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HOPE C0LLE6E ANCHOR

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Hope College — Holland, Michigan

LXVIII—lif

Salm Wins M.I.S.L Oratory Victory,Hope Group to Compete at Penn. Following a long tradition of Hope Student Ambassadors, Nell Salm, senior f r o m St. Anne, Illinois, took first place in the womens' division of the annual oratory contests of the Michigan Inter-collegiate Speech League, held March 2 on the campus of Michigan S t a t e University, at E a s t Lansing, Michigan. David Dethmers, sophomore f r o m E a s t Lansing, Michigan, participated in the men's division, t a k i n g fourth place. Both had won the local Adalaide and Raven contests earlier in the year. Nell's, oration, called " A M a t t e r of Time," dealt with the problem of h u r r y and worry in our modern American civilization, as contrasted with the peaceful life which she experienced this past s u m m e r as Holland's A m b a s s a d o r to E n g l a n d . She also a t t e m p t e d to show how British a t t i t u d e s which she found applied to life in America. Dave's oration was called "Individualism: The Road to Security," and showed that t r u e security is possible only when men are f r e e to act as individuals r a t h e r than being bent to group pressures. Both contestants were coached by Mr. Paul Ried, of the speech d e p a r t m e n t . Pi Kap Group to Visit Penn. Members of t h e local c h a p t e r of Pi Kappa Delta, national speech honorary, will leave during Spring Vacation to participate i n t h e Province of the Lakes convention of t h a t organization, to be held this year at Grove City, Pennsylvania, April 11th through 13th. J o h n Van Dam, f r e s h m a n f r o m Zeeland, will participate in Men's O r a t o r y ; Carol Kuyper and Bob Winter, senior f r o m Holland and junior f r o m Grand Rapids respectively, will participate in extempore speaking; Donald J . Kroes, senior from Muskegon, Michigan, will be entered in the A f t e r - D i n n e r Speaking contest and will also t e a m up with Bob W i n t e r in Men's Debate. John Van Dam and Tom Lubbers will also participate in this division. Mr. Paul Ried, debate coach and director of forensics, will accompany the group.

Just A Thought Since we are coming near the close of the Lenten season, it might be well worth while to look back to the time just preceeding the betrayal and death of Christ. We find Christ going into a garden with His disciples to pray. He feels the need to be alone with His Father and asks those with Him to watch and pray until He returns, lest they fall into temptation. But when He returned, He found His followers asleep: they could not stay awake for one hour after Christ had left them alone. With Christ just a stone's throw away, those who loved Him most fell asleep! What a lesson this should be for the Christians in our time. With our minds off of Christ, we too, like those in the garden, will fall asleep spiritually. And this spiritual sleep is not too hard to fall into as we are all too human. So let this be our constant prayer, that we might be faithfull watchers "till we all come in the unity of faith . . . unto the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ." Eph. 4:13. —H. A. Stegenga

Bulletin —

Students Adopt New Constitution According to a vote taken after chapel yesterday, the student body officially ratified the revised Student Council constitution. The revision of the constitution has been proceeding since October. The objective of the revision was to construct a document highly improved in organization and structure. Five student members of the Council and one faculty member fork».ed the committee. These were sophomore Karl Hoellrich, juniors Lois Hoeksema and Bob Winter, seniors Penny Ramaker and John Adams, and Howard Zandburgen representing the faculty.

MARCH 16, 1956

Siedentop Picked To Be City's 1956 Community Ambassador L a r r y Alan Siedentop, junior f r o m Downer's Grove, Illinois, has been chosen Holland's Student A m b a s s a d o r for the s u m m e r of 1966. L a r r y was selected from a group of 13 contestants, and he will spend the s u m m e r in France. Immediately upon becoming the Student Ambassador, L a r r y became a p a r t of the Experiment in International Living. The Experiment is so organized that 10 students who have chosen the same country for their s u m m e r home compose a group. The small group travels to its country together, and, upon a r r i v i n g there, each student becomes p a r t of a f a m i l y . During the time spent living with the family, L a r r y will make several week-end bicycle t r i p s with his group and an equal number of French students. At some time during the s u m m e r he will take an extended trip to Paris, probably f o r two and one-half or three weeks. The essential idea of the trip is not t h a t of a sight-seeing tour, although to an extent this can be combined with it. Rather, the t r i p stresses the importance of knowing the family, and the surroundings, t h e r e b y promoting excellent international relations. The a m b a s s a d o r is accepted a s part of the f a m i l y to the extent t h a t he is actually treated as one of the children.

The completed constitution was mimeographed and compiled by the Council secretary, and the copies were distributed in chapel WednesMiss N e l l Salm day morning. On the same morning, during the fourth assembly period, a meeting of the student L a r r y was selected to become body was held. At this time there Holland's Student Ambassador by was opportunity for discussion, a group of townspeople who conTired of calculus, Latin, chemiscomment, and criticism on the residered his application and his intry or S h a k e s p e a r e ? Like to exvised document. The greatest critiLarry S i e d e n t o p terview. He is a history-philosophy perience a second childhood or concism concerned Article II, Section m a j o r , editor of the 1956 Milestone, tinue your first? Well, then, we've 1, on the elected representatives to a member of the Knickerbocker Accountants Sought by got a remedy f o r you! Let's go the Council. The possibility that society, president of the Hope Ininto the Land of Mother Goose. National Government representation is not given to every ternational Relations Club, and secT h a t ' s what we said . . . . Mother group in proportion to its per cent r e t a r y of the Mid-West Region of An examination of especial inGoose! You can s t a r t your journey on of the entire enrollment of the International Relations Clubs. He terest to students of accounting S a t u r d a y night, March 24. Leave college was discussed. is also a m e m b e r of Phi Alpha has been announced by the U. S. Civil Service Commission f o r filling your dorm or house and follow Although the Council realizes Theta, national history honorary accountant and auditor positions in your nose in the direction of Car- that the new constitution is not f r a t e r n i t y . Federal agencies in Washington, negie Gym. Arrive there about When L a r r y returns, he will perfect, results of the committee's D. C., and t h r o u g h o u t the country. 8:00 p.m. and get set for an evework are satisfactory in that they s h a r e his experiences with the com- Positions will be filled in the U. S. ning of f u n . munity by a p p e a r i n g several times show improvement. The constituGeneral Accounting Office, the InW h a t we mean by all this is, it's in the capacity of lecturer. tion remains open to further aternal Revenue Service, the DepartPenny Carnival time, and the Womendment and revision due to a ment of Defense (which includes men's Activity League, its sponsor, the D e p a r t m e n t s of A r m y , Navy, has selected " I n t o the Land of just cause. and Air Force), and various other Mother Goose" as the theme f o r agencies. this year. Co-chairmen f o r the event a r e Appointments will be made to The Hope College Symphonette, Joyce Van Doom and Rosemarie positions paying entrance salaries under the direction of Dr. Morette of $3,670 a year. A f t e r completion Kish. Jini Vanderborgh is he Prog r a m Chairman and J a n Blunt is Rider, will a p p e a r in the Memorial of special t r a i n i n g p r o g r a m s , usin charge of Publicity, assisted by The I.R.C. showed a movie in Chapel Sunday afternoon, March ually 6 months a f t e r entrance on Mary K. Diephuis and Lillian color, "The New India," yesterday 18, at 4:00 p.m., in a program duty, appointees will be promoted Bruins. afternoon in the Kletz. A panel to positions paying $4,525 a year. which will include a number of The sororities and f r a t e r n i t i e s discussion by s t u d e n t s who have Opportunities f o r promotion therehave chosen their booth chairmen, lived in India followed, and various compositions to be played on its a f t e r are excellent. who a r e : Carol Beuker, A.S.A.; aspects of this controversial coun- Spring Tour. The public is invited Like other organizations, t h e Lynn Van't Hof, Delphi; Marge try's economic, political and cul- to attend. Government depends heavily upon Addis, Dorian; Mary Hunter, Sib; tural s t a t u s were discussed. Anthony Kooiker, of the Hope the help that trained accountants K a r a g a y H a r d y , Sorosis; Diane On Wednesday, March 28th, Procan provide in making its manageVicha, T h e t a ; Ken Kole, Arkies; fessor Marshall Knappen f r o m the piano faculty, will be soloist for the ment most effective. An accountant Ted Du Mez, Cosmos; Wayne Eb- Political Science D e p a r t m e n t of the concert, and will be heard in the with the Federal Government can bens, E m m i e s ; M at t Peelen, F r a - University of Michigan will be the von Weber Concert Piece f o r piano choose to specialize in any of sevters; and Bob Vander Lugt, Knicks. guest speaker a t IRC. He will and orchestra, a composition welleral a r e a s of accounting — general The r e f r e s h m e n t booths will be un- speak on "The U.S. and Russia," known for its brilliant color and accounting, cost accounting, tax acder the m a n a g e m e n t of the Y's. and a f t e r w a r d s will answer quescounting, systems accounting, or The various booths will be com- tions presented by the students. enjoyable melodies. auditing. Another large work to be perpeting to see which one raises the Professor Knappen is a Rhodes Applications will be accepted most money. This y e a r the pro- Scholar, an a u t h o r , and formerly formed is the Handel " W a t e r Music f r o m senior college students m a j o r ceeds will go into the Building a U.S. g o v e r n m e n t worker in Ger- Suite," a series of five compositions ing in accounting who expect to Fund of Hope College. many. This timely discussion prom- written f o r the s u m m e r boating complete the f o u r years of study ises to be one of much interest and p a r t i e s of the King of England. within 9 months of the d a t e of filall students a r e cordially invited Young Dems Petition Other selections played will be the ing application. Applicants qualifyto attend and participate. ing on the basis of education will B r a h m s Choral Prelude entitled Lowered Voting Age This coming week-end the midnot be required to take a written Campus Young Democrats a r e western division convention of the "There Is a Rose in F l o w e r ; " an test but will be rated on the incirculating petitions which concern Association of International Rela- air and rondo by the seventeenth- f o r m a t i o n in their application form the reduction of t h e Michigan vot- tions Clubs is being held a t Mc- century English composer Henry and information f r o m schools and ing age to eighteen. Murry College f o r Women in Jack- Purcell; the " P e r p e t u a l Motion" of employers. There is no closing date The action is aimed at h a v i n g sonville, Illinois. Representing Hope J o h a n n S t r a u s s ; and "Village Mus- f o r receipt of applications. evidence which will aid in u r g i n g College will be Dr. Donald Brown, F u r t h e r details and instructions ic" by Douglas Moore. Mr. Moore the legislature to place the question Dave Van E e n e n a a m , Gene Te on where to send applications are is a t present on the faculty of on the ballot f o r consideration by Hennepe, Dave Dethmers, a n d given in the examination announceColumbia University, and explains the people of the state. L a r r y Siedentop, General Secretary m e n t , No. 51. Announcements and The movement is sponsored by of the mid-western association. that his composition is a musical application f o r m s m a y be obtained the Michigan Young Democrat s t a t e Among the m a n y speakers will be description of life in a small rural f r o m college Placement Offices or committee, which printed and pri- the very prominent H a n s J . Mor- community in Ohio some f i f t y y e a r s direct f r o m the U. S. Civil Service marily distributed the petitions. genthau, political science author. ago. Commission, Washington 25, D. C.

