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^Anch

D o n ' t

f o r g e t : t h e

m a p .

March I 996 • i

H o p e C o l l e g e • H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n • An i n d e p e n d e n t n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 109 y e a r s

check

Four's a charm for Dutch basketball GL.YN W I L L I A M S staff w r i t e r

Dancers d o d g e raindrops, prison in Dance

22.

Intermission, p a g e 4-5.

The saying "there's a first time for everything" has never been more true than when it comes to the Hope College m e n ' s basketball team. For the first time in the illustrious 94 years of m e n ' s basketball at Hope, the Flying Dutchmen (26-4) are headed for the N C A A Division III Final Four to be played this w e e k e n d in Salem, Virginia. The Dutchmen will play the highly touted Franklin & Marshall (29-1) who won their region. Hope won both of their g a m e s last weekend, first beating the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater 88-66 and then overpowering Wittenberg University 69-60. "We've worked a long time to get a group of players to get to this point," coach Glenn Van Wieren said. "It takes a lot of integrity and com-

mitment to get this far and it is very gratifying to win a big tournament game on the road and the way we did." The Dutchmen surprised the Tigers (24-5) in front of their home crowd, where they were undefeated throughout the season. Hope, as always, effectively utilized their big men, as Duane Bosma ('96) and Kris Merritt ('98) each hit outside shots to put Hope up 6-2 with 16:30 left in the first half. Wittenberg notched th e ir o n l y lead of the game at 7-6 with 13:20 to play. From there on it was a practically a one team show, as Hope coasted on a 20-7 run that left Tigers licking their wounds and purring helplessly. A Marc Whitford ('97) layup and foul shot put the Dutchmen ahead by ten with 3:51 left in the first half and there was no looking back. The keys to Hope's win were a number of little things that added up to be huge. First, they out-rebounded Wittenberg 32-25. Although that

It's something you dream about, but it is so hard to believe because there are so many teams. —Duane Bosma ('96)

is a normal feature of Hope basketball, the Tigers have a season average of out-rebounding their o p p o n e n t s by nine. Nearly one-third of Hope's rebounds were grabbed by Bosma alone. "We have great respect for their rebounding, and we were saying that w e need to stay with them," Van Wieren said. " O n e of the giants of the game is under B o s m a ' s name and that is 10 rebounds. He was a man on the glass and he was determined to bring down those rebounds." Another factor involved in the win was the Dutchmen's nearly perfect free-throw shooting. Hope shot a season-high 94 percent on 16/17 shooting from the charity stripe, while their seas o n a v e r a g e is a m u c h l o w e r 7 5 p e r c e n t . Wittenberg shot only 61.5 percent from the free throw line off of 8/13 shooting. The third factor was Hope's suffocating zone d e f e n s e that W i t t e n b e r g c o u l d not o p e r a t e against. All evening the Tigers appeared to be out of sync and were unable to move as effectively as they had in the past. The Dutchmen are usually a man-to-man defensive team, but the final two weeks of the season revealed that Hope had gradually moved to the zone defense, and more FINAL FOUR on 7

Trip to Canada planned, faucets remain leaky

Kletz j o k e s t e r crosses the line.

JENN D O R N

Campusbeat, p a g e 2.

campusbeat editor

tual Arab league. " T h e perfection of the Model is to be that country in every way," said Beta Bajwa ('96) from India. "It is necessary to really get into it." The students prepare for the model for seven weeks, compiling summaries of the countries, including their governments, politics, and current issues. The Hope students knew they were going to be assigned to cover Egypt and Iraq, so they hit the books, or magazines rather, reading article upon article, to learn all that they could about the countries. After doing the extensive research, the delegations developed resolutions to make proposals to deal with the issues. "It gives participants a belter understanding of the Arab world," said Amer Madi ('98) from Palestine, "of the political processes, and the stereotyping that goes on. We have to be in character and take on the role of the country that we

All cottage residents are being offered a lift to Toronto for weekend, free of charge. Some students are grateful for the time away from campus, others are hot under the collar, wishing the money would go towards more functional outlets, like repairs. Planning these getaways is something that cottage RDs have been doing for years; providing each cottage resident with transportation to and lodging in a city that bears no resemblance to Holland. Traditionally the destination has been Chicago, but this year it was decided to head to the border and take Toronto by storm. "In the staff meeting, the RAs decided what they wanted to do," said Shelly Spencer, R D of cottages. "We just wanted to do something different. And Toronto is good choice, culturally and educationally." So where is the money c o m i n g from? ' T h e r e is a cottage f u n d , " Spencer said. "Five dollars for every resident. There has been a lot of unused money because the cottages didn't do programs, so that has accumulated." Spencer does not know at this point the total cost of the trip. T h e fund set aside for each cottage is to go t o w a r d s p r o g r a m s for the residents. As R D , Spencer also tries to do programs for the residents. "I try to do at least one educational program and one social program," she said. "This is my educational program." While this weekend getaway may be just what some students need, others feel that they would rather have the f u n d s funneled into other outlets, possibly towards the repairs needed in many on-campus houses. But the idea of spending the cottage fund on repairing cottages was never taken into consideration. "This money is for programming, not for repairs," Spencer said. ' T h e money is for residents to do social and educational activities." Some students seem to think that spending the money for repairs on the places that they call home for eight months out of the year would be more appropriate then spending it on a weekend escape. "It seems like a w a s t e to m e , " said Jason Dillabough ('96). "The money could be better spend. There are a lot of existing cottages that are in need of repair." Last year, Dillabough and others tried to get general improvements in Greek houses. "Greek houses seem to have more traffic than other nouses, so we tried to get more funding," he said. "A lot of the cottages need new carpet, and we also wanted to be able tofixup the base-

more LEAGUE on 8

more CO I I AGES on 2

u£,t.

/ '\

Mm® Palestinians talk frankly about war and bloodshed in their country.

In Focus y p a g e 6.

PR photo

x o X H E T O P : Joel Hostelge ('98) dribbles his way around a defender to help take Hope to the Final Four tournament.

A r a b league takes h o m e honors JENN D O R N campusbeat editor

Fellowship recipient does Hope

proud.

Campusbeat, page!.

Hope students once again took home the brass ring at the ninth annual Midwest Model League of Arab States which took place at Calvin College Feb. 29- March 2. T h e student delegations, representing Egypt and Iraq, each won "Best Delegation" awards. Of the 12 Hope students who participated, nine took home individual "Outstanding Delegate" awards. "We have participated in the Model for the past nine years," said Laurie Engle, advisor to the League. "This is the eighth year in a row that w e have w o n "Outstanding Delegation" honors." The Midwest Model League of Arab States is a three-day conference in which colleges from Michigan and other states come together to take on the role of one of the 22 countries in the ac-


