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VOL. N O .

Students dance 'for the kids' Karen Patterson C O - E D I T G R IN C H I E F

The 2010 Dance M a r a t h o n f u n d r a i s e r m a r k e d t h e eleventh consecutive year t h a t H o p e College has p a r t n e r e d with t h e Children's Miracle N e t w o r k t o raise m o n e y for the Helen Devos Children's Hospital in G r a n d Rapids, MI. Various H o p e o r g a n i z a t i o n s and individual s t u d e n t s raised $50, 312.23 for t h e hospital, which relies solely o n private support. "The total a m o u n t raised, t h o u g h slightly lower t h a n last year, didn't d a m p e r anybody's spirits," said co-Director Sarah P a t t o n ('11). "Each p e r s o n recognized that the true p u r p o s e of D a n c e M a r a t h o n is w o r k i n g for t h e

GUEST W R I T E R

PHOTOS BY

Hour EVENHOUSE

t h e m t h r o u g h their chaUenges a l l f o r t h e K | D S _ . D a n c e r s a n d m o r a l e r s look on as t h e M i r a c l e f a m i l i e s m a k e t h e ir way a n d giving t h e m h o p e to ma e t o t_hi e s t a g e a t t h e s t a r t of t h e M a r a t h o n . (Below liof*\ n a n r p r Q learn Iparn tt h hp dance. (Below f B e l o w right) right)T he e f t ) Dancers e ll ii n np e dance. The it t o t h e next day." Dream Team s h o w c a s e s t h e line d a n c e at t h e s t a r t of t h e M a r a t h o n . Giving h o p e could easily s u m u p this year's m a r a t h o n . Over 250 dancers were e n c o u r a g e d by nearly as m a n y moralers t o stay mentally a n d physically s t r o n g t h r o u g h t h e w h o l e 24 hours. For first time dancer Stephanie M a r c h e t t a ('10), t h e s u p p o r t of her f r i e n d s kept h e r strong. "I wasn't even b o t h e r e d by t h e physical exhaustion," M a r c h e t t a said. "It was t h e m e n t a l e x h a u s t i o n toward t h e e n d of the event t h a t really m a d e m e think that SEE D A N C E , PAGE 1 0

Spring Break missions provide opportunity to serve STAFF WRITER

M o r e than 250 H o p e s t u d e n t s will be traveling o n mission trips domestically and abroad t o aid schools, o r p h a n a g e s a n d c h u r c h e s d u r i n g spring break. This year, there will be a n e w mission trip to X o c e m p i c h , Mexico, c o m p r i s e d of j u n i o r and senior nursing m a j o r s as well as a faculty adviser. The g r o u p f r o m H o p e will a c c o m p a n y a g r o u p of 20 p e o p l e f r o m Sunshine C h u r c h in G r a n d Rapids t h a t consists of nurses, surgeons, anesthesiologists a n d others. M e g h a n Katner ('10), o n e of t h e p a r t i c i p a n t s of t h e trip, said, " W e will be providing surgical services, health teaching and

Model UN largest in Michigan Cassaundra Warner

Miracle Families, s u p p o r t i n g

Arryn Uhlenbrauck

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HOPE COLLEGE • HOLLAND. MICHIGAN

"SPERA IN DEO

MARCH 17. 2010 • SINCE 1887

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Bible study t o t h e residents of Xocempich. W e look f o r w a r d to serving t h e Lord in such a variety of ways and are h a p p y t h a t we can i n c o r p o r a t e our spiritual lives into o u r profession!" M o s t of t h e trips will work with organizations Hope's C a m p u s Ministries Office have assisted in prior years and will be doing a variety of service work in each area. M a r c Tori ('12), a p a r t i c i p a n t in a trip to Nicaragua, said, " W e will d o lice and parasite t r e a t m e n t s in schools a n d teach t h e kids a b o u t hygiene. Bluefields (is) a small, p o o r city o n the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua. F o u r t e e n s t u d e n t s are going o n a trip that will o p e n o u r eyes, n o t only to t h e health disparities

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in the world, but t o t h e h o p e f o u n d in Christ." Another mission trip to G u a t e m a l a City will "be taking care of t h e kids and i n c o r p o r a t i n g a recycling p r o j e c t for an o r p h a n a g e called Funaninos," said Ashleigh VerHulst ('11). Laura Nyitray ('11) is a leader t o a trip to N e w a r k , N J . , w h e r e s t u d e n t s are helping an organization called W o r l d I m p a c t . The g r o u p will help in t h e classrooms of W o r l d Impact's Christian e l e m e n t a r y school and w o r k o n p r o j e c t s for t h e m a r o u n d their building. C h r i s t o p h e r Billquist ('11) and the o t h e r participants in a trip to East Palo Alto, Calif., will also be w o r k i n g with youth. "East Palo Alto is o n e of the p o o r e s t

areas of t h e country. Bayshore Christian Ministries was f o u n d e d by Stanford students who r e c o g n i z e d this disparity and decided to d o s o m e t h i n g a b o u t it," said Billquist. K e n n e t h B a u m a n ('10), o n e of t h e leaders for a trip t o Jackson, Miss., w a n t s t h e work he and his g r o u p do with Voice of Calvary Ministries t o go beyond physica helping. " W e will definitely be learning a b o u t t h e ministry a n d racia reconciliation while we are d o w n t h e r e and t h a t will take priority," B a u m a n said. The mission trip t o P o m p a n o Beach, Fla., h a s a u n i q u e itinerary Paul Rice ('11) said, "The

For t h e past 38 years, high school s t u d e n t s f r o m all over t h e Midwest have flocked t o H o p e College with t h e goal of learning h o w international politics work t h r o u g h the a n n u a l M o d e l United N a t i o n s Conference. The high school s t u d e n t s each r e p r e s e n t a c o u n t r y and take that c o u n t r y ' s position o n t h e issues at h a n d to create a realistic simulation. Like t h e actual U N , m o d e l U N is divided into several different o r g a n s to tackle t h e issues m o r e efficiently: the Introductory General Assembly, Security Council, E c o n o m i c a n d Social Council, a n d I n t e r n a t i o n a l Criminal Court. These different o r g a n s are directed by H o p e s t u d e n t s studying political science. The political science d e p a r t m e n t s p o n s o r e d p r o g r a m attracted over 700 p a r t i c i p a n t s f r o m 2 5 high schools this year, m a k i n g it t h e largest m o d e l U N c o n f e r e n c e in Michigan. The s t u d e n t s w h o a t t e n d m o d e l U N seek to find a n s w e r s to s o m e of t h e world's m o s t pressing issues. Alyssa Z e l d e n r u s t ('11), a director f r o m t h e Security Council, said of m o d e l UN, "Model UN addresses s o m e of the toughest issues in t h e world right now, and there are no right or w r o n g answers. D u r i n g t h e conference, students get t o try their h a n d at solving problems that diplomats have been w o r k i n g o n for years, so there will always be conflicting opinions." This year, t h e s t u d e n t s were able t o give their conflicting o p i n i o n s in debates dealing with such difficult p r o b l e m s as h u m a n i t a r i a n relief for natural disasters, global energy, child soldiers as well as child labor, violence against w o m e n and ethnic independence movements. O v e r 30 H o p e S t u d e n t s were involved in t h e p r o g r a m with 13 serving as directors. SEE M O D E L

SEE S P R I N G

Local Fun— Spring Break Ideas If you'll be here In Holland Page 7 Got a story idea? Let us k n o w at anchor@hope.edu. or call us a t 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

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Final F o u r - The Flying Dutch advance to the NCAA Division III Final Four Page 12


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CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

Hope students ride out Chilean earthquake, aftershocks

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday March 17 The American Dream A r t e x h i b i t by M a r k Paris, D e p r e e A r t Center.

SAC Coffeehouse Kletz 9 - 1 1 p m

Thursday March Women's Lacrosse

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Friday

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

March 1 9

Spring Recess Begins

IN BRIEE

C A M P U S MINISTRIES RELEASES NEW CHAPEL CD

From the recent earthquake, approximately 700 p e o p l e have STAFF WRPTER been r e p o r t e d dead, while The effects of t h e massive m a n y m o r e r e m a i n missing. The e a r t h q u a k e that struck Chile m o s t severe d a m a g e w a s d o n e o n Feb. 27 are being o b s e r v e d in C o n c e p c i 6 n , C h i l e s s e c o n d firsthand by three H o p e College largest city. s t u d e n t s . Amy Clinton ('11), The entire city shifted m o r e Derek Brinks ( 4 12) a n d Emily t h a n ten feet t o t h e west as a Stolz ('12) are studying in Chile result of t h e massive quake. In this s e m e s t e r t h r o u g h Hope's addition, t s u n a m i s caused by t h e department of international q u a k e inflicted f u r t h e r d a m a g e education. Brinks and C l i n t o n w e r e and devastated t h e coastline. Hope junior Amy Clinton in Chile w h e n t h e e a r t h q u a k e c a m e t o Santiago, Chile, to s t r u c k ; Stolz w a s o n her flight study i n t e r n a t i o n a l relations and to Chile. U p o n h e a r i n g a b o u t Spanish. W h e n asked why she t h e disaster, Stolz's plane t u r n e d picked this particular location a r o u n d and r e t u r n e d to t h e for study U.S. Stolz is, abroad, h o w e v e r , she said, currently The house was shaking "I chose in Chile, so badly I thought it was C h i l e a n d s h e has going to collapse on us. b e c a u s e it experienced — A M Y C L I N T O N hassuchan s o m e of t h e 11 interesting numerous political aftershocks. and social background T h i and, even today, is g r o w i n g a n d an earthquake resulted in c h a n g i n g profoundly. (It is) a 8.8 reading o n t h e m o m e n t scale, which is c o u n t r y t h a t h a s historically magnitude been very p o o r but, in t h e last used t o assess t h e severity and twenty or thirty years, (has) m a g n i t u d e of e a r t h q u a k e s . O n l y m o d e r n i z e d a n d b e c o m e p a r t of six q u a k e s of larger m a g n i t u d e t h e 'first world.'" have b e e n r e c o r d e d , and t h e C l i n t o n w a s staying at her h o s t largest q u a k e also o c c u r r e d in family's w h e n t h e e a r t h q u a k e Chile; this quake, w h i c h struck in 1960, had a m a g n i t u d e of 9.5. struck. Chris Russ

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The eagerly awaited Chapel C D was released this week. It is entitled "Here is Mercy." The C D is comprised of many of the chapel band favorites including "Here is Mercy," " C o m e Ye Sinners," and " K w a k e Yesu." CDs can be purchased at the Keppel House or the bookstore for $12 or two for $20.

RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE The Alpha Phi O m e g a service fraternity is sponsoring a Red Cross Blood Drive Thursday, March 18, from 12-5:45 p.m. in Maas Auditorium. Walk-ins are welcome.

