n g capital which the t r e a s u r y provides. Mr. Steffens quoted fees which the College might c h a r g e to the store, based on prevailing c o m m e r c i a l rates: R e n t and h e a t $1800 J a n i t o r , telephone, and light 600 F i n a n c i a l losses 2000 Wages for Blue Key help 2100 TOTAL $6500 However, the College does not lose this a m o u n t of money from the s t o r e ' s profits by not c h a r g i n g these bills to the store. These are r a t e s which would be c h a r g e d were the store o p e r a t i n g independently and keeping its own profits, in which case the College would still be gaining.

The retail prices of text-books and p a p e r - b a c k s a r e very consistently 20 per cent higher than the manufacturer's wholesale price. However 14 p e r cent of that is lost in o p e r a t i n g e x p e n s e s of the store. It should be e m p h a s i z e d that, although the store m a k e s some profits on text-books, these a r e not high-profit items. Interestingly, the items which d r a w the highest profit, according to Mr. Wade, a r e p a p e r i t e m s , which a r e substantially discounted. The Book Store buys p a p e r directly f r o m the mills, and so can afford to discount. Used Book R e s a l e Used books a r e still bought at 60 p e r cent of original cost, a n d resold, according to Mr. Wade, at 75 per cent. However, this is only done if the book is to be used in a course the following s e m e s t e r . If there is any risk in buying a used book, the store will o f f e r the p r i c e quoted by used-book companies. These prices, h o w e v e r , are so low that students a r e usually e x t r e m e l y dissatisfied with the bargain, and students' displays of disappointment in turn, said Mr. Wade, tend to m a k e the store v e r y hesitant to mention the possibility. This accounts for complaints that the store will not buy back c e r t a i n used texts. Two years ago there was a oro-

posal that the Alpha Phi Omega f r a t e r n i t y set up a used-book exc h a n g e lor better b a r g a i n s for the students. M r . W a d e s answer to this w a s t h a t they would be doing exactly what the Blue Key was doing twenty y e a r s ago. ihe implication being that it would be pointless. F u r t h e r , he said, according to a survey done a m o n g 50 college book stores t h r e e y e a r s ago, there were only eight stores which offered e x c h a n g e r a t e s as high as those o f f e r e d by the Blue Key. Won't Lower

Prices

In conclusion, Mr. Wade offered s e v e r a l r e a s o n s for not lowering prices. F o r one, the trouble and confusion involved, and the ensuing m i s t a k e s , would m a k e it impractical. F o r another, the students wouldn't know the difference. For e x a m p l e , he said, if the price of a roll of Scotch Tape were lowered f r o m 25 cents to 22 cents, students would still put a q u a r t e r on the counter. Mr. Wade also noted that a significant drop in the store's p r i c e s would i n c r e a s e competition with the local stores, thus raising the ire of local businessmen. In short, it would s e e m t h a t the c o m p l a i n t s of high prices are somew h a t unjustified since the Blue Key offers the best possible prices to s t u d e n t s u n d e r the present circum-

stances

Mr. S t e f f e n s expressed the expectation that, a s the College grows, the Book Store's o p e r a t i n g costs will not i n c r e a s e significantly, and b e c a u s e of the g r e a t e r sales volu m e , profits will i n c r e a s e .

of i t e m s seen e l s e w h e r e at a lower price than at our store. He urges students to a c q u a i n t him with any such condition. "The Book Store also m a i n t a i n s a s t a n d a r d policy for used books. If books a r e to be re-used in courses on Hope's c a m p u s , the store will r e t u r n 50 to 60 p e r cent of the initial i n v e s t m e n t to the student and then m a r k s ' s i c ' the used books up 20 per cent, depending on the risk of r e s a l e . "Those books out of print or not used on H o p e ' s c a m p u s a r e purchased as a f a v o r to the student, at the price given by the used book c o m p a n i e s with the cost of handling and shipping t h e s e books absorbed by the Blue Key Store. " T h e Hope C h a p t e r of Blue Kev uses a fund taken f r o m the book store profits and t u r n s it into a student-centered gift or project. The Blue Key Book Store was founded as a service of t h e Blue Key F r a t e r n i t y , and it f i r s t operated exclusively as a non-profit used-book e x c h a n g e . Soon a f t e r its founding, t h e s t o r e b e g a n to sell

BOOTERY

SnA SkoH.SUktt Sftt O p e n Every Day 'Til 5:30 p.m. (Including W e d . ) M o n . a n d Fri. 'Till 9 p.m.

