Page 1

Sororities, Fraternities Enter Musical Contest The Civic Center will be t r a n s f o r m e d into a music auditorium on Saturday,

March

20 at

8 p.m.,

when the f r a t e r n i t i e s and sorori.ies compete in the All-College Sing. Each

fraternity

The

sororities,

by

one

its

Delta Phi—"A Bird F l e w , " Louise Voorhorst,

their

chosen

Go

companists

Cheryl

Sibylline—"Milk

Hekman:

Sorosites—"Love Makes the World

songs and (heir d i r e c t o r s and acare:

Rosemary

Round,"

Sharon

Defendorf;

Dyks r a .

Alpha

Phi —

Knickerbocker — "The Whiffenpoof

Song," John Versteeg, Tom

Mazur; Arcadian — " J o s h u a Fit De

Battle

ing, Gene P e a r s o n ; E m e r s o n i a n — "Cool

Water,"

Mark

Lemmenes,

Kelly Bakker.

of

Jericho,"

Harvey

Loren

Meengs;

Cosmo-

planned by co-chairmen Gail Gro-

politan — "Black is the Color of

tenhuis and Jeff Muller. Mr. and

My

Mrs. J a m e s Tanis a r e advisors for

Lucas,

The

All-College Sing h a s been

sorority

and Honey," J a n i e c e Smoll, Gloria

its choice,

L a n g s t r a a t ; Dorian—"My F a v o r i t e

and the best presenta'.ion will be

T h i n g s , " Kit J a n s e n , Caron Vandcr

r e w a r d e d with a trophy. E a c h of

competi ion

Hoek;

songs, led by their d i r e c t o r s and

Walvoord, Doug Smith; F r a t e r n a l

the competitors

the event. No admission

•Betty Lou Dietch, Evonne Taylor;

accompanists:

— "Rock-a-My Soul," J i m Bekker

charged.

will sing

a

song

and

and accompanied members.

of

will be directed

Kappa

C h i - " T h e Sleigh,"

" C h a r l o t t o w n , " Linda Tiezzi. F r a t e r n i t i e s will e n t e r with

the

into the following

True

Love's

Hair,"

Chuck

will be

OPE COLLEGE

anc or

Sophomore Dance Saturday, 8 p.m. Carnegie Gymnasium

$ O c c ^

77th YEAR -

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

20

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

II

March 12, 1965

'Modern Man's Dilemmas'

Harris To Discuss Modern Man Sydney J . Harris, columnist and

In 1941, he b e c a m e a r e p o r t e r

d r a m a critic for the Chicago Daily

and f e a t u r e writer for the Chicago

News, will speak to the c a m p u s

Daily News, and t h r e e y e a r s l a t e r

next T u e s d a y in the Chapel at 10:30

he began his editorial-page column,

a . m . on the topic, " T h e D i l e m m a s

"Strictly P e r s o n a l , " which is now

of Modern M a n . "

distributed to some 100 n e w s p a p e r s

M r . H a r r i s began his c a r e e r of journalism

while

still

in

high

The recipients a r e J a m e s Boeringa, a psychology m a j o r f r o m Oak P a r k . 111., iMarjorie Gouwens,

Of t h e 11,000 faculty-nominated college seniors who competed, only 1.39o students received the a w a r d .

Giant's Party Honors Champs S a t u r d a y the Hope College MI A A champion basketball team will be honored at the all-college d a n c e , "The

Jolly

Green

Giant's Birth-

day P a r t y , " to be held in Carnegie G y m n a s i u m at 8:00 p.m. The d a n c e will f e a ' u r e the " L a t e K n i g h t s " and various other t a l e n t s of the sophomore class will provide e n t e r t a i n m e n t . The highlight of the p r o g r a m will be a presentation of .he Hope basketball t e a m by Coach DeVette. D r e s s is casual and the cost is 50c per person. The all-college d a n c e is sponsored by the sophomore class. Coc h a i r m e n a r e Gwenn Dacus and R a n d y Miller. Other chairmen include: Cindy Clark, r e f r e s h m e n t s ; Ellen Folkert and B r a d KIow, tickets; S h e r r y C h a p m a n , en ertainm e n t ; Carole Fields and Carol De Young, publicity; and Marcia Newhouse and J o a n M e d e m a , decorations. Tickets a r e on sale in Van R a a l t e and also through d o r m r e p r e s e n tatives.

The fellowship, designed to recruit new college t e a c h e r s , consists of full tuition and fixed fees with $1800 living expenses at the g r a d u a t e school of the student's choice. Honorable mention was given to P a m e l a D y k s t r a . English; P^ul Hesselink. English; Ronald Mulder, history and J a m e s Ronda history. " H o n o r a b l e mention winners a r e expected to r e c e i v e a l t e r n a t i v e a w a r d s f r o m other s o u r c e s by circulation of their n a m e s throughout t h e g r a d u a t e schools of the U.S. and Canada by the F o u n d a t i o n , " said Sir H u g h Taylor, president of t h e Foundation. The p r o g r a m is the l a r g e s t private source of support for adv v a n c e d work in the liberal a r t s . It has been f i n a n c e d by two Ford Foundation g r a n t s , totaling $52 million. The p r o g r a m is in its twentieth y e a r of a w a r d i n g fellowships. Last y e a r Hope College had seven recipients of t h e a w a r d . P r e s i d e n t D r . Calvin V a n d e r Werf said, " T h e s e fine young people and o t h e r s in t h e p a s t well r e p r e s e n t e d Hope in this Foundation P r o g r a m and we expect to continue our e f f o r t s in producing excellent u n d e r - g r a d u a t e s during Hope College's second century of p r o g r e s s and g r o w t h . "

gained

his post

In as

which he still holds.

Herald

and

Examiner.

He

Harris

has

been

described

by

y e a r s and m a j o r e d in philosophy

Time

at the University of Chicago. F o r

quoted n e w s m a n in Chicago." He has won a n u m b e r of prizes for j o u r n a l i s m , and is the a u t h o r of four books: "Strictly P e r s o n a l " (1953); " M a j o r i t y of O n e " (1957); " L a s t Things F i r s . " (1961) and "On the C o n t r a r y " (1964).

con," and later worked f o r an en-

a German literature m a j o r from South Holland. 111., and Carole Timkovich. an English m a j o r and a native of Lansing. Illinois.

Harris

Hemisphere.

cago

of his own m a g a z i n e , " T h e Bea-

The three Hope recipients of the Woodrow Wilson fellowships w e r e announced today by Dr. John Hollenbach.

1945,

Western

d r a m a critic for the Daily News

a y e a r he was editor and publisher

Wilson Foudation Gives Aid For Three Seniors' Study

the

school, as a copy boy for the Chiheld this job through his college

SCHOLARS—Vice-president Dr. John Hollenbach congratulates the finalists for the Woodrow Wilson Fellowships. They are (from left to right): J a m e s Boeringa, J a m e s Ronda, Paul Hesselink, Pam Dykstra, Marjorie Gouwens, and Carole Timkovich. Not pictured is Ron Mulder.

in

cyclopedia c o m p a n y and for the City of Chicago Law D e p a r t m e n t .

Magazine

as

"the

most

-

SIDNEY J. HARRIS

Academics Investigated in Terms of Religion Impact, a series of discussions on the relationship of fact and faith, was launched Tuesday with e 1 e v e n departmental seminars meeting in classrooms throughout the c a m p u s .