Carnival to Offer 2nd Childhood to All

I.R.C. to Feature Speaker and Trip

Symphonette to Give Pre-Tour Concert


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Page Two

HOPE

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Member Associated Collegiate Press PRESS

Published every week by the students of Hope College except during holiday or examination periods. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at a special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $1.00 per year.

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COLLEGE

Beating Our Own Drum This space is usually reserved f o r p r o f o u n d words f r o m t h e editors, r e p o r t s of t h e i r philosophies on a c u r r e n t issue, or s o m e t h i n g s i m i l a r to a lecture. Read on, and you'll see t h a t we're covering no such problem today. W h a t we a r e doing is kicking up o u r heels in m e r r i m e n t . We c a n ' t help f e e l i n g good! Look a r o u n d you . . . can you see w h y ? No? . . . well look a g a i n , and b r e a t h e in and f e e l t h e e n t i r e a t m o s p h e r e p e r v a d i n g you. You've g o t it . . . s p r i n g is a g a i n coming to Michigan. W e heard r u m o r s to t h a t effect all w i n t e r , but only recently have we begun to believe t h a t t h e y w e r e not ill-founded. It's more t h a n this, however. More t h a n a c h a n g e of season is necessary to produce a f e e l i n g this e x h i l i r a t i n g . We've t a k e n stock of o u r e n v i r o n m e n t , and f o u n d it to be quite s a t i s f a c t o r y . J u s t recently we've had several all-college a f f a i r s . The f o r m a l p a r t y was a confirmed success, the S i n g inspired f r i e n d l y r i v a l r y , and I n t e r n a t i o n a l N i g h t produced a g r e a t e r a w a r e n e s s and deeper u n d e r s t a n d i n g of o u r m o r e d i s t a n t neighbors. This s t r e s s increases t o l e r a t i o n , not only of those of different r a c e s and creeds, but also of each o t h e r r i g h t h e r e a t Hope. A l t h o u g h every d a y we m a y have t i n g e s of f e e l i n g s of i n s e c u r i t y and u n s u r e n e s s concerning our social and scholastic s t a n d i n g s , w e a r e gene r a l l y r e a s s u r e d rapidly by t h e exchange of a f r i e n d l y smile. I n s e c u r i t y is a f e e l i n g which is highly expendable in such an a t m o s p h e r e . F o r m o s t of us here, t h e r e will not o f t e n r e c u r t h i s secureness. The world outside of Hope is not such a bad place to be in, but a s m a n y of us will be t h e r e b e f o r e long, we a r e especially a w a r e and a p p r e c i a t i v e of t h e closeness t h e r e is on c a m p u s . F o r us, Hope combines m a n y good t h i n g s s u c c e s s f u l l y , and we're glad to be a r o u n d . W e ' r e l e a r n i n g lots, b u t especially w e ' r e learning t h a t t h i s had m e a n i n g to it: Spies! Suspicions! Smear campaigns! Kinseyitis! Mounting delinquency! W h a t t a world — w h a t t a world! How Can you t r u s t a n y b o d y ? How Can you feel decently hopeful About This crazy g e n e r a t i o n ? This screwball w o r l d ? This f r u s t r a t i n g life? This — 0 , you add Your s p a d e f u l of cynicism! Funny thing though Chap named Claudius About t h i n g s Round 50 B.C. HE said,— "I've been w o r r i e d . " Look! If t h i n g s a r e Going to the d o g s — Then the dogs H a v e had an a w f u l long w a i t ! D'you h e a r About the folk Who a r e n ' t Spies D r u g addicts Kidnappers Traitors Wife-beaters Seducers ? No! 'Course not! Don't become a victim of "Headline neurosis." A L L isn't well with t h e world. But A heck of a lot IS.

From the

EDITOR'S DESK Hope College and Beauty E v e n he who is the m o s t m u n d a n e of collegians can scarcely deny t h a t t h e r e a r e m o m e n t s in t h e h u m d r u m life of t h e college s t u d e n t , as t h e r e a r e in t h e lives of all who belong to t h e e a r t h and s h a r e in h e r soul, when t h e h e a r t of t h e i n n e r being is a w a k e n e d and s t i r r e d to life. In guises r a n g i n g f r o m t h e fulfilling w a r m t h of joining in t h e A l m a M a t e r a f t e r the Sing, to t h a t first m o m e n t when a h u m a n realizes the joy of loving and being loved, comes t h a t m y s t e r i o u s e l e m e n t of m a n ' s existence which so moves h i m ; which slips so easily f r o m t h e conciousness of the collegian in his e a t - s t u d y - s l e e p r o u t i n e ; and which, if labeled, m a y best be called simply b e a u t y , goddess of m a n y and p r o f o u n d l y simple f o r m s . An ability to respond to h e r call is vitally essential to the "whole of m a n " which Hope s t r i v e s to " e d u c a t e f o r t h e whole of life." To spend t i m e in m e d i t a t i o n upon h e r can indeed t h e n be f r u i t f u l . How best to open one's being to her is to seek her, find her, and know here. " W h e r e shall you seek b e a u t y , and how shall you find h e r unless she herself be your w a y and y o u r g u i d e ? And how shall you s p e a k of h e r except she be t h e w e a v e r of your s p e e c h ? The a g g r i e v e d and t h e i n j u r e d say, " B e a u t y is kind and gentle. Like a y o u n g m o t h e r , h a l f - s h y of h e r own glory she w a l k s a m o n g us." And t h e p a s s i o n a t e s a y . N a y , b e a u t y is a t h i n g of m i g h t and dread. Like t h e t e m p e s t she s h a k e s t h e e a r t h b e n e a t h us and the sky above us.! • The tired and the w e a r y say. B e a u t y is of s o f t w h i s p e r i n g s . She s p e a k s in o u r spirit. H e r voice yields to o u r silences like a f a i n t light t h a t q u i v e r s in f e a r of the shadow. But the restless say, W e have h e a r d h e r s h o u t i n g a m o n g the mountains, And with her cries c a m e the sound of h o o f s and the b e a t i n g of w i n g s and the r o a r i n g of lions. A t night t h e w a t c h m e n of the city say, B e a u t y shall rise w i t h the d a w n f r o m t h e east. And a t noontide the toilers and the w a y f a r e r s say, We h a v e seen h e r leaning over the e a r t h f r o m the windows of the s u n s e t . In w i n t e r say t h e snow-bound, She shall come with t h e s p r i n g leaping upon the hills. And in t h e s u m m e r h e a t the r e a p e r s say, We have seen h e r dancing with the a u t u m n leaves, and we s a w a d r i f t of snow in h e r h a i r . All these t h i n g s have you said of beauty. Yet in t r u t h you spoke not of h e r , but of needs unsatisfied. And b e a u t y is not a need but an ecstasy. It is not a m o u t h t h i r s t i n g n o r a n e m p t y h a n d s t r e t c h e d f o r t h , But r a t h e r a h e a r t enflamed and a soul e n c h a n t e d . I t is not t h e i m a g e you would see n o r the s o n g you would h e a r . But r a t h e r a n i m a g e you see t h o u g h you close y o u r eyes And a s o n g you h e a r t h o u g h you s h u t y o u r e a r s . It is not t h e s a p within the f u r r o w e d b a r k , n o r a w i n g a t t a c h e d to a claw. But r a t h e r a g a r d e n f o r e v e r in bloom and a flock of a n g e l s f o r e v e r in flight. People of Orphalese, b e a u t y is life when life unveils h e r holy face. B u t you a r e life and you a r e t h e veil. B e a u t y is e t e r n i t y g a z i n g a t itself in a m i r r o r . But you a r e e t e r n i t y and you a r e t h e m i r r o r . "

-S. L. S.

liy

More Fun! In the c o m p a n y of friends h o m e ward b o u n d you can make it a " p a r t y " all the way. There's room to roam, time to visit, and nothing to worry a b o u t .

More Comfort! Restful coaches, loads of luggage space, refreshments and swell meals en route. N o t o u g h driving o n crowded highways. N o waiting for skies to clear. Yessir, the train is t o p s in t r a n s p o r t a t i o n !

What Savings!

-R1T Reporter — M . W.

Give yourself a "Scotch t r e a t " by teaming up with two or more friends b o u n d for your h o m e town. O n trips of 100 miles or more, y o u ' l l each save 25fl) o n r o u n d trip coach tickets using GROUP ECONOMY FARES!* And here's another b a r g a i n ! R o u n d u p 25 or more to travel long-distance together on the same homeward train. T h e n return singly or together, and you each save 28% of regular r o u n d trip fare. * Except for local travel between New YorkWashington and points east of Lancaster, Pa.

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HOPE

Mr. E d i t o r : Of prejudice in t h a t f o r g o t t e n s t a t e Sing heavenly Muse, and fill my h e a r t with thoughts, And words, so to put f o r t h my deep intents Which otherwise expressed m i g h t wrongly use The minds of those f o r whom I sing in these Celestial strains. Me c a r r y f a r beyond The limits of my body's sense into The realm of spirits f a r above where I May see and h e a r of t h a t which was and is And is to come. W h e r e f o r e do men in these. The p a g e s of our college p a p e r w r i t e ? Men be they? or t h a t which men nor even Beast can tolerate within the s t r u c t u r e Of our f a i r college walls. N o r can I now The editors of our deep paper ken Who in their work do nicely t h u s allow Such tripe a place to t a k e beside the news And all such worthwhile things. It seems to me T h a t j u s t because the U. of Mississippi Should in a w f u l w r a t h their learned Scholiast's Contract break proves no exculpation f o r Him to hurl such insults at our heads. Why, When we had our guest to lecture us on Subjects consentaneous to all, we did Not e'en belittle him when it w a s found T h a t on his back he wore t h e s t a m p of a Great tailor of Genevan f a m e . In f a c t . Once he confessed a democrat to be. And to have f o r gone T r u m a n a good vote Back in the long f o r g o t t e n p a s t e'en giv'n. Him then, yet then, we t h r e a t e n e d not to hang. And doth he think t h a t we in this good place To problems large of s e g r e g a t i o n be All blind, and deaf, and dumb, and are not now Yet r e a d y such g r e a t t h i n g s to f a c e within The hallowed halls of Holland's H o p e ? Think not. Good sir, t h a t we of colors f r i g h t e n e d a r e ; N o t h i n g better do we like t h a n t h a t all College life be permeated with s t r a n g e Peoples f r o m every realm beneath the sun. And not with worldly nationalities Is our desire yet satisfied; f o r we Believe in every creed and every god, Represented here a t least to be; And If 'tis possible assimilate all This within the s t r u c t u r e of our t h o u g h t ; Broadminded then we doubtless do become; Some such word as ecumenical I Think 'tis called. And if a m a n there be, or Woman, f o r lately h a t h it seemed t h a t they Have more attacked been, who is by name Of a religious nondescript, or if You would p r e f e r the term a precisian Yclept, he sorely persecuted is; And r i g h t l y so — f o r w h a t worse beast could on The f a c e of e a r t h y dust his f o o t s t e p s leave. When as a long lost dinosaur of old Who wandered o'er the e a r t h with peanut brain. Destroying, wrecking, mutilating, and Of all the worst, consuming h u m a n flesh. So do these c r e a t u r e s t r a m p l e on all else Besides the bit wherein their t r u e concerns Do lie, condemning worthy t h i n g s which are, In f a c t of t r u t h , completely without harm. These folk, if such they m a y in honesty Be called, do still believe the Bible now To be the will of God revealed to man, F r o m timeless age to timeless age beyond All understanding of the s t r e n g t h of men. And w h a t is worse, they preach t h e wornout creeds Of olden fashioned, leprous, and highflown Words which have the power to nauseate our minds — Those ideals which collapsed so long ago Of a Reformed f a i t h held closely bound By Catechisms quaint which Heidelberg's Proud authors wrote back in the days when these Convictions stood f o r something close to h e a r t .