ly over $100,000 during the acad e m i c y e a r ' l a s t y e a r ' s volume was a p p r o x i m a t e l y $102.0001, although in past y e a r s volume h a s been considerably less and profit minimal. E i g h t to ten per cent of the store's volume of sales is profit, which goes to the t r e a s u r y of Hope College. The Blue Key F r a t e r n i t y , whose fourteen m e m b e r s contribute 48 hours of service a week without pay, receives $1,500 a y e a r for its help. Although at one time the Blue Key F r a t e r n i t y presented a yearlygift to the school with its profits, this has not been done for several years. At the end of this year, according to Blue Key t r e a s u r e r J i m Lee, the f r a t e r n i t y will prob-

According to Mr. Wade, the managing policy is still, as ever, to give the best possible b a r g a i n to the students, and he stressed the fact that the Administration n e v e r p r e s s u r e s him for profits. "If t h e r e is ever any item over-priced." h e said, " I ' d be very happy to know it. b e c a u s e we do not ever want to be u n d e r s o l d . " Pricing Policy No item in the store is priced higher t h a n the m a n u f a c t u r e r ' s suggested price, and m a n y items, particularly p a p e r stock and clothing, are priced considerably lower. However at the m o m e n t , in cont r a s t to the s t a t e m e n t of the 1960 article, the only books the store sells at discount, with the exception p e r h a p s of some few which won't sell well, a r e hard-bound books other than text-books, which a r e always a higher-profit item t h a n text-books or p a p e r - b a c k s .

KtJY —The Book Store, despite its rather cramped quarters, m a k e s use of every available inch to display teit-books and paperbacks.

AT HOPE CHURCH HOLLAND EX 4 - 8 5 9 7

YMCA

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ZEELAND 9 EAST 1 O t h S t .

CORDIALLY INVITES HOPE STUDENTS TO JOIN IN HAVING FUN THE Y's WAY Life Saving Recreational Swimming Senior Leaders Club Present this a d a n d receive a 5 0 % discount on our regular $10.00 A d u l t f e e .

*New

Address

THIS SUNDAY Morning Worship 9:30 A.M. —

11:00 A.M,

SERMON: "Elected To S u f f e r " Rev. W a l c h e n b a c h , Preaching

HOPE STUDENTS ARE CORDIALLY WELCOME


Pace S

Hope College anchor

Graduation, Ineligibility Dim Track Outlook

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PLAY BALL

AIl-American Paul T e r p s t r a uncorks a

pitch in batting p r a c t i c e as Hope ( oilege p r e p a r e s

for coming baseball season which opens April 13 ag ainst Spring Arbor at Spring Arbor.

Coach Sieden-

top expressed high hopes of Hope r e g a i n i n g the MI AA title this year with the services of five all-conference p l a y e r s to bolster the lineup, a m o n g the 16 lett e r m e n r e t u r n i n g .

i 6 Lettermen

March 25. 1966

Hope t r a c k s t e r s a r e out running again, and will be t r y i n g to c o m e up with a b e t t e r p e r f o r m a n c e t h a n last y e a r ' s showing. Last y e a r the squad under coach B r e w e r ' s able instruction. finished with a 4-2 league record and c a m e in third in the conference behind the Knights of Calvin and the first place Britons of Albion. Hope lost a lot of potential to graduation last y e a r , especially in q u a r t e r - m i l e r Dave Lane, who set a new MIAA record in the 440 y a r d run. and also helped set a MIAA record in the m i l e relay, along uith Bill Hultgren, J i m Pierpont and Mike 'Greek> P a l i a t s o s . Coach B r e w e r ' s squad also was hurt by first s e m e s t e r m a r k s , as m a n y po. i ^ n t i a l men b e c a m e ineligible. As a result of these two factors, the track t e a m will bo m a d e up mostly ol freshmen and untried upp e r c l a s s m e n . with a scarcity in letterwinners. The Dutch a r e especially weak in the hurdle e v e n t s with the loss of G a r y Holvick to ineligibility He was one of Coach B r e w e r ' s consistent winners last y e a r , who will be missed greatly this s e a s o n . Ray Cooper will again be back at his spot on

the starting blocks gunning for sprint victories for Hope this year and Steve Rynen will again compile in the 880 for the Dutch. P e r h a p s the strongest part of the Hope attack will be in the field where Floyd Brady and B r u c e Menning will high j u m p . Both a r e back from last s e a s o n ' s t e a m and Les Cole will be hack at the shot put along with Chris Buys. A f r e s h m a n will strengthen the Hope field a t t a c k as Douglas Nichols will throw the javelin for the Dutch for the s e a s o n . Doug is a s u r e bet to b r e a k the present Hope record as his a v e r a g e last season w a s better than 10 feet f a r t h e r than the present school record. Nichols will be a great improvement to Coach B r e w e r ' s squad along with m a n y other valuable but inexper ienced f r e s h m e n The t e a m will have to rely on the total strength to get wins this year. One a d v a n t a g e that the Dutch will h a v e this y e a r is the f a d that the MIAA Field Day at the end of the y e a r . May 21. will be held in Holland on the Dutch home grounds. With the f r e s h m e n coming through, the t e a m could h a v e a very fine s( ason.