" O u r discussion was truly rew a r d i n g . " said Wes Michaelson. c h a i r m a n of the psychology discussion group. " T h e interest of he faculty m e m b e r s was most encouraging. I feel we got a good

Ken', Meyerson Quit Berkeley After Incidents of Obscenity At a news conference held Tuesday. Presiden Clark K e r r and Chancellor Martin Meyerson of the University of Calif, at Berkeley announced that they would submit their resignations to the Regen s meeting to be held on March 26. Both m e n h a v e refused to indicate the reason for their resignations, but the c m p u s abounded wi h rumors. The predominant feeling, according to Associated Students President Charles Powell, is that the resignations were occasioned by the p r e s e n c e of a few obscene signs d u r i n g rallies staged during he past few weeks. The s p e a k e r s at the rallies, said Powell, p h c e d " n o inhibition on four-letter w o r d s . " T h e r e a r e no regulations concerning political activity now in force by the university, according to Powell. The Chancellor was to establish a set of int e r i m rules, but no effort is being m a d e to enforce t h e m . Most organizations h a v e set t h e m s e l v e s up at various places where they s e e m to b e most effective. Several s t u d e n t s h a v e been a r r e s t e d for c h a r g e s connected with their participation in obscene rallies, b u t heir cases a r e in State of California c o u r t s

and not the disciplinary p r o c e s s of the university. The resignations b r o u g h t quick responses f r o m the Associated S udents (the official student g o v e r n m e n t ) and the F r e e Speech Movement, which organized the f i r s t s e m e s t e r protest d e m o n s t r a ions. Both expressed r e g r e t s over the resignation and urged the two men to reconsider. The Associated Students c o m m e n d e d P r e s i d e n . K e r r for his fine service to the J school. The F r e e Speech Movement (FSM) Steering Committee issued the following s t a t e m e n t on Wednesday: "The prospec s (for restoring h a r m o n y ) h a v e never been better. Only in the r e c e n t controversy over obscene words can s t u d e n t s be said to h a v e not acted responsibly. FSM did not ini iate or support this controversy . . . The problem is now in the courts where it belongs." FSM held a d e m o n s t r a t i o n Wednesday for the dual p u r p o s e of protesting he Selma, Ala. situation and urging the reconsideration of P r e s i d e n t K e r r ' s resignation. One to two thousand persons participa ed, in comparison to one to two hundred in the " r i s q u e " demonstrations, according to Associated Students P r e s i d e n t Powell.

s t a r t in discussing s o m e basic issues and I a m m a s t about the f u t u r e . "

optimistic

Not all the meetings were unqualified successes. Music-art and philosophy m e e ings w e r e poorly attended, although the leaders of those expressed the belief t h . t t i m e conflicts m a y h a v e b e e n at fault. Said Al Wilson of .he Music-Art s e m i n a r , "We will continue to m e e t and to look for a new a p p r o a c h to our common p r o b l e m s . " T h e groups w e r e set up to explore the p r o b l e m s arising between m a j o r fields of study and Christianity. "We a r e .rying to discover the d y n a m i c a s p e c t s of Christian belief," said P a u l Ransford, c h a i r m a n of I m p a c t . The discussions were planned to be informal so that spontaneity would replace any sense of a classroom situa.ion. "We want to avoid getting into any artificial r u t , " c o m m e n t e d Bob Anderson, history discussion l e a d e r . " E a c h group is setting up its own schedule and topics according ..o its own w a n t s and n e e d s . " F u t u r e d a t e s and t i m e s of e a c h g r o u p will be announced, with each discussion continuing to m e e t weekly. Students a r e invited to a tend whichever sess.on i n t e r e s t s them. T h e discussions w e r e c h a r a c t e r ized by strong faculty i n t e r e s t in most d e p a r t m e n t s and s t u d e n t int e r e s t that r a n f r o m v e r y strong to almost nil. " W e hope that those groups which w e r e poorly attended will run s t r o n g e r n e x t w e e k , " said R a n s f o r d . " I n t e r e s t g e n e r ated so f a r p r o v i d e s a strong b a s i s on which to build an ever b r o a d e r base of s u p p o r t , " he s a i d .


Page Z

Senate Plans Elections; Nominations Due Monday The Student Senate Tuesday night d i s c u s s e d forthcoming elections for Student Senate offices and class presidents. The Elec'ions Committee has set the c a l e n d a r in the following m a n n e r : nominations will have to be turned in to the Student Senate by 5 p.m. March 15; there will be a mee ing of c a m p a i g n m a n a g e r s March 16 and petitions will be available the s a m e day; Campaign Week will run f r o m April 19-23 with April 20 being the day for speeches by candidates; election runoffs will be held on April 22 and final election on April 23. The AWS board reported their recommendation t h a : girls be allowed to w e a r b e r m u d a s a f t e r supper every day, all day Saturday including in the library, language laboratory and music building, but no b e r m u d a s will be allowed on Sunday. The m a t t e r of pink slips for excuses f r o m chapel r e m a i n s in a subcommittee of the Religious Life Commi tee and no f u r t h e r action could be taken on this issue. Gerry

March 12. 1%5

Itope CÂŤUefe aackor

Auten

presented

a

re-

"New Great Concept of God'

Brinig: 'Wonders Through God's Will'

port on the T a l l a d e g a College student exchange p r o g r a m and the upcoming trip over spring recess, e x ^ ' a ninÂŤ? f h p puTvose of he d~og r a m and the progress attained at that t i m e . (See additional story on page six.) It was decided that there will be no all-college formal this y e a r because of lack of s p a c e on the social calendar. Also discussed was the m a n n e r of honoring the Hope M1AA champion basketball t e a m . This m a t t e r was r e f e r r e d to co-chairmen Anita awad, P a t McEachron and Joel Monsma. T h e y h a v e since decided to honor the t e a m at the all-college dance at Carnegie G y m t o m o r r o w .

Mrs. Harold C. Brinig

Symphonette to Play The Hope College Symphonette, under the direction of Dr. Morrette Rider, will a p p e a r in a concert series sponsored by Oakland University in Rochester, Mich, today. The Symphonette, with Robert Cecil, hornist, as soloist, will play he Fou-th Horn Concerto in E-flat by Mozart. .James Tallis. harpsichordist, will present a variety of solo works for harpsichord in addition to joining the Symphonette in the p e r f o r m a n c e of the Twelfth Concerto Grosso by Corelli. Other portions of the program will be devoted to the Fifth Symphony of Schubert, the ballet music of Gretery and works by F a u r e and Strauss.

f

If everybody and his duck-billed platypus phones Long Distance at 9 P.M. Why don't you phone earlier-or later? [THLEPHD Nte

" E a c h of us can help to c u r e the w q - H ' s disease by formu 1 ating an adequate philosophy of life." This was the analysis of our g e n e r a t i o n ' s basic role and our personal significance in achievein? th s goal given by Mrs. Harold C. Brinig at last Tuesday's assembly. Mrs. Brinig is a f o r m e r Pittsburgh parole officer, Chicago youth w o . k e r and leader of youth education at Marble Collegiate Church, New York. Using e x a m p l e s of people she has worked wi h in her varied c a r e e r s , she went on to explain what she considers to be an " a d e quate philosophy of life." " P e o p l e should ask themselves who they are, where t h e y are, and what is their p u r p o s e . " Out of the answers 'o these questions comes philosophy of life which includes: (1) "a new concept of the w o r l d " '2t " a new great concept of self" and <3> " a new great concept of God." For Mrs. Brinig, "life is a victory to be won, an adventure in creating s o m e t h i n g . " This urge to crea e has been responsible for most of the a d v a n c e m e n t s of society. If we would allow this divine urge for social b e t t e r m e n t to take precedence over self advancemen , we would take the first step towards

a better world, continued Mrs. Brinig. But if we consider ourselves incapable of affecting the world, this life ?oncep. is of little use. "You must have also a new great concept of y o u r s e l f , " according to Mrs. Brinig. "The world's disease isn't poverty, war, sex, or cheating. These are only s y m p t o m s . The disease is h a t e , fear, jealousy and dishonesty. T h e s e all fall under the re .1m of personal m o r a l s . One either follows a good moral code and aids in the cure, o r p a r tially follows rules of honesty, etc. and a d d s to the world's d i s e a s e s , she s t a t e d . The most important concept needed .o adequately cope with society is the " n e w great concept of God." continued Mrs. Brinig. "God wants to c u r e this diseased world and wants to m a k e it beautiful, hrough the unique plan he has for each of our lives. With a philosophy based on honesty. self-less friendship and considering God's will in e a c h of our lives, we will be able to achieve wonders in solving the world's d i l e m m a . " Mrs. Brinig closed with the Biblical quote: "You h a v e not chosen me. but 1 have chosen you, and ordained you to go and bear f r u i i . "

DeValois Discusses Marriage As Mutual and Spontaneous " P e r s o n a l h a p p ness should not be the p r i m a r y objective Ln m a r riage. Such happiness is a byproduct of m a r r i a g e , " said Dr. B e r n a r d i n e De Valois in her first lec ure last Monday night on the topic. " A r e You Fit to be T i e d ? " The p r o g r a m was sponsored by AWS.

lecture by saying, " M a r r i a g e increases the joys of life and decreases the s o r r o w s . " Questionnaires w e r e distributed on the topic, "Holding the Line Steady," which will be discussed March 15 in student discussion groups led by facul.y and ministers' wives.