^Anchor

C a m p u s Beat

March

I 3. I 9 9 6

C r u d e K l e t z c o m e d i a n offers Student reaps awards of l a u g h t e r and groans o f disgust fellowship L o w r y w a s f u n n y ; he had the au-

saved the s h o w f r o m b e i n g c o m -

d i e n c e m e m b e r s r e s p o n d i n g to his

pletely c r u d e and vulgar. Early in

questions, laughing, at times uncontrollably, and c l a p p i n g in response

t h e p e r f o r m a n c e , L o w r y did his o w n imitation of Barry W h i t e , with

t o his antics. L o w r y also slipped s o m e public

w h o m he toured for a short time. Lowry lowered his voice and c u p p e d the m i c r o p h o n e to imitate

o n Def Comedy Jam and Showtime at the Apollo,

service announcem e n t s into his act, urging the audience m e m b e r s to practice

did very little to adapt his

s a f e sex and not to

abilities w e r e q u i t e a u t h e n t i c and d r e w r o u n d s of a p p l a u s e f r o m the

r o u t i n e t o the c o l l e g e

drink and drive. A majority

of

audience. L o w r y not only boasted an imi-

material

tation of Barry W h i t e , but he also

l o w s h i p s . S t u d e n t s f r o m over 2 0 0

H u m a n i t i e s and T h e o l o g i c a l s t u d ies f r o m C h r i s t i a n s c h o o l s t o pur-

did a mean impression of H u m p t e y ,

s c h o o l s are eligible f o r the the fel-

s u e P h . D s t u d i e s with t h e h o p e that

lowships. " H o p e ' s research o p p o r t u n i t i e s in

s t u d e n t s will incorporate their

psychology are exceptional," E s c h l e m a n said. " T h e p s y c h o l o g y

and t e a c h i n g . O n e h u n d r e d s t u d e n t s applied to

J E N N

D O R N

c a m pus b e a t e d i t o r

Bill Lowry, the last K l e t z c o m e dian of the y e a r f o r S A C , w a s not exactly an entertainer for the shy, nor for the w e a k s t o m a c h e d . Lowry, w h o has a p p e a r e d

audience.

Lowry's

He started out his

the sexy, d e e p - v o i c e d R & B singer. His i m p e r s o n a t i o n and s i n g i n g

act w i t h e n t h u s i a s m

e v o l v e d f r o m either his

and energy, w h i c h enc o u r a g e d the s t u d e n t s

c h i l d h o o d or his per-

from the group Digital Under-

s o n a l life. He talked e x t e n s i v e l y of his

g r o u n d . T h i s particular i m p e r s o n ation s o u n d e d exactly like the ac-

who

had

nearly

KIM POWELL, staff r e p o r t e r

When Amy Eschleman(,96) t h i n k s a b o u t w h a t put her o v e r the top w h e n i n t e r v i e w i n g f o r the P E W f e l l o w s h i p , s h e t h i n k s of H o p e p r o fessors and the research that s h e w a s a b l e to p a r t i c p a t e in t h r o u g h t h e College's Psychology Department. Eshleman, a Hope senior, and Anna-Lisa Cox ('94) were honored to receive t w o of o n l y 11 P e w Fel-

A m y Eschleman (*96)

Christian p e r s p e c t i v e into research

packed the Kletz to eagerly a n t i c i p a t e the c o m e d i c an-

d a u g h t e r s and the

tual performer. He also incorporated

trials that he g o e s t h r o u g h raising a

p r o f e s s o r s h a v e w o n d e r f u l intern-

the P e w Y o u n g e r S c h o l a r s P r o g r a m

tics of the next hour.

s i x - y e a r - o l d and a 14-year-old. Of

m i m i c r i e s of J a m e s B r o w n a n d M i k e T y s o n , w h i c h w e r e true-to-

s h i p s with s t u d e n t s and g r e a t re-

life. T h r o u g h o u t the e n t i r e e v e n i n g , L o w r y ' s antics and material evoked

search." O b t a i n i n g h e r d e g r e e in s o c i a l p s y c h o l o g y g i v e s E s h l e m a n the

and o n l y 2 1 f i n a l i s t s w e r e picked to g o t o t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f N o t r e

bouts of laughter and applause f r o m

opportunity

research

time to celebrate personal accom-

the a u d i e n c e . T h e s t u d e n t s w h o braved the cold to listen to the hu-

multicultural and gender issues,

p l i s h m e n t . T h e s t u d e n t s had an op-

specifically how these prejudices

p o r t u n i t y t o m e e t a n d talk a b o u t

m o r of the e v e n i n g s e e m e d to en-

e f f e c t the s e l f - c o n c e p t .

their C h r i s t i a n b e l i e f s .

Lowry leaped o n t o the stage c o m -

course, he m a n a g e d to tie even these

p l a i n i n g a b o u t t h e w e a t h e r in M i c h i g a n , s t a t i n g that it w a s " t o o

r e f e r e n c e s back to sex. He had the

d a m n c o l d " and then segued into his

duty of e x p l a i n i n g to his d a u g h t e r w h a t an o r g a s m w a s . He also w e n t

next material, u s i n g the r e s t r o o m s

into great detail about w h e n his

o n airplanes. T h i s particular subject

daughter "became a w o m a n " and

w a s r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the rest of his

he, t h e o n l y p e r s o n h o m e at t h e

hour a n d a half r o u t i n e .

t i m e , w a s f o r c e d to buy her " p r o -

It s e e m e d a p p a r e n t that m o s t of the j o k e s that L o w r y told related in s o m e w a y or a n o t h e r back to either bodily f u n c t i o n s , sex, o r o t h e r lesst h a n - p l e a s a n t topics.

COTTAGES f r o m

j o y t h e m s e l v e s , b u t the c o n s t a n t

t e c t i o n " for her. T h a t r e f e r e n c e led

r e f e r e n c e s to b o d y parts, sex, a n d

to a tangent a b o u t f e m i n i n e prod-

fecal matter w e r e a little m u c h for most a u d i e n c e m e m b e r s , as proc-

ucts and their possible alternate uses. His i m i t a t i o n s are p e r h a p s w h a t

lamations of disgust w e r e overheard on a fairly regular basis.

wear and tear on Greek houses.

quickly as w e w o u l d like." Physical Plant has only nine m a i n t e n a n c e men for the entire

went through cuts a few years back," said Fred C o a t e s , Director of Physical Plant Operations. " W e had to r e d u c e the s t a f f . S i n c e then w e

" O u r carpet n e e d s to be r e p l a c e d b e c a u s e a lot o f p e o p l e c o m e

c a m p u s . E a c h m a n s p e c i a l i z e s in a trade, f r o m c a r p e n t e r to m e c h a n i c

have b e e n trying to hold o u r o w n .

through the house during Rush "

to e l e c t r i c i a n . T h e s e m e n a r e re-

C u r r e n t l y , w e are t r y i n g t o get a

said Carrie Carley ( ' 9 7 ) , S I B active.

c o u p l e of a d d i t i o n s a n d fill the po-

The SIB house, as do other cot-

s p o n s i b l e for m a k i n g repairs, fixing p l u m b i n g , d o i n g c a r p e n t r y

tages, n e e d s repair that g o b e y o n d

w o r k , g r o o m i n g the g r o u n d s a n d

can provide a bit better s e r v i c e . "

damages caused by pledging.

numerous other duties. "Cottages have so much m o r e

s i t i o n s w e feel w e need s o that w e T h e d e m a n d on m a i n t e n a n c e to

m a i n t e n a n c e than d o r m s , " A rnold

repair c o t t a g e s is c o n s t a n t , with the h o u s e s n e e d i n g both d a y - t o - d a y re-

things that need to b e d o n e , like o u r drapes are broken. Actually, o u r

said. " E a c h o n e has its o w n f u r n a c e

pairs, such as c h a n g i n g lights and

and w a t e r heater. I t ' s tricky trying

f i x i n g those leaky s i n k s , to m o r e

light fell o u t o f the c e i l i n g a b o v e o u r kitchen table. T h e r e w a s g l a s s

to get it all d o n e . " P h y s i c a l Plant has not e x p a n d e d

worn-down carpet and repainting

everywhere. Maintenance c a m e to

its staff in at least seven years, ac-

f i x it, but it t o o k at least a w e e k . " M a i n t e n a n c e o f t e n has a p r o b l e m

c o r d i n g t o A r n o l d . In f a c t , several

the exterior. "Just like a h o m e - o w n e r , w e

y e a r s a g o , they w e r e f o r c e d to cut

w o u l d a l w a y s love to b e able to up-

of g e t t i n g to r e q u e s t s a s q u i c k l y a s

several p e o p l e f r o m staff a n d have

grade things," Arnold said. "But

not g a i n e d any e m p l o y e e s back

s o m e t i m e s w e just d o n ' t h a v e the

" T h e h o u s e is j u s t r e a l l y o u t d a t e d , " Carley s a i d . " T h e r e are little

they w o u l d like. " W e d o not h a v e a n y m a i n t e nance m e n just for c o t t a g e s , un-