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Model UN participants seek answers to global problems

CASA EASTER BASKETS Volunteer Services is providing Easter baskets for C A S A students.Students are encouraged to pick up a basket and fill it for a C A S A students. Baskets are available from March 15-18 from the S U D or Campus Ministries and need to be returned by March 30 at the SUD or C a m p u s M i n istries.

aftershock yesterday morning." "I woke u p a r o u n d 3:35 Classes w e r e n o t t h e only t h e night of t h e e a r t h q u a k e completely terrified," C l i n t o n p a r t of C l i n t o n s educational experience that changed. The said. "The h o u s e was shaking so badly I t h o u g h t it w a s going emotional atmosphere of to collapse o n us. Glass was shattering and t h e noise of things falling was unbelievable. I ran t o t h e kitchen I could see lights blowing w h e r e my host m o m and I out, and it made the sky over rode out the three-minute the hill look like a light show long e a r t h q u a k e u n d e r t h e at a concert d o o r f r a m e . Five m i n u t e s DEREK BRINKS after the earthquake '12 s t o p p e d , waves w e r e still splashing out of o u r pool." She stated that while t h e q u a k e caused s o m e d a m a g e to t h e h o u s e s h e was Clinton's c a m p u s e s was also staying in, it was not extensive. In contrast, o t h e r buildings in affected. "I k n o w a few p e o p l e w h o s e Santiago, as well as s o m e roads, family m e m b e r s live in Talca were m o r e severely d a m a g e d . or C o n c e p c i o n and died in the The e a r t h q u a k e h a s also q u a k e there," said Clinton. resulted in c h a n g e s t o h e r Roughly 130 kilometers e d u c a t i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e in t h e away to t h e west, in Valparaiso, country. s o p h o m o r e Derek Brinks is "In my p r o g r a m we c a n studying Spanish and issues of take classes at b o t h Pontificia cultural identity, social justice Universidad Catolica de Chile and t h e Universidad d e Chile," and c o m m u n i t y d e v e l o p m e n t . Asked a b o u t his choice of Chile Clinton said. "La Chile sustained as a study-abroad destination. s o m e p r e t t y bad damages, and Brinks said, "I decided to study s o m e classes aren't going to start in Chile because I love Latin until April. America, a n d t h e history of La Catolica started last Monday, but classes were S E E CHILE, PAGE 1 0 canceled a f t e r t h e 7.2 m a g n i t u d e

• JUMP, f r o m page 1 T h e faculty advisors of t h e p r o g r a m , Dr. Virginia Beard and Dr. Jack H o l m e s , each teach a class in which H o p e s t u d e n t s f u n c t i o n as p r e s i d e r s and a r e responsible for r u n n i n g t h e conference. O n e of t h e secretary-generals Alison Benoit ('10) said, "All of t h e s t u d e n t s involved gain e x p e r i e n c e in helping plan events, teaching o t h e r s , and gaining leadership experience." S t u d e n t s in t h e class learn as m u c h a b o u t t h e issues their g r o u p s will be dealing with as they can. S o m e s t u d e n t s in higher leadership positions have even been w o r k i n g on organizing

this year's p r o g r a m since last year's c o n f e r e n c e ended. Benoit, who has been w o r k i n g o n this conference for the past year, said, "The other secretary-general Stephanie Bogema ('10) and I started p l a n n i n g for the conference beginning in July and worked t h r o u g h o u t t h e year. "We both gained extensive experience in event planning and, more generally, leadership skills, as we were responsible for

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over 700 s t u d e n t s d u r i n g t h e t w o days, as well as preparing the college s t u d e n t s for their role in t h e conference. T h r o u g h o u t t h e year we coordinated with o n - c a m p u s offices, high schools and speakers f r o m t h e c o m m u n i t y to p u t t h e c o n f e r e n c e together." Amy Alvine ('12), P u r c h a s e of a w h o served as a Security S 5 M e a l Xteal Council director and w h o has also been working o n That's 2 preparing the program Hot D o g s since last year, said of this year's success: A n y Style, "The directors, Chips, & a | secretary-generals and Dr. Beard had worked PHOTO BY HOPE P R tirelessly in p r e p a r a t i o n R A I S E Y O U R V O I C E - M o r e t h a n 7 0 0 s t u d e n t s f r o m 2 5 M i c h i g a n high for this c o n f e r e n c e since schools t o o k part In Hope's M o d e l UN M a r c h 1 1 - 1 2 . Hope s t u d e n t s were t h e end of last year's Coupon Required able t o e n g a g e w i t h t h e s t u d e n t s in s e m i n a r s t h r o u g h o u t t h e event. conference. In t h e end, it

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was nice to see h o w all of o u r hard work had paid off." Zeldenrust ('11) also said: "Overall, this year w a s a n o t h e r success t h a n k s to good leaders and d e d i c a t e d students. My personal success is k n o w i n g 1 a m a better leader after w o r k i n g as a director. "I was n e r v o u s about taking o n t h e role, but n o w I would actually r e c o m m e n d that people d o it." Those interested in being involved in next year's conference can contact Beard or H o l m e s or sign u p for o n e of the spring s e m e s t e r m o d e l U N classes.


NATIONAL Reconciliation vote on health care reform nears THE ANCHOR

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

Meghan McNamee GUEST WRITER

F r o m t h e early days of P r e s i d e n t O b a m a ' s t e r m in office, the A m e r i c a n p e o p l e have h e a r d the p r o m i s e s of health c a r e r e f o r m . The t o w n hall m e e t i n g s m a d e t h e n ews , a n d b o t h Republicans a n d D e m o c r a t s have b e e n a c c u s e d of misleading t h e A m e r i c a n people. Health care r e f o r m s e e m s impossible, as it has for decades, but t h i s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is looking to e n d that. Last week, O b a m a called for an e n d t o filibuster d e b a t e s . H e told r e p o r t e r s , including "ABC News," "My q u e s t i o n to t h e m i s , ' W h e n ' s t h e right time? If not now, w h e n ? If not us, who? Is it a year f r o m n o w or t w o years f r o m now, five years f r o m n o w o r 10 years f r o m now?' I t h i n k it's right now." Currently, the h e a l t h c a r e r e f o r m bill d e p e n d s o n a twostep legislative vote. The H o u s e m u s t a p p r o v e the Senate's bill and both chambers must vote on a f o l l o w - u p bill. Unlike t h e Senate's bill, t h e followu p bill has not b e e n released publically, b u t t h e i n t e n t i o n is to satisfy the House's d e m a n d s . The bill is close to passing, b u t n o o n e is s u r e if the D e m o c r a t s have t h e votes to p u s h it t h r o u g h legislation. The D e m o c r a t s are w o r k i n g on a

tricky a n d controversial tactic called reconciliation to try to pass t h e bill. Reconciliation is a parliamentary procedure that allows a bill to be c o n s i d e r e d w i t h o u t giving any o p p o r t u n i t y to filibuster. Filibusters are not allowed b e c a u s e p r i o r to reconciliation, members of t h e H o u s e o r Senate Budget Committees adjust certain a s p e c t s of t h e bill so t h a t they are in line w i t h t h e previously agreed u p o n b u d g e t . These adjustments can include eliminating spending or increasing revenues that would be affected by t h e bill. The procedure is usually reserved for bills related to finance o r b u d g e t m e a s u r e s . If reconciliation is u s e d to pass a bill t h a t e n d s u p a d d i n g to t h e national debt, t h e bill c a n n o t be r e n e w e d in 10 years. The last t i m e reconciliation w a s used was d u r i n g P r e s i d e n t George W. Bush's tenure in office. Congress used reconciliation to pass t h r e e r o u n d s of tax cuts. However, these tax c u t s w e r e limited to e n d after 10 years b e c a u s e of t h e i r significant increases to t h e national d e b t . The C l i n t o n A d m i n i s t r a t i o n dealt with reconciliation as well. Specifically, C o n g r e s s used reconciliation to pass two tax relief m e a s u r e s . Clinton

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convince their m e m b e r s , within M a r c h 21 d e a d l i n e w h e n the later v e t o e d these m e a s u r e s . eight m o n t h s of an election, to p r e s i d e n t is set to travel to W i t h t h e bill close to passing, ignore their c o n s t i t u e n t s a n d Indonesia and Australia. H e O b a m a a n d his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n d o s o m e t h i n g that the public is has already p u s h e d back his t r i p have t u r n e d their f o c u s to o p p o s e d to." to try to help the D e m o c r a t s health i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s , What has been made in their final p u s h for t h e bill. cracking d o w n o n cost control. The speaker of the House, Rep. a b u n d a n t l y clear in t h e r e c e n t "ABC N e w s " r e p o r t e d that days is that the D e m o c r a t s N a n c y Pelosi, D-Calif., p r e d i c t s o n e i n s u r a n c e b r o k e r h a d said will not simply pass the Senate approval in 10 days. t h a t raising rates a n d losing bill as it is, not w i t h o u t s o m e The Republicans will not c u s t o m e r s was b e t t e r for t h e r e a s s u r a n c e s that t h e b u d g e t go d o w n w i t h o u t a fight. insurance companies than reconciliation bill will be A c c o r d i n g to The N e w York e x p a n d i n g their business by passed. Republicans, however, Times, M i n o r i t y Leader Sen. lowering rates a n d gaining n e w M i t c h M c C o n n e l l , R-Ky., said, are h u n k e r e d d o w n for t h e c u s t u m e r s , p r e s u m a b l y d u e to debate. "The r e a s o n all of this a r m t h e cost of serving m o r e p e o p l e All good i n t e n t i o n s aside, twisting a n d d e a l - m a k i n g a n d with less profit. it doesn't s e e m likely t h e two parliamentary maneuvering O b a m a s u m m e d u p his sides will agree in t i m e for the is going o n is t h a t p e o p l e h a t e a r g u m e n t to r e p o r t e r s , q u o t e d president's t r i p o n M a r c h 21. this bill. They are trying to by The N e w York Times, " H o w m a n y p e o p l e w o u l d like a proposal t h a t h o l d s i n s u r a n c e companies more accountable? How many people w o u l d like to give A m e r i c a n s t h e s a m e i n s u r a n c e choices that m e m b e r s of C o n g r e s s get? A n d h o w m a n y would like a proposal t h a t brings d o w n costs for everyone? That's our proposal." The p r e s i d e n t w a n t s to e n s u r e t h a t t h e people w h o d o not have coverage, an e s t i m a t e d 3 0 million, would have m o r e i n s u r a n c e policy choices, p e r h a p s s o m e they c a n afford. It is t h e last p u s h for the P H O T O COURTESY THE A S S O C I A T E D P R E S S h e a l t h c a r e r e f o r m bill t h a t has D E F E N D I N G REFORIVI President Obama visited Strongsb e e n in t h e h a n d s of C o n g r e s s vllie, Ohio on Monday t o argue t h e merits of health care reform for nearly a year now. H o u s e D e m o c r a t s are a i m i n g for a as t h e final vote draws near.

Education, financial reform added to legislative agenda Eric Anderson C O - N A T I O N A L N E W S EDITOR

Last week brought a brief diversion f r o m the usual talking points, as Democratic leaders began to pursue n e w issues. The health care reform p u s h is as strong as ever, but President O b a m a and Sen. Chris D o d d , D-Conn., are beginning to eye reform in different areas. On Saturday, Obama a n n o u n c e d his administration's -plans for an education overhaul, looking to r e f o r m President George W. Bush's N o Child Left Behind policy. D o d d is also looking for a significant reform on how the g o v e r n m e n t regulates banks. Amidst continuous complaints over the state of the

nation's public school system, Obama's blueprint for education reform looks to make significant changes. The biggest of these changes will be in the focus and ultimate goals of the education system and a shift away f r o m the N o Child Left Behind policy. For example, the N o Child Left Behind policy placed a great deal of emphasis on test scores, using t h e m to judge the success of schools. Obama's policy would incorporate factors such as test scores, attendance and graduation rates in the j u d g m e n t of schools. Obama's new education legislation would also strike N o Child Left Behind's r e q u i r e m e n t s for students' reading and writing abilities. Instead, Obama's plan would establish an ultimate goal

Under President Obama's Education Plan - Schools would be judged on, a m o n g o t h e r things, students' test scores, att e n d a n c e and graduation rates. - States would develop new m e t h o d s of evaluating teachers. - Schools would be rewarded for reaching goals and making progress towards t h o s e goals. - Very few schools would be penalized. - Students would be judged on w h e t h er they g r a d u a t e high school p r e p a r e d for college o r a career.