"To try and achieve a perfect 50-50 equality in m a r r i a g e relationship is impossible," said Dr. De Valois, who believes that " m a r riage should be mutual and spon-, t a n e o u s . " She then e n u m e r a ed the various problems that should be solved before m a r r i a g e , such as in-laws, money and church attendance.

Peace Corps Halsey and J a n e B e e m e r , returned P e a c e Corps volunteers who served in t h e Philippines, will visit t h e Hope c a m p u s next F r i d a y , March 19. They will be available for consultation with students concerning opportunities in the P e a c e Corps. Anyone wishing to speak with them should sign an appointment list available in D e a n H i l m e r t ' s office, according to Marsha Hendricks, who will co-ordinate the visit of t h e two volunteers.

Speaking on planned parenthood Mrs. De Valois said, "The number of children should ibe dee ded by the p a r e n t s ' ability to give love and support to the children."

Drop at

Dr.

De

Valois

concluded

her

Westrnte's

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Speed Reading

Course Aids R e a d i n g Skills

ARTHUR LITTLE

LEONARD C. HOLVIK

Earlham Professors To Lecture On Japanese Music, Drama J a p a n e s e music, d r a m a and d a n c e will be discussed and demonstrated on c a m p u s by two guest l e c t u r e r s Tuesday. P r o f e s s o r Leonard Holvik, c h a i r m a n of he music d e p a r t m e n t and director of the concert choir at E a r l h a m College, and professor A r t h u r l i t t l e director of D r a m a t i c productions at lEarlham College, h ve been Culture10

and

by

the

Hope

faoult

During their visit to the c a m p u s they will take p a r t in classes. A special J a p a n e s e dinner planned by Dr. and Mrs. M a s a n a o will also t a k e place during their s t a y . A public p r o g r a m in the Snow Auditorium will be held T u e s d a y even i n g at 8:45 p.m. P r o f e s s o r Holvik, a native of Minnesota, received both his B.S. and M.A. f r o m H a r v a r d Universi y where he was elected to Phi Beta K a p p a and also s e r v e d as a t e a c h i n g fellow following his graduation. He c a m e to E a r l h a m College in 1949 and has since held two F o r d Foundation F a c u l t y Fellowships, one for study in New York and another, in 1962-63, to J a p a n . P r o f e s s o r Ar hur Little, who t e a c h e s speech and d i r e c t s d r a m a t i c s at E a r l h a m , joined the college staff in 1947, spent the summ e r of 1962 in J a p a n taking p a r t in a faculty s e m i n a r on A s n n a r t s and culture, and then r e m a i n e d in the country for the a c a d e m i c year. While on Hope's c a m p u s P r o f e s s o r s Holvik and Little will m e e t with Dr. Van P u t t e n ' s F a r E a s t students ' T u e s d a y , 4th hour, Chapel 14—up '.o 25 guests can be accomodated) and with Dr. K a n o ' s

y s e m i n a r in J a p a n e s e History and class in J a p a n e s e history and civilization (1-2:30 p . m . ) which will be moved to the Carley room in t h e l i b r a r y . L a t e r in the afternoon •they will meet wi h m e m b e r s of the F a c u l t y S e m i n a r '5:30 p.m., P r e s i d e n t ' s Room, G r a v e s ) . The evening p r o g r a m , to which students and t h e public a r e invited. will include a short movie on various f o r m s of t h e a t r e and dance, followed by live illustrations on the koto and a recorded performance. Particular emphasis will be given to the role of the Noh D r a m a . T h e r e will also be a displ y of musical i n s t r u m e n t s , books of pictures and no ations. pictures and records. Students in D r . K a n o ' s J a p a n e s e history course will have an opportunity to see an hour-long film on t h e J a p a n e s e Doll T h e a t r e ' B u n r a k u ) which is in J a p a n e s e , but will be n a r r a t e d and commented upon by P r o f e s s o r s Holvik and Little. This event, too, scheduled for 1 p . m . in Van Zoeren Library, will be open 4.o the public.

"1 used to t a k e all afternoon just to r e a d the Holland E v e n i n g Sentinel—now I whip through the New York T i m e s in just a few minutes. 1 can do all m y classwork with plenty of t i m e for extra reading besides." The above testimonial f r o m a satisfied s t u d e n t was elicited by Mrs. Helen Schoon's " I m p r o v i n g Reading Skills" course, a noncredit six week study designed to aid s t u d e n t s in developing g r e a t e r speed and comprehension in reading. "This is not a ' r e a d i n g clinic' or a r e m e d i a l c o u r s e , " Mrs. Schoon emphasized. "We do not not teach people how to r e a d , but how to perfect adult r e a d i n g skills necessary for college reading. "Most people who t a k e the course h a v e a re ding r a t e of 250 o 350 words per m i n u t e , " said Mrs. Schoon. " T h e y usually increase their r a t e to around 1000 words, .although we once had a student who was r e a d i n g 5000 words. We also work on comprehension improvement and vocabulary lists." An army of machines is employed in the course, including a " r e a d i n g controller." which flashes a reading selec ion. line by line, onto a screen at a fixed r a t e . " I t ' s fun to r e a d — " says the f i r s t selection, appropriately. A " r e a d i n g a c c e l l e r a t o r " pushes the s t u d e n . to read rapidly by m e a n s of a b a r which inexorably moves along the page, fore ng the r e a d e r to keep ahead of the bar or lose the s e n s e of the p a s s a g e .

phrases," according to Mrs. Schoon. " T h e tachistoscope f l a s h e s digits, p h r a s e s and finally sentences on a screen for one onehundreth of a second, convincing the viewer that he doesn't need to read in the left- o-right wordby-word method he has b e e n using." Not all students at the r e a d i n g center a r e f r e s h m e n who fail the

grammar c o u r s e , said Mrs. Schoon. S e n i o r s contempla ing graduate study also register. Why can't college students read faster? "When 1 ask them, they say, 'I never read anything but my assignment,'" said Mrs. Schoon. Registration for the next session of the reading course will be taken in April.

BEAT THE MACHINE—Anna-Marie Fisher improves her rate of reading by keeping ahead of the machine which moves down the page.

"Most s t u d e n t s r e a d words, not

P. F. TENNIS

JACK PLRCELL

The International Relations Club has cancelled its r e g u l a r m e e t i n g scheduled for M a r c h 16 and is replacing it with the p r o g r a m on J a p a n e s e music and d r a m a .