A s for a career, E s h l e m a n s e e s

T h e w e e k e n d w a s n ' t all f u n

herself teaching. "I w o u l d like to b e a H o p e C o l -

though. Each finalist had a 25

lege-type professor," Eshleman said. " A t e a c h i n g e m p h a s i s but also

p r o f e s s o r s and scholars to talk about h o w they will i n c o r p o r a t e Christian

research." T h e P e w Younger S c h o l a r s Fel-

b e l i e f s into their particular field o f

lowship grants each recipient

I

ments." R u s h and p l e d g i n g d o put a lot

to

since. "The

m a j o r r e p a i r s like r e p l a c i n g t h e

f u n d s or the staff." College

fortunately " said Kathleen

$ 3 6 , 0 0 0 to b e s p r e a d out o v e r a p e riod of three y e a r s a s they attend graduate school. " T h i s is m o n e y for m e to live off of," Eshleman said. T h e f e l l o w s h i p serves a s a s o u r c e

news over the telephone. p h o n e c a l l , " s a i d E s h l e m a n . "It

a g e s t u d e n t s in S o c i a l S c i e n c e s ,

t a k e s a w a y a lot o f s t r e s s . "

r ace is t h e c a u s e o f the divided soJEM Z E R R I P

cieties, L o u r y s a i d . " W e m u s t c o m e t o g e t h e r as

staff r e p o r t e r

by all r a c e s w a s t h e s u g g e s t i o n

A m e r i c a n s , not as s p e c i f i c e t h n i c g r o u p , " he said. "Everyone

given by an expert e c o n o m i s t at a

s t r u g g l e s t o live a G o d l y life, and

lecture last T u e s d a y r e g a r d i n g the

t h a t ' s m o r e interesting than s h a r i n g

issue of divided societies.

the s a m e z i p c o d e . "

F i n d i n g a c o m m o n tradition held

his

views

on

racial

reflection of the spirit isn't a b o u t color and isn't u n i q u e to m e . " Loury explained the need to find

Anchor

Editor

Opus editor

Applications and job descriptions are available at the English office, Lubbers 321

Deadline: March 14, 1996

T h r o u g h o u t the evening, audie n c e m e m b e r s c o u l d p i c k u p on L o u r y ' s f ai t h. T h e p h r a s e " G o d has no respect f o r person, but loves eve r y o n e " was repeated throughout the evening, a n d used a s a c h a l l e n g e to a u d i e n c e m e m b e r s . Loury w o u l d like all p e o p l e to live by this s t a n d a r d , not j u s t r e s p e c t i n g a person,

and to f o c u s o n similarities b e t w e e n

but loving t h e m . W h i l e m a k i n g the point that w e

societies, t h u s reducing the division

are one nation, Loury c o m p a r e d the

present in society. He t e r m e d this

d i f f e r e n c e s that exist a m o n g A m e r i -

idea ' u n i v e r s a l i s m ' . " W e need to t r a n s c e n d the par-

cans.

ticulars of race a n d find a tradition shared by e v e r y o n e , " Loury s a i d .

that exist a m o n g i n d i v i d u a l s a n d t o realize the unity in this nation.

Loury c h a l l e n g e d a u d i e n c e

m e m b e r s to a c c e p t the d i f f e r e n c e s

are

Loury stated that he w a s n ' t try-

p r o d u c i n g the racial d i v i s i o n b y

ing t o c o n v i c t p e o p l e , r a t h e r h e w a n t e d t h e m to b e c o m e m o r e a w a r e

A c c o r d i n g to Loury, m a n y

WTHS general m a n a g e r

"I w a s t h r i l l e d w h e n I g o t t h e

Prof urges 'universallsm'

neither do they pray," he s a i d . " A

spond as ^

d i d n ' t get the s c h o l a r s h i p . "

t i m e researching. T h e p r o g r a m ' s goal is t o e n c o u r -

v i d e s society. " S k i n and b l o o d do not think,

up

well in t h e i n t e r v i e w , " E s h l e m a n said. "I kept telling everyone I

day before she received the good

d i s c r i m i n a t i o n , w h i c h , he feels, di-

re-

sors s h e felt a s p r e p a r e d a s possible. "I d i d n ' t f e e l like I h a d d o n e very

of classes, s t u d e n t s c a n s p e n d m o r e

sented

keep

having practiced with Hope profes-

of h a v i n g to wait t a b l e s a f t e r a day

Physical Plant. " W h e n w e get a request, w e r e s p o n d to it.

and

study. Eshleman w a s nervous, but after

E s h l e m a n o n l y had to wait o n e

Dr. Glenn Loury, an e c o n o m i c s professor at Boston University, pre-

to

m i n u t e i n t e r v i e w w i t h a p a n e l of

o f i n c o m e for grad students. Instead

A r n o l d , o f f i c e m a n a g e r at

But it's d i f f i c u l t

D a m e o n J a n u a r y 12 and 13. The two-day excursion was a

b e l i e v i n g that, d u e to different experiences, p e o p l e c a n n o t relate to

of t h e p r o b l e m of divided societies

o n e another. L o u r y ' s r e s p o n s e w a s to n o t f o c u s o n t h e d i f f e r e n c e s ;

in o u r c o u n t r y . " B e i n g c o l o r e d isn't me, b e i n g a

rather find a tradition that shared by

child of G o d is," L o u r y s a i d . " W e need to g r o w u p o u t of o u r ethnic

everyone. F o c u s i n g on the traditions e x p e rienced specifically by only o n e

pride and have a universalist perspective."


March

^Anchor

I 3, I 9 9 6

Ranting, raving, and practically foaming at the mouth, Alan K e y e s s t r u g g l e d as the c o p s dragged him from the TV studio. Inside, G O P presidential candidates debating. Outside, handc u f f s w e r e s l a p p i n g on Keyes' wrenching wrists. "I have the right to speak!" he shouted as they took him into custody. As Dave Barry would say, I am not making this up. Alan Keyes, the crusading moralist and languishing presidential hopeful, freaked out big time last week. Not being invited to the debate involving the top three G O P contenders, he c l a i m s that " m e d i a bosses" are controlling politics and bemoans the downfall of democracy. And he blames the media, of all things. As a member of that upstanding breed that are journalists, I am extremely offended at this absurd statement. Au contraire to those w h o bash it—the media is friend and beneficiary to society. Busy nineties voters value their time, and now, thanks to the media, they don't have to squander it dwelling on the issues. We can now have the pure, unadulterated Truth fed to us in 30second sound bites and colorful charts. This is progress. Find it vexing to form your own opinion? Never fear—that's what informed, non-biased people like Dan, Barbara and Willard are there for. They, quite simply, know best. Why do you think the media so enthusiastically supported Operation Desert Storm and so condemningly damned the effort in Bosnia? Sure, there are those petty mudslingers who insist it was all about oil, nukes, and politics. But we know the real reason those media virtuosos favored Kuwait—Colin Powell, who the media knows is the absolute epitome of American truth and patriotism, was involved. On the home front, the media has blessed us as well. Two simple words for the future of sex ed: Wall Disney. True story: subliminal sexual symbolism has been found on such kiddie flicks as The Lion King, Aladdin, and The Little Mermaid. Skip the tiresome debate we don't need sex ed in schools. Parents just need to bust out cartoon genies. For more advanced levels, Disney could come out with The Lion King 2: Siniba Unleashed and The Little Mermaid After Hours. The media also benefits teenagers. Besides keeping those pesky hoodlums off the street, it increases social conciousness. When Coolio tells kids to rock the vote, you can bet they flip off the MTV and rush right out to register. The virtuous media yearns to help and to objectively increase knowledge, awareness, and wisdom. Subliminal messages? Blatant bias? Come on. You can trust me. I'm here to help. After all, I am the media.