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that every student graduates high school prepared for college or a career. O n e big difference between the plans is the t r e a t m e n t of failing schools. Under NCLB, schools that received a failing grade would o f t e n go to u n f o r t u n a t e m e a s u r e s to improve their status. These measures included teaching to t h e test a n d states lowering their education standards to include m o r e schools. To fight these counterproductive measures, Obama's n e w plan would reward progress instead of punishing failure. There would be penalties, but a majority of schools would be given assistance to improve a n d rewarded if they d o so. O n e aspect of reform that

Under Sen. Dodd's Financial Reform

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- Public c o m p a n i e s would face m o r e supervision f r o m t h e g o v e r n m e n t . - The C o n s u m e r P r o t e c t i o n Agency would be created, working to prevent b a n k s f r o m taking advantage of consumers. - A council would be selected to play a m o r e active role in detecting and preventing systemic risks to the economy. - Shareholders would influence executive pay and the m a k e - u p of a c o m p a ny's b o a r d of directors.

Obama's blueprint touches o n briefly is t h e process for evaluating teachers. The n e w legislation would call for states to develop new m e t h o d s of assessing teachers focusing on if students are learning instead of if a teacher is properly certified. While the specifics are yet to be released, these new b e n c h m a r k s for teachers could be one of the m o r e controversial points of reform. Currently, a national debate over w h e t h e r t e n u r e has contributed to the nation's declining education system is raging. Of the opponents of tenure, the chancellor of t h e District of Columbia Public School system, Michelle Rhee, is the most vocal. Rhee argues that granting tenure to teachers contributes n o t h i n g to the success of students. If anything, Rhee argues, tenure makes it m o r e difficult to fire ineffective teachers. Rhee, w h o took over o n e of the worst public school systems in the nation two years ago, has p r o p o s e d giving teachers higher salaries but judging t h e m on their merits and removing tenure. Her I d e a s are being met with opposition f r o m teachers' unions w h o have recently struggled to defend the tenure system W h e n it c o m e s to financial reform, Dodd is treading in familiar water. He is the chair of the Senate Banking Committee, and he introduced

similar legislation last summer. This overhaul of the nation's financial regulations would give m o r e power to shareholders. Shareholders can influence executives' salaries and n o m i n a t i o n s for companies' boards of directors would accomplish this. It would also allow the government to have m o r e control over mortgages, credit cards a n d loans distributed by banks. The responsibility for this supervision would lie with the newly created C o n s u m e r Protection Agency. O n e consequence of this r e f o r m would be a altered role for Federal Reserve. The Fed would lose control of t h o u s a n d s of smaller banks. However, they would gain oversight over many more larger banks and financial institutions. The newly created C o n s u m e r Protection Agency would also operate under their supervision. Education and financial reform are both on Obama's agenda. Helping these measures b e c o m e bills would improve Obama's resume w h e n he r u n s for re-election in 2012. However, both of these bills are already being met with Republican opposition. Perhaps prepared for this reaction, D o d d was quick to incorporate a n u m b e r of Republican suggestions into what is looking like the final draft of the bill.


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THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK IN QUOTES

Vice president visits Israel, discusses peace with Palestine arrival. Obviously placed in a difficult STAFF W R I T E R situation, Biden arrived to a state d i n n e r 90 m i n u t e s late as a sign Vice President Joe Biden of displeasure at this decision visited Israel last week to a t t e m p t t h a t will surely stall any p e a c e to revive t h e p e a c e process talks b e f o r e they begin. b e t w e e n that nation and t h e The difficulty of Biden's Palestinian people. A l t h o u g h t h e position lies in t h e fact that t h e U.S. has historically m e d i a t e d United States h a s always this peace process, in been a s t r o n g s u p p o r t e r of r e c e n t years t h e drive for Israel, and p a r t of Biden's peace h a s stalled. j o u r n e y was to reinforce As well as a t t e m p t i n g t h a t relationship. In a to p r o m o t e peace in speech, he criticized this this region, Biden's visit building decision, but served as a p l a t f o r m for he also stated that the t h e U n i t e d States t o b o t h United States had "no repeat its c o m m i t m e n t t o better friend t h a n Israel." a s t r o n g relationship with Biden also said t h a t Israel and to discuss t h e this relationship was t h r e a t of a nuclear Iran. "impervious to any The peace talks will shifts in either c o u n t r y revolve a r o u n d t h e issue and in either country's of a Palestinian state. partisan politics." D u r i n g Currently, t h e Palestinian his speech, Biden P H O T O COURTESY THE A S S O C I A T E D P R E S S people, through e m p h a s i z e d this P E A C E T A L K S — Vice President Joe Biden shakes hands w i t h Israeli Prime t h e g o v e r n m e n t s of relationship by stating M i n i s t e r B i n y a m i n Netanyahu d u r i n g a five-day t o u r t h r o u g h t h e m i d d l e Hamas and Fatah, that Israel will n o t east. legally c o n t r o l c e r t a i n stand alone in t h e face s e c t i o n s of t h e state of a nuclear Iran if it develops insisted o n Jerusalem r e m a i n i n g that Israel h a s p r o p o s e d . of Israel: namely, t h e G a z a Strip nuclear w e a p o n s . t h e undivided capital of t h e Israel h a s also b e e n reluctant and t h e W e s t Bank. T h e Palestinian A u t h o r i t y to negotiate peace, as the. Jewish state." These r e q u i r e m e n t s A m a j o r issue t h a t t h e g o v e r n m e n t said that it would for peace will b e h a r d for t h e c o u n t r y feels t h r e a t e n e d by Palestinians have is that Israel, be difficult t o e n t e r into any Palestinian p e o p l e a n d o t h e r t h e n a t i o n s s u r r o u n d i n g it, b e c a u s e of its greater military negotiations if t h e plans w e r e M i d d l e E a s t e r n Islamic c o u n t r i e s including t h e Palestinian people. a n d i n t e r n a t i o n a l power, builds not w i t h d r a w n . Saeb Erekat, t h e to accept. A n article in t h e Jerusalem s e t t l e m e n t s in w h i c h Israelis head Palestinian negotiator, said A l t h o u g h b e f o r e Biden's visit Post w r i t t e n by Efraim Inbar, can live within t h e t e r r i t o r y peace w a s c o n s i d e r e d feasible in regard to t h e building plans: however, suggests t h a t Israeli of t h e Palestinians. A c c o r d i n g "The s t a t e m e n t is unacceptable by both Israeli and Palestinian Prime Minister Binyamin to t h e BBC, "Close to 500,000 b e c a u s e it talks a b o u t an authorities, the Israeli N e t a n y a h u " w a n t s p e a c e and is Jews live in m o r e t h a n 100 e r r o r in timing and not t h e g o v e r n m e n t a n n o u n c e d a plan interested in n e g o t i a t i o n s with s e t t l e m e n t s built since Israel's e r r o r in substance, w h i c h is a to create 1,600 n e w h o m e s in a t h e Palestinians." 1967 o c c u p a t i o n of t h e W e s t c o n t i n u a t i o n of s e t t l e m e n t s t h a t new m a j o r s e t t l e m e n t at R a m a t Inbar c o n t i n u e s that a l t h o u g h Bank and East Jerusalem. They S h l o m o shortly after Biden's m u s t stop." are illegal u n d e r international - N e t a n y a h u w a n t s peace, p e r h a p s Glen Shubert

"Tiger W o o d s is reportedly ready to return to golf, possibly in t w o weeks in O r l a n d o . According to The N e w York Post, Tiger's hired f o r m e r President Bush's press secretary, Ari Fleischer, to help with his PR c a m paign. Is that the guy you want in charge of your approval rating? I'd hire Clinton's guy. That's the o n e with s o m e experience in that particular area." - Jimmy Kimmel on "Jimmy Kimm e l Liv6."

"It w a s like holding the Holy Grail." - V i n c e n t Z u r z o l o of M e t r o p o l i s C o l l e c t i v e s , w h i c h c o n d u c t e d a $1 m i l l i o n a u c t i o n of A c t i o n C o m i c s N o . 1. f e a t u r i n g t h e first a p p e a r a n c e of S u p e r m a n . #

"If this s e t t l e m e n t allows m e to move on in m y life, if it allows m e to protect my family's future, I guess I don't have anything else to fight about." - K e n n y S p e c h t , a r e t i r e d fireman with thyroid cancer and a plaintiff a g a i n s t N e w York City, d i s c u s s i n g an a g r e e m e n t r e a c h e d with rescue and cleanup workers w h o w e r e at g r o u n d z e r o a f t e r Sept. 11,2001.

" W e had a lot of calls, a lot of interest, a n d w e sold s o m e tickets. It w a s interesting." - Scott Wellington, Arnold Palmer Invitational director, on r e p o r t s t h a t Tiger W o o d s is set for a r e t u r n t o golf at Bay Hill f o r t h e t o u r n a m e n t o n M a r c h 25.

"I've seen bits of it since, and I stare blankly at t h e m . I don't r e m e m b e r any of it. At least that's my excuse for all t h e people w h o t h o u g h t it * * * »» was s . - A c t o r C o l i n Farrell o n " M i a m i Vice," a film he m a d e d u r i n g his d r i n k a n d d r u g days.

"We're a p o p band f r o m the N o r t h Pole." - Benny Andersson, co-founder of ABBA, e x p l a i n i n g w h y h e n e v e r expected the Swedish pop group t o b e i n d u c t e d i n t o t h e Rock a n d Roll Hall of F a m e .

"The s n o w s t o r m s couldn't keep c o n s u m e r s away f r o m the cash registers, and neither could the c o n s t r a i n t s i m p o s e d by tightening credit card t e r m s and near d o u b l e digit u n e m p l o y m e n t . " - C h r i s t o p h e r Rupkey, a n e c o n o m i s t at Bank of T o k y o - M i t s u b i s h i in N e w York City, d i s c u s s i n g t h e j u m p in F e b r u a r y retail sales in t h e U.S.