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Page 4

March 12, 1965

Hope College anchor

Off The Cuff

â&#x20AC;˘' Foreign Policy Needs Rethinking by Robert Donia IRC s p o n s o r e d a v e r y worthwhile panel l a s t S a t u r d a y night on U. S. policy t o w a r d E a s t e r n E u r ope. Most of the p a r t i c i p a n t s spent their t i m e in a t t a c k i n g t h e c u r r e n t policies of both p a r t i e s concerning E a s t e r n Europe and pleading for friendlier relations with those C o m m u n i s t l a n d s . T h e p a n e l discussion a n d subseq u e n t q u e s t i o n s and a n s w e r s r a i s e d s o m e vital a n d f u n d a m e n t a l probl e m s r e l a t i n g to A m e r i c a n f o r e i g n policy. In the give and t a k e of day-to-day d e v e l o p m e n t s in Europe, V i e t n a m , t h e Congo a n d othe r t r o u b l e a r e a s , m a n y of us o v e r look or f o r g e t s o m e of t h e basic principles upon which o u r policy is b a s e d . Many would like to believe t h a t our sole b a s i s f o r action is a vigorous i d e a l i s m , but u n f o r t u n a t e l y A m e r i c a n p r a g m a t i s m e n t e r s into t h e p i c t u r e at l e a s t as m u c h . Actually, a u n i q u e and a m b i g u o u s combination of i d e a l i s m a n d r e a l ism e n t e r s the p i c t u r e a n d sometimes, a s w a s t h e c a s e r e c e n t l y with r e f e r e n c e to V i e t n a m , even the P r e s i d e n t a n d S e c r e t a r y of State s e e m to d i s a g r e e . We s t a n d for f r e e d o m , p e a c e and self-determ i n a t i o n f o r all n a t i o n s on an ideal level. P r a c t i c a l l y , we prom o t e o u r own s e l f - i n t e r e s t with p a r t i c u l a r a t t e n t i o n to m i l i t a r y s u p e r i o r i t y and d e f e n s e of our home s h o r e s . At p r e s e n t , this m e a n s t h a t we do e v e r y t h i n g possible to oppose a g g r e s s i o n by t h e other p o w e r f u l m i l i t a r y bloc in t h e world t o d a y , t h a t u n d e r t h e influence of C o m m u n i s t ideology. T h e n e g a t i v e i m a g e of t h e United S t a t e s in n e u t r a l a n d allied nations of the world i s - l a r g e l y a result of our policy in s i t u a t i o n s which do not fit into this basic power s t r u g g l e . It s e e m s t h a t we don't know w h a t to do w h e n Comm u n i s m isn't at s t a k e . M a n y exa m p l e s could be cited, but p a r t i c ularly t h e i n t e r n a l s i t u a t i o n in South A f r i c a , t h e African colonies of P o r t u g a l a n d the A r a b situation s t a n d out a s p r i m e e x a m p l e s of i n c o n g r u i t i e s which c a n n o t b e explained a w a y b y the u n d e r l y i n g principle of A m e r i c a n f o r e i g n policy. The ideal foreign policy is one which r e t a i n s t h e long-range i d e a l goals of o u r policy as s t a t e d above, ye 1 one which p r u d e n t l y and properly uses p o w e r to p r o m o t e those goals. Our p r e s e n t position finds us as a n a t i o n doing t h i s with r e g a r d to the C o m m u n i s t bloc c o u n t r i e s . H o w e v e r , we a r e not doing this in dealing w i t h situations in which t h e conflict with C o m m u n i s m is not the d o m i n a n t consideration. We h a v e failed to recognize the e s s e n t i a l d i f f e r e n c e s of t h e s e c a s e s a n d failed r e m a r k ably in o u r ability to d e a l with them.

This philosophy is in d i r e c t cont r a s t to those who today a r e advoc a t i n g a " n e o - i s o l a t i o n i s t " position. W a l t e r L i p p m a n , in discussing this new philosophy which h e clearly s u p p o r t s , s t a t e d , " W h i l e we h a v e i m p o r t a n t i n t e r e s t s on t h e Asian and A f r i c a n c o n t i n e n t s , they a r e not vital i n t e r e s t s which would j u s t i f y a unilateral A m e r i can c o m m i t t m e n t of our m i l i t a r y forces. In t h e s e a r e a s , which a r e b e y o n d the l i m i t s of o u r vital s t r a t e g i c i n t e r e s t s , the sound policy is to rely o n collective security." Mr. L i p p m a n has a point in opposing u n i l a t e r a l m i l i t a r y c o m m i t ment but the distinction b e t w e e n " v i t a l A m e r i c a n s t r a t e g i c intere s t " a n d just p l a i n " i n t e r e s t " is indeed a q u e s t i o n a b l e one. In p r a c t i c a l t e r m s , w h a t h a p p e n s in Saigon is of v i t a l s t r a t e g i c interest to all A m e r i c a n s .

Furthermore, "neo-isolationism" would rule out s u c h h u m a n i t a r i a n a n d idealistic a c t i o n s a s the Congo r e s c u e mission a n d any a c t i v i t i e s c a r r i e d on at t h e r e q u e s t of o t h e r governments. And p r o b a b l y the m o s t i m p o r t a n t a s p e c t of policy to r e t a i n , to s o m e w h a t p l a c a t e our c o n s c i e n c e s and m a i n t a i n o u r mor a l e , is s o m e s e m b l a n c e of idealism. We find ourselves, t h e n , g r o u n d ed on f i r m u n d e r p i n n i n g s in our p r e s e n t f o r e i g n policy. What is n e e d e d is a n i n f u s i o n of a bit m o r e idealism and realism combined: we need to r e g a i n a vision of the goals and t h e c o u r a g e of o u r convictions a n d s t r e n g t h to put s o m e of o u r i d e a l s into a c t i o n . T h i s is p a r t i c u l a r l y t r u e of a r e a s which do not fit into the o v e r r i d i n g cons i d e r a t i o n of the c u r r e n t i n t e r n a tional s t r u g g l e b e t w e e n t h e f r e e world and C o m m u n i s m .

Hope Delegation to T allegada To Survey Civil Rights Issue D u r i n g the s p r i n g r e c e s s seven Hope s t u d e n t s a n d t h r e e f a c u l y m e m b e r s will s p e n d a week on the c a m p u s of T a l l a d e g a College in p r e p a r a t i o n for the f o r t h c o m ing s t u d e n t e x c h a n g e p r o g r a m planned between Hope a n d Talladega. The students were chosen through i n t e r v i e w s given by seve r a l f a c u l t y and s t u d e n t l e a d e r s of the p r o j e c t . F a c u l t y l e a d e r s a c c o m p a n y i n g the s t u d e n t s will be Dr. J e n t z of t h e Philosophy and Religion d e p a r t m e n t s and D r . William B a r l o w and Dr. David Powell of the history d e p a r t m e n t . T a l l a d e g a College, located in Talladega, Albania, approximately 100 m i l e s f r o m S e l m a , A l a b a m a , is a liberal a r t s institution f o u n d e d in 1867 a n d h a s an e n r o l l m e n t of 385 s u d e n t s . T h e school will organize t h e p r o g r a m f o r the Hope visitors, including visiting of classr o o m s , f o r m a l a n d i n f o r m a l discussions. The p u r p o s e of t h e t r i p is to

Student

orient Hope s t u d e n t s into the f u n c ionings of a s o u t h e r n N e g r o c o m m u n i t y . Dr. Powell s t a t e d t h a t " W e a r e just going to o b s e r v e life at the college and to try to gel to know the s t u d e n t s . We a r e not going as a m i l i t a n t or activist group." To g a i n m o r e insight as to the social conditions in the South, all applicants had read many recent a r t i c l e s and books on the r a c i a l crisis. They h a v e also m e t with all Hope College f a c u l t y m e m b e r s who h a v e lived in the Sou h to d i s c u s s what can be e x p e c t e d at T a l l a d e g a . Dr. Powell w a r n e d t h a t even a f t e r e x t e n s i v e r e a d i n g , " W e c a n ' t feel we a r e e x p e r t s in the South. We h v e n ' t been e n g a g e d in the civil r i g h t s issues a n d we a r e i g n o r a n t of conditions. But we will l e a r n , " he a d d e d . T h e t r i p to the A l a b a m a college will be followed by a r e t u r n visit of five T a l l a d e g a s t u d e n t s to H o p e ' s c a m p u s l a t e r his s p r i n g r e p o r t e d G e r r y Auten. s t u d e n t c o - c h a i r m a n .

Group Sponsors

The USNSA ( U n i t e d S t a t e s National Student Associa ion) is sponsoring for i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s a Student L e a d e r Delegation to be held in J a p a n . K o r e a , and Hong Kong f r o m J u n e 7 to J u l y 10. Six s t u d e n t s will r e c e i v e s c h o l a r s h i p s for the p r o g r a m . T h e s e s t i p e n d s will include a p a r t i a l a l l o w a n c e for m e a l s plus c o m p l e t e p a y m e n t of t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e x p e n s e s . T h e d e a d l i n e f o r a p p l i c a t i o n s is April 1. The d e l e g a t e s will m e e t with Asian s . u d e n t s in t h e i r own en-

Travel

v i r o n m e n t to gain a b e t t e r insight into the Asian m i n d and the position t h j t Asia occupies in the world today. B e f o r e l e a v i n g for their assigned a r e a , t h e r e will be a briefing session for the g r o u p given by e x p e r i e n c e d p e r s o n n e l f r o m the g o v e r n m e n t a n d USNSA. These p r e h e n s i v e k n o w l e d g e of the a r e a m e e t i n g s will give t h e s t u d e n t comhe will be visiting. Applications a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m T o m O g r e n in A r c a d i a n Hall.