Foe

m

HEATHER BOSCH infocus e d i t o r

Sharp crackling echoes reverberate through the busy shopping district. Bulletsripthrough the teeming crowd, which quickly disperses anlid screams...and the moans of those w h o were plugged by the random shots. It's just another day in the wartorn realm known as the Promised Land. To Palestinian students such as Hanan Awwad ('96), and Jalaa Abdelwahab ('97), this was simply the norm. " B a c k home, w e are used to hearing gunshots," another Palestinian student • said. "When I came to H o p e , it w a s strange to just be able to go downtown and not have bullets fly over your head." T h e West Bank is located

Some Palestinians are frustrated with the fact that groups such as the PLO, w h i c h used to be more demanding, are now "going with the flow" and accepting a peace that they say is unacceptable and unfair. Groups like Hamas appeal because they seem to stick to what they say and follow through with it. This peace referred to is a Sept. 28, 1995 a g r e e m e n t b e t w e e n the PLO and Israeli government which grants Palestinian self-rule in the West Bank. However, this much-hailed treaty isn't all it's cracked up to be. S o m e Palestinians are upset, saying that they are not truly represented in these discussions that so many praise. According to s o m e , Israel c h o s e the P L O out of many differing Palestinian g r o u p s and made a peace treaty that would favor their own

It was strange to just be able to go downtown and not have bullets fly over your head. Palestinian Student

in o n e of t h e most troubled areas on earth-Israel and Palestine. This Holy Land to Jews, Muslims, and Christians is also the predicted site of the horrible world-ending battle that Scripture calls Armageddon. And when one knows its bloody past, tense present and uncertain f u ture, apocalyptic scenes occuring here are not difficult to envision. It is here that the fiery blasts of several suicide bombings have killed 5 7 people and wounded hundreds in the past two weeks. But these Hope students call it home. And they have a lot to say about the Arab/Israeli conflict—a fiercely festering wound of resentment that was further inflamed by the bombings. "There is so much that you can't forget," Abdelwahab said. "We cannot just open a fresh p a g e — w h o is going to decide when the new page is going to start, you know, before the Israelis' final killing or the Palestinians* final killing?" This ongoing saga of hatred was continued in the past weeks with the s c o r c h i n g d e t o n a t i o n s of s u i c i d e b o m b s , killing bus p a s s e n g e r s in Jerusalem and shoppers in Tel Aviv. H a m a s , an I s l a m i c political group that may be suffering from d i v i s i o n in t h e r a n k s , c l a i m e d responsiblility for the carnage. Some members of this group want to compromise with the peace plan advocated by Yassir Arafat, the leader of the Palestinian Liberation Organization. Others, such as those who made their mark with the suicidal explosions, consider themselves eternal foot soldiers in the jihad, or holy war, against Israel. And this militarism is not a bad thing to everyone.

interests, ignoring the dissenting v o i c e s of

other Palestinian groups. "It is so clear that what they call peace is actually the safety of the Israelis," Abdelwahab said. "The attitude seems to be screw the Palestinians—it is the peace that Israel wants." This peace agreement includes granting about four percent of the West Bank to Palestinians, according to Abdelwahab. Six Palestinian cities that have been declared to be under self-rule dot the landscape. Their hometown of Ramallah, located on the West Bank about 20 minutes from Jerusalem, is one such town. W h a t they experienced there and what is going on now could help to e x p l a i n w h y g r o u p s s u c h as Hamas are so bitter. "The towns are under Palestinian a u t h o r i t y , but they are still s u r r o u n d e d by Israeli soldiers," Abdelwahab

he

him in that city—a statue! Because " W h o is going to stop them?" he is a hero to them." T h e s t u d e n t s w i t n e s s e d and " S o why are the Israelis so inheard many horrible things during nocent and w e are criminals and tertheir lives in Palestine. "During the occupation, whole rorists?" Awwad said. " R e c o g n i z e that the Palestinvillages were destroyed," ians are also people that have sufA b d e l w a h a b said. " P e o p l e w e r e fered and been killed. Their blood kicked out of their homes." that has been shed is not less " S o m e of them still have the than the I s r a e l i s b l o o d , " keys, hoping someday they will go Abdelwahab said." back to their home," Awwad said. "The American meC u r f e w s , brutal beatings, dia ignores the fact that squalid refugee camps, bullets flythere are t w o sides to ing through crowds—all are too this." familiar. y " T h e Israelis have "If the soldiers s u s p e c t the power because they you of anything, o r even if SiaOf BtUl* have the military and the they are just bored, they can support of other nations. stop you, beat you, imprison We have nothing," you...and these are 18 yearT«V Abdelwahab said. old kids with g u n s w h o WW " W e a r e not r e a l l y feel powerful," h o p i n g for much from Abdelwahab said. America," Awwad said. "It's "I had a classmate not like America is the power who was also Jalaa's jenrt®**™ that is g o i n g to c o m e and save second cousin who t hese oppressed people. was killed, America is going to help those Awwad said. V w h o are going to help America "This w a s an V, back." innocent 14 yearAnd the two sides continue old and they t o o k h to feud and hate and bleed for a him to the mountains, ' chunk of land on the eastern side burned his body with • of the Mediterranean." c i g a r r e t t e s , beat him, "I don't support the killing of and left him there." the children or innocent people. But "A shepherd found only when people are treated equally his body three days later," is w h e n they can expect no vioAbdelwahab said. lence," Abdelwahab said. "I don't know now much \ " W h a t they call terrorism is of this still goes on inside the sometimes the only way of making cities. But I do know that the soldiers can still go in there and do what people realize that there are people being oppressed. When no one is they want," Abdelwahab said. listening, what other options do they " T h i n g s got b e t t e r a f t e r t h e have?" peace talks, but the bombings and "What peace are they talking what has been going on lately has started the whole thing again to be about w h e n your family and friends like it was when w e were in high are being killed and imprisoned? It is too late for peace now," Awwad school," Awwad said.