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A N C H O R

Page Three

Oh Muse, inspirer of my h e a r t , r e t u r n To whisk a w a y beclouding webbs of mind And t h o u g h t ; allow me now to see within T h e f u r t h e r souls of men; j u s t how t h e y work, And eat, and play may I determine by Thy vast and p e n e t r a t i n g light. These, yes. These which I have just bespoken of, do D e m o n s t r a t e o f t times audacious nerve, and Have credenda firm, midst storm's d i s t r e s s e s Through fiery s t a t e m e n t and the h e a t of t h a t Great passion which made L u t h e r s t r o n g , by which They stand no m a t t e r w h a t comes to t h e i r door, Repulsing t h r e a t s and leaving us f o r l o r n . They're odd indeed — I t h o u g h t them long extinct. But recently I spoke to one, who seemed E'en d u m b e r t h a n I had supposed. And I W a s shocked, but quickly saw t h a t in his heart No hope t h e r e w a s of change. They'll always be, I'm much a f r a i d , r i g h t in the way to h a l t . And hinder, a n d recede. N e x t on his list Of t a r g e t s is t h e social plan 'pon which The h a r s h e s t incrim'nation he doth hurl. Tell me, oh spirit of the nine, of all T h a t wisdom b r i n g s to men in search of h e r ; Fill up my mind with f r e e d o m ' s voice t h a t I May speak with brightness as of m o r n i n g s t a r To wretched m e n who in their knowledge false Do mockery o'er all the e a r t h spread wide. And o f t a g a i n s t F r a t e r n i t i e s , which are, As all men know, the wisest and the best Of groups to which a lad belongs. Does he, Of whom I s p a k e a moment past, in f a c t . Believe t h a t he all of a college fools. His wit is not becoming t o an one Who doth not e'en belong with us in this Great movement f a r and widespread flung whose will Is but to teach a f r e s h m a n w h a t is m e a n t By servitude and t r u e humility. Can t h e r e be something wrong with t h a t ? And if. Of course it is not true, we do t r a n s p o r t The d e a r s out to a distant place, we w a n t To say the a v e r a g e ride is nothing more T h a n t h i r t y miles at the outside, with all The d a n g e r s of the woods removed, because E ' e n in this rough, unsettled Middle W e s t There a r e those means of t r a n s p o r t a t i o n which Are now the r a g e in civil E a s t ; I mean, Of course, the s t a g e with horses f o u r which makes A nightly r u n f r o m Allegan a t one. And in its course doth quickly speed t h e lads Which in our glee we did take out, t h e r e to Suffer all alone in h e a l t h f u l , lovely Agony, as did the chariots of g r e a t . Ancient Rome into the thickest b a t t l e Fly with re-inforcements t h a t t h e legions A g a i n e m e r g e victorious might. And if In certain deeds, as f o r example with I n f o r m a l night, when there a r e then, to say The very least, some crass and filthy, low Unpublishable, and repulsive t h i n g s Which to a mind unused to life m i g h t seem A bit absurd, y e t these a r e all a piece Of t h a t which in our college slang we call " T r u e living." And to end all useless speech And a r g u m e n t i n g sweet, I say the new And I g n o r a n t pledges eat it up! So t h e r e ! And as f o r " B a m a Blood," why I w a s shocked. Since h e r e a t Hope we ne'er to violence are A t all allured, save when a cackling hen F r o m W.C.T.U. invades our grounds With blood hound noses sniffing a t our b r e a t h s To seek a sign as to our alcohol Consumption and our smoking f u n . It b u r n s Me up, indeed it does, to see such t h i n g s ; F o r Christian's lives are f r e e indeed — in word. And t h o u g h t , and action. And in b a t t l e m u s t Our cry resound of Christian liberty! One more t h i n g I f a i n would add; I t r u s t t h a t I have not too long gone on in veins Of deep contempt, but I contend t h a t h e r e In these our sacred vales one need not e'er Himself concern about our souls and t h e i r E t e r n a l destination, not as long As there in D u r f e e ' s shelves one t e a cup doth Remain f o r us to g r a n t t r u e yielded f a i t h . As genuine a s you please, though not q u i t e right. As even t h a t m i g h t have a tendency To be a bit specific. Now I know T h a t to be a l t o g e t h e r in the r i g h t I ought p e r h a p s to challenge to a duel T h e m a n t h a t t h u s offends. But I shall now Count up to t e n and then be quite c o n t e n t ; F o r I a m without question j u s t about The most completely tol'rant g u y a r o u n d . Sincerely yours,

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Delphis, Arkies Cop Sing Cups On F r i d a y , the ninth of March, at 8:00 p.m. in Hope Memorial Chapel, Ted Redding announced the first n u m b e r on the p r o g r a m and thus began the annual All-College Sing f o r t h e seventeenth s t r a i g h t year. This traditional event was a witness to outstanding and superlative performance, in scene and song,. and set the precedent f o r years to come. The Thesaurian Society began the p r o g r a m by singing "Mr. J i m " by Malotte, a serious ballad of t h e American Negro. T w e n t y - t w o strong, they were dressed colorfully and a p p r o p r i a t e l y in black skirts, white blouses and red suspenders. The forty-seven men of E m e r sonian, in d a r k jackets, light trousers, and red ties, presented t h e strains of " H a l l e l u j a h " a s their bid for the number-one position. Sorosis was next, wearing blue skirts and white blazers with medallions of their Greek l etters on t h e breast pocket of each blazer. They gave an example of showmanship and h a r m o n y , singing "Old K i n g Cole" a r r a n g e d by F o s y t h . They were followed by F r a t e r n a l , under the hand of Gordon Meeusen, who led his f r a t e r n i t y in the Sing for the third s t r a i g h t year. Dressed in blue sport jackets and g r e y trousers, they were t h e best in appearance of all the f r a t e r n i t i e s present. The F r a t e r n a l Society s a n g the lusty, virile song " L e t There Be Music," by Williams. In red bow ties and white collars, blue s w e a t e r s and skirts, the Sibyllines s a n g the gay, skipping song by Gershwin, "Of Thee I Sing." The Cosmopolitan F r a t e r n i t y , directed by Neal P e t t y , centered their aspirations on "The N a v y H y m n " dedicated to all those who had died in t h e service. Dressed in d a r k suits, and seventy s t r o n g , they s a n g with delicate shading and f e a t u r e d a baritone section solo with musical backing f r o m the other parts. Delphi, under t h e direction of Marcia Veldman, s a n g the W a r i n g a r r a n g e m e n t of an old Scottish song. They were significantly clad in Scottish plaid h a t s and handkerchiefs, with white blouses and black skirts. The song, "Comin' Thru the Rye," w a s a gay piece about lads and lassies in the Highlands. Giving the rendition "One World," by O'Hara, and uniformly attired in d a r k suits and maroon bow ties, the Arcadians p e r f o r m e d in traditional style with an appealing f o r t i s s i m o . Announced as the youngest sorority on the campus "now and f o r many years to come," the F r e s h man society, A.S.A., in red kerchiefs, white and blue blouses and skirts respectively, s a n g a humorous rendition entitled "New River Train." U n d e r the second s t r a i g h t y e a r of direction , by Nick Pool, the Knickerbocker Society ended the men's competition by singing a humorous a r r a n g e m e n t by Loesser called by the superflous title, " T h e New Ashmolean Marching Society and S t u d e n t s ' Conservatory Band." Dorian, directed by Ann Bloodgood, w a s t h e l a s t of t h e competing g r o u p s to p e r f o r m . They s a n g "Sea Moods," by Tyson-Benham, picturesquely dressed in a l t e r n a t ing s h a d e s of blue, representing the waves of the ocean. T h e y made an admirable bid f o r a f o u r t h s t r a i g h t win. (Continued on p a g e 5)

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Page Four

HOPE

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

Report of Council Committee On Committees For the p a s t f e w weeks a student committee h a s been quite active in presenting an appeal f o r the World University Service f u n d . P a r a m o u n t was a novel function at the W a r m Friend with a "fine" collected f o r t h a t time, a f t e r 12:00 midnight, to which girls prolonged t h e i r dates; another request was made upon the eleven sororities and f r a t e r n i t i e s on campus. The request, presented by individuals f r o m the societies, picked by the committee, implied that each society should contribute a certain, set amount, levied according to the membership of the society. While this may, or may not have been considered by t h e committee, it is a p p a r e n t t h a t if a society did not contribute the suggested amount, or did not contribute as an organization, it would seem t h a t t h e delinquent society would stand out as uncooperative

and, possibly, even selfish. This appeal then, seemed to use social pressure as a means to the end of the W U S f u n d . It is presupposed that we, as students in a Christian college, give out of a concern and love f o r others and t h a t principle alone should govern our giving. If we are compelled to give, to maintain our s t a t u s as a group, we defeat the whole purpose of giving itself. With these considerations in mind, it is suggested t h a t in the f u t u r e ; donations a r e to be presented as resting on the responsibility of the individual alone, and t h a t even on this personal level, social pressure is not to be used but relegated to a competitive economic realm that exists outside, and should be left outside, the motivations of the individual Christian. —W. H. L a t h a m (Continued on page 5)