Smoking Clinic The Students a n d Faculty are invited to worship on the Second Sunday of Lent in Hope Church. M o r n i n g Worship at 9:30 a n d 11:00 with M r . Hillegonds preaching at b o t h services. The Chancel Choir sings at 11:00.

The School of Christian Living meets at 6:45.

A THOUGHT FOR LENT: When God took a handful of clay and hid in It the very torment of eternity, he got him a turmoil out of it.

And why not?

But the

birds of heaven and the beasts of the field looked on with wondering eyes; for this strange creature had its heart among the stars, and its head was only a little lower than the angels!

There was a man.

HOPE CHURCH 77 W. l l t h Street

To Be Offered By Doctor Team F r o m Sunday through Thursday,. M a r c h 18, H o p e College will hold its f i r s t s m o k i n g clinic. S m o k e r s will m e e t in the C a r l e y R o o m f r o m 6:30 to 7:30 p . m . on e a c h of the five nights. The clinic w a s developed by t h e S e v e n t h Day A d v e n t i s t C h u r c h a n d h a s been of n a t i o n a l i n t e r e s t . T h e clinic h a s b e e n r e p o r t e d a s o v e r 509f s u c c e s s f u l on the national level. T h e clinic a t t e m p t s to p r e s e n t t h e f a c t s about s m o k i n g in t e r m s of h e a l t h but also t y i n g it into a s p i r i t u a l c o n t e x t . D r . E a r h a r d of the L a n s i n g a r e a is t h e m e d i c a l e x p e r t who will w o r k w i t h the group. A p a s t o r f r o m this a r e a will aid h i m . T h e f i l m , which will s t a r t off the clinic S u n d a y n i g h t , is " 1 to 10,000," a f i l m a b o u t a lung o p e r a t i o n . M a n y such f i l m s a r e u s e d by t h e clinics.

DELEGATION TO YUGOSLAVIAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;The GLCA delegation to Yugoslavia met at Hope last weekend in conjunction with the Michigan IRC conference. They are (standing, left to right): Claude Lancome, Earlham; Bruce Bigelow, Wooster; Fred McEIdowney, Albion; Ken Jaros,

Wabash;

Bob

Donia.

Hope;

John

Taggart,

Kenyon;

Jan

Strasma, D e P a u w ; (seated, left to right): Nancy Vogeler, Denison; Linda Donnely, Antioch; Craigen Wall, Oberlin; and Donna Garrison, Ohio Wesleyan.

IRC Symposium for Professors Concludes Yugoslav Seminar by Paul Verduin P r e s e n t United S t a t e s policy t o w a r d E a s t e r n P^urope a n d s u g g e s t i o n s for i m p r o v e m e n t w e r e the s u b j e c t of a s y m p o s i u m of college p r o f e s s o r s at the Michigan I n t e r n a t i o n a l R e l a t i o n s Club C o n f e r e n c e , held h e r e last Saturday

in

conjunction

with

the

Great

Lakes

College

Association

S e m i n a r , to be held in Y u g o s l a v i a next s u m m e r . The symposium on Eastern E u r o p e w a s held in the D u r f e e Hall T e r r a c e Room i m m e d i a t e l y following a b a n q u e t for a tending s t u d e n t s f r o m A q u i n a s College, C e n t r a l Michigan U n i v e r s i t y , a n d Hope. Also a t t e n d i n g w e r e the t w e l v e GLCA Yugoslav S e m i n a r students. Members of the panel included Dr. Irwin A b r a m s , p r o f e s s o r of his o r y at Antioch College, who a c t e d as m o d e r a t o r . Dr. M o r r i s B r a n c h , p r o f e s s o r ot e c o n o m i c s al Albion and Dr. Milton Yinger, prof e s s o r of sociology at Oberlin. Also on the p a n e l w e r e Dr. J o h n Hollenbach a n d Dr. Calvin V a n d e r Werf of Hope. All of t h e s e m e n e x c e p t Dr. V a n d e r W e r f will a t t e n d the Yugoslav S e m i n a r . T h e p r e s e n t U.S. policy ^oward E a s t e r n E u i o p e . a c c o r d i n g to Dr. A b r a m s . is b a s e d on the f a c t t h a t c o m p l e t e s o l i d a r i t y no longer exists within the c o m m u n i s , e m pire. " T h e concept of t h e iron c u r t a i n as a closed off section, f o r m u l a t e d by Winston Church.ll. is no longer the c a s e , " he said, adding that " t h e y o u n g e r g e n e r a t i o n in E a s t e r n E u r o p e is e s t r a n g e d f r o m the g o v e r n m e n t , and t h e g o v e r n m e n t l e a d e r s know i t . " A b r a m s called o u r p r e s e n t policy " a n enlightened one c o m p a r e d to . h a t of J o h n F o s t e r Dulles during t h e E i s e n h o w e r y e a r s , " a n d d e s c r i b e d it a s " b u i l d i n g b r i d g e s " to close the g a p of m i s t r u s t between the U.S. and E a s t e r n E u r o p e in o r d e r to s t i m u l a e the g r o w i n g d i f f e r e n c e s b e t w e e n the E u r o p e a n c o m m u n i s t n a t i o n s . T h i s is accomplished t h r o u g h e c o n o m i c aid, trade and cultural exchange. Dr. Abrams voiced disagreement with the U.S. policy o build up West G e r m a n y as a m i l i t a r y p o w e r a n d a s a nation, s a y i n g t h a t E a s t e r n E u r o p e still f e a r s a s t r o n g , a g r e s s i v e G e r m a n y . (West G e r m a n y still c l a i m s h e r f o r m e r l y - h e l d ' e r r i t o r y e a s t of t h e O d e r - N . e s s e line, a c l a i m which the U.S. h a s not f o r m a l l y opposed.) " A s long as the United S t a t e s lets its policy t o w a r d E a s t e r n E u r o p e be influenced by the West G e r m a n s , w e turn the E a s t e r n European powers into t h e h a n d s of t h e R u s s i a n s , " said A b r a m s . Specifying possible improvem e n t s in policy, A b r a m s s t a t e d t h a t t h e U.S. could give up t h e m u l t i - l a t e r a l f o r c e in E u r o p e a s a b a r g a i n i n g point with the Communist countries. Calling f o r flexibility in .our policy, D r . Y i n g e r e m p h a s i z e d t h e