$

G r o u p s like H a m a s refuse to said. T h e bitterness runs deeper than accept this restrictive life as a peace, current strife and injustice. It flows according to the students. with the shed blood of generation And many Palestinians agree after generation. with their point. "You can't forget the things that "Everyone is applauding how have happened to you, your father, the situation is in those cities. But you brother, to your grandfather," the c u r r e n t s i t u a Abdelwahab said. tion is not p e a c e "They are our enemies. We are and it is not freenever going to be the same people. dom," Abdelwahab They occupied us, and w e just want said. to be free of them. We don't want "It is by name said. them to be included in our lives in only that they gave P e o p l e in us back some of our any way," Awwad said. the towns often And this vicious cycle of hatred land," Awwad said. cannot freely Also upsetting keeps circulating. travel, thanks to "What I am realizing is that if to the Palestinians b a r r i c a d e s of is the apparent pro- there were an Israeli person here, he soldiers and Israel slant of the w o u l d h a v e the s a m e h o s t i l i t y checkpoints. against us, the same frustration. I western powers. The only change can't deny that. There is always the " T h e r e is a seems to be that other side," Abdelwahab said. definite bias in the the Israeli solAnd as for how to resolve this American media," R. F r i s l c r diers s u r r o u n d c o n f l i c t , s o recently revealed in A w w a d said. "It t h e t o w n s inwreckage and death, no one has an makes it seem like only one side is stead of roaming the inner grounds. answer. "It is k i n d of like a b i g g e r suffering." "I personally don't think peace, "Why is it only when it happens prison," Abdelwahab said. the real peace, will exist in my lifeto them that people question it?" Israeli soldiers still roam the time," Abdelwahab said. Abdelwahab said. "There w a s an streets like they did before the peace And in the meantime, the strife Israeli that shot and killed 45 Palestreaty. "Soldiers can walk in and d o t i n i a n s w h o w e r e p r a y i n g at a c o n t i n u e s as the w a t c h i n g world whatever they want," Awwad said. mosque, and they built a shrine for holds its breath.

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* Editor's note: Names have been withheld for anonimity


Dance 22

When the spiWt mo M. M O R G A N staff r e p o r t e r

The opening number of Dance 22, entitled "With You," immediately evoked feelings of contentment and freedom in the audience. This engrossing dance number was the perfect opening act for the performance, a presentation of student dancing by the Hope College Dance Department in DeWitt Theater on the nights of March 7, 8, and 9. The consistently upbeat piece was performed b y twelve talented dancers appropriately costumed in frocks reminiscent of the revolutionary anti-war movement of the sixties.The backdrop of the stage changed throughout the dance from teal to lavender to a light sky blue. The tiedye clad dancers performed collectively during the first two songs. The musical accompaniment for "With You" was provided by a live band, the Folk Lizards. The first song played was an original Folk Lizards composition entitled "Tennesse Rain," followed b y a cover of the Grateful Dead's "Franklin's Tower." The twelve dancers then formed a loose group in the corner of the stage to watch the solos performed by Stephanie Gebhardt ('99) and Gina Buwalda ( , 99). Both girls performed their individual numbers beautifully as the the other dancers on stage playfully shouted words of encouragement. As the song ended, the dancers all left the stage, except Crystal Wright ('98) and Nathanael Buckley ( ' 9 7 ) . Wright performed an athletic solo climaxing in a graceful frenzy as Phil Melton, drummer for The Folk Lizards, drummed a solo on the bongo. Buckley joined in at the conclusion of the piece, and the two danced together before the rest of the cast reappeared to finish with a flourish. Huddled together in the middle of the stage, they concluded their message of freedom with the final triumphant stance of a tangled formation. The second piece of the night, " d ' E b a c l e de Ballet," was a comical ballet choreographed by M. Linda Graham. The spoof began with five women dancers posed together, smiling suspiciously. The lights were cut and a voice over the loudspeaker announced a change in the plans: the male lead was "unfortunately" to be replaced by Jonathan Fry. When the lights came on again. Fry was kneeling in the center of the ballerinas smiling broadly, continuing the spoof with his attempt to flirt with the dancers, and their attempt to throw him off the stage. This crowd favorite proved not only humorous but full of well timed, tight dancing. A m a j o r c h a n g e of p a c e o c c u r e d w h e n the p r o d u c t i o n ' s guest dancer, Avi Kaiser, began his twenty-eight minute " L e Depart De Marseille Pt. 1." Kaiser is well respected in dancing circles for h i s internationally known choreog. raphy and teaching. Kaiser's /'/ abstract Dance 22 per-

formance was met with criticism and compliments f r o m different members of the audience. He marched sideways across a diagonal strip of spotlight, his face menacing but otherwise devoid of expression and his bald head adding to the unsettling effect of the music. Kaiser illustrated sudden m o v e m e n t s of "escape" from his monotonous journey, only to be dragged back into his steady pace and pattern of marching. He effectively portrayed feelings of helplessness and struggling through his movements, his f a c e showing the pained looks of hopelessness. At last the passionate dancer began a new series of repeated movements. Kaiser would charge u p a wooden ramp only to stop everytime, throwing his hands in the air and falling back. T h e result was always the same: he was rejected and would again fell to the floor. Kaiser is a startling dancer in his fluidity of movement, and yet his piece became extremely monotonous; the lack of energetic movement wearied the audience. Following Kaiser's performance was the student-performed "Clay Dolls," choreographed by Julio Enrique Rivera. T h i s piece began with four dancers lifting and lowering a large, transparent piece of material, causing it to mushroom in the air like a descending parachute before falling lazily back to its original state. The "dolls" appeared to be depicting creation and the spiritual fall of humanity. The synthesizer-driven music and jerking, freeze frame motions of the dancers were reminiscent of the movements of the snaggle-toothed David Byrne in an early

-

80's Talking Heads video. The most chaotic, sinister number was "Somewhere T h e r e ' s Always Something Going On." The dancers, visually androgynous, were dressed in matching black and white camoflouge, loose gray shirts, and gray hats that covered head and hid hair. The dancers' movements echoed the pounding, industrial music of Glenn Branca with a tightness unachieved by many other numbers, making Stephen lannacone's choreography a m o n g the most creative of the evening. T h e dancers' faces showed no sign of emotion, and their actions personified power and strength. T h e climaxing moment came when all the dancers threateningly aproached the apprehensive audience before sitting down on the front of the stage in a single file line facing the audience. Audible with the concluding silence of the performance, were the dancers heaving, gasping for air and counting together. "A Walk Between the Raindrops," choreographed by M. Linda Graham, was a m o n g the most tightly danced pieces of the evening. This performance fit perfectly with the simple, acoustic balladsof Neil Young. Cleverly using an umbrella, the dancers impressed onlookers with graceful movements and smiling faces. Avi Kaiser once again took the stage for part two of his journey, this t i m e c a r r y i n g a b u n d l e of evenly cut, m a t c h i n g l u m b e r . He emphaticaly dropped the wood with a crash, awakening those who were already asleep in anticipation of another long, c o n f u s i n g piece. Once again Kaiser executed the dance with excellent skill, but dismal repetition. This time, his repeated motion seemed to serve more of a purpose as he rearranged the wood, trying to balance the sticks upright and find some sort of acceptable symmetry. At last he placed them in an even, uniform stack and acceptingly sat on it. The m o o d was altered, and he began using more of the stage to sway hips and arms, as if by arranging the wood he was somehow free. Kaiser also proved to be a skillful actor. His face never broke character, and he convincingly portrayed the passionate feelconvey. ings he was trying to The performance concluded with a tap piece, " C a l i e n t e , " perf o r m e d to M e x i c a n music. Dancers executed the dance which was choreographed by Terri Filips, garbed in red and black lace dress of Spanish flavor. T h e d e m a n d i n g kicks and turns, which were not always simultaneous, emitted random tapping sounds, but its unique style was pleasing, causing some to claim it as there favorite act of the evening.

W A R

PA.11

apply stage make-, Federico C 96) sec their performance

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LIBERATE ME: Bottom right. Dance 22's guest artist, Avi Kaiser, performed two self-choreographed dances, "Le Depart De Marseille " Parts I and 11. Kaiser is an international dancer, choreographer, performer and teacher. His works have been commissioned by the Canadian government, Communaute Francaise, and the Hebbel Theatre in Berlin, among others. Kaiser's appearance was funded by the Dorothy Wiley DeLong professorship in Dance. X: Kirsten Singer ('96), front, and Beth McCuster ('98) for their performance of "Calienie." Top right, Sandra d, and Angela Lo Cicero ('96), prepare their stage faces for i "A Walk Between the Raindrops."