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

law, although Israel disputes this." This r e m a i n s a c o m p l a i n t of t h e Palestinian people, and the current Prime Minister M a h m o u d Abbas has r e f u s e d to negotiate any sort of peace process for 17 m o n t h s b e c a u s e of a n e w series of s e t t l e m e n t s

t h r o u g h a t w o - s t a t e solution, t h e r e are stipulations: "His insistence o n a demilitarized state reflects ingrained Israeli fears of d a n g e r o u s neighbors. N e t a n y a h u also d e m a n d e d the long o v e r d u e recognition of Israel as t h e Jewish nation-state. In line with Israeli c o n s e n s u s , he

Candidates emerge for 2010 Michigan gubernatorial race Eric Anderson CO-NATIONAL N E W S EDITOR

W i t h Gov. Jennifer G r a n h o l m p r o h i b i t e d f r o m seeking a t h i r d t e r m in office, t h e state of M i c h i g a n is g e a r i n g u p for a c o m p e t i t i v e g u b e r n a t o r i a l race. With candidates from both p a r t i e s l o o k i n g t o establish t h e m s e l v e s as t h e f r o n t - r u n n e r , t h e political j o c k e y i n g has b e g u n earlier t h a n usual. The Democratic side features a promising group of c a n d i d a t e s . However, t h e y c o u l d struggle t o d i s t a n c e themselves f r o m Granholm's poor performance concerning Michigan's e c o n o m y . It is n o s e c r e t t h a t t h e state of M i c h i g a n has come upon hard times, and how m u c h voters associate t h o s e s t r u g g l e s with G r a n h o l m and fellow D e m o c r a t s is yet t o be seen. O n e possible i n d i c a t o r of this c a m e w h e n Lt. Gov. John C h e r r y w i t h d r e w his n a m e from consideration. Cherry was widely c o n s i d e r e d t h e Democratic front-runner, l e a d i n g in m a n y polls t a k e n b e f o r e h e w i t h d r e w . However, Cherry was reportedly performing poorly in his f u n d r a i s i n g efforts. A lack of funds coupled with voter d i s a p p o i n t m e n t over Michigan's struggling economy may have b e e n f a c t o r s in C h e r r y ' s

decision. WithCherryoutofthepicture, t h e D e m o c r a t i c field is w i d e open. Among the announced c a n d i d a t e s are Virg B e r n e r o , t h e m a y o r of Lansing; A n d y Dillon, s p e a k e r of t h e M i c h i g a n H o u s e of R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s ; and A l m a W h e e l e r Smith, m e m b e r of t h e M i c h i g a n H o u s e of Representatives. Bernero has enjoyed a successful stint as t h e m a y o r of Lansing. D u r i n g his t e n u r e , B e r n e r o b r o u g h t in over $500 million in n e w i n v e s t m e n t s . H e also h e l p e d l a u n c h t h e L a n s i n g E c o n o m i c Area P a r t n e r s h i p , an economic development initiative. Dillon p r a c t i c e d law b e f o r e e n t e r i n g politics, w h e n h e w a s e l e c t e d t o t h e State H o u s e of R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s in 2004. A f t e r being r e - e l e c t e d in 2006, Dillon w a s n a m e d s p e a k e r of t h e House. A l m a W h e e l e r Smith h a s a lo n g h i s t o r y in Michigan's local and s t a t e politics. She s e r v e d in m a n y roles f r o m s c h o o l b o a r d p r e s i d e n t to s t a t e senator, r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e city of A n n Arbor. She h a s also h a d a p r o d u c t i v e c a r e e r in Michigan's H o u s e of R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . The field of R e p u b l i c a n c a n d i d a t e s is just a s p r o m i s i n g . T h e battle for R e p u b l i c a n s to d i s t i n g u i s h t h e m s e l v e s is fierce. This is u n d e r s t a n d a b l e .

as a n u m b e r of polls have given R e p u b l i c a n s slight edges. W h o e v e r comes out on top of t h e g r o u p of R e p u b l i c a n c o n t e n d e r s will be a f o r c e t o r e c k o n with c o m e A u g u s t . Of the announced Republican candidates, four s e e m t o be g e n e r a t i n g t h e most attention. Those people are Mike B o u c h a r d , O a k l a n d C o u n t y sheriff; M i k e C o x , M i c h i g a n a t t o r n e y general; Rep. Pete H o e k s t r a , R-Mich., a H o p e College a l u m n u s ; and Rick Snyder, f o r m e r b u s i n e s s m a n . As O a k l a n d C o u n t y Sheriff, B o u c h a r d led o n e of t h e nation's largest sheriff d e p a r t m e n t s . His last foray into politics w a s an u n s u c c e s s f u l bid for t h e U.S. S e n a t e in 2006, w h e n he lost to t h e i n c u m b e n t . Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D - M i c h . H e h a s a n n o u n c e d t h a t his l i e u t e n a n t g o v e r n o r will be Michigan's f o r m e r s e c r e t a r y of state, Terri Lynn Land. Like G r a n h o l m b e f o r e h i m . C o x is l o o k i n g to m a k e t h e leap f r o m b e i n g Michigan's attorney general to being Michigan's governor. Cox w a s t h e first R e p u b l i c a n to serve as Michigan's a t t o r n e y general in 48 years. His c a m p a i g n p l a t f o r m includes a list of 92 p r o p o s a l s t o fix Michigan's e c o n o m i c problems. W h e n Hoekstra announced in D e c e m b e r of 2008 t h a t . he

w o u l d n o t seek re-election t o t h e c o n g r e s s i o n a l seat he held since 1992, m a n y s p e c u l a t e d it w a s t o r u n for governor. H o e k s t r a h a s since c o n f i r m e d this speculation and has b e c o m e a leading R e p u b l i c a n c a n d i d a t e , g a r n e r i n g s o m e of t h e h i g h e s t levels of s u p p o r t among Republican candidates. Rick Snyder can b e d e s c r i b e d as t h e "sleeper" Republican c a n d i d a t e . Currently, R a s m u s s e n R e p o r t s d o n o t s h o w Snyder receiving an a m o u n t of s u p p o r t c o m p a r a b l e t o t h a t of t h e t h r e e o t h e r m a j o r Republican c a n d i d a t e s . However, Snyder is g a i n i n g m o m e n t u m , h e l p e d in large p a r t by his p u r c h a s i n g of ad t i m e d u r i n g t h e S u p e r Bowl. Snyder, t h e f o r m e r C E O a n d c h a i r m a n of G a t e w a y Inc., h a s d e s c r i b e d himself as "one t o u g h nerd." H e b r i n g s m u c h b u s i n e s s e x p e r i e n c e with h i m . Each c a n d i d a t e is p r i m e d t o m a k e a r u n , a n d with a b o u t five m o n t h s b e f o r e t h e election, t h e r a c e will b e c o m e considerably more heated. There have already b e e n c o m p l a i n t s f r o m Republican c a m p s a b o u t a t t a c k ads f r o m o t h e r R e p u b l i c a n candidates. However, c o n s i d e r i n g what is at stake w i t h Michigan's 2010 g u b e r n a t o r i a l election, we can e x p e c t t o see m u c h m o r e aggressive political maneuvering.


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THE ANCHOR

5

Thriller 'Shutter Island' marks Martin Scorsese's 21st picture Elena Rivera STAFF W R I T E R

With six Oscar directing nominations, Martin Scorsese is a m o n g the most Oscarnominated directors in Hollywood. Not only is he k n o w n for his old classics such as "Raging Bull" and "Goodfellas," he has also garnered n u m e r o u s accolades in the last decade f r o m producing movies such as "Gangs of N e w York" and "The Departed," for which he w o n an Oscar. "Shutter Island" is Scorsese's 21st m o t i o n picture and his fourth collaboration with actor Leonardo DiCaprio. Set in the 1950s,. "Shutter Island" is the quintessential psychological thriller. It's also a n o d to the film noir classics, evoking m e m o r i e s of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and "Rear Window." The story begins with Teddy Daniels (played by Leonardo DiCaprio), a Boston U.S. marshal, sailing to Shutter Island, a r e m o t e island that previously served as a military base and now houses the criminally insane. O n the

way there, Daniels is introduced to Chuck Aule (played by M a r k Ruffalo), his new partner. Daniels a n d Aule's objective when they arrive at Shutter Island is to aid in the search for a missing inmate, Rachel Solando (played by Emily Mortimer). From t h e opening misty scenes on the small sailboat, Scorsese sets the t o n e for the rest of the movie. The scenery is gray, lacking color, but the shadows still seem vibrant a n d alive. The score, written by Robbie Robertson, keeps the viewer feeling uneasy with violins a n d dissonant piano chords that bring the asylum to life, even before Daniels and Aule have a chance to discover its unsettling secrets. DiCaprio, RufFalo and M o r t i m e r are s u p p o r t e d by o t h e r f a m o u s actors k n o w n for dramatic roles, including Ben Kinglsey as Shutter Island's head psychiatrist Dr. John Cawley, Michelle Williams as Teddy's wife Dolores a n d Jackie Earl Haley as George Noyce. Kingsley's acting is especially noteworthy for the raw

e m o t i o n s he conveys in the brief m o n o l o g u e s he gives. Kingsley's eyes implore the viewer to see him as a trustworthy source, but there is a hidden malice behind his kind gazes. Kinglsey plays Crawley expertly, presenting h i m as Daniels and Aule's most trusted ally or their most d a n g e r o u s foe. DiCaprio, grown up f r o m his "Titanic" days, portrays Daniels as a relatable but suspicious protagonist. It is made apparent to the audience that Daniels is no ordinary U.S. marshal, but rather s o m e o n e harboring dark, hidden motives. As the movie progresses, Daniels' backstory is revealed t h r o u g h flashbacks that illustrate key m o m e n t s in his past. As s h o w n in the flashbacks, Daniels' life is m a r r e d by a tragic a p a r t m e n t fire, a large reason for his interest in Shutter Island. A n o t h e r defining m o m e n t in Daniels' life is his participation in liberating World W a r II concentration c a m p s . Teddy's

paranoid suspicions of all those a r o u n d him, as well as his violent nature, make him a m o r e volatile and complex character than first perceived. Aule s u p p o r t s his p a r t n e r in his search for Solando, and as Shutter Island

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b e c o m e s a menacing landscape, they band together to uncover the secrets hidden all over the island. Aule's backstory is not

as widely explored as Daniels', but their relationship is essential and drives the plot forward. With a r u n n i n g time of two h o u r s and 18 minutes, "Shutter Island" may move a little slower than big s u m m e r blockbusters, but the emotional payoff is warranted. Scorsese, channeling Hitchcock, the master of psychological thrillers, creates a truly unique look at one man's attempt to overcome i n s u r m o u n t a b l e personal loss and the price he ultimately pays to succeed in that quest. Scorsese leaves the movie's ending ambiguous, inviting the audience to interpret it as they see fit. Some may find this approach, as well as the movie's final twist, intensely frustrating, while others may see it as refreshing. Although "Shutter Island" may be polarizing, Scorsese deserves praise for expecting and d e m a n d i n g more of his audience. With "Shutter Island," he has convincingly created a complex, mainstream masterpiece.

'Hurt Locker' wins big as Oscars celebrate 10 best picture selections Annelise Belmonte

tacija SIIUI W. MHSSU

A R T S EDFTOR

After three long h o u r s of watching stars a n d studs parade on ABC's presentation of the Oscars, my brain felt overloaded with brand name dresses a n d clips from the best picture n o m inees. This year, the Academy decided to expand t h e best picture category to a c c o m m o d a t e 10 nominations, most likely to give m o r e films a chance to put "nominated for best picture" on their DVD boxes. For those of you w h o missed it, I'll recap the n o m i n a t i o n s a n d wins overall for the best pictures of this year. "Hurt Locker" was the night's big winner with nine nominations a n d six wins. These are t h e four best film nominees that walked away with zero wins and the n o m i n a t i o n s they received: Up in t h e Air"

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"The H u r t Locker'

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It had nine nominations and six wins for best directing, best editing, best achievement in sound, best achievement in sound editing, best screenplay a n d best picture. Kathryn Bigelow is also the first female to win best director for an Oscar, making another historical landmark for the night. Since Bigelow is also the ex-wife of James C a m e r o n (director of "Avatar"), the win was probably even sweeter.

It had five n o m i n a t i o n s and two wins for best animated feature film and best original score. It was only the second animated film to be nominated for best picture, the first being "Beauty a n d the Beast." It is, however, the first animated film to be nominated since best animated film b e c a m e its own category in 2001.

'Inglorious Basterds'

'Avatar'

It had eight n o m i n a t i o n s and o n e win for best supporting actor for Christoph Waltz's portrayal of Col. Hans Landa, a c u n n i n g Nazi officer d u b b e d "The Jew Hunter." For Q u e n t i n Tarantino, this was his second Oscar nomination for both screenplay and directing. The last Oscar he won was for best director of his hit "Pulp Fiction."

It had nine nominations a n d three technical wins for best art direction, best cinematography a n d best visual effects. It was not, however, u p for a best screenplay nomination. The last film to win best picture without that nomination was coincidentally James Cameron's own mega-hit "Titanic" in 1997. I echo the sentiment that "Avatar" received all the nominations it deserved. The visual ones.