Fuibright Grants Available to Hopeites The I n s t i t u t e of International Education, 1 E a s t 67th S t r e e t , New York City, h a s published a News Bulletin this month, explaining the meaning of a Fuibright scholar and the a d v a n t a g e s of a y e a r abroad. In this bulletin a r e explained the requirements and selection of graduate students f o r the F u i b r i g h t g r a n t s . It clears up the false impression t h a t the purpose of the Fuibright p r o g r a m is to help bright students get Ph.D's. On the contrary, the most i m p o r t a n t requirements are academic qualification, ability t o w o r k independently, stated purpose and a pleasing personality. Academic qualification does not necessarily mean one must be a candidate f o r an advanced degree, or committed to an academic career, but students who would profit by a y e a r in a foreign university. The F u i b r i g h t p r o g r a m is p a r t of the international educational exchange activity of the D e p a r t m e n t of State. The Fuibright Act authorizes the use of f o r e i g n currencies and credits acquired t h r o u g h the sale of surplus p r o p e r t y abroad f o r educational exchange. This money

or capital pays the expenses of American students studying abroad and pays the travel expenses of foreign students coming to the United States. Besides the student provisions, the program provides g r a n t s f o r American teachers, professors and lecturers to go abroad. Since the F u i b r i g h t p r o g r a m ' s inception, 5,549 American students have gone to 27 countries in the eight years of its operation. P r o g r a m Affects Hope The F u i b r i g h t program affects Hope College students just as it affects students of the large state universities, because the selection committee is t r y i n g to represent the United States abroad. As a result, students f r o m all over the United States are considered on their personal qualifications and not on the school they are attending. Italy will offer fellowships to American g r a d u a t e students f o r the 1956-57 academic year, Kenneth Holland, the President of the Institute of International Education, announced yesterday. Competetion for these p a r t i c u l a r fellowships will close April 1, 1956.

Western Michigan's

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The following a r e the proposed recommendations f o r the change of the S t u d e n t Council Committee System. The committees are broken down into five fields: education, culture, religion, social, and student affairs. NSA is also included in this report. I. Education committee. A. P u r p o s e : tD promote an interest in scholarship and education. B. Membership shall consist of six student council members. C. Suggested fields of activity. 1. To create a file of past exams, so t h a t all students would have an equal opportunity to see type of exams given by a professor previously. 2. To publish information on scholorships and g r a d u a t e fellowships which m a y act as an incentive f o r lower classmen. 3. To develop an honor code. II. Cultural committee. A. Purpose: To c a r r y out the basic planning and coordination of cultural p r o g r a m f o r the college. B. Membership shall consist of 4 fine a r t s students, 2 student council members and 2 faculty members. C. Functions. 1. Aid in planning of events. 2. Be responsible f o r publicity; f o r their schedule of events. 3. Be responsible f o r apportioning of the budget f o r this p r o g r a m . III. Religious committee. This recommendation is made to the Chapel committee, which is a faculty-student committee. A. P u r p o s e : to create an interest in chapel services and the religious p r o g r a m on Hope's campus. B. Proposed membership is the 11 faculty members and 6 students consisting of 4 Y members, 2 being cabinet members, and 2 student council members. This would double the present student membership. Addition of the Y members m a y also aid in coordinating p r o g r a m s . C. Functions: 1. To enlist chapel speakers. 2. C a r r y on the present duties of the chapel committee. IV. Social committee. A. P u r p o s e : to be responsible f o r the student social p r o g r a m on campus. B. Membership. 1. Chairman shall be a student council member. 2. One member of W.A.L. 3. One member of W.A.A. 4. One f e m a l e s t u d e n t at large, a sophomore.

5. One male student at large, a sophomore. 6. One f e m a l e s t u d e n t at large, a junior. 7. One male s t u d e n t at large, a junior. 8. One member f r o m each Y group. C. Functions. 1. To schedule and be responsible f o r student activities in the college d a t e book. 2. To be responsible f o r arr a n g e m e n t of all student events. V. Student Affairs committee. A. Purpose: to relieve student council of burden of many unconnected committees. B. Membership shall be 8 student council members. C. Function. 1. To take complaints and suggestions of students and and channel them to related committees or if no committee exists to f o r m u l a t e and act upon such requests. VI. National Student committee.

Association

A. Purpose: to make use of and promote NSA information on campus. B. Membership. 1. Two f r e s h m a n appointed on a trial period. 2. Two sophomores. 3. Two juniors. 4. Two seniors a f t e r the first year. 5. There shall be c a r r y over of all members if work is satisfactory e x c e p t for f r e s h m a n members, w h o will be on a t e m p o r a r y basis f o r the first year. In addition to the above committee f o r m a t i o n s it is proposed to disband the Buildingand Grounds committee and the Dining Hall committee. The main purpose of these changes is to relieve the student council of the burden of many small, essentially related committees which are present during an annual session of the council. This report is designed to provide a system of committees with a direct line of hierarchy for efficiency in function and purpose. It h a s created a system of committees t h a t may in one way or a n o t h e r be related to every phase of campus life. The removal of the Dining Hall and Building and Grounds committees was accomplished mainly because they have become somewhat redundant and are no longer fulfilling purposes f o r which they were created. Due to the space this report would entail if it were complete, it is advisable t h a t every student read the full committee report posted upon the Student Council Bulletin Board. (Continued on p a g e 5)

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Food, Salm Tour Prove Successful Those who attended the International N i g h t banquet and prog r a m last S a t u r d a y found themselves c a u g h t up in a cloud of foreign f r a g r a n c e and f r i e n d s h i p . The pervading a t m o s p h e r e was one of wholesomeness a n d gentility manifested in the fellowship of fine individuals f r o m all p a r t s of the world. The evening opened informally as the g u e s t s arrived to enjoy f r u i t punch and chips. Many of the f o r eign s t u d e n t s came in the costumes of their homes, and several of t h e missionaries and other g u e s t s f r o m town, a s well as the members of the Alcor society appeared in the dress of various countries. This time provided a chance f o r those interested to circulate and become better acquainted with t h e individuals, the c u s t o m a r y dress, and the habits of other countries, and to inspect a fine Indian display set up in the lounge. At the ringing of the dinner bell, all filed into a candlelit Terrace Room to enjoy the foods of m a n y lands. Included in the menu were a Hawaiian f r u i t salad, J a p a n e s e t e m p u r a , very t a s t y chicken prepared in the Italian style, au Gratin potatoes, cauliflower, German rolls, Mexican tamales, and a choice of Brazilian coffee or wonderfully f r a g r a n t Chinese J a s m i n e Tea. The dessert was r a t h e r American, but the names a t least were f o r e i g n : French Vanilla ice cream with Brazilian pecan squares. We were not once allowed to f o r g e t the emphasis placed on the world at Hope, for, h a n g i n g f r o m a central point in the ceiling w a s a large moveable a b s t r a c t f o r m , beautifully conceived and" well-constructed, r e p r e s e n t i n g the entire e a r t h . A t the close of the meal, f o r e i g n students f r o m Hope College and Western Seminary were introduced, most of whom took p a r t in t h e p r o g r a m which was to follow. " A r o u n d the World at H o p e " was accomplished by an i n g e n i o u s American tourist, Nell Salm, who, having borrowed Captain Marvel's magic wand " S h a z a m " , t r a n s p o r t e d the entire audience with h e r on h e r brief but experience-filled tour. A f t e r b r i e f i n g us on our destination by use of a g r e a t backdrop of the world. Miss Salm ushered us to the Netherlands where we learned a g r e a t deal about Dutch dirt, dikes, and d a t i n g , t h a n k s to John Helmus, H a n k Van Essen, H e t t y Vos, J o h n Drost, John Vander Male, and Louise Zilverberg. Having been to England as Holland's Community Ambassador, Nell was most interested in r e t u r n i n g to t h a t country. Therefore, we all went along with her. There we found Chris Denny who held a r a p t l y attentive audience by her presentation of a scene f r o m " A s You Like It", one of the m a n y plays of E n g l a n d ' s pride, William Shakespeare. W e liked it! We l e f t E n g l a n d and E u r o p e to make a short stop in Syria. We became acquainted there with Slivo Barkho, who gave us a sampling of the i n t r i g u i n g style of singing common to his people. It was a short j a u n t f r o m Syria to Iraq where Mary B a n n a danced beautifully a dance of the Iraqian women. A very fine t r i b u t e w a s given America on our next stop by Suphan S o t t h i t a d a . He read to us t communication s e n t f r o m the k i n g of his country, Thailand, to the President of t h e U.S. in 1833, and a t the close, w a r m l y expressed the g r a t i t u d e and good wishes of the Thai people to us Americans. Nell f o u n d herself somewhat uncomfortable on our next stop. Reiko Kim and Mitsue N a g a o , two lovely J a p a n e s e young ladies served her t e a in t h e i r c u s t o m a r y m a n n e r , (Continued on p a g e 6)


HOPE

Moore, Jonker to Present Recitals Two s t u d e n t recitals will be presented by the Hope College Music D e p a r t m e n t d u r i n g the coming week. Both will be held in the Chapel. On Tuesday, March 20, a t 8:30 p.m., Ruth Moore, pianist will appear in h e r senior recital. Among the selections on the p r o g r a m will be Beethoven's " A p p a s s i o n a t a , " Opus 57; "Ondine," by Debussy; a contempory composition by Swanson, and two numbers f r o m the Romantic E r a .

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

Student Council Minutes . . . Delphi, Arkies Sing Best . . . (Continued f r o m p^ge 4) N.S.A.—New members of N.S.A. committee a r e Bob Vander Lugt, Isla Van E e n e n a a m , and Blaine T i m m e r . T h e r e will be an In t ernational Relations seminar April 6-8 to which we are asked to send representatives. On May 19 t h e r e will be a regional assembly to prep a r e m e m b e r s f o r the National Congress. Hope will be presenting their p r o g r a m on Student Government at Ann Arbor next fall. The Social committee s u g g e s t s t h a t the $40 profit received f r o m the All-College F o r m a l be given to the college building p r o g r a m .

Nelvie J o n k e r , contralto, will preThe L i b r a r y Committee feels that sent h e r senior recital at 8:15 p.m. on T h u r s d a y , March 22. Composi- the main room of the library has tions by French, German, Italian become a study hall r a t h e r than a and English composers will be in- reference room. They present the cluded in the p r o g r a m . Miss J o n k e r following questions f o r student conwill sing German Lieder by Mahler sideration: 1. How can we best use our presand an Italian a r i a by Rossi, as ent library facilities? well as selections by Handel, Gluck, 2. W h a t can we do to improve Bridge, C a r p e n t e r , and Rachmaninthem right now? off. H e r accompanist will be Ann 3. W h a t can we do to provide f o r Bloodgood. f u t u r e library facilities when enrollment increases ? Patronize Your Advertizer

Peace and Joe Hope F o r countless centuries, it h a s been the s u p r e m e desire of men over all the world to secure a lasting peace on t h i s w a r - w e a r y planet of E a r t h . The sin in men's h e a r t s , however, h a s dominated their actions, and t h e f e r v e n t hope f o r a pacific existence in this life h a s remained only a hope. Today, as in all previous eras, men still y e a r n f o r t h a t which t h e i r f o r e f a t h e r s yearned. Yet, the world is as f a r distant f r o m the realization of the fond dream of its i n h a b i t a n t s as it h a s ever been. F o r the c r e a t u r e s of God's creation have failed to realize that peace is built on mutual understanding alone; t h a t such understanding is built on b r o t h e r l y love; t h a t love's foundation is giving; and t h a t giving itself consists of humbly ministering to one's fellow men. Only when a man or a generation drinks willingly of the cup of humility and serves with total d i s r e g a r d of self-gain, will the cornerstone f o r peace have been laid.