N

V

K E T E D C R E A T I O N : "Clay Dolls," choreographed by Julio Enrique \arated six student dancers into three characterizations: The "Dolls," the "Good," and The dance itself was choreographed by Rivera in five parts: I. The Dust, 11. Creation, ery, IV. Separation, and V. Balanced. The dance depicted a spiritual creation story.

Anchor

p h o t o s by Jill Fischer


the

Opinion

Anchor

our voice.

your voice.

Making H o m e I m p r o v e m e n t s

Parking

T h e s h o w e r d o o r w o n ' t quite c l o s e . A crack in the k it c h e n

violation

March

questioned

Dear Editor,

w i n d o w has s l o w l y b e g u n c r e e p i n g a c r o s s the g l a s s . Paint c h i p s o c c a s i o n a l l y fall f r o m the c e i l i n g o n t o the t o p bunk d u r i n g the night like s n o w f l a k e s in early N o v e m b e r and the o n c e ivory l i v i n g r o o m c o u c h h a s turned a dusty gray o v e r the years. W h i l e the c o n d i t i o n s o f H o p e - o w n e d c o t t a g e s d o not fall i n t o the g e n r e of Animal

House

l i v i n g quarters, m a n y o f the

C o l l e g e h o u s e s here o n c a m p u s are in dire n e e d o f t o u c h ups. But i n s t e a d o f i n v e s t i n g in capital i m p r o v e m e n t s w h i c h w o u l d i m p r o v e the l i v i n g c o n d i t i o n s f o r s t u d e n t s y e a r round, the H o u s i n g D e p a r t m e n t has d e c i d e d to allocate e x c e s s f u n d i n g e a r - m a r k e d for c o t t a g e a c t i v i t i e s for a w e e k e n d e x c u r s i o n t o Toronto, Canada. A n d , w h i l e roadtrips are f u n — e v e n e d u c a t i o n a l in the c a s e

13, 1 9 9 6

When I found a parking place ralher late one February night behind the Dorian cottage, I was overjoyed. Tired from work, the walk back to my apartment would neither seem as long or as frightening. Pulling into a recently vacated spot in the very snow-covered lot, never did I think there would be a problem. No signs were visible to the contrary and the six other cars on either side of me seemed to share

my opinion. Nevertheless, when I returned to my car the next day, I was greeted with a fifteen dollar ticket f o r " parking on the grass." " My appeal of the ticket, which explained that the snow cover, the lack of signs and the presence of six other cars in the same area gave no indication of a " no parking zone," was denied. Hope College has provided much in terms of education and opportunity in the four years that I have been a student here. I will be the first to acknowledge this.

S t u d e n t

C o n g r e s s

However, in future years, when I am approached to freely donate as an alumni, memories of a fifteen dollars not so freely taken will be sure to have an impact on my spirit of generosity. I would like to encourage Public Safety to continue focusing on creating a safe campus atm o s p h e r e to the s a m e d e g r e e at w h i c h they regulate our parking patterns. Sincerely, Hollis M. Pangle ('96)

Z l b b v ,

M i n u t e s

o f t r a v e l i n g to a f o r e i g n c o u n t r y — i t m a y not b e the best u s e

The meeting on 3-7-96 was called to order at 8:08 p.m.

of d o l l a r s .

Old Business • The Constitutional Review was brought off the table. After brief discussion Parliamentarian Jeremy Van Ek moved to approve the changes. It passed with a majority of 17 with 3 abstentions. • President Nina Bieliauskas asked for questions concerning the Alternative Proposal for the Core Curriculum. Cot. •~ll • .* r\ I .1. J . C •L. nnoakAflp \ tage r>Representative Christine Osborn requested a representative of the proposal to address OCongress. Van Ek moved to leave organization of Congress' objective to the Social Environment task group and passed unanimously. Bieliauskas requested the return of completed surveys of the College's boards and committees.

T h e m o n e y to be u s e d c o m e s f r o m the general h o u s i n g fund. W h e n e a c h student p a y s their h o u s i n g f e e s at the b e g i n n i n g o f the year, five d o l l a r s per c o t t a g e resident is a l l o c a t e d for t w o p r o g r a m s — o n e s o c i a l activity and o n e educational activity. E a c h r e s i d e n t a s s i s t a n t and the m e m b e r s o f their c o t t a g e are g i v e n a c h u n k . A n y l e f t o v e r m o n e y g o e s i n t o a pot for the f o l l o w i n g year. T h i s y e a r c o t t a g e r e s i d e n t s w i l l u s e the a c c u m u l a t e d pot to p a y f o r the trip. But a c c o r d i n g to c o t t a g e R e s i d e n t D i r e c t o r S h e l l y S p e n c e r , o f the 4 3 8 s t u d e n t s w h o l i v e i n c o t t a g e s , o n l y 2 0 p e o p l e attended last y e a r ' s e x c u r s i o n to C h i c a g o . A g a i n this year,

New Business ...... • Van Ek moved to recommend to the Executive Committee (dealing with the questioned jurisdiction of the Administrative Affairs Board to ban smoking in the Kletz) that Student Congress be allowed to work on the issue before a particular board commits a vote. The motion was passed 16 to 3 with 1 abstention. • Tne Social Environment task group p dence hall bathrooms and another to live Jeremy Monty moved to pass both proposals. The former passed The meeting was adjourned at 9:30 p.m. The next meeting bThursday, March 21

any m o n e y not u s e d o n the T o r o n t o trip w i l l g o back into the f u n d f o r the 1 9 9 6 - 9 7 year. S p e n c e r i s c a r e f u l to m a k e the d i s t i n c t i o n b e t w e e n m o n e y

Hope College's First Annual Jh&AnW -

set aside f o r student activities and that u s e d for h o u s i n g repairs: they s i m p l y aren't the s a m e thing. Still, if the o p t i o n w a s g i v e n t o s t u d e n t s and they c o u l d c h o o s e b e t w e e n a w e e k e n d in the northland or a n e w d i n i n g r o o m table v o i d o f s t i c k y s p i l l s o n w h i c h they c o u l d spread

T a l e n +

J a m

This year Air Jam's taking a new twist.

out their h o m e w o r k e v e r y night, they m i g h t v e r y w e l l c h o o s e the table. It m a y b e t i m e f o r h o u s i n g t o rethink their a l l o c a t i o n o f

«*//

f u n d i n g . K e e p i n g u p - t o - d a t e w i t h c o t t a g e repairs w o u l d be a w i s e capital i n v e s t m e n t .

Can y o u do m a g i a ?

meet the press editor-in-chief operation manager campusbeat editor spotlight e d i t o r infocus e d i t o r intermission e d i t o r sports e d i t o r graphics e d i t o r photo editors photographer copy e d i t o r business m g r V a d r e p page designers

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Julie Blair Arin Neucks Jenn Dorn A my-Lynn Halverson Heather Bosch Melissa Herwaldt Greg Paplawsky Jacob Roesch Jill Fischer Zach Johnson Josh Neucks Matt Sterenberg Julie Harris Nina Bieliauskas Amy-Lynn Halverson Dave Schrier Angie Strey Becky Hollenbeck Dan Oderkirk Dennis Renner

There will be no publication of Any m u s i a a i + a l e n + ?