'Blind Side'

' P r e c i o u s ' : Based on the novel "Push" by Sapphire

It had two nominations and o n e win for best actress Sandra Bullock for her portrayal of the reallife w o m a n Leigh A n n e Touhey ,who took in an African-American homeless boy w h o went on to play football. This was Bullocks long-overdue Oscar. Despite her previous successes, she had never even been nominated for the award before this year. She dedicated most of her speech to parents everywhere and to her mother, w h o recently passed away.

It had six nominations and two wins for best adapted screenplay and best supporting actress. The historical significance would be that Geoffrey Fletcher was the first African-American to win an Oscar for screenwriting.


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MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

Alice as hero in Tim Burton's 'Alice in Wonderland' Lindsey Wolf A S S T . A R T S EDITOR

"Why is a raven like a writing desk?" While I can't answer the Mad Hatter's question, I can tell you what I thought about Tim Burton's latest film, "Alice in Wonderland." Director Tim Burton and Johnny Depp team up once again in this magical, wacky film. Burton's film, a twisted take on Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," uses Carroll's iconic characters and unique fantasy setting, yet the film has its own unique plot. While the film's storyline combines elements from "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," as well as from Carroll's "Through the Looking-Glass" and his poem "Jabberwocky," devoted fans of Lewis Carroll should be warned: the film is based loosely on Carroll's works of literature. Even though my fellow critic and I detested Anne Hathaway's dark eyebrows that sharply contrast her white dress, white hair and alabaster skin, I enjoyed Hathaway's performance of the kind and graceful White Queen. O n e of the most obnoxious characters in the film was the Red Queen, the White Queen's evil, narcissistic sister, played by the eccentric Helena Bonham Carter. The Red Queen's malevolent behavior,

dramatic makeup and bulbous head (a physical reflection of her enormous ego) contributed to her horrendous self. One of the most amusing characters was the Mad Hatter, colorfully played by Depp. I found the Mad Hatter very humorous. Depp's quirky character is one of Alice's friends. While explaining the difference between Alice as a teenager and Alice as a child, the Mad Hatter tells her, "You used to be much more ... muchier. You've lost your muchness." His quirkiness is evident in his speech as well as in his mannerisms. A Scottish accent is recognizable in some scenes of the film, and the Mad Hatter's corny dance at the end of the film is truly unforgettable. Entertaining? Yes. Necessary? No. While the marketing of the movie focused on Depp as the Mad Hatter, 1 thought Alices performance was wonderful and her story had an important message. Alice Kingsley, played by Mia Wasikowska, is an imaginative young w o m a n who refuses to conform to Victorian society. Independent Alice refuses to wear a corset to the party in the beginning of the film. After the son of one of her father's business partners asks for her hand in marriage, she flees from the party in pursuit of

the White Rabbit. Alice's journey reminded me of Joseph Campbell's hero archetype. The standard path of the mythological adventure of the hero follows three stages: separation, initiation and return. Even though Alice does not satisfy all the stages of the hero, her journey mimics Campbell's standard to some degree. According to Campbell's introduction to "The Hero with a Thousand Faces," "A hero ventures forth from the world of c o m m o n day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man." While fabulouscircumstances do not surround her conception or birth, Alice is called to adventure by a messenger, the White Rabbit. During her journey, she receives aid and direction from several helpers: the Cheshire Cat, the Dormouse and Tweedledee and Tweedledum. Alice crosses the threshold when she falls down a rabbit's hole and enters Wonderland once she unlocks a tiny door. Alice travels through a dream-like world and undergoes a series of tests through encounters with the Red Queen's

faithful legion, including the army of cards, a creature called the Bandersnatch and Stayne, the Knave of Hearts. Alice is accompanied on her journey by a helper who assists her and serves as a loyal companion. In the film, Alice's helper is the Mad Hatter who surrenders himself to the Red Queen's army in order to protect Alice. Alice's final battle occurs at the end of the film when she fights the Jabberwocky. After accomplishing her mission, Alice returns to the everyday world by crawling out of the rabbit's hole and returning to the party. The knowledge Alice acquires during her adventure is put to use in the everyday world. Alice refuses a marriage proposal and becomes an apprentice for her father's trading firm. Alice's adventure teaches her to make her own

way in the world and not to live life to please others. While I did not see the movie in 3- D, I was still visually stunned. The CGI animals, talking flowers and army of cards are just a few of the bizarre characters brought to life in this film. The fantasy world of Wonderland is at times as dark as it is beautiful, but nevertheless, it is spectacular and creative. This colorful film is worth seeing on the big screen and is now playing at local Holland theaters.

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Gorillaz — 4Plastic Beach'

GoriUaz w e r e an e x p e r i m e n t from their inception-a Britpop frontman a n d a comic b o o k artist g e t t i n g • t o g e t h e r to create real music for a fictional b a n d , an u n p r e c e d e n t e d s p r i n g b o a r d for n e w ideas.Yet they c o n s i d e r e d "Plastic Beach" so different from their previous albums that they almost didn't call it a Gorillaz album. Variety is the key. More than e v e r b e f o r e , they are a melting pot of different g e n r e s a n d textures, f e a t u r i n g different g u e s t artists on almost e v e r y track a n d p r e s e n t i n g a c o m p l e t e l y u n i q u e instrumental palette for almost e v e r y song. This a l b u m is an e x c e p t i o n a l display of m i n d - b o g g l i n g l y creative p r o d u c tion a n d textures p r o p e l l e d by Dam o n Albarn's p o p s e n s e a n d g u e s t r a p p e r s ' different styles. But t h e diversity is also the albums b i g g e s t w e a k n e s s - many of the guest spots f e e l forced, not a d d i n g anything but a g e n e r a l lack of c o h e s i o n b e t w e e n t h e album's tracks. - P R

F r i g h t e n e d Rabbit — l T h e Winter Of M i x e d D r i n k s 1

Scottish i n d i e rock quintet Frighte n e d Rabbit have g a i n e d a m e m b e r with e a c h a l b u m they've r e l e a s e d , a n d their third a l b u m reflects this by b e i n g their l o u d e s t a n d most b o m b a s t i c r e l e a s e to date. Their last a l b u m w a s a b r e a k u p a l b u m that d e m o n s t r a t e d their firm g r a s p on the thin line b e t w e e n intimate, confessional s o n g w r i t i n g a n d adol e s c e n t whining, but "The Winter Of Mixed Drinks" t a k e s a s t e p out of the h e a r t b r e a k a n d into a m e s s i e r mix of hurting a n d healing. The result is a f r e s h a n d lively a l b u m with substantial d e p t h , w h e r e the music c h a n n e l s its e n e r g y t h r o u g h the lyrics to d r i v e h o m e e v e r y sentiment with p o i g n a n c y a n d power. This isn't a revolutionary a l b u m in any way, but it is a c c e s s i b l e a n d e n j o y a b l e on m a n y levels. - P R

These album reviews are courtesy of W T H S m u sic directors Paul Rice, Aaron Martin and Laura Helderop with guest review by David Caplan.

P a v e m e n t — ' Q u a r a n t i n e the Fast'

G o n j a s u f i — 'A Sufi a n d A Killer'

Pavement w a s b o r n in t h e a g e w h e n i n d i e / a l t e r n a t i v e / u n d e r g r o u n d rock w a s a s c r a p p y little niche of the music b u s i n e s s s u p p o r t e d b y little m o r e than incessant touring a n d merciful college r a d i o DJs. While only r e l e a s i n g five albums, they b e c a m e o n e of the most influential b a n d s of the 'QOs, almost s i n g l e - h a n d e d l y proving that a b a n d could win fans, acclaim a n d stability without b e i n g p i c k e d u p b y a m a j o r label, p a v i n g t h e way for the indie/und e r g r o u n d s c e n e as w e know it today. From their first album, fuzzy, s l o p p y a n d off-the-cuff, to their m i d - c a r e e r college-rock a n t h e m s a n d class-clown attitude (go y o u t u b e t h e v i d e o for " G o l d Soundz"), to their m o r e introspective a n d s u b t l e final albums. Pavem e n t n e v e r stayed the same, but n e v e r s t o p p e d b e i n g Pavement. C o i n c i d i n g with their first reunion tour s i n c e their 2000 b r e a k u p , this c a r e e r retrospective highlights the w o u l d - b e hits as well as the lovable detours, p r e s e n t i n g an e a s y introduction to a b a n d that certainly d e s e r v e s to b e i n t r o d u c e d to you. -PR

The p r o d u c e r - e m c e e dynamic has b e e n r e p e a t e d l y c h a l l e n g e d over the p a s t few y e a r s b y u n d e r g r o u n d s c e n e s e a g e r to distill the k i n d of American hip h o p d o m i n a t e d by the Timbalands a n d W a y n e s of the mainstream. No more is this evident than on Gonjasufi's debut, "A Sufi a n d A Killer," p r o d u c e d by West Coast u n d e r g r o u n d g r e a t s Flying Lotus a n d The G a s l a m p Killer. While holding true to the "wonky," off-center production techniques of the n e w school of American hip-hop, the b e a t s p r o v i d e a dusty, disjointed outlet for Gonjasufi's m u m b l e d melodies, c a p t u r i n g t h e ethos of the e s t r a n g e d Middle E a s t e r n foreigner. Himself a Sufi, h e softly sings with the voice of a world-weary street mystic as by a transmission, f a d e d a n d a g e d to s o u n d like an audio copy of a copy. It c a p tures the spirit a n d mysticism of a p r e digital, p r e - T i m b a l a n d age. - D C


FEATURES

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

THE ANCHOR

It's spring break! And I'm, uh,staying here Perhaps for spring break you're not going to Florida to sunbathe on the ocean shore, or perhaps you're not serving the community on one of Hope's service trips around the world. Maybe you're not even going home, if home is not Holland. Luckily, you're already in an area that's not surrounded by miles of cornfields and is actually a great place for some entertainment! Need some spring break ideas for your stay in Holland? Look no further.

Saugatuck

Drive 15 minutes south on 1-196,

and you'll find yourself in a quaint town filled with little shops and art galleries. Although the shops are a little pricey (hey, window-shopping can be fun too!), some of the restaurants are student-budget friendly. Get some food to go and settle on the grass near the dock that borders Silver Lake. But if there's one thing you should do, though, before you leave — stop at Kilwin's for delicious fudge!

SAUGATUCK The b e a c h — It's spring! And it might not be 80-something degrees, but the sun is shining it's a lot warmer than it was all winter. Grab a volleyball or Frisbee and enjoy the sun! Better vet, take a good book and lie in the warm sand

C h i c a g o - Hop aboard an Amtrak train in Holland for 28 bucks.. .and three hours later you'll arrive in the Windy City. Grab a few friends and take a day trip; you can scout out some attractions befo you leave (museums, Shedd Aquarium and live shows) or simply go scouting around town for anything that strikes your fancy. Stop

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at the "bean" to take pictures and be sure to ride the Ferris wheel on Navy Pier!

Road rally — Organize a road rally that focuses on downtown Holland. Gather friends (and friends of friends) and come up with the zaniest and craziest activities. Afterwards, walk over to Cold Stone and treat yourselves to something sweet (or you could start there to help give you an energy

for a couple of hours at Tunnel Park. If you're

boost for the rally!)

feeling super adventur-

Volunteer — None of your friends sticking around town

ous, try camping at the Holland Slate Park. Pack a car full of friends and food. Good luck with

to do that road rally with you? Choose an organization and spend a day volunteering. Many places would love your help. Like people? Spend an afternoon at Resthaven getting to know the residents. Like animals? Donate your time to an animal shelter. You'll feel good about your time not wasted, and those you reach out to will appreciate it.

that tent!