(Continued f r o m page 3) While awaiting the decision of the judges, three non-competing groups entertained the audience. The Durfee waiters, under the direction of Jim Neevel, offered the college version of "Sixteen Ton." A group of senior girls, known as the Minors, under the guidance of Miss Veldman, sang two selections, "In the Still of the N i g h t , " a n d "W h i s 11 e Mary, Whistle." Directed by Mrs. Chester Oonk, the Hope-Ives presented "Dish P a n Blues," " D a s h i n g Off to School" and "Count Your Blessings." Group singing was employed while awaiting the decision of the judges. A f t e r fifteen minutes of deliberation, the judges gave Barbara Klomparens and Ted Redding, the "emcees" f o r the evening, the envelopes containing the all-important choices. In the sororities, Delphi took first place, and A.S.A. was awarded runner up position. In the f r a t e r n ities, the Arcadians marched off with the t r o p h y and amid much rejoicing the Knickerbocker Society was awarded the close second place decision. The judges were emphatic in announcing t h a t never before had they wittnessed such keen p e r f o r m ance, and consequent difficulty in choice. Thanks should be extended to all those who made this traditional college event possible: B a r b a r a Klomparens and Ted Redding, Cochairmen: Dr. Cavanaugh, t h e faculty advisor; the judges: # Miss M a r g a r e t Van Vyven, Mr. Marvin Bass and Mr. Willard F a s t ; and all those who worked diligently to make this an outstanding sing.

Page Five

Coming Assembly Schedule Announced T h e Cultural P r o g r a m Committee, announces t h e following schedule of speakers and musical prog r a m s to a p p e a r on succeeding Wednesday mornings at 11:10 in the Hope Memorial Chapel. The student body and general public are invited to a t t e n d : Wednesday, March 21: Concert by the Hope College Orchestra with Janice Conklin as French Horn soloist. The p r o g r a m will include music by Mozart and Enesco, as well as a number of light classical selections.

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The history of the world h a s been a series of such events. Yet, you and I somehow fail to learn. Two thousand years ago, a s u p r e m e effort w a s made to teach the foolish c r e a t u r e s of e a r t h how to find t h a t peace f o r which they strove t h r o u g h the life and sacrifice of a m a n called J e s u s . H e gave and H e served. He m a d e Himself t h e h u m b l e s t s e r v a n t of men. He lived and died t h a t we m i g h t see the lighted w a y to which we close our willful eyes. A Son w a s given t h a t w e m i g h t be t a u g h t to bless the world with t h e bounty we possess t h r o u g h a s h a r i n g of ourselves, and our possessions w i t h our fellows. Only when t h e youth, you, J o e Hope, humbly dedicate yourself to serve, i n your own level of society, will our country, o u r beliefs, a n d our God be glorified, and only when this is so will peace become more t h a n a t r i t e p h r a s e in the mouth of Bulganin. —S. L . S.

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M

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Into the h a n d s of the citizens of America, then, h a s been placed a g r a v e responsibility which m a y be ignored or accepted. It is the younger generation, the youth of the land: you and I, who will live and rule in the t i m e when the decision will be made to either adopt or r e f u t e the moral obligation it is their destiny to face. I t is to the youth t h a t the challenge is made, f o r the young a r e those who possess t h e vigor, the s t r e n g t h , the n a t u r a l enthusiasm, and the prospect of long lives which a r e t h e vital requisites of those who would s p a r k a nation to the winning of the peace. Indeed, it is the task of t h e younger generation to do so. I t alone h a s the ability and the potential. However, a generation which is p r i m a r i l y concerned with seeking its own pleasure and serving its own ends will lead the world only f a r t h e r f r o m a harmonious existence of all men. Such generations sucked the b r e a t h of life f r o m ancient Rome, and in l a t e r centuries, b r o u g h t two ugly world w a r s upon society. Previous y o u n g e r generations have demanded more wealth and power, and have received instead more agony and misery.

EASTER CANDY

Wednesday, March 28: Marshall Knappen, professor of Political Science at the University of MichEASTER SUNDAY igan, will speak on current probAPRIL 1ST lems in our relationship with Russia. WHITMAN'S Wednesday, April 18: Mr. John SAMPLER Nuveen, distinguished i nvestment b a n k e r f r o m Chicago, and trustee GILBERT'S of the University of Chicago, will PANAMA give an address entitled " L e t ' s T a k e a S t r a i g h t Look into the DE M E T ' S Future." T URTLES Wednesday, April 25: William Masselos, pianist f r o m the faculty of the Indiana University School of Music, and well-known recording a r t i s t , will be heard in a recital. Wednesday, May 9: Mr. Norman Select Yours Now While Selections Webster, recognized authority on Are Complete forensics, will be presented under Priced the auspices of the Speech Depart5/ from ment.

Many times in the history of the world, an opportunity to be such a s e r v a n t nation h a s been given to a people. Whenever God has g r a n t e d g r e a t m a t e r i a l blessing to a society. He has also granted it the privilege of u s i n g all t h a t it has in service to all of the peoples of the world. No nation, however, h a s ever so returned His g r e a t generosity to it. In early times, ancient Rome was richly endowed with t h e pleasures of life. The wealth and g r a n d e u r of Roman civilization have long been legendary. U n f a t h o m a b l e riches and g r e a t l u x u r y were hers. Yet, ruled by p a g a n gods and instincts, she lived only f o r herself, ignoring the pitiable plight of her conquered, w r i t h i n g empire. U t i m a t e l y , her splendor and glory were taken f r o m her. T h r o u g h her f a i l u r e to use properly t h a t which she had, she becam u n w o r t h y of her own existence, and so it was taken f r o m her. H u n d r e d s of years and m a n y events have passed since the days of ancient Rome. During much of this time, no single nation had been given the g r e a t g i f t s of this life which were Rome's. No nation had been chosen to receive once again such bounteous blessings. Then the United S t a t e s of America entered upon the scene of history. In the land were found infinite f o r t u n e and potential wealth, and in her democratic ideals f o r the governing of her people is found a gem which d w a r f s the g r e a t e s t accumulated t r e a s u r e s of the world. It is f a r f r o m a hidden f a c t t h a t the people of the U.S. a r e living a t a higher and h a p p i e r level t h a n those of any other country on e a r t h , and t h a t an even g r e a t e r s t a n d a r d of living is a bright and probable prospect.

Wednesday, May 16: The Hon. John Dethmers, Chief J u s t i c e of the Michigan Supreme Court, and graduate of Hope College, will speak on "The F u t u r e of International Law." Wednesday, May 23: Concert by the Hope College Hand. W e a t h e r permitting, this will be held under the t r e e s in Pine Grove.

::: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

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Page Six

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On March 7th, the Planning Committee f o r the M.I.A.A. met a t Schuler's in Marshall to plan the coming spring activities. Representing Hope were Miss Breid, Suzie Van Slageren, Mary Hesselink, and Betty J . B u r n e t t .

One of t h e federal g o v e r n m e n t agencies t h a t has been the most active recruiter of college g r a d u ates and is likely to remain so f o r some time is the Bureau of OldAge and Survivors Insurance of the D e p a r t m e n t of Health, Education, and W e l f a r e ( O A S I ) . This bureau relates itself to the world's l a r g e s t insurance p r o g r a m as it presently concerns itself with annual disbursements totaling about 5 billion dollars to a p p r o x i m a t e l y 7 ^ million American citizens. By 1975 OASI anticipates t h a t an estimated 90 million people will be covered by its p r o g r a m and t h a t more t h a n 16 ^ millions of our citizens will be receiving monthly benefits through the offices of OASI. Obviously a brief consideration of the above leads the college student, interested in the field of social service, to conclude t h a t OASI f a c e s a real task in staffing its bureau with qualified college g r a d u a t e s . From information made public by OASI, college g r a d u a t e s with majors in the various social studies, English, education, business administration, and languages become eligible to q u a l i f y f o r positions with OASI by w a y of the Federal Service E n t r a n c e Examinations. Those who qualify v/ill receive an initial r a t i n g of GS-6 with s t a r t i n g salary of $4,080, a s of the present, and in two years would find it possible to have a GS-8 rating with a salary of $5,000. Subsequent advancements would depend on capability and opportunity. There m a y be a n u m b e r of students on our campus, f r e s h m a n , sophomores, and juniors, as v/ell as seniors who may wish to consider f u t u r e opportunities with OASI. Information can be secured f r o m the regional bureaus of OASI. The college Placement Office in conjunction with Mr. T i m m e r ' s office (VR 110) can supply additional information to those who a r e interested.

The Committee set the dates f o r the Tennis and Archery Tournament as May 10, 11, and 12. This year the competition between the M.I.A.A. colleges will be held at Albion. The Committee also decided to revise the present constitution of the M.I.A.A. Hope will do the revising and then present the revised copy to the other colleges for discussion and approval a t Albion during the Tennis and Archery Tournament. As f o r the activities of our own W.A.A., every F r i d a y f r o m 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. girls can bowl at the Holland Bowling Alley f o r 10c a line. This is a wonderful opportunity so be sure to come and t r y your skill. Also, the basketball i n t r a m u r a l s have almost been concluded. Upon their completion, Softball and mixed volleyball will begin. Watch f o r announcements for these coming events.