Return

Batsmen Prepare for Opener By Graydon Blank With the coming of spring and w a r m w e a t h e r , the baseball season steals into the h e a r t s and m i n d s of the sporsters around the world. Hope is no exception, and Coach Siedentop has had his 1966 version of the Flying Dutch Baseball t e a m at work sharpening up their techniques for over a week. The w a r m w e a t h e r has allowed the t e a m to get out and s h a r p e n their fielding on good ole Mother E a r t h , in p r e p a r a t i o n for their first r e g u l a r season g a m e on the 13th of April with Spring Arbor at Spring Arbor. In p r e p a r a t i o n for this g a m e and for their first MIAA g a m e with Kalamazoo on the 16th of April, the Dutch will take a s e v e n - g a m e spring

De Vette Declines Offer to Be Calvin Coach Russ De Vette, basketball coach of the Flying Dutchmen, declined the offer of Calvin College to become head basketball coach of the Knights. De Vette would be taking over the position of Dr. Barney Steen, who stepped down at the close of this

trip to Tennessee. This will allow the t e a m some actual g a m e action b e f o r e their season opene r . The b a s e b a l l squad will open their spring trip with a single g a m e at Nashville. facing David L ipsc omb College, and will finish their trip at Goshen College. Goshen, Ind., before returning to their home grounds. The Dutch should be title contende r s this y e a r , as they won the MIAA title two y e a r s ago, and finished second to Olivet with an 8 win 4 loss record. Coach Siedentop will h a v e 16 l e t t e r m e n r e t u r n i n g , including last y e a r ' s first t e a m allMIAA m e m b e r s Wayne Cotts and Don Kroodsma, and second t e a m all-MIAA m e m b e r s P a u l T e r p s t r a , T o m Pelon and Clare Van Wieren.

season a f t e r s e r v i n g 13 y e a r s a s the Calvin coach. De Vette w a s contacted about the position during the 1965-66 season. Qualifications for the post according to Dr. Steen a r e that along with the coaching duties, the coach m u s t teach in the phyical education d e p a r t m e n t and hold a m a s t e r ' s deto hold the views of the Christian gree. The coach is also expected Reformed Church.

I P AND O V E R â&#x20AC;&#x201D; F r e s h m a n Doug Nichols p r a c t i c e s the pole vault for the K a l a m a z o o m e e t on April 16. Although the t e a m h a s been hurt hy a n u m b e r of ineligibilities, many key men a r e returning.

A Quick Look at Campus News Ethiopia

Visit Possible

Hope has been selected to send one student to Addis A b a b a , Ethiopia, this s u m m e r , the Student Sena t e announced this week. This p r o g r a m , sponsored by the P r e s b y t e r i a n Church and t h e Ethiopion Orthodox Church, will last f r o m July 12 to August 23. The s t u d e n t will p a r t i c i p a t e in education and work p r o j e c t s u n d e r the guida n c e of St. P a u l ' s Theological School in Ethiopia. A Hope f r e s h m a n will be selected by a Student Senate c o m m i t t e e . Applications for this a p p o i n t m e n t will be m a d e a v a i l a b l e before s p r i n g vacation, a n n o u n c e d Joan Woederhoff. c o m m i t t e e c h a i r m a n . All e x p e n s e s will be paid and the Student Senate will help d e f r a y costs by raising about $250.

Dancing

COACH RUSS DE VETTE

T e r p s t r a and K r o o d s m a led the hitters last season with Don Kroodsm a supplying the pitching strength of the ball club. Captain Roger K r o o d s m a will lead the t e a m to regain their title, but the Hornets of Kalamazoo, and the Britons of Albion will pose a big threat to the Dutch. K a l a m a z o o will especially be rugged, as they had a very young and inexperienced squad last season and h a v e many of the p l a y e r s returning, along with picking up s o m e v e t e r a n s , who were off c a m p u s last spring. Also helping the l e t t e r m e n , will be s e v e r a l p r o m i s i n g f r e s h m e n , who should c o m e through for the Dutch with the aid of Spring Trip experience. A good season should be in store for Hope baseball followers.

for Missions

A " M a d r a s D a n c e " f e a t u r i n g the new c a m p u s group, the G r e e n b r i a r s , will take place next Wednesday between 8 p . m . and 11:30 p.m. in Carnegie Gym. Girls will be given late permission for the SCCC sponsored event, which will raise money for its " F o o d for M a d r a s " p r o j e c t . All p r o c e e d s will be used to buy food and supplies for the people of Mad r a s . India. The project is co-sponsored by the RCA Board of World Missions and the SCCC missions committee. According to G a r y G i l m o r e , Hope c h a i r m a n of the project, "every $100 e a r n e d will buy one badlyneeded w a t e r p u m p and 3000 pounds of g r a i n for the people of M a d r a s . "

The 10-member missions committee consists of r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of each Greek society as well as the f r e s h m a n class, the sophomore class, student council, Trinity Fellowship and Young Life. Admission to the d a n c e is $.50.