All +alen+s a r e w e l a o m e Practice your talent over Spring Break '96 because tryouts are right around the comer: March 26 from 7pm-midnight d k a f l O P A T TH& S O O R Y 5 p m , T H O R S O A Y M A R C H 1 4

This week is your last chance to sign up for Talent Jam!!!! T a l e n t J a m will b<s held on April t i t h a t t h e K n i a k e r b o d k e r T h e a t e r

March is the month to start your Hepatitis B vaccination. T h i s is the vaccine to prevent the fastest g r o w i n g sexually transmitted disease

Hepatitis B is 100 t i m e s more c o n t a g i o u s than HIV and 1 in 2 0 A m e r i c a n s arc infected. But it is p r e v e n t a b l e ! is available

free!

staff r e p o r t e r s

Glyn Williams • Becky Hollenbeck • Ally son Pickens • Nicole McClain • Peter Emery • Michelle Piel • Laura Mihailoff • Matt Morgan • Deana Rennick • Matthew Haseltine • Adam Couturier • Kim Powell • Jess Owens • Jen Zeerip T h e Anchor is a p r o d u c t of s t u d e n t e f f o r t a n d is f u n d e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e College Student Congress Appropriations C o m m i t t e e . Letters t o the editor are e n c o u r a g e d , t h o u g h d u e t o s p a c e l i m i t a t i o n s t h e Anchor r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t T h e o p i n i o n s a d d r e s s e d in t h e e d i t o r i a l a r e s o l e l y t h o s e of t h e e d i t o r - i n chief. S t o n e s f r o m t h e H o p e C o l l e g e N e w s S e r v i c e a r e a p r o d u c t of t h e Public R e l a t i o n s O f f i c e . O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o the Anchor a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r $ 1 1 . W e r e s e r v•e e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t o r r e j e c t a n y a do v ee rrtui s imn g .

the

Anchor

March 27,h due to Spring Break. Look for the next issue April 3rd and have a great break! v:

backpacking hiking

camping ^adventure

a m o n g college students.

If you are under 19, the vaccine

feAnchoron

Call Health Services today for more information about receiving this vaccinc!

^canoeing ^ g o o d books . o u t d o o r s f o r 31 days

W h a t m o r e could you ask for In a MAY TERM? Take D r . Ellis' A n i s h i n b e May T e r m . Be p a r t o f a n o n v a n -

Call X 7 5 8 5

ishing c u l t u r e . T a k e p a r t in

Hope College Health Clinic (All scrviccs and records arc confidential.) The Health Clinic is o p e n 8 : 3 0 - 1 2 : 0 0 and 1 : 0 0 - 4 : 3 0 .

the adventure of a lifetime.

Please call for an appointment.

English 395 3.0 Semester h o u r s h u r r y ! limited space

In the March 6 edition oiThe Anchor. Marc> Jllis was mistakenly identified as a nurse in the Sleeping with the Enemy article. She is actually a Ccrtitlea Physician's Assistant. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused. The Anchor wishes to correct any misinformation. If you find an error, call us at x7877.


the

Sports

Anchor

Joel Holstege: actions louder than words just comes naturally," he said of his skills. "The team just gives me the staff r e p o r t e r ball and if I ' m hitting then so be it. After the Hope College m e n ' s The rest of the guys on the team can basketball team beat Wittenberg to put the ball in the basket just as well advance to the N C A A Final Four, as I can." Almost all of his regular season Joel Holstege ('98) allowed himself to crack a smile. For perhaps the averages jumped in the N C A A tourfirst time all season long, Holstege nament. He averaged 11.9 points, 50.8 percent field goal shooting, 4.2 showed uncharacteristic emotion. He never talks to the o f f i c i a l s rebounds, 4.8 assists, and 2.5 steals per game durwhen they make ing the regular a bad c a l l . H e season. In the will not talk tournament, trash to the ophe h a s a v e r ponents and get aged 18.3 into their heads points, nearly to try to mess up 60 percent their g a m e . He f i e l d goal doesn't even shooting, and joke arounds six assists. In and show-off at f a c t , a g a i n s t the morning W i s c o n s i n shoot-around. Whitewater, H e is a c o o l he came close character, even to n o t c h i n g t h o u g h he h a s his first collehad much to talk g iate tripleabout lately. But d ouble with that's just his J o e l H o l s t e g e ( ' 9 8 ) 12 points, 10 style. a s s i s t s , and His impecGLYN W I L L I A M S

cable humility doesn't permit him to show much emotion on or off the court. He regards himself as just simply a member of the team. "It

Dutchmen

romp

continued f r o m

Offsides

kind of lax lately, but he has carried it for us. He can really do it all and it is very exciting to play with

him." Holstege's marvelous play and determination do not at all go unnoticed by t h e M I A A , as he was named to the first team M I A A as shooting guard. Calvin College head coach Ed Douma holds Joel's play in the highest regard. " H e is a really good player," D o u m a said. "Next year he will definitely be the best player in the MIAA. Without a doubt. It's obvious why he made the first team AllMIAA, and that is the fact that he is certainly the best shooting guard in the league." Ninth all-time leading scorer in Hope College history, Clare Van Wieren ('66) is an avid basketball fan and says that Holstege offers something to the team that no one else c a n . " H e is a very c l u t c h player," Van Wieren said. " H e has a great knifing drive that not many can do. He is very strong willed and exudes a lot of confidence. He is a great player and in no way is he onedimensional." Perhaps the reason for his amazing talent and will to win are his eight rebounds. highly-touted days of high school " H e has been quite the savior basketball at Covenant Christian lately," teammate Kevin Brintnell High School in Grandville, Michi( ' 9 6 ) said. "Our offense has been

to Final Four

by Jeff Brown

CO^CH

gan. W h i l e there, Joel w o n t w o Michigan state titles in basketball, and only knows how to win. Not once while he was in high school did he experience playing on a team with a losing record. "Joel finds a way to win," said Hope C o l l e g e b a s k e t b a l l c o a c h Glenn Van Wieren. " H e has always experienced the w i n n i n g f e e l i n g and refuses to allow himself to lose. Joel d o e s things p e r h a p s u n c o n sciously to win." A d i f f i c u l t transition that Holstege had to make while on the Hope basketball squad was that all through high school he played the point guard and thrived as the offensive leader. However, he seems

Community

to have adapted well to the completely different role. " T h e point guard's main objective is to lead the team and his foc u s is not to s c o r e , " C l a r e Van Wieren said. " T h e shooting guard, however, gels in there and scores. T h a t ' s what he d o e s . He gets in there, gets the rebound, scores. The responsibilities are very different and that just shows you how multidimensional he is." Holstege gives his all every g a m e . He d o e s n ' t quit. He c a n ' t quit. Quitting would show that he is afraid, and he can't do that, for that would mean that he is displaying emotion. He can't do that. T h a t ' s not his style.

lines up for memberships

DAN CWIK staff r e p o r t e r

OFORI i V PR photo

FOREVER D U T C H : Wendy Carroll ('96), Jeff "Spanky" Amlotte ('98), and Jeff WhUmore ('99) hopped the Hope College booster bus along with approximately 48 other fans to watch the Dutch advance to the Final Four last weekend. At o n e p o i n t t h e n u m b e r of B o s m a ' s f o u l s was exactly even with the total number of fouls that were assessed to Wittenberg. The trip to the Final Four is especially heart-thumping to the seniors on the team, as they have faced adversity and have drastically improved their game from the first day of practice in 1991. Bosma said he didn't smile about the fact that