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Despite Red jamming attempts, Radio Free E u r o p e comes through powerfully and effect i v e l y t o 70 million h o p e f u l listeners behind the Iron Curtain. The truth of its broadcasts keeps alive faith and the will to resist. No wonder the Reds fear Radio Free Europe. No wonder the Iron Curtain captives take heavy risks t o listen. Make sure the truth gets through! Each dollar you contribute sponsors a Minute of Truth on Radio Free Europe. Keep its voice strong, free and effective. Official stations can give official views. Only Radio Free Europe can speak for the captives themselves! Send your Truth Dollars to—

Second semester bidding and lite r a r y meetings have been recent highlights of the f r a t s on Hope's Campus. The Cosmopolitans recently held a l i t e r a r y meeting a t which Mr. Willard De Pree gave a talk on psychological w a r f a r e . L a r r y Arends and Ted Du Mez have been choosen as the outstanding pledges f o r 1955-56. Their names will be engraved on the pledge award plaque which h a n g s in the lounge of the Cosmos house. F r a n k K r a a i and Bill Noorlag are the new Cosmo second semester pledges. Knick Project Nears Completion Activities about t h e K H N house are still centered around the library basement project which is now going into its final paint s t a g e . A1 Hill has been the p r o j e c t architect. Accepting second s e m e s t e r bids to the Knickerbocker f r a t e r n i t y were A1 Timmer, Keith E m e r s o n and Dale Visser. Mr. and Mrs. Roger R i e t b e r g recently entertained the Arkies with a p a r t y a t t h e i r house. New second semester pledges f o r the Arkies a r e Corwin Bredeweg,

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Dave De Ruiter, Don Knapp, Dick Schulz, W a r r e n V a n d e r Hill and H e r b Widmer. F e b r u a r y ' 24, a t the E m m i e House, was the scene of the E m mieDorian joint l i t e r a r y meeting. Richard Stadt, Don J a n s e n , J o h n Drost and Carl Coates a r e the new Emmie pledges. With the F r a t e r s considering a new constitution and by-laws meetings have been r a t h e r a b u n d a n t . J o h n A d a m s w a s recently elected president of the F r a t e r n a l Society f o r the Spring T e r m . Other officers a r e : Veep, Carlton Failor; Recording Secretary, Don Kroes; Corresponding Secretary, Judd De Young; T r e a s u r e r and I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Council Representative, Pete B y l e n g a ; and Keeper of the Archives, Dick Gantos. The F r a t e r s received two new pledges in second s e m e s t e r bidding, Don P a a r l b u r g and J o h n Bulthuis. C h a i r m a n of t h e J o i n t Meeting between Sorosis and F r a t e r n a l , Howard H a r r i n g t o n , recently announced t h e meeting would be held March 23 in t h e J u l i a n a Room of Durfee Hall.

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kneeling on a pillow. Nell's knees kneeled with p r o t e s t s , but the t e a was delightful. The girls took us to t h e University of Tokyo w h e r e we heard a q u a r t e t of f o r e i g n s t u dents sing a Christian hymn together. One boy was a n Israelite named Dave Cassie, Dan Sasaki was a native of J a p a n , Ed De J o n g was f r o m A r a b i a , and a Greek s t u dent, Nate Vanderwerp, was the f o u r t h member of the group. In China, our next stop, we were instructed in the " v e r y logical" m a n n e r of writing Chinese characters, in shadow boxing, in some of China's history, and we heard two lovely songs being s u n g by S t a n Yin, who nearly convinced not a few of the f e m a l e t o u r i s t s to remain in his country. Others t a k i n g p a r t in the Chinese exhibition were Aaron Su, Bob Yin, J o s e p h Su, and Don Lee. Our last stop was Korea. H e r e we became a w a r e t h a t we couldn't go on vacation f o r very long without being reminded of the studies awaiting us a t Hope. Ki Bum H a n , a most i n t e r e s t i n g l a n g u a g e prof e s s o r instructed us in his language, and within five minutes of g r u n t s and g r o a n s we m a s t e r e d t h e 14 Korean consonants a n d 10 vowels. A n o t h e r of H a n ' s countrymen favored us with his singing and we l e f t with a vivid impression of the desire f o r peace held by the Korean people. Upon a r r i v i n g back on the campus of Hope and recalling some of our general impressions, we realized how backward our concepts had been of t h e countries we visited. We saw f a r less tulips and windmills in the N e t h e r l a n d s t h a n we see here in Holland, Michigan, and we found nearly all the countries f a r more modernized t h a n we had ever d r e a m e d they were. We had a thoroughly enjoyable trip, and we would like to express to Nell and her travel bureau our g r a t i t u d e f o r a well conducted t o u r .

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H O P E

Night Walk . . .

Sir Slob Chosen "Party-Boy of Year"

Ellen put down h e r n e w s p a p e r and sighed. T h e newly painted

*

Once upon a t i m e in a c o u n t r y f a r off was a k n i g h t , which can be distinguished

from day

by

a

distinct differences in a p p e a r a n c e . This

knight

was

one

of

king

A r t h u r ' s boys who w e n t by t h e moniker H a r r y Slob. Now H a r r y was

pretty

up

on

the

ways

of

n i g h t s and could really paint t h e t o w n s h i p red. It h a p p e n e d in t h o s e d a y s of yore t h a t good old K i n g A r t h u r decided to t h r o w a real b a n g - u p f u n c t i o n . A p a r t y w a s n ' t a p a r t y in those d a y s when good old H a r r y Slob didn't handle the whole a f f a i r . So Sir Slob got on his t r u s t y old horse and b e a t it over to A r t h u r ' s shack to g e t t h i n g s rolling.

porch on which she w a s s i t t i n g w a s warmed by t h e J u l y sun. A baby robin hopped across t h e newlymown g r a s s . A c a r c r e p t slowly down the tree-lined s t r e e t . Across

Two Most Important Words: T H A N K YOU Least Important Word: I

chair over t h e curb and continued wheeling down the s t r e e t . This was life and Ellen hated it. It was six m o n t h s a g o t h a t J o e walked

down

those

fresh

white

steps and out of h e r l i f e — t h e J o e who had planned to m a r r y her someday, the J o e who had taken her dancing,

skiing, sailing,

the

Joe who had m a d e h e r e y e s sparkle, her h e a r t

warm.

She

had

tried

was to scare up some good music. H a r r y knew t h a t t h e r e was n o t h i n g

all available clubs, a t t e n d e d every p a r t y , but all w a s in vain. A shell w a s all t h a t r e m a i n e d of her

out and got the h o t t e s t h a r p in t h e

—a bitter, m i s e r a b l e shell of iron through which no one o r nothing

c o u n t r y along with a couple real

could p e n e t r a t e . And now a t h o u g h t

gone flutes. A f e w l y r e s and a hopped up d r u m m e r and t h e y w e r e

which this f u t i l e a t m o s p h e r e had

all set to move.

up.

N e x t w a s t h e decoration. All H a r r y had to work with was a couple of d r a g o n h e a d s A r t h u r had picked up in the N o r t h woods and a lot of r u s t y old a r m o r . But t h i s didn't stop H a r r y . H e took the two h e a d s and p u t t h e m a t each end of t h e hall and s t r u n g w i e n e r s f r o m t h e c h a n d a l i e r s to t h e d r a g o n heads. The effect was so d i f f e r e n t t h a t even H a r r y had to s t o p and marvel. N e x t he took t h e a r m o r and d u m p e d it into the m o a t . To complete the w i e n e r effect he took old h o r s e b l a n k e t s and s p r e a d them c a su a l l y around t h e hall. T h e y not not only lent color to the place but also g a v e t h a t outdoor odor t h a t only old horse b l a n k e t s can produce. The place was really s h a p i n g up.

Three Most Important Words: IF YOU P L E A S E

was crippled f r o m b i r t h , rolled h e r

The first t h i n g H a r r y had to do

a good r a g t i m e b a n d . So he went

Four Most Important Words: W H A T IS YOUR O P I N I O N ?

the s t r e e t , B a r b a r a , a neighbor who

desperately to f o r g e t h i m . She had thrown herself into h e r job, joined

b e t t e r to m a k e a p a r t y j u m p t h a n

A N C H O R

Food for Thought

by Connie Miller

by Dave Muilenbur^ ^

C O L L E G E

bred w a s born. H e r mind was made

The clock ticked on t o w a r d midnight. W h e n the house was quiet she g o t up, p u t on a robe and crept a s silently as possible downstairs. All t h e l i g h t s in the big living room were off, b u t the door onto the v e r a n d a w a s open. She went out, descended the steps, crossed the g a r d e n , and cautiously felt h e r w a y down t h e dunes to the beach. It did not seem too t e r r i f y i n g now. She w a s t h a n k f u l that she could not s w i m .

The w a t e r lapped and gurgled. The night was serene. She wondered w h e t h e r she had ever seen so m a n y s t a r s . Yes, yes, the thought, she had, r e m e m b e r i n g one s u m m e r night, s t r o l l i n g with J o e across a lawn w h e r e t h e r e were N e x t t h e invitations. Old H a r r y trees and m i s t and s t a r s and fires e n t some scribes or p a g e s or w h a t flies. The m e m o r y g a v e her calm ever w e r e called in those d a y s up and f o r t i t u d e in h e r resolve. " N o w , " to the h i g h e s t t o w e r to blow t h e i r she said to h e r s e l f . " N o w I will do bugles a t the c o u n t r y r o u n d a b o u t , it—now, now." not t h a t anyone paid any a t t e n t i o n "Ellen, Ellen," The voice s t a r t l e d to t h e bugles, it w a s j u s t because her and she t u r n e d quickly to see good old H a r r y j u s t loved to h e a r a d a r k , small figure in a wheelbugles off the h i g h e s t t o w e r . Getchair. " I t is such a b e a u t i f u l night ting back to w o r k , H a r r y didn't that I can't sleep. I see you can't w a s t e much t i m e h a v i n g t h e m deeither. Are you going f o r a swim, livered to the v a r i o u s cas tles down Ellen ? I noticed your beach coat." around t h a t neck of the woods. B a r b a r a watched t h e waves play Then H a r r y decided t h a t t h e r e upon t h e shore f o r a long time. "I had to be some e n t e r t a i n m e n t f o r wonder w h a t it's like to swim, to the p a r t y . He figured two t r a i n e d walk, to kneel, to feel life in a seals would be nice but since he limb. If only f o r an h o u r I could didn't know w h e r e he could pick u p be a normal person. If only once a couple trained seals cheap, he I could become a p a r t of life and g a v e up the idea. He finally denot j u s t w a t c h it f r o m a big shiny, cided to let A r t h u r sing "Old Man ugly wheelchair. It m u s t be wonRiver" and let it go at t h a t . derful, E l l e n ? " Since the p a r t y was all set, " Y e s . . . yes it's p r e t t y wonH a r r y went home to get r e a d y f o r derful." it. Ellen walked slowly t o w a r d t h e Old A r t h u r ' s p a r t y w a s really a red hot m a m a and the k i n g knew garden. W h e n she reached the r i g h t t h e n and t h e r e t h a t good old dunes she flung herself on the sand, Sir H a r r y Slob w a s the best p a r t y and w i t h uncontrollable sobs begged, "God f o r g i v e me, God f o r g i v e m e . " boy he'd ever had.