M o v i e m a r a t h o n -You've hit the books hard all semester.Take a whole day and have a movie marathon: grab popcorn, theater candy and a handful of movies (anything Disney works well, or you could try some ol my favorites: "Lord of the Rings" and "Harry Potter"). Stack the cluster or lounge with pillows and blankets and get ready to relax all day (and night) long.

H o m e w o r k If you really have run out of all your other J

S

options, do some homework. Your professors probably gave you enough to do over break. We promise. We won't judge you.

Graphics by Emily Dammar

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VOICES

THE ANCHOR

MARCH 17. 2 0 1 0

An outside perspective

Musings on mutual misunderstandings

Madelyn Clark Guest Columnist

Emily West

Broken porches

Co-Editor-in-Chief

The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth I d o not believe in objectivity. Perhaps j u d g m e n t about what readers expect and I am p u t t i n g my role at The A n c h o r in want a n d what is relevant, i m p o r t a n t and timely. These are vague t e r m s about which jeopardy, but it is that very role that has people feel differently An opinion, a lack led m e to contemplate t h e validity of of o p i n i o n - these are both i m p o r t a n t objective story telling. Week after week, factors. News stories, like all stories, are The Anchor staff p r o d u c e s a newspaper subjective to people, places a n d things. that tells t h e stories of he H o p e c o m m u n i t y Therefore, I find it impossible to believe in and beyond. A story cycles t h r o u g h m a n y sets of h a n d s before being set to print. It objective news. . A n d it is not just about news. is subject to editors, writers, interviewees Institutionalized education, research, a n d o t h e r information sources. textbooks, ne w spa pe rs and C N N d e p e n d N e w s carriers via radio, print media, o n a n d therefore p e r p e t u a t e the m y t h television and the internet present stories of total objectivity. W e rely on t h e as if these happenings are i n d e p e n d e n t of the m e d i u m . The m y t h of objectivity is a s s u m p t i o n that h u m a n s are able to ful a n d prevalent. W e differentiate present information by unemotional, rational m e t h o d s . etween news stories a n d stories o n t h e A simple science e x p e r i m e n t could basis that o n e is objective and the o t h e r not possibly be tainted by the scientist ective. m o o d , opinion or e q u i p m e n t . The myth This past year, many believers of this of objectivity is a sophisticated society. m y t h looked d o w n their noses at Fox A n d it allows us to argue with one a n o t h e r news, offended by the news source's without admitting to our vested interests. political agenda a n d obvious bias. Perhaps History is accurate. Literature a n d we should not be so critical. The folks m e m o i r are fictitious, irrational a n d / o r involved with Fox are worse liars than the non-linear. History is considered to be rest of the media world. objective; literature is not. W e d e p e n d o n The decision of w h e t h e r o r not to objectivity to help us find truth. cover a story displays a j u d g m e n t about It may be unnerving to consider what stories are n e w s w o r t h y The news objectivity to be a myth, but objectivity is source m u s t consider their reputation not a s y n o n y m for truth. T r u t h is m u c h (or the reputation of their affiliates) a n d their financial situation. The Anchor, for larger t h a n our a t t e m p t s to pin it down. Objectivity is a noble, h u m a n effort, but example, reflects directly back o n t o Hope's reputation. We rely o n subscriptions f r o m we can d o better. readers to print each week. W e can try Emily is thankfulfor pizza, long walks on a n d avoid these factors; this does not Saturday afternoons and finding treasures make t h e m disappear. in the most unexpected of places. W h a t makes a story a news story? This seemingly simple decision reflects a

Parentheticalities Kaili Doud Columnist

Anon we are, anon we go? O n e of the most fallible traits of vocabulary: the necessity of u n d e r s t a n d i n g what a word m e a n s in order to use it. Take the word "anon." I don't think there has ever b e e n a time when 1 haven't been astonished at exactly how quaint it sounds. But w h o in heaven's n a m e knows what it means? I suppose, probably, mostly everyone. Unfortunately, I had failed to inform myself of its definition until very recently w h e n s o m e o n e finally had to tell m e 1 was using it incorrectly. To say the least, it was a little embarrassing. Honestly, though, I've used and witnessed usage of the w o r d "anon" with several dozen meanings: "tomorrow," "quickly" and "full speed ahead!" are a m o n g

Emily West Karen P a t t e r s o n Amy S o u k u p Lindsey B a n d y Eric A n d e r s o n

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the most c o m m o n . In general, such an aurally satisfying w o r d (in a British accent, typically) can m e a n anything as long as it is spoken with c o n f i d e n c e and a sense of purpose. Images of 19th c e n t u r y nautical or military grandeur c o m e to mind. W h o doesn't feel imminently illustrious sporting a one-liner like "We go anon!" Whilst searching about the Internet for s o m e information on the t r u e definition of "anon," I naturally gravitated toward the glorious convenience of Wikipedia. T u r n s out "anon" is short for "anonymous," which had never even crossed my m i n d all of these years. The article itself was charming, to say the least. Rather unnerving, actually. Beyond my previous knowledge, "anon" has actually b e c o m e "Anon" with a capital "A" representing anyone w h o has ever taken advantage of the faceless benefits of the Internet. A n o n as a n o n y m o u s is everyone, everywhere. "Fight Club?" Perhaps some Orwell? Despite the fact that Wikipedia was probably not the best initial choice of reference, everything else has just gotten m e confused. M e r r i a m - W e b s t e r defines "anon" three ways: "immediately," (archaic, but included nonetheless) "soon" and "later."

ANCHOR

distance, a person can seem put together and happy. Delve deeper, though, and you might find that the roof of that facade is caving in. Relationships are messy, but G o d calls us to be in fellowship with one another. To d o this, we have to look closer, past the sparkling lights and the cookie cutter pieces of a Lego set. W e have to invest t i m e and energy in the people we love. In my children's literature course, we just finished a beautiful book titled "Lizzie Bright a n d the Buckminster Boy." At the end of the book, the main character has an epiphany a b o u t really, truly seeing into people. H e calls it "looking at s o m e o n e straight on." W h a t a fabulous image: two o p e n and bare hearts seeing clearly into each other. It's time that we stop flying a r o u n d aimlessly, watching f r o m a distance. Let's sit with the ones we love on broken porches, trying with all our might to see each o t h e r straight on.

Over winter break, I was blessed by a trip to Florida with my m o m and younger sister. O n the flight h o m e , I was given a window seat (the best kind, in my opinion). So w h e n the pilot came o n the overhead speaker and told us to prepare to land, 1 closed my book a n d settled back into my seat to watch our descent. A s we flew b e n e a t h the clouds, the city a n d suburbs of Detroit b e c a m e visible. It was evening, a n d lights sparkled f r o m inside buildings and f r o m the bulbs of streetlamps. The landscape resembled a Lego play set â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a perfect alignment of buildings, houses a n d trees. From a distance, all looked well. However, having been to t h e city of Detroit before, I knew better. The houses that seemed beautiful f r o m u p in the sky were m o r e than likely the same houses I had seen w h o s e p o r c h e s were disintegrating, whose w i n d o w s were broken a n d w h o s e roofs were collapsing. It occurred to m e that this same p h e n o m e n o n h a p p e n s in our relationships with others. From a

The A m e r i c a n Heritage Dictionary of New Cultural History (inhale) says it m e a n s "again." And everything else defines it as "anonymous." A n o n itself! I suppose the only thing that any of us can learn f r o m this evidence is that the word "anon" should continue to be used in whatever way everyone thinks it should be. Admittedly, that Wikipedia article has gotten m e a little nervous, but I suppose "anon" can't be t o o threatening. I m e a n , we've got 4 C h a n . Anyway, I h o p e this investigation into "anon" hasn't doused anyone's spirits. It shouldn't, really. W h o cares what "anon" actually means? Nobody! It m e a n s "immediately," "soon" and "later" all at the same time! It's impossible to discontinue the use of such a versatile word simply because it's paradoxical. G o out and fancy yourself splendid by using such a lovely specimen of vocabulary. A n o n , anon!

Kaili is flustered exclamation

by all of this. Sorry for the excess of

points.

2010 Spring Semestter Staff

Annclise Bclmonte LindseyWolf B r e n n i g a n Gilson Ayanfe O l o n a d e JoleneJeske

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VOICES

MARCH 17. 2 0 1 0

T H E ANCHOR

9

From the inside out Jolene Jeske

Rob Guimond

Voices Editor

Columnist

Ya know?

Sailing day dreams across the Atlantic I'm in Barcelona. It's well-known for petty theft. The Olympics of pickpocketing are held here, every day. Last week, 1 was sitting in a sparsely inhabited metro, riding b e t w e e n two places that you won't r e m e m b e r and minding my own business. Actually, 1 was practicing my Clint Eastwood faces in the glass across f r o m me. I like to s h a r p e n t h e m every once in a while, >ust in case 1 r u n into a tight spot. This feller c o m e s up to m e and starts chattin' m e up about chalets and cows and whatnot. Well, here I was in Barcelona, trying to better my p r e p a r e d n e s s for adversity, and this guy was distracting m e with a topic 1 care less about than Tiger W o o d s ' sex life. Clearly, this was a planned distraction, so I got cautious. I wasn't too worried because 1 keep a booby wallet on me, a wallet for boobs. I put some grocery receipts in there and an unpaid Michigan parking ticket. I d u c t tape my actual wallet to my inner thigh. This tactic makes m e less susceptible to pickpocketing and impulse spending. Wouldn't you know it, as he was showing m e his fancy pants, Swiss-made watch, 1 felt s o m e o n e go for my booby wallet on my o t h e r flank. I was faced with indecision: possible confrontation or loss of my only booby wallet. I decided u p o n the latter with t h e intention to investigate the matter. I casually t u r n e d to see w h o had taken my wallet, but I was unable to decide between a sturdy ginger lady and t h e reincarnation of Edward R. Murrow.

After the loot was obtained, the dull distracter quickly exited the train. I covertly followed him. He walked to a bar just off of G r a n Via Street. It was called "Bar Ombligo Dulce Dulce." I waited outside. Sure enough, Edward R. strolled in. I had reason e n o u g h to charge into the bar and d e m a n d that the duo r e t u r n my booby wallet. So 1 did, only there was less charging and m o r e politely asking. The two of t h e m were wide-eyed and flabbergasted at my gumshoeility. This is a condensed, translated version of the conversation that occurred: "Eh, what's the deal? Can 1 get my wallet back?" "Oh, yeah, sorry dude. We're just trying to feed our families. We're farmers, and we have a hard t i m e after that plaga de langostas." "Man, a plague of lo'bsters?" "Yeah, they're everywhere." " W h y don't you just eat those? W e eat e m all the time in the New World." He looked skeptical about this statement, but he agreed to try. Then, we all m a d e friends and decided to go ride the escalators in t h e metro. I was hoping that he'd invite m e over for a lobster boil, but he never did. Also, I forgot to get my wallet back, so I h o p e he pays that parking ticket. Rob wants you to know that this entire story is true except for anything after the first paragraph.