I 3. I 9 9 6

Dow fever

I

they have apparently perfected it. " W e ' v e always been a man-toman team," Kevin Brintnell said. " W e ' v e been p l a y i n g m o r e a n d more zone lately and now that we have become more comfortable with it, w e are starting to use it to get us wins." T h e final factor was, as expected, the e x h i l a r a t i n g play of Joel Holstege ( ' 9 8 ) and Merritt w h o finished with 19 and 17 points respect i v e l y . B o t h had a g r e a t g a m e against Whitewater as well, as H o l s t e g e c a m e c l o s e to a t r i p l e double with 12 points, 10 assists, and eight rebounds. Merritt scored 16 points, 12 in the second half alone, on Friday night off of 6/8 field goal shooting. "Merritt did a great j o b of getting isolated and putting the ball into the basket," Van Wieren said. "Holstege is a guy you have to pay attention to. He definitely plays a key role in our wins." Holstege was the leading scorer for Hope on Saturday night with 7/ 11 shooting from the field, seven assists, and a smooth f i v e steals. Many of Merritt's points came from the free throw line, as he was 7/8 from the foul stripe and 5/9 from the field. T h e big forward also had three rebounds and four blocks. To add to B o s m a ' s i m p r e s s i v e reb o u n d i n g a c t i o n , he s c o r e d 12 points despite being consistently d o u b l e - t e a m e d and even tripleteamed on numerous occasions. A statistic highly in favor of Wittenberg was under the foul column. The Tigers w e r e called on merely two fouls in the first half.

March

he was going to be playing in Virginia next weekend until there was a mere :30 left in the game. " I t ' s s o m e t h i n g you d r e a m about as a kid," Bosma said. "Deep down you believe it in your mind and all. But actually it is so hard to believe because there are so many teams out there. But I guess it's like the assistant coaches say, 4 why not Hope?"'

For most Hope students the Dow Center is always there. It is a place to play, work out, and have a good time. And best of all there is no waiting.Students can just walk right in without waiting w h e n e v e r the Dow is open. What may surprise many Hope students is that community members are also able to use the Dow, but they have to buy a membership to do so. What also may be surprising is that so many community members desire to use the facilities that there is a year-long waiting list just to get into the Dow. In order to get on the waiting list, you just tell the Dow office your name and address and then all you can do is wait. Usually, the time a resident must spend on the wailing list is b e t w e e n o n e year and 14 months. According to Jane Holman, Ihe head of the Dow Center, people go to the Dow because, "Not everyone has a s w i m m i n g p o o l , r u n n i n g Irack, exercise room, and a weight room." The first type of membership is the Community Membership which allows use of the Dow any lime. The price is $314 per year for the first person on Ihe membership, and $70 for an additional person such as a s p o u s e . O t h e r a d d i t i o n a l people, like children, incur a $35 cost. Hope alumni get a slight break on a membership $39 cut f r o m Ihe

total cost. There is also a waiting list for this type of membership. The second type of membership is Early Bird Membership through which you can only use the Dow in the morning on weekdays and Saturday f r o m 8:30 -10:30 a.m. With this type of membership one can not use the Dow on Sunday. They can use the Dow at any time only when the s t u d e n t s are o n b r e a k s f r o m school such as Christmas Break. From January to March, the season w h e n the Hope S w i m teams are practicing, members can only use the s w i m m i n g pool from 12-1 p.m. When the swim t e a m s are not in season. Early Bird m e m b e r s can only swim in the morning. However, the price is $100 per year per person. There is no waiting list for the Early Bird Membership and the Hope alumni do not get their price reduced. For senior citizens, it costs $95 per year for a single membership, and $145 for a couple. Also, with a s e n i o r m e m b e r s h i p , the Hope alumni do not gel their price reduced. They have to be on the wailing list and they can use the Dow any time.As it turns out, the Dow is not only for students but for others as well. The wailing list is long because the Dow doesn't want to create further c r o w d i n g problems in the already overcrowded space in the Dow. Students already have a hard enough lime finding space to use the facilities around the community members.


Anchor

the.

Back

s t r i c t l y classified. For Sale: 1994 Salurn SL2,4-door, 5-spccd, 37,000 miles. Many extras. Very clean. $10,900. For more information. contact 786-7497. Attention Hope Students: Information and materials regarding Life issues are available by contacting Right to Life of Holland Area, 100 S. Waverly, Holland, Ml 4 9 4 2 3 at 396-1037. Having trouble finding a variety of food choices in the dining area? If so, this is your month. It's national Nutrition Month! C o m e as those questions about nutrition y o u ' v e been wondering about, enter drawings for prizes, in valuable info, pick up s n a c k s and find what a healthy diet looks like. Sheila Tebo, a Registered Dietitian f r o m Creative Dining Services, will be visiting Phelps on Thurs. March 28 at lunch time. Wanted!! Individuals, Student Organizations, and Small Groups to promote SPRING BREAK '96. Earn M O N E Y and FREE TRIPS. C A L L T H E NATION'S LEADER, INTER-CAMPUS PROGRAMS, htlp://www.icpt.com 1 -800-3276013. PREGNANT AND CONSIDERING YOUR O P T I O N S ? Discover the advantages of ADOPTION. Call 1 - 8 0 0 - B e t h a n y ( t o l l - f r e e ) or (616)396-0623 in Holland. World Wide Web: http://www.bethany.org/ and Internet e-mail: info@bethany.org S U M M E R 1996 - S E A S O N A L POSITIONS AVAILABLE Ottawa County Parks & Recreation. Outdoor work at C o u n t y ' s parks and beaches; Grand H a v e n , Holland, and Jenison areas; $5.80 to $6.90 per hour; contact Human Resources at (616) 846-8306 for application. ColorWorks is currently interviewing H O P E students for a limited number of S u m m e r ' 9 6 management positions. Opportunities available in Holland, Gr. Rapids, and K a l a m a z o o . Last s u m m e r s a v g . earnings $6,200. To speak to a campus representative call (800) 4771001.

r

LEAGUE f r o m

March

I 3, I 9 9 6

I

are representing, so that means that we are not going to look at it with an American perspective." The issue of emphasizing awareness seems to be a focal point to the conference. "You can really see a lot of perspectives," Matt Lapinga ('97) said. "It o p e n s y o u r e y e s to a lot of things." In a d d i t i o n to a w a r e n e s s , the Model also aspires to highlight the important issues of the Arabic region, and to generate understanding about the patterns of cooperation and conflict within the Arab world and within the international community. The students worked on one of five committees: economic affairs, Palestinian affairs, political affairs, security affairs, and socio-cultural affairs. Each delegation wrote position papers outlining its nation's stand on the various issues being

discussed and wrote resolutions that were presented to the committees for dicussion and voting. "Our goal was to get the support of the Arab League," Lapinga said. "Our resolutions got changed and amended for the benefit of the country which we represented." T h e Model League has taken place at Calvin for the past several y e a r s , t h o u g h t h e l o c a t i o n has moved from state to state, including to the University of Miami in O h i o . H o p e p a r t i c i p a n t s in the Model would like to see Hope have a crack at hosting as well. Several years ago, Engle approached the administration about holding the Model on campus and was turned down. "Knowing that we host one of the biggest Model UN conventions, I think that Hope should host the Model," Madi said. "It would be a good sign of open-mindedness."

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ATTENTION BUSINESS STUDENTS T h e r e will b e a p o si t i o n o p e n for Business M a n a g e r / Advertising R e p r e s e n t a t i v e for n e x t shool year. If you a r e i n t e r e s t e d in a j o b t h a t is g o o d e x p e r i e n c e and looks g r e a t o n your r e s u m e , c o n t a c t Julie Harris a t t h e Anchor.

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Profile for Hope College Library

03-13-1996  

03-13-1996  

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