fact t h a t t h e r e a r e i m p o r t a n t diff e r e n c e s within e a c h c o m m u n i s t coun ry. and a r a n g e of policy views. "If we r e a l i z e t h e r e is a r a n g e , we should a d j u s t our policy to e n c o u r a g e their most negotiable o n e . " Underscoring Dr. Yinger's statem e n t , Dr. V a n d e r W e r f r e m a r k e d , "I w a s s t r u c k by the v a s . differences in the E a s t e r n E u r o p e a n c o u n t r i e s 1 visited l a s t s u m m e r . " Dr. Branch stated he held to a the viewpo.nt of e c o n o m i c s , questioned the a p p a r e n t d e t e r m i n a t i o n of the U.S. to " c o n q u e r " Comm u n i s m . "Only with the possible e x c e p t i o n of China does o n e s e e a d o c t r i n a i r e concept of C o m m u n ism t h r i v i n g t o d a y , " he s a i d . Dr. B r a n c h s t a t e d he held to a policy of " h u i T L m i t a r i a n i s m a n d help.ng na ions a c h i e v e g r e a t e r independence" toward Eastern E u r o p e , as opposed to t h e Machliaveliian " d i v i d e ,and c o n q u e r " plan. R o b e r t Donia, H o p e ' s Y u g o s l a v Seminar representative, asked Dr. Brunch w h e t h e r t h e basis of our policy now is m e e t i n g the m i l i t a r y .hreat from Communist countries, and r e q u e s t e d a p e r s o n a l c r i t i c i s m of our pol.cy. B r a n c h replied t h a t e c o n o m i c aid is t h e p r e r e q u i s i t e for i m p r o v m e n t of E a s t - W e s t relations, but t h a . t h e U.S. holds " a h e t e r o g e n e o u s collection of policies, of which the p o w e r s t r u g g l e predominates." Controversy over whether United S t a . e s policy should be guided by i d e a l i s m or p r a g m a t i s m d o m i n a t e d t h e r e m a . n i n g discussion. W h e n a s k e d by Hope s t u d e n t J a c k Cook to r a t i o n a l i z e o u r t o l e r a n c e of totalitarian governments, such as in the D o m i n i c a n Republic, Ying e r replied, " W e d o n ' t a l w a y s s t a n d for 100 p e r c e n t p r i n c i p l e . We m u s t r a t h e r k e e p in m i n d t h e highest g o J s . " D r . H o l l e n b a c h r e acted ,o this by s a y i n g , " U n l e s s w e can find s o m e b a s i c e n d , s u c h a s t h a t of the C h r i s t i a n t r a d i t i o n , we a r e r e a l l y t r y i n g to a t t r a c t undecided na ions to o u r s i d e f o r selfish r e a s o n s . " Commenting on U.S. support of P o r t u g a l a n d South A f r i c a , D r . Yinger said, " W e m u s t not be too s y m p a t h e t i c with A m e r i c a n policy in this a r e a , " and c a l l e d A m e r i c a n b u s i n e s s e n t e r p r i s e s in h o s e areas i m m o r a l . Dr. A b r a m s synt h e s i z e d by s t a t i n g , " U n l e s s w e k e e p i d e a l s a h e a d of p r a c t i c a l considerations, our idealistic goals a r e not a c c o m p l i s h a b l e . "


Page 5

Hope College anchor

March 12, 1965

Hope Looks Ahead

Freshman Study Sessions Data

P r i n s Explores Hope's F u t u r e

Reveals Good Effects on Grades "The study p r o g r a m had definite beneficial e f f e c t s , " said Dean J a m e s Harvey abou . the study sessions which were conducted for freshmen last s e m e s t e r .

by John Mulder The man who looked more like a professional football player than a college a d m i n i s t r a t o r sat back, crossed his legs and began to an-

On the basis of this I he unanimous vote of involved, the p r o g r a m tinued next year, .he

swer questions. This

man

was

Robert

(Bud)

Prins, 1954 g r a d u a t e of Hope College.

formerly

an

employee

The study sessions were held four nights a week for three hours a night during the t h r e e weeks prior to Christmas vacation. Those freshmen whose m i d t e r m a v e r a g e was 1.6 or lower w e r e required to attend three of the four nights and those whose a v e r a g e was 1.6 to 2.0 were invited to attend on a voluntary basis.

of

Michigan Bell Telephone Co., and the recently appointed assistant to the president and head of development. Head of development is a new a d m i n i s t r a t i v e position c r e a t e d by Dr. VanderWerf. The position is becoming a c o m m o n one in many colleges and universities across the nation. A bulletin f r o m a firm which t r a i n s men in this field has c o m m e n t e d on this change in this way: " T h e development officer is still a newcomer to the college scene. Fifteen y e a r s ago there was only a handful throughout the country. Ten years ago the n u m b e r was still small. However, the pressures facing higher education have brought a new a w a r e n e s s of the necessity for establishing a continuing, long-range, planned program of a d v a n c e m e n t and development for colleges and universities." (Bulletin of Gonser, Gerber, Tinker and Stuhr; Chicago, 111.) This bulletin goes on to state that t h e position of head of development is a difficult one to define as far as its responsibilities and the goals of development. • Mr. P r i n s c o m m e n t e d that he felt this was the case. He indicated that his job was not a static one but one involving a constant process of critical evaluation. " W e must constantly evaluate where we have been and w h e r e we are going," he said. " T h e r e has to be a recognition of the fact that first and foremost the alumni will continue to be an excellent source of college policy, progress and finances. This is the one group which is growing in direct proportion to the growth of the college," P r i n s said. He contrasted the potential alumni support with church support. " T h e church is not growing in direct proportion to the college. We must develop in the church the realization that the college needs a g r e a t e r portion of the overall pie, so to s p e a k . " Contained in all of his r e m a r k s about his new position w a s the view that the head of development w a s a man who was concerned with money. That a college cannot grow or develop without money is an assumption basic to his outlook. In raising the money necessary for development, Mr. P r i n s pointed out t h a t three potential sources must be tapped—the alumni, the church and the c o m m u n i t y . Mr. P r i n s as head of the 1964 Alumnf Fund Raising D r i v e showed himself to be qualified in this aspect of his job. The drive went over its goal by bringing in over $127,000 and by raising the percentage of alumni contributors f r o m 17 to 35 per cent.

DU SAAR PHOTO and GIFT SHOP Everything

Photographic

Holland, Mich. EX 2 - 2 2 3 0

According to Dean Harvey the p r o g r a m was an " a t t e n p to help new freshmen who m a y have m a d e miscalculations about college.'" In

Dr. Robert DeHaan Selected As Education Department Head Dr.

Robert

DeHaan,

currently

on leave with the G r e a t Lakes Colleges

Association

Programmed

Leapning

Project,

chairman

of

the

will

In the y e a r s ahead. Mr. P r i n s expressed the hope that the Alum ni Fund could be raised to $250,000 yearly and could increase t h e p e r c e n t a g e of contributors.

Department

of

His job involves more t h a n fundraising, however. Development must occur within the student body, and thus he will be e n g a g e d to a certain degree in student recruitment. As the college develops, its n a m e and its reputation must b e c o m e known to more people, and so his job involves public relations as well.

ning with the next a c a d e m i c y e a r ,

Mr. Prins said, " T h e r e is a definite relationship between fundraising, student r e c r u i t m e n t , and public relations. However, admissions must be and continue to be a job for the admissions office. This is true a s well for public relations. T h e r e is an i n t e r r e l a tionship only in specific c a s e s . " Mr. P r i n s ' record as c h a i r m a n of last y e a r ' s fund drive, as an a d m i n i s t r a t o r with Michigan Bell, and as a l e a d e r in raising money for the United Foundation in Detroit portends well for Hope's development and f u t u r e .

X

In 1966 he will be relieved of his directorship, and will be able to devote full t i m e to the education d e p a r t m e n t .

become

Education of Hope College beginROBERT PRINS

announced President VanderWerf. Dr. DeHaan stated that right now he sees the main problem confronting the d e p a r t m e n t as one of staff. With the r e t i r e m e n t last y e a r of c h a i r m a n VanderBorgh and the a p p r o a c h i n g r e t i r e m e n t of two more m e m b e r s of t h e staff, new replacements will have to be obtained shortly. Dr. DeHaan has another y e a r on the GLCA P r o j e c t and will be splitting his t i m e between the project and Hope. During this period he plans to lay the groundwork and integrate himself into the d e p a r t m e n t .

Dr. DeHaan stated recently that he sees c h a n g e s occurring in American education. T e a c h e r s are confronted with new techniques for instruction. There is also a growing e m p h a s i s on education for t h e culturally depr i v er children and an emphasis on increased technology in education. President Dr. VanderWerf stated. "With the sweeping changes that a r e occurring in education, our D e p a r t m e n t of Education is destined to play a crucial and leading role in shaping p r i m a r y and secondary school education in this region. These new appointm e n t s are a i m e d to strengthen our d e p a r t m e n t to m e e t the challenges and d e m a n d s of tomorrow."

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Welcome

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Hope Students to

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PLACE

finding and the students will be condean added.

comparing grade point a v e r a g e s f r o m mid e r m and finals of 33 students who were required to go regularly, the a v e r a g e of 23 of students went up, nine wen. down and one remained the s.ime. The a r e a of voluntary a t t e n d a n c e also had some beneficial effect on grade point averages. Evaluation sheets which the studen s completed, indicated that they unanimously approved of the idea behind the study sessions. The sessions next fall may have some modifications which were suggested f r o m experience with this y e a r ' s p r o g r a m , the dean said, such as the addition of lectures on how to study. Other possible changes a r e concerned with the sessions themselves such as having a study room in the library and requiring only the first two of the three hours.