Quote for thought Kate Schrampfer Columnist

A single word. N o t one word, not two, but a singular word. Every one of us has a chance to c o m m u n i c a t e t h r o u g h a variety of social channels. We have an opportunity to use our language t h r o u g h writing, songs, signs and even verbal o u t p u t . But d o we ever stop a n d examine the way w e are communicating? Have you ever considered that every word that travels f r o m hand to pen, sign to eye a n d t h o u g h t to m o u t h is considered your own linguistic style? In o n e of my classes, we were discussing language habits and h o w they are formed. As I was sitting there I couldn't help but reflect o n my own language habits. I had a good laugh. I b e c a m e familiar with my overuse of filler words. W o r d s like: "Ya know" and "so ..." quickly c a m e to mind. 1 o f t e n catch myself saying, "It's raining so hard outside, ya know?" Or, "I can't go to the movies tonight, so ...." The weirdest thing a b o u t these filler w o r d s is they are so incomplete. I attach t h e m to t h e e n d of almost every sentence, making people wonder, "So ... what?" o r "Do I k n o w what?" As 1 continued to reflect u p o n my inconclusive filler words, t h e thought of origin p o p p e d in my head. W h e r e did I develop this verbal linguistic style? O n e answer c a m e to mind: my mother. Now, everyone knows that parents have phrases they always say, like "Because I said so," or, "Yeah, well, life isn't fair." But my m o t h e r couldn't be like most parents; she had to add "ya know" to just about every sentence. I didn't notice that I had adopted her linguistic style until I got to H o p e College. A s I was acquainted with n e w people, they not only noticed my u p - n o r t h accent, but my tendency to end a sentence with "so ..." or "ya know." The point is w e are m o r e like

our parents than we think, and we adopt small characteristics of our language f r o m t h e m . As I sat there daydreaming about how weird language really is, it came across my m i n d that we don't always c o m m u n i c a t e the way we talk. 1 would never hand in an essay with filler w o r d s attached to each sentence, and I h o p e most people wouldn't either. I began to think about how versatile our lines of c o m m u n i c a t i o n really are. For instance, in educational or formal writing, you probably write with close attention to vocabulary and grammar. W h e n talking, you o f t e n add (iller w o r d s such as "like" and "um." W h e n making a sign of s o m e sort you are using imagery a n d not written or spoken words. A n d finally, w h e n texting, well you pretty m u c h skip all g r a m m a r and vocabulary lessons you've learned since fifth grade. It's interesting how every one of us both c o m m u n i c a t e s differently and f o r m s linguistic habits developed f r o m lines of commimication, whether it is f r o m parents or peers. The t r u t h is, w e all have strengths in different f o r m s of communication. Some people are better writers, s o m e better speakers and others talented artists. It doesn't really matter because we all have our own unique linguistic style. So, s o m e time you're in class or just bored, think about the w o r d s you choose to say, write or draw. Take a m i n u t e to reflect on how you are c o m m u n i c a t i n g to the world. You may just surprise yourself, ya know? Jolene has been working on finishing her giant jaw breaker for way too long!

The master painter "God must be a painter. W h y else would we have such beautiful colors?" - "A Beautiful Mind" Walking a r o u n d c a m p u s in this lovely spring weather, I can't help but drink in the t r u t h of those words. After m o n t h s of black and white and gray, the blue sky just seems unbelievably bright, and t h e fact that there is actually grass makes u p for its brown tint. There are places around Hope w h e r e it has started to green up. Some brave little plants start poking u p t h r o u g h the dark m u d , showing early buds that promise yellow and pink and red a n d white b l o o m s later on. It makes m e wish 1 could paint. I want to capture the way the world looks, reflect it, like the way a puddle mirrors the clouds caught in its surface. But my talents lie elsewhere. Besides, anything I could d o wouldn't come close to the original, so I think I'll just leave illustrating spring to the master painter. Of course, there are other ways of looking at him; we could say he's an engineer. He works things out

so that w h e n the ground thaws just the right a m o u n t , the Holland tulips start coming up. He created robins with some specific instinct that told t h e m w h e n they ought to fly back for the s u m m e r . W h e n we look at t h e world f r o m a Christian perspective, we can see certain characteristics of God. Inside that perspective, there are different angles. I was having a lighthearted debate with one of my friends about which was better: n u m b e r s or words? I said words, because you couldn't get along without t h e m . If you had t o go without n u m b e r s , you could still d o math. You could say "Five times five equals twenty-five" and still be fine. It wouldn't be as easy, sure, but it would be possible. But n u m b e r s can't substitute for words, I told my friend. You can d o anything with words. You can describe the world. But then she suggested to m e that n u m b e r s could do that, too. M a t h problems explained and illustrated the way things were, the way they worked. I had heard this before, but never the way she explained it. Here's a mathematician's description of a cat: 4c=/?;

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with c being the n u m b e r of cats and p being the n u m b e r of paws, you could explain cats (unless there's a cat with a missing paw). This m a d e sense, and I could see where she was coming f r o m (although personally, I still liked words better. You could say a lot m o r e about cats t h a n "They have four paws for every o n e cat" with words). But still, it made sense. G o d is a painter, an engineer, an author and a mathematician. W h a t we do, with our paints and n u m b e r s and letters, is imitate him. We're trying to reflect his light, in these different disciplines. W h e n we walk t h r o u g h t h e springtime world and wonder, w h e t h e r it is about how the flowers bloom or how they look or how to describe them, we are looking at a n d wondering about the creativity of God.

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ANCHOR

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

Hope students dance for the kids at annual Dance Marathon fundraiser « Dance Marathon, from page 1 I wouldn't be able to make it the full 24 hours. But I did, only because of my wonderful friends and moralers" Many who participated as dancers admit that their friends and moralers help push them through, but thinking about the Miracle Families and what they go through on a daily basis also provides strong motivation. "Hearing the stories of the miracle children is really meaningful to me," moraler Julie Reishus ('10) said. "Like Miracle Child Noelle, I was born with hip dysplasia. While I only had to wear a special brace for the first few months of my life, that treatment didn't work for Noelle. I had no idea that something what was relatively harmless in my experience could be so much more serious.

"1 had a chance to talk to Noelle's m o m a little bit and that time of connecting with her helped me realize more than ever that all we do with Dance Marathon is for the kids." Throughout the Marathon there were a variety of events that helped dancers and moralers stay motivated and keep their energy high. The Life Support committee taught an energetic eight and a half minute line dance at various points throughout the Marathon. Also, H o p e s Greek, along with the men's and women's tennis team, the Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity, and "Five Football Studs" performed in the fan-favorite lip-sync competition early Saturday morning. This was the first year that multiple groups outside of Greek

Life participated in the lip- sync, and they did not disappoint. Alpha Phi Omega took third place with an energetic interpretation of the Disney song "I'll Make a Man out of You." The men's and women's tennis team got a big cheer after their second place interpretation of Cobra Starship s "Good Girls Go Bad." Finally, Brett Cain ('10), Bryan DeKoekkoek ('10), Neil Droppers ('10), Scotty Snyder ('10) and Kyle Dietrich ('11) brought the house down with the winning number of the classic Temptations song "My Girl." At the end of 24 hours, students agree that it's not about the total amount of money raised. Rather, the lives touched and changed are more important. "The last few minutes of the Marathon are what it's really

about," Dream Team member Meghan Vanderlee ('11) said. "The Circle of Hope, where every participant is thanked individually by each child and parent with hugs, handshakes and tears of joy is what makes all the hard work and sacrifice worth it." While parts of Dance Marathon are certainly a struggle—staying on o n e s feet for 24 hours and not breaking down physically and mentally— students involved all agree that the experience is like no other. For the members of the Dream Team, multiple committee members, moralers and dancers, it all comes down to supporting the Miracle Families and letting them know the Hope Community stands with them. At the end of the day, it really is all for the kids.

• S p r i n g B r e a k , f r o m page

1 Pastor who runs the thing basically prays about what we should do each morning and lets the Spirit point him in the right direction, so nothing's sure until the last minute and it's different every year."

CENTER FOR FAITHFUL LEADERSHIP SEMINAR The Center For Faithful Leadership Office is hosting a Leadership Showcase in the Martha Miller Rotunda on March 31, from 6-7 p.m. There will be an open house for students to learn more about the Leadership Minor and CFL will be presenting its First Annual Servant Leadership Award to three students who exemplify the beliefs and teachings of the Leadership Minor through their involvement on campus. There will be free ice cream and refreshments for everyone who comes.

J U S T B U S T A M O V E - Members of Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity (above left) and the Delta Phi sorority (above) perform In the lip sync competition at Dance Marathon. • CHILE, f r o m page 2

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military dictatorships has interested me greatly since taking Latin American Politics with Prof. Annie Dandavati." Unlike Clinton, Brinks was outdoors when the earthquake struck. "1 was actually standing outside on a hill when the earthquake hit and it was crazy," Brinks said. "I could see lights blowing out, and it made the sky over the hill look like a light show at a concert. "The lights near me were blowing and throwing sparks everywhere, and the ground was shaking like mad." W h e n asked to describe the damage in Valparaiso, Brinks said, "There's quite a few buildings that had their facades fall off or even parts of the building fall down, but my house was fine. One girl in our program, though, had her family's house deemed unsafe to live in, so she had to switch families, and her old family has to find a new place to live." For Derek, classes continued uninterrupted, with only a handful of field trips canceled as a result of the quake. Many parts of Chile, however, are still feeling the effects of the

massive earthquake. Much work remains to be done to repair the damage, and there appears to be some debate over how well the country's government is responding to this need. On this point Clinton said, "The country still has a lot of work to do; the damages were over a billion. However, the government of Michelle Bachelet responded very well, and people are coming together to help those who have lost everything. In my opinion, the country is doing a great job of recovering and responding to the tragedy of the earthquake." Brinks, although he agreed that the people of Chile working hard to raise funds for and support one another, held a less optimistic view regarding the government's involvement with disaster relief. "The country is recovering," Brinks said, "but aid came very late in Concepcion and the area around there, which was very close to the epicenter, because water, electricity, natural gas and telephone ... are all privatized, and the companies were quite slow to respond. They were also hurting for food, and the government was a little slow to bring food in."


SPORTS Baseball season set to begin in Florida MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