Girls!!!! C H A M B L E E , G. — ( A G P ) — The Technician, published by students a t t h e S o u t h e r n Technical Institute, recently took a scientific view of the f e m a l e of t h e species. It printed this description of a woman as seen t h r o u g h t h e eyes of a chemist: SYMBOL: WO. A C C E P T E D ATOMIC W E I G H T : 120 lbs. P H Y S I C A L P R O P E R T I E S : Boils at nothing and f r e e z e s a t any m i n u t e ; melts when p r o p e r l y t r e a t ed; v e r y b i t t e r if not well used. O C C U R R E N C E : Found w h e r e v e r man exists. C H E M I C A L P R O P E R T I E S : Possesses g r e a t a f f i n i t y f o r gold, silver, platinum and precious stones. Violent reaction if l e f t alone. Able to absorb g r e a t a m o u n t of food m a t ter. T u r n s g r e e n when placed beside a better-looking specimen. U S E S : H i g h l y o r n a m e n t a l , useful a s a tonic in acceleration of low spirits, and an equalizer of the distribution of wealth. Is probably the m o s t effective income-reducing a g e n t known. C A U T I O N : Highly explosive in inexperienced hands.

COLLEGE CALENDAR Friday 16 . . . P&M Play Saturday 17 . . . P&M Play Sunday 18 . . . Symphonette Concert 4 P.M. Tuesday 20 . . . Student Recital 8 P.M. Joint Y Meeting, film, "King of Kings" Wednesday 21 . . . Orchestra Assembly Concert, 4th hour Thursday 22 . . . Student Recital 8 P.M. Friday 23 . . . Senior Day Saturday 24 . . . Penny Carnival Wednesday 28 . . . 4th hour assembly, Dr. Marshall Knappen Friday 30 . . . Spring vacation begins 4 p.m.

Track Schedule

Gals Strive Hard To Raise WUS $ A l t h o u g h the s p r i n g s o r o r i t y schedule will be a busy one, a t the present, sorority shenanigans are at an all time low. The s o r o r i t y a g e n d a does h o w e v e r include one brand new project — t h a t of r a i s i n g money f o r the W U S . In t h i s project, each sorority h a s been assessed a quota, and several w a y s and m e a n s to meet t h e s e q u o t a s have been invented. As t h e i r mode f o r m a k i n g money, the Dorians a r e p l a n n i n g a white e l e p h a n t sale. The d a t e f o r the event, which will be held in the Dorian room, is F r i d a y evening, March 23. According to sale c h a i r men, J u d y K i n g m a and Nel J o n k e r , a portion of the w a r e s will be auctioned and the r e m a i n i n g p a r t will be sold w i t h o u t bids. A f t e r s o r o r i t y h o u r s t h e sale will be t r a n s p o r t e d to D u r f e e Hall w h e r e all can benefit f r o m the b a r g a i n s . In o r d e r to reach t h e i r quotas, the Sibs and Sorosites have p u t all money m a k i n g schemes aside and individual pledges will be t h e method of m e e t i n g t h e assessed sums. The T h e t a s and the A.S.A. are doing likewise.

April 24, Calvin, home April 28, G.R.J.C., a w a y May 1, Albion, Allegan May 5, Hillsdale, a w a y May 8, Kalamazoo, Allegan May 12, E l m h u r s t , R e l a y s May 19, M.I.A.A., Field Day May 26, J o h n Bos Relays, G. R.

Tennis Schedule April 20, Calvin, home April 24, G.R.J.C., home April 27, A l m a , home April 28, Adrian, a w a y May 2, Olivet, a w a y May 3, Kalamazoo, home May 5, W a y n e , home May 7, Hillsdale, a w a y May 12, Albion, home May 18, 19, M.I.A.A., Kalamazoo

Baseball Schedule April 13, F e r r i s , a w a y April 17, G.R.J.C., a w a y April 21, A d r i a n , a w a y , 2 g a m e s April 28, Hillsdale, home, 2 g a m e s May 1, Kalamazoo, a w a y , 2 g a m e s May 5, Calvin, home, 2 g a m e s May 8, Albion, a w a y , 2 g a m e s May 12, Alma, home, 2 g a m e s May 16, Olivet, home, 2 g a m e s

T h e Delta Phi g a l s h a v e concocted a possible c a r - w a s h r i n g to raise f u n d s to m e e t t h e W U S quota. T h e e n t e r p r i s e will be set up on Carol K u y p e r ' s lawn and Delphi a t t e n d a n t s will be on hand to polish and chamois all vehicles.

Golf Schedule

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April 13, G.R.J.C., home April 17, Kalamazoo, a w a y April 27, Hillsdale, home May 1, Albion, a w a y May 4, Adrian, home May 7, Calvin, a w a y May 11, A l m a , a w a y May 15, Olivet, home S U B S C R I B E TO T H E ANCHOR I May 18, 19, M.I.A.A., Kalamazoo

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Page Eight

H O P E

C O L L E G E

Intramural Basketball Championship Captured By the Men of Fraternal

Fraters Leading All-Sports Race The F r a t e r s have moved out to a seven-and-one-half point lead in the race f o r the A l l - S p o r t s T r o p h y . They have totalled 33 Va points. The Cosmos and Arkies a r e deadlocked f o r second place with 26 points apiece. The E m m i e s have 20 points and the Knicks 1 4 ^ . Ten points a r e a w a r d e d to the f r a t e r n i t y t a k i n g first place in a m a j o r sport, e i g h t f o r second, six for t h i r d , f o u r f o r f o u r t h , and two f o r fifth. In minor s p o r t s a first place brings five points, second place f o u r , third place three, f o u r t h place two, and fifth place one. In case of ties points a r e divided equally between the tied t e a m s . F o r e x a m p l e if two t e a m s a r e tied f o r first place in a m a j o r sport, the two t e a m s will receive nine points instead of ten or eight. The Independents and the S e m i n a r y do not compete f o r the t r o p h y . The following s p o r t s are m a j o r ones: Touch football, basketball, volleyball, Softball, t r a c k . Minor s p o r t s a r e tennis, golf, handball, and bowling. The following is a breakdown of point distribution f o r the All-Sports Trophy: A C F E K Football 9 6 9 4 2 Tennis 4 3 ' 5 1 2 Golf 2 5 3 1 4 Basketball 4 8 10 6 2 Handball 2 1 5 4 3 Bowling 5 3 IK 4 IM* Volleyball, s o f t b a l l , and t r a c k are yet to be played.

Fraters Sweep Handball The F r a t e r s c a m e out victorious in t h e first I n t r a m u r a l Handball T o u r n a m e n t . They had the c h a m pions in both the singles and doubles competition. H a r r y Voss d e f e a t e d the Knick's Tom McCall in the final match to become the i n t r a m u r a l singles champion. Meanwhile Dick Gantos and M a t t Peelen combined t h e i r e f f o r t s to d e f e a t J o h n Soeter and Ted Redding of the E m m i e s to cop t h e i n t r a m u r a l doubles championship. T h u s the F r a t e r s with 81/2 points w e r e f a r ahead of the r e m a i n d e r of the field. The E m m i e s and Indies tied f o r second place with 4 ^ points each. T h e y were followed by the Knicks with 3, the A r k i e s with 2, and the Cosmos with one point.

Hannett Top Scorer, Benes Top 'Bounder Official M.I.A.A. basketball s t a tistics were recently released, showing J o h n H a n n e t t of Albion took the scoring crown and Hope's Paul Benes copped the rebounding title. H a n n e t t ' s league-leading total f o r f o u r t e e n g a m e s w a s 300 points, giving him a 21.4 a v e r a g e . Paul Benes dumped in 244 points to take fifth place in t h e scoring derby, and W h i t e y R i e m e r s m a held down sixth place w i t h 207 points. Tall Paul led t h e league with a total of 143 d e f e n s i v e rebounds to c a p t u r e the crown in his f r e s h m a n y e a r a t Hope. The offensive-minded D u t c h m a n led the M.I.A.A. in scoring, with 1,070 points in 14 g a m e s . However, the H o p e squad also g a v e up 1,027 points, to end u p l a s t defensively. T h e Grand R a p i d s Herald released t h e i r All-M.I.A.A. t e a m , which included W h i t e y R i e m e r s m a and P a u l Benes on t h e second t e a m , while Harold M o l e n a a r received honorable mention.

A N C H O R

Through The Keyhole

F o r the second consecutive year, the F r a t e r s have won the chamS p r i n g has a r r i v e d ; and a l t h o u g h pionship in i n t e r f r a t basketball. the f a c t is not a l w a y s a t t e s t e d by Last y e a r they tied with the Costhe w a r m sun and balmy breezes mos, but won o u t r i g h t l y t h i s year. we usually associate with the seaThe F r a t e r " A " l e a g u e five posted son, it can easily be seen if one a record of 8 wins and 2 losses, would t a k e a look into the g y m any and their " B " league t e a m did the night a t about 4 p.m. There he same to give them an overall m a r k would find h a r d a t work g e t t i n g of 16 wins and 4 losses. The second into s h a p e f o r the coming season, place Cosmos made it a t i g h t battle the baseball, t r a c k , tennis, and golf all the way, finishing up with an a s p i r a n t s of 1956. overall record of 15 wins and 5 The baseball t e a m , under the losses. The Cosmos " A " league quintet topped all m a r k s with 9 wins and only one loss. T h e i r " B " league team c a m e back s t r o n g a f t e r losing f o u r out of t h e i rfirstfive g a m e s to wind up with a 6 and 4 mark. F i n i s h i n g third with a record of 11 and 9 were the E m m i e s . The Arkies came in f o u r t h , winning 5 and losing fifteen. B r i n g i n g up the rear, the Knicks won 3 and lost 17. The S e m i n a r y had a record of 7 wins and t h r e e losses in " A " league, while the Indies' " B " league won-lost total was 3 and 7.

Riemersma Selected As Most Valuable

The F r a t e r s led the " A " league on offense, piling up 515 points in ten g a m e s to the r u n n e r - u p Cosmos' 480. Defensively, however, the Cosmos took the honors, holding their opponents to a scant 31 points per g a m e . N e x t best on defense were the S e m i n a r i a n s , allowing an a v e r a g e of 39.5 points per g a m e to be scored a g a i n s t t h e m . In " B " league, t h e F r a t e r s were tops offensively, r a c k i n g up 503 points. Second in line were the Cosmos, tallying 426. The E m m i e s came in a close t h i r d with 422. Defensively s p e a k i n g , the Cosmos were again u n s u r p a s s e d , giving up 39.6 points per g a m e . The F r a t e r s were second with a m a r k of 40.7. A r t Bieri of t h e A r k i e s was the " A " league scoring champion this year. He scored a total of 181 points. H a r r y Voss of the F r a t e r s was r u n n e r - u p with lo2. In " B " league, Carl V a n d e r l a a n , also of the Arkies, won t h e scoring race with 125 points. Ron Bolthuis' 123 was a close second.