OPEN 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Daily Sundays 12 to 3 p.m. Visit Our Gourmet Table FORMERLY "THE FIFTH WHEEL" Phone 3 9 6 - 5 3 3 3 833 Washington

CASUAL

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COME AND HONOR THE MIAA BASKETBALL CHAMPS


Page 6

Hope College anchor

March 12, 1965

anchor Rook Review: 'Ln Jalousie

French Novel Uses Cinematographic Technique t e m p t to a n a l y z e a n d r a t i o n a l i z e an e x p e r i e n c e , a s r e a d e r s , we a r e n e v e r q u i t e c e r t a i n of a c h a r a c t e r ' s s t a t e of m i n d . All the clues w e a r e g i v e n a r e to be found in t h e o b j e c t s upon which the e y e of the n a r r a t o r rests, the g e s t u r e s a n d m o v e m e n t s he t a k e s into account, a n d m u c h of the t i m e w e a r e left b e w i l d e r e d a s to which a s s o c i a t i o n s a r e v a l i d . This, howe v e r , is purposely i n t e n d e d by the a u t h o r who c a r e f u l l y a v o i d s letting us u n d e r s t a n d , or g u e s s , t h e feelings of t h e c h a r a c t e r s . If. by c h a n c e , one h a s seen the movie a d a p t a t i o n of Robbe-Grillet s Last Year at Marienbad (19(51) this point b e c o m e s c l e a r e r . We find t h a t the c a m e r a e y e s h i f t s f r o m one s c e n e to a n o t h e r — w e t a k e in t h e d e c o r , the g e s t u r e s , we h e a r a few w o r d s s p o k e n , but yet w e a r e n e v e r allowed to know what the c h a r a c t e r s t h i n k , feel, or e v e n who t h e y a r e . This technique p r o d u c e s , on one h a n d , a h y p n o t i c e f f e c t , but on the o t h e r hand it can be f r u s t r a t i n g .

CAROL B E U K E M A C R I T I Q U E : The new French novel LA J A L O U S I E , by A l a i n RobbeGrillet, reviewed by Carol Beukema. ( E d i t o r ' s Note: Miss Beukema if a senior majoring in French. The new novel JALOUSIE was publishecJ by Evergreen Books, Grove Press Inc., and is available through the bookstore. Other Robbc-Grillet books are IN T H E LA S Y R I N T H , V O Y E U R , and LAST YEAR AT M A R I E N B A D . ) Alain Robbe-Grillet a n n o u n c e s a new trend in F r e n c h fiction which," breaking away from the tragic t h e m e s of w a r t i m e e x i s t e n t i a l i s m , in or about 1955, i n t r o d u c e d w h a t is known as t h e " a n t i - n o v e l " or t h e "new novel." His a p p r o a c h is entirely d i f f e r ent f r o m a n y t h i n g a t t e m p t e d before. Robbe-Grillet h a s deliberately r e p l a c e d the world of m a n by the world of o b j e c t s , forcing t h e r e a d e r to accept i n s t e a d of the r e a l i t y of psychological a n a l y sis, a reality as it is c i n e m a t o g r a p h i c a l l y r e p r e s e n t e d — v e r y objective, r e g i s t e r i n g only t h e reaction to a c e r t a i n incident itself. It is the a u t h o r ' s position t h a t feelings a r e not e x p l i c a b l e in c a u s a l t e r m s and t h a t s u b j e c t i v e a n a l y s i s has b e e n e c l i p s e d by o b j e c t i v e associations which constitute a world t h a t is m o r e solid a n d immediate. B e c a u s e t h e r e is n e v e r any at-

Robbe Grillet's whole contention is t h a t g e s t u r e s and o b j e c t s a r e t h e r e b e f o r e a m e a n i n g is assigned to t h e m . The r e a d e r must then go one step f a r t h e r — h e must first " r e a c t " a s does the n a r r a tor, t h e n r e l a t e , i n t e r p r e t a n d j u d g e , and lastly m a k e a choice. While t h e t r a d i t i o n a l psychological novels l e a v e t h e r e a d e r to m a k e only a choice in s o m e c a s e s , the m o d e r n r e a d e r is a s k e d to exert his i m a g i n a t i o n a little m o r e and play the role of t h e j u d g e . In one of his most recent novels the " o b j e c t i v e " t e c h n i q u e of Robbe-Grillet is b e a u t i f u l l y illust r a t e d . " L a J a l o u s i e , " which c a n be t r a n s l a t e d in two w a y s a s e i t h e r " j e a l o u s y " or " b l i n d s " ( e a c h image i m p o r t a n t to the total evaluation) is b a s e d upon a s t a n d a r d t h e m e — t h e j e a l o u s y of a husband over his w i f e . The plot could not be m o r e s i m p l e o r m u n d a n e , which is one of t h e m a i n r e a s o n s why the violence of the j e a l o u s y is so h e i g h t e n e d . On a r a t h e r s e c l u d e d b a n a n a p l a n t a t i o n p r e s u m a b l y in the West Indies, a h u s b a n d b e g i n s to suspect his wife A . . . ( n o t i c e how s h e is t r e a t e d like a n o b j e c t ) of infidelity, b a s i n g his j e a l o u s y

on two m a j o r a s s u m p t i o n s ( 1 ) t h a t his neighbor, F r a n c k , h a s m a d e too r e g u l a r a habit of " v i s i t i n g " his house a n d (2) t h a t F r a n c k a n d A . . . w e r e forced to spend a whole nighl t o g e t h e r in town b e c a u s e of c a r t r o u b l e w h e n they should h a v e r e t u r n e d f r o m doing " e r r a n d s " by e v e n i n g . The intrigue centers a r o u n d the h u s b a n d ( n e v e r d e s c r i b e d in the s t o r y except for his s h a d o w which c r o s s e s the d o o r w a y ) w h o r e g a r d s his w i f e ' s e v e r y g e s t u r e , e v e r y word with the n a k e d e y e of the c a m e r a , picking u p s e e m i n g l y disc o r d a n t s i g n a l s f r o m t h e monotone of their daily routine. A h a n d placed upon the a r m of the c h a i r , the position of f o u r c h a i r s on the t e r r a c e , a glass set d o w n , a look, a laugh, A . . .'s b r u s h i n g h e r h a i r , the m a r k of a c e n t i p e d e on t h e w h i t e wall—all of t h e s e i m a g e s i n t e r t w i n e , o v e r l a p , c h a n g e , yet reiain t h e i r i d e n t i t y . One o b j e c t is enough to b r i n g to mind a c e r t a i n s c e n e a n d the n a r r a t o r f l a s h e s b a c k in his mind f r o m one i m a g e by which he is obsessed to a n o t h e r — d i s t o r t i n g w h a t he sees a n d o v e r h e a r s . Our g r e a t e s t p r o b l e m is to d i s c e r n w h a t e x a c t l y took place b e t w e e n F r a n c k and A . . . a n d to u n t a n g l e the s t r i n g of e v e n t s we m u s t be a w a r e of R o b b e - G r i l l e t ' s use of the " r e l a t i v e " point of view. Since the husband n e v e r p a s s e s a j u d g m e n t upon w h a t h e overh e a r s or sees but only r e g i s t e r s e a c h incident e q u a l l y in his mind, we m u s t t a k e into a c c o u n t the w a y in which h e s e e s t h i n g s a n d w h a t he sees. E v e r y w i n d o w h e looks out of. we look out of. N every o b j e c t he selects we. too. study m o m e n t a r i l y . We s e e only through his e v e s a n d . as his g a z e constantly shifts, we m u s t be a w a r e of w h a t r o o m we a r e in or w h e r e t h e o b j e c t s a r e ; o t h e r w i s e it would be a l m o s t impossible for us to detect w h e r e and w h e n the s t o r y becomes distorted. To aid us, Robbe-Grillet h a s p r e f a c e d the s t o r y with a detailed plan of the p l a n t a t i o n and h o u s e . Two i m a g e s r e o c c u r f r e q u e n t l y —the m a r k on t h e wall w h e r e F r a n c k has killed a c e n t i p e d e and