W epfer

Given

Grant

R i c h a r d W e p f e r . Hope senior f r o m South Haven. Mich., received word today that he has been awarded a National Science Foundation G r a d u a t e Fellowship for the amount of $1800. A m a t h e m a t i c m a j o r Wepfer intends to do g r a d u a t e work in the field of probabilities and statistics. He h a s applied for admission to Cornell University. While at Hope he served for two y e a r s as officer of the G e r m a n honors society. Delta P h i Alpha, acting a s vice president last y e a r and president this y e a r . He is also a m e m b e r of the service f r a t e r n i t y . Alpha Phi O m e g a . He h a s annually a p p e a r e d on the D e a n ' s List.

Romney

Appoints

Rider

Dr. Morette Rider, professor of music at Hope College, has been appointed by Governor R o m n e y to the c h a i r m a n s h i p of the State Council for the Arts Music Committee and to a seat on the State Council for the Arts. As head of the c o m m i t t e e Dr. Rider will coordinate educators and professional m u s i c i a n s throughout the s t a t e in a d m i n i s t e r i n g a state-wide p r o g r a m of musical e v e n t s and s e m i n a r s beginning this

year. Other activities will include the sponsoring of various musical groups both professional and ama t e u r in out-of-state tours, in workshops and in clinics.

Vander

Jagt to Speak

Michigan s t a t e s e n a t o r Guy Vander J a g t will be a guest of Hope's political science d e p a r t m e n t next week. He will s p e a k in G r a v e s Auditorium next T u e s d a y at 7 p.m. on the subject " L e g i s l a t i v e Politics." Sen. Vander J a g t is a 1953 graduate of Hope College, a g r a d u a t e of the University of Michigan Law School and of the Yale University Divinity School. While at Hope he won the national c h a m p i o n s h i p in oratory.

Civil Rights

Work

The civil rights registration drive sponsored by the YWCA in Greenville, N.C., has invited the Student Senate of Hope to send a t e a m to Greenville to aid in voter r e g i s t r a tion. The Hope t e a m would o p e r a t e in Greenville April 2-9. Hope's t e a m will be working in conjunction with t e a m s f r o m all o v e r the country, r e p o r t e d Wes Michaelson, Senate president. Michaelson also comm e n t e d , " T h e S e n a t e will work out a p r o g r a m to aid interested persons in m e e t i n g costs s o t h a t money will not be a m a j o r b a r r i e r in student p a r t i c i p a t i o n . " Those s t u d e n t s who would be interested in the d r i v e should contact Alyce Meengs or Wes Michaelson this weekend.

Students

Win A wards

Senior Robert Werge and junior J o h n Cox were e a c h a w a r d e d S50 prizes for their winning p a p e r s in competition sponsored by the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. They h a v e been invited to attend an A c a d e m y dinner in Detroit on next F r i d a y , to receive their a w a r d s . . W e r g e s p a p e r , sponsored by Mr. VPhilip Homes of the Hope Art De"Was entitled "Iconogr a p h y of the Body in Early Syrian P a i n t i n g . " Cox's p a p e r deals with " C h a u c e r and M a r y M a g d l e n e " and w a s sponsored by Dr. E d w a r d Sav- v a g e of Hope's English_itefiQrtment. ^ h o will^atScTattend I h e dinner. Werge and Cox w e r e two of seven winners selected out of 29 entries f r o m small colleges throughout Michigan.

Clark Wins Contest Leslie Clark, a senior m u s i c m a jor whose i n s t r u m e n t is violin won the Young Artist Contest of the Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra as a result of c o m p e t i t i v e p e r f o r m a n c e s held in K a l a m a z o o M a r c h 12. As winner, s h e will a p p e a r as f e a t u r e d soloist playing the Beethoven Violin Concerto with the K a l a m a z o o S y m p h o n y O r c h e s t r a in its M a r c h 27 c o n c e r t . Miss Clark is a g r a d u a t e of Holland High School w h e r e she studied violin under W a n d a Nigh Rider. At Hope College s h e has been a s t u d e n t of Dr. M o r r e t t e R i d e r for the past four y e a r s . Miss Clark h a s been c o n c e r t mist r e s s of the Hope College Orchest r a for the p a s t two y e a r s .

Profile for Hope College Library

03-25-1966  

03-25-1966  

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