THE ANCHOR 11

T H I S W E E K I N SPORTS

March 17 Wednesday Steve Tompkins, Pete Zessin and Men's Tennis Mike Dekker, are all expected to ASSISTANT S P O R T S EDITOR vs. A q u i n a s at 4 p.m. step up and lead the team this year, Fritz said. Imagine having to play 10 "The senior class has to fill Friday March 19 baseball games in six days. some of that leadership role," Women's Basketball Couple that with temperatures vs. Rochester a t Illinois W e s l e y a n at Fritz said, when asked who he is in the 80s and heat indexes 8 p.m. EST looking for to lead the team. pushing 100 and you have the After a 20-20 season last year, Hope College baseball t e a m s the Flying Dutchmen are looking spring break trip. IN BRIEF to improve and regain a positive The Flying Dutchmen will win percentage. head to Winter Haven, Fla., on MEN'S TENNIS CONTINUES "The guys have been working March 18 to play teams from WINNING really hard at practices!' Fritz across the country said. "Our team cohesiveness is from Connecticut The men's tennis team deoutstanding. All we want is to to Iowa. feated both Grand Rapids Complay well and compete." "The munity College and Davenport The Flying Dutchmen have stakes University on Friday to increase almost no break in between its winning streak to four. The their spring break trip and the first match of the weekend, all beginning of the MIAA season. The final game of their spring Flying Dutchmen were victoribreak trip is at 9 a.m. on March ous over the Raiders of Grand Rapids Community College for 25, and they head to Olivet on a score of 9-0. All three doubles March 27 for a 1 p.m. game. Every MIAA team is played teams from Hope were able to twice, the second time usually a defeat the Raiders in one set, and all but one singles matchup few days after the first. The teams play once at Boeve ended in two sets. Later that 7 Alex Fryer > Stadium in Holland and once day, Hope topped Davenport, 8VanNoord \ 1. The men's tennis team is now at the other team's field. The Chris mattso 5-4 for the season and will face only exception is a non-MIAA 2 2 I V Peters Aquinas this afternoon in the 18 Eric Zy doubleheader against Aquinas DeWitt Tennis Center. on April 13. l O P e t i»Zessin 8 Colt Hope's second MIAA 15 Danny Detmar 18 Cu opponent is Calvin College at 29 Ryan C SPRING BREAK TRIPS Calvin on April 1 at 2 p.m. and PLANNED at Hope on April 3 at 1 p.m. "We are very excited for All of Hope College's spring this year," Fritz said. "We have sports teams will head to warmer a good tradition of winning locations this spring break for championships, and we want to their annual spring break trips. G R A P H I C BY KRISTEN M U L D E R get back to that." STARTERS LISTED FIRST The baseball team will go to Winter Haven, Fla., where they will play 10 games, beginnin, March 19 and lasting through March 25. Their opponents are UW-Whitewater, Denison, Westthe Dutch will be in Florida take on teams from across the outfielders out in our outfield Bethany Stripp ern Connecticut, Otterbein, Luagainst Spring Arbor on country, ranging f r o m Spring (this week) to get some real S P O R T S EDFTOR thur and Washington & Jefferson. fly balls and grounders on the Arbor in Michigan to MIT in Friday. The softball team will particigrass," Wolters said. "We hope The team will also play Massachusetts. Last season, Hope College's pate in two spring tournaments, The recently warm weather that we can get the whole team softball team found itself in Anderson, (Ind.), the same the Rebel Spring Games and the an unfamiliar position. After day as part of the Rebel Spring has helped the softball team out there before we head to National Training Center Games, Florida for spring break." a 6-10 start before MIAA play Games. After that, they will prepare better for these games. both held in Florida. Hie h o m e opener for the "We have been able to get our began, the team struggled to participate in the National They also will play 10 games Dutch will take place on April consistently beat its opponents Training Center Games, also against 10 teams that include 3 against Alma at 1 p.m. and ended with a 16-24 record in Florida, for a total of Spring Arbor, Anderson, Trinity, 10 games before the — the first losing season since UW-Stout, Union, MIT, DePauw, 1990. They also lost first team regular season D'Youville, Washington & JefAll-American Kelli Duimstra b e g i n s . ferson and Grinnell from March T h e y ('09) when she graduated. 3 For** 19-24. Though the Flying Dutch w i l l The men's and women's track will not play their first game teams will travel to Georgia, of the season until Friday, the where they will compete in both team already appears to be well the Emory Invitational and the on its way to rebounding from Emory Classic, held on March 20 last season. and March 27, respectively. "This year's team is working 4 Anne K e e r l e M The men's tennis team will be harder than any softball team competing in Hilton Head, S.C., « Uiaira TJepiUMnji I have ever coached," head from March 22-26 against Carcoach Karla Wolters said. "We leton, DePauw, Alleghany, Prinare in excellent shape. We have cipiaand Elmhurst. terrific team chemistry." The women's tennis team will 7 Kristin Higgs 12 Molly Collins The team will see many also be in Hilton Head, S.C., com5 Beth Yahrausl experienced players return to peting against many of the same the field this year, as 11 of the opponents as the men's team. The Mulcahy L 18 players on the roster are Nieuwsma] women are set to face Carleton, returning letter winners. 14 Deidra Enochs DePauw, Alleghany and Erskine Captains of the Flying Dutch in their matches. this year include Deidra Enochs All teams with the exception ('10), Abby Phillips (11) and of the men's and women's track Beth Yahraus ('10). teams will resume home play afEnochs, along with fellow ter spring break. senior Michelle Marra, were MIAA conference play will both involved in a combined 40 also begin for these teams after pitching decisions last spring. G R A P H I C BY KRISTEN M U L D E R spring break. PLAYERS LISTED ALPHABETICALLY BY POSTION The 2010 season opener for James Nichols

aren't as high as league play," coach Stu Fritz said about the spring break trip. "The goal is still to win every game though. We want to see what we have this season and see how we can use the freshmen once we go home." With 10 freshmen on a 29-man roster, Fritz sees a good amount of the freshmen

contributing this season. Among others, Fritz named outfield T | Klein ('13) as having a "good chance to start" sometime this season. Fritz also expects some freshmen to get into the pitching mix. "A lot of our freshmen will get the opportunity to pitch down there (in Florida)," Fritz said. Tri-captains Alex Fryer ('10), Robby Poll ('10) and Scott Snyder ('10), as well as fellow seniors

Softball looks to return to winning ways


[2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

MARCH 17, 2 0 1 0

Women's basketball headed to NCAA Final Four Bethany Stripp SPORTS EDITOR

For the third consecutive year, the H o p e College women's basketball team extended its season d e e p into March by winning the region and advancing to sectionals. On Friday, the Flying Dutch began sectional play at Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington, 111., against the Saints of M a r y m o u n t University, who had advanced to the Sweet 16 after a convincing 74-44 win over Medaille State on March 6. Neither team was able to take control of the game for almost seven full minutes of play until a jumper by Miranda DeKuiper ('11) began a five minute 10-2 run that saw the Dutch gain a 10 point lead, the largest of the game. The Saints fought back to tie the score at 24 with 1:56 remaining in the half where it remained until time ran out in the first half. After the break, Carrie Snikkers ('11), who had been held to five points in the first half, helped to j u m p s t a r t the Dutch's comeback by scoring 10 points in less than two minutes A layup by Liz Ellis ('13) just seconds after Snikkers's 10th

P H O T O COURTESY OF H O P E P R

D O U B L E - D O U B L E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carrie Snikkers ('11) led t h e t e a m w i t h 2 1 points In both Friday and Saturday's games, 1 4 rebounds on Friday and 1 2 rebounds on Saturday. point put Hope up by seven. After the strong start, M a r y m o u n t , known for its strong defense that only allowed an average of 46.8 points per game f r o m their o p p o n e n t s , was able to prevent Hope f r o m scoring f r o m the field again for almost six full minutes. The Saints continued to battle against the Dutch and tied the score with 2:04 left in the

game. Snikkers was fouled on a jumper soon after and made the following free throw to put H o p e up for good. Two m o r e free throws f r o m both Snikkers and Ellis sealed the game and gave H o p e the victory, 53-46. Jenny Cowen ('10) added eight points for the Dutch and Philana Greene ('10) grabbed seven boards. With the win, t h e

Flying Dutch advanced to play the Pointers of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, who upset host Illinois Wesleyan 7776 Friday night. The Pointers were the first o n the scoreboard, but the Flying Dutch quickly responded with a 9-0 run that put them up by seven less than four minutes into the game. Though Hope remained

ahead for the rest of the half, UW-Stevens Point did not allow the Dutch to build a comfortable lead, sticking within six or less for a good portion of the half. Though the Dutch led by nine with 2:28 on the clock, the Pointers rallied and cut Hope's lead to two, 32-30, at halftime. The second half of the game was an even closer battle than the first, with neither team able to establish a solid lead until the last three minutes of the game. With 3:18 left in the game, a layup by sharpshooting Britta Petersen of UW-Stevens Point pulled the Pointers within one, but a layup by Snikkers that was soon followed by a three-pointer f r o m Ellis gave the Dutch a sixpoint advantage that the Pointers were not able to overcome. H o p e stayed strong through the end of the game and made it past the Elite Eight for the first time since its national championship run in 2006 with a 71-64 victory. The Dutch will n o w advance to the national semifinals, which will take place on Friday at Illinois Wesleyan. They will face Rochester, N.Y., an unranked team that upset No. 2 Kean in its sectional final. Both teams will be making their third semifinal appearance.

Hockey team finishes season as national runner-ups James Nichols ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

While the women's basketball team was earning a spot in the Final Four of the N C A A Division III championships, another H o p e College team was making its own r u n for a national championship. The men's hockey team was in Fort Myers, Fla., at the American Collegiate Hockey Association national t o u r n a m e n t . The Flying Dutchmen's first g a m e was March 10 against the Blue Devils of Fredonia State, N.Y. Two goals a piece for Brett Kopinski ('11) and Chris Kunnen ('12) helped the Flying D u t c h m e n roll past the Blue Devils 7-2. Captain Matt Schrader ('10) racked up five assists in the game, and goalie Sean LaDouce ('12) stopped 22 of 24 shots. Next o n the schedule for

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H o p e was the University of Arkansas on March 11. Two goals by Kunnen led the Flying D u t c h m e n to a 5-2 victory. LaDouce again played well in goal, stopping 18 of 20 shots taken by the Razorbacks. Friday's m a t c h u p pitted the two undefeated teams (2-0) in Pool C, the Flying D u t c h m e n and the University of Colorado Buffaloes; the winner would advance to the semi-finals. The Flying D u t c h m e n trailed early in the first period but scored seven goals in the second period, resulting in a t o u r n a m e n t best 12-5 victory over the Buffaloes. "(Twelve goals) certainly was not expected," Captain Austin Sonneveldt (10) said the next morning. "However, preparation and determination wins championships. W e play every game the same, and last night we h a p p e n e d to score 12 goals."

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Kunnen scored four goals in Friday afternoon's game. Kopinski earned a hat trick and two assists in the blowout. Schrader got four assists, bringing his t o u r n a m e n t total to 11. The third captain, Dan Bolt ('10), scored two goals. The victory against Colorado meant H o p e was set to play Saturday morning against Florida Gulf Coast University. The Flying D u t c h m e n got started early, with C o u r t Fall ('13) scoring the first goal within the first minute of play. Schrader was able to capitalize on an empty net at the end of the game, sealing a spot in the national championship game with a 3-1 victory. "(Winning) this morning was special," Sonneveldt said after the game. "It was our toughest game, and we responded with great intensity and heart." LaDouce had his best p e r f o r m a n c e yet, stopping 37 of 38 shots f r o m the Eagles. The other semi-final game resulted in a Saginaw Valley State University victory. This meant the Flying D u t c h m e n would be facing their conference rivals in the national championship Saturday night. "It will be a battle," Sonneveldt said between games on Saturday. "We know how good they are. They know how good we are. These kinds of games are a b o u t w h o wants it more." Kopinski had two goals, and |us tin|ohns ton('13)a ndSc hra de r had one each. Unfortunately for the Flying D u t c h m e n , this

P H O T O BY J I M D O S T IE

M I C H I G A N T E A M S M E E T IN F L O R I D A - Nick Cornlcelli ('13) brings t h e puck up the ice In the national championship.

wasn't enough as the Cardinals took the game 6-4. Proving to be Hope's Achilles heel this season, the SVSU Cardinals handed the D u t c h m e n four of their six total losses. A final record of 25-6-1-1 boasts a record-tying n u m b e r of wins in one season for Hope. "We made a few mistakes at critical times," Coach Chris Van T i m m e r e n said. "SVSU d o e s not miss an opportunity to score, and they are very good at it." With eight goals and seven assists during the t our nam ent , Kunnen was named to the allt o u r n a m e n t team. Joining the team was Will Guerin ('11) with one goal and five assists throughout the t o u r n a m e n t . Schrader accumulated the most assists for the

Flying D u t c h m e n during the t o u r n a m e n t with 11. O n e goal behind Kunnen, Kopinski scored seven during the tournament. LaDouce stopped 126 of 140 shots during the four day span. "For me, beinga senior, playing in the national championship game is what we have worked for day in, day out for the past four years," Sonneveldt said of finishing his hockey career at Hope. "This was the best team I have ever coached," Van Timmeren said. "They worked so hard for each other that it made my job so easy. Coming in second is not what we wanted, but I know we put our best effort forward and just came up short."


03-17-2010