Whitey

Riemersma

Co-captain W h i t e y R i e m e r s m a , of St. J o s e p h , Michigan, has been named Hope College's most valuable basketball p l a y e r f o r the 195556 season. A s a result of his being chosen f o r t h i s honor by his t e a m m a t e s , Whitey qualifies with other s i m i l a r l y honored M.I.A.A. p l a y e r s The following p l a y e r s were the f o r t h e Randall C. Bosch t r o p h y . leading scorers in t h e i r respective This is a w a r d e d to the o u t s t a n d i n g leagues: " A " L e a g u e : Bieri, Arkies, p l a y e r in t h e league, who is selected 181; Voss, F r a t e r s , 152; Ebbens, by t h e league coaches. E m m i e s , 134; V a n d e r l u g t , Knicks, W h i t e y closed out his f o u r t h and 129; Ritsema, E m m i e s , 128; Peelen, final y e a r of v a r s i t y play by scorF r a t e r s , 117; S p a a n , F r a t e r s , 110. ing 207 points in f o u r t e e n league Benes, S e m i n a r y , 103; Van Hoeven, g a m e s f o r a 14.8 a v e r a g e . UnSeminary, 101; S a n d a h l , Cosmos, doubtedly the best g a m e W h i t e y 101; Martin, Knicks, 99* played in his e n t i r e college c a r e e r *played only six g a m e s . was the last Calvin g a m e . " B e a r " " B " L e a g u e : V a n d e r l a a n , Arkies, poured 26 points t h r o u g h t h e hoop 125; Bolthuis, E m m i e s , 123; Borr, t h a t night, to lead the team on to Cosmos, 114; H o n d o r p , Arkies, 114; a g r e a t u p s e t victory over the Redding, E m m i e s , 111*; Woodcock, Knights. F r a t e r s , 103***. Coach Visser will surely miss the *played in only seven g a m e s . " B e a r " , who t u r n e d in some very ***played five g a m e s , a f t e r which fine p e r f o r m a n c e s a t both g u a r d he became a m e m b e r of Hope's and f o r w a r d positions, and who also varsity team. did a fine job of rebounding. The points f o r the All-Sports trophy f r o m basketball were distributed t h u s l y : F r a t e r s 10, Cosmos 8, E m m i e s 6, A r k i e s 4, Knicks 2.

SUPERIOR

Arkie Kegler's Win Pin Championship The Arkies proved t h e i r s u p e r iority on t h e alleys f o r the second s t r a i g h t y e a r , once a g a i n winning the bowling t r o p h y . T h e y a m a s s e d 14 out of a possible 15 points to win by a good m a r g i n . The E m e r sonians finished second and the Cosmos t h i r d . H i g h g a m e s of t h e season w e r e :

SPORT STORE

mies — 200 Samse, Knicks — 198 W a g n e r , Cosmos, and Byro, F r a t e r s — 197

F r e s h m a n basketball s t a r P a u l Benes of Grand Rapids, Michigan t u t e l e d g e of coach Russ DeVette has been selected a s one of ten and led by captain Dick O r t q u i s t , college v a r s i t y p l a y e r s to t o u r has a good nucleus of v e t e r a n s South A m e r i c a t h i s c o m i n g s u m r e t u r n i n g and a p r o m i s i n g crop of mer. T h i s g r o u p is sponsored by new men anxious to prove t h e m Youth f o r C h r i s t , and they will selves w o r t h y of a s t a r t i n g b e r t h . travel u n d e r the b a n n e r " V e n t u r e Jack K e m p k e r has r e t u r n e d to fill f o r Victory." T h i s f o r t h - c o m i n g the vacancy l e f t by the g r a d u a t i o n tour will be the f o u r t h v e n t u r e to of s t a r pitcher Willie Rink, a t a s k various p a r t s of t h e world by such to which he undoubtably will be a group. The basketball team will equal. Coach De V e t t e h a s been travel with a m i s s i o n a r y as t h e y s h i f t i n g his personnel around concarry the m e s s a g e of J e s u s C h r i s t siderably this s p r i n g in an a t t e m p t to the v a r i o u s c o u n t r i e s of South to find t h e most suitable place f o r America. The squad leaves Miami, every m a n . If the v e t e r a n s come Florida, on J u n e 11 and r e t u r n s t h r o u g h as we expect t h e m to and home on A u g u s t 20. if the untried men can add a little This a l l - s t a r squad is comprised help in s t r a t e g i c places the baseball of C h r i s t i a n a t h l e t e s who a r e willteam should be able to t u r n in a creditable p e r f o r m a n c e and easily ing to d o n a t e t h e i r services f o r t h e raise themselves a few notches on s u m m e r . T h u s f a r , Coach Don Oldo of T a y l o r U n i v e r s i t y in I n d i a n a , the c h a m p i o n s h i p ladder. The t r a c k t e a m , the only one not has chosen p l a y e r s f r o m v a r i o u s to have been affected by the re- schools including T a y l o r , W h e a t o n , a l i g n m e n t of coaches this s p r i n g , and S t a n f o r d , with o t h e r p l a y e r s will a g a i n be handled by Dr. L a r r y to be selected. Green. The track t e a m also h a s a hard core of l e t t e r m e n r e t u r n i n g , led by All-M.I.A.A. broad j u m p and pole vault champion J o h n De Vries and h u r d l e r s Paul W i e g g e r i n k and Jim H i l m e r t . The h e r e t o f o r e weak distance r u n s should be a d e q u a t e l y handled by cross c o u n t r y s t a r s H e r b W i d m e r and J a c k Walchenbach, and F r e s h m a n L a r r y T e r Molen should provide the needed punch in t h e shot-put. Mr. J o h n Van Ingen has taken over the tennis reins this season for the absent Ken Weller. With the loss of f o u r of the top five men f r o m last y e a r ' s t e a m , coach Van Ingen f a c e s a t o u g h rebuilding problem. However he m a y be able to f a s h i o n a c o n s i s t a n t winner f r o m n u m b e r one man J o h n J e l t e s , T i g e r Teusink and the f e w p r o m i s i n g new men who have r e p o r t e d f o r practice. R e t u r n i n g to the reins of the golf t e a m t h i s y e a r will be coach J o h n Visser. Mr. Visser h a s a good nucleus to work with in t h a t t h r e e of the top players f r o m last y e a r ' s team have again r e p o r t e d f o r p r a c tice. Following n u m b e r one man Ray DeDoes a r e Gord H o n d o r p and Bill Holt. Also out to add s t r e n g t h to the t e a m is Joe M a r t i n . *

*

>t!

Also looking f o r w a r d to the opening of the s p r i n g schedule are the five f r a t e r n i t i e s a b o u t t h e c a m p u s . A new eligibility rule enables everyone, r e g a r d l e s s of w h e t h e r or not they compete in a n y o t h e r sport, to compete in the volleyball t o u r n a m e n t . This should provide a f a s t round of play and added suspense as to the outcome of the All S p o r t s Trophy race, which is still wide open. S o f t ball and May D a y round out the s p r i n g s p o r t docket fraternity-wise. *

*

*

Senior co-captain D w i g h t " W h i t e y " R i e m e r s m a and F r e s h m a n P a u l Benes were chosen to r e p r e s e n t Hope on the All-M.I.A.A. stcond team, while Harold M o l e n a a r received honorable mention. W h i t e y was also chosen by his t e a m m a t e s as being this y e a r ' s most v a l u a b l e player. —Dave Spaan

0

Table Tennis

0

Sweat Sox

0

Tennis

#

Golf

M.I.A.A. ALL-SPORTS TROPHY STANDINGS

0

Basketball

School

0

Archery

1. K a l a m a z o o

35

%

Skating

2. Hillsdale

27

%

Trophies

3. Albion

24

4. H o p e

23

4. Calvin

23

6. A d r i a n

17

Bieri, Arkies — 202 W a g n e r , Cosmos, and Boeve, E m -

Benes To Play Ball In South America

Holland's Athletic Headquarters

7. A l m a 8. Olivet

Points

Green Sees Track Prospects As "Good" "Albion is loaded, and Kazoo is going to give us plenty of trouble, but this y e a r w e ' r e p u s h i n g f o r t h e top," said t r a c k coach L a r r y " D o c " Green a s he viewed his s t a r - s t u d d e d squad of r e t u r n i n g l e t t e r m e n a n d p r o m i s i n g f r e s h m e n . Looking o v e r this y e a r ' s t e a m , we can see t h a t coach Green h a s good reason to begin his pre-season f o r e c a s t i n g on such an optimistic note. F o r m i n g the nucleus of t h i s y e a r ' s a t t a c k will be t h r e e t o p record-holders: J o h n De Vries, M.I. A.A. and Hope College ace in both pole v a u l t and broad j u m p ; D a v e Spaan, who cracked t h e q u a r t e r mile m a r k last s e a s o n ; and P a u l Wiegerink, who a m a z e d e v e r y o n e with his s t e r l i n g p e r f o r m a n c e in the hurdles. Backing v e t e r a n Ron Den Uyl in the w e a k l y - m a n n e d distance races will be H e r b W i d m e r , of whom much is expected, a l o n g with f r e s h m e n Carol Bennech and H e n r y De W i t t . In t h e d a s h e s , Paul W i e g e r i n k is s h a p i n g up to be n u m b e r one m a n in the 100-yard event, Dave S p a a n in the 220, and both Spaan and Jack Walchenbach look exceptional in the 440. F i v e new r u n n e r s will be a t t e m p t i n g to replenish o u r sorely-lacking stock of h a l f - m i l e r s . The new 880 men are F r e d L e a s k e , Lyle Hop, Dick Brown, J o h n S o e t e r , and Dick Brockmeier. B r o c k m e i e r was t o p m a n in the Grand Valley Conference last year. Pole Vault Looks Good Hope a p p e a r s to be s t r o n g in t h e pole vault, with c h a m p J o h n De Vries back a t work, assisted by Dave K u y e r s a n d Blaine T i m m e r . S t a r t i n g f r o m s c r a t c h in the s h o t put, w i t h the loss of Bob H e n d r i c k son, L a r r y T e r Molen, top m a n in the Grand R a p i d s h i g h school competetion last y e a r , will be t h r o w i n g the sixteen-pound s p h e r e , a l o n g with J i m H i l m e r t and Bill Brooks t r a . The discus event will see these s a m e boys c a r r y i n g t h e o r a n g e and blue. In t h e broad j u m p , J o h n De V r i e s will be out to d e f e n d his c r o w n , pushed by Paul W i e g e r i n k , w h o hurls well o v e r t w e n t y f e e t . A g i l e Jim H i l m e r t and C u r t Menning a r e expected to do well in t h e h i g h jump. W i t h t h e loss of E v N i e n house and J i m Cooper, t h e big j o b of p r o d u c i n g in t h e h u r d l e s will be up to W i e g e r i n k and H i l m e r t , t w o top men.

Official p r a c t i c e sessions b e g a n 15 T u e s d a y , M a r c h 6. T h e t r a c k t e a m opens its s e a s o n with a home m e e t 2 a g a i n s t Calvin on April 24th.

03-16-1956  
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