the b r u s h i n g of A . . . 's h a i r . In a j e a l o u s m i n d which is e a s i l y p e r v e r t e d by the slightest suspicion o r possible a s s o c i a t i o n , t h e black m a r k left by the d e a d centipede becomes associated with A . . . and later becomes a sexual s y m b o l , r e f e r r i n g at first to the s i m i l a r i t y in the m o v e m e n t of A . . . 's filed f i n g e r n a i l s w h e n she c l a s p s the b r u s h a n d t h e movement of h e r h a i r d u r i n g the b r u s h ing p r o c e s s with the legs and ant e n n a e of the c e n t i p e d e a n d the c r a c k l i n g sound it m a k e s . When the h u s b a n d c o n j u r e s up the possibility of F r a n c k and A . . . 's s p e n d i n g the night t o g e t h e r , in his m i n d F r a n c k kills a c e n t i p e d e before' c o n s u m m a t i n g the a f f a i r . The " j a l o u s i e s " or blinds become a pertinent image. When the h u s b a n d s u r v e y s his wife on the v e r a n d a with F r a n c k t h r o u g h the b l i n d s , his vision is limited and d i s t o r t e d — c u t up into s m a l l sections. T h i s is just how the s t o r y p r o g r e s s e s ; bits a n d s n a t c h es which lead the h u s b a n d in all d i r e c t i o n s , n e v e r to a c o h e r e n t whole. In this type of s t o r y the d e v i c e is ideally suited b e c a u s e a jealous m i n d o p e r a t e s along this p a t t e r n — i r r a t i o n a l l y , s e e i n g relationships, p e r h a p s not in their p r o p e r p e r s p e c t i v e s but in pieces, each l e a d i n g to a d i f f e r e n t version of the s a m e i n c i d e n t .

At a b a n q u e t held in P h e l p s C o n f e r e n c e Room last S a t u r d a y e v e n i n g , Epsilon Pi w a s initiated as H o p e ' s new c h a p t e r of S i g m a Delta P h i , the national h o n o r a r y Spanish fraternity. Officiating at the i n s t a l l a t i o n a n d initiation c e r e monies was Dr. F. Dewey Amner of Kent S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y , the National e x e c u t i v e s e c r e t a r y of the fraternity. The s t u d e n t s initiated into t h e c h a p t e r w e r e Marion H o e k s t r a , Fran Hala, Barbara Momeyer, M a r i a Toy a n d I n a r a B u n d z a . Dr. Ralph P e r r y , Dr. H u b e r t Weller, a n d Mr. M a r t i n R a l p h b e c a m e

Schedules Lecture for Sunday Ford F o u n d a t i o n Fellow in Tokvo, J a p a n . On r e t u r n i n g f r o m J a p a n , he w a s a l e c t u r e r at the University of California until 1960. M a l m h a s r e c e i v e d the Mono g r a p h P r i z e in H u m a n i t i e s f r o m the A m e r i c a n A c a d e m y of A r t s a n d S c i e n c e s in 1960. H e is a m e m b e r of P i K a p p a L a m b d a . A m e r i c a n Musicology Society, Society of Ethnomusicology and Association f o r Asian Studies. He is the a u t h o r of two books, " J a p a n e s e Music and M u s i c a l Ins t r u m e n t s " and " N a g a u t o : The Heart of K a b u c k i M u s i c . " In addition h e is the d i r e c t o r of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n J a p a n e s e Music Study G r o u p .

EASTER RECITAL—The symphony and chapel choir under the direct-on of Dr. Cavanaugh presented an Easter recital of Faure's 'Requiem' last Sunday in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Also performed were two Faure orchestral works by the symphony under the direction of Dr. Morrette Rider.

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T h e r e is. h o w e v e r a b i z a r r e p a r a g r a p h t o w a r d s the end in which I he h u s b a n d c o n t r a d i c t s e a c h statement he m a k e s . W h e t h e r or not the r e a d e r will i n t e r p r e t this a s a b a s i s for the d i s c o u n t i n g the husb a n d ' s p r e v i o u s a s s e r t i o n s is up to him—he must decide. Some critics feel the RobbeGrillet h a s c o m p l e t e l y d e h u m a n ized the novel by placing t h e emp h a s i s upon o b j e c t s , t h a t in t r y i n g to avoid p a s s i n g j u d g m e n t he h a s p r o d u c e d a l i t e r a t u r e of e v a s i o n . 1 believe that R o b b e Grillet h a s a c h i e v e d his p u r p o s e in e f f e c t i n g the tension in a j e a l o u s m i n d in an u n d e n i a b l y p o w e r f u l and unusual m a n n e r . It m a y be t h a t w e a r e u n a c c u s t o m e d to viewing the h u m a n s i t u a t i o n in such a detached m a n n e r . W h a t e v e r our opinion, one thing r e m a i n s c e r t a i n — " L a J a l o u s i e " m a k e s for exciting a n d p r o v o c a t i v e r e a d i n g .

Spanish Fraternity Begun

U of M Ethnomusicologist Malm P r o f e s s o r William M a l m of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan, e t h n o m u sicologist a n d specialist in Oriental m u s i c , will give a l e c t u r e - d e m o n s t r a t i o n S u n d a y at 4 p . m . in Snow A u d i t o r i u m . Intensely i n t e r e s t e d in O r i e n t a l m u s i c . M a l m spent an a c a d e m i c y e a r 1963-64 in J a p a n s p o n s o r e d by a g r a n t f r o m the A m e r i c a n Council of L e a r n e d Societies a n d the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n . M a l m r e c e i v e d his B a c h e l o r a n d M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e s in Music f r o m N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y a n d his Doctor of Philosophy d e g r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of California in Los Angeles. F r o m 1955 to 1957, M a l m w a s a

We notice too t h a t the h u s b a n d is not v e r y s u r e about what he h a s seen—he unconsciously interjects a "seems to," " p e r h a p s , " " a s if" which l e a d s us to Believe t h a t he is not too c l e a r in his own mind w h e t h e r he h a s r e g i s t e r e d the imp r e s s i o n p r o p e r l y . This j u x t a p o s i tion and confusion of e v e n t s r e a c h es a c l i m a x then d e s c e n d s to a c a l m in w h i c h t h e h u s b a n d descibes the n ght and the silence.

h o n o r a r y m e m b e r s . The b a s i s for m e m b e r s h i p includes t h e s t u d e n t ' s a c a d e m i c e x c e l l e n c e and i n t e r e s t in the H i s p a n i c l a n g u a g e and culture. T h e c h a p t e r o f f i c e r s a r e Pres ident, F r a n H a l a , a n d S e c r e t a r y Treasurer, I n a r a B u n d z a , with Dr. H u b e r t Weller as the organization's sponsor.

Newspaper Fund Selects Mulder For Internship J o h n M u l d e r , anchor n e w s editor, h a s been g r a n t e d one of app r o x i m a t e l y 50 s u m m e r i n t e r n ships for t r a i n i n g in j o u r n a l i s m by t h e N e w s p a p e r F u n d , Inc., of N e w York City. The N e w s p a p e r F u n d . Inc., created in 1962 a n d f i n a n c e d by t h e Wall S t r e e t J o u r n a l , places selected collegiate j o u r n a l i s t s in s u m m e r positions with m e m b e r n e w s p a p e r s . S t u d e n t s a r e paid by the individual n e w s p a p e r in addition to r e c e i v i n g $500 f r o m t h e F u n d at t h e s u m m e r ' s e n d . This p r o g r a m is u n i q u e b e c a u s e its i n t e r n s h i p s go only to s t u d e n t s at small liberal arts colleges where journalism p r o g r a m s a r e seldom a v a i l a b l e . Mulder becomes the fourth anchor staff m e m b e r to r e c e i v e this honor. G e r r i t Wolf, '62 a n d '63 e d i t o r , w o r k e d f o r C h i c a g o ' s A m e r i c a n and C h a r l e s M e n n i n g , p r e s e n t e d i t o r , spent last s u m m e r with the P i t t s b u r g h P r e s s . J i m M i c h m e r h u i z e n ('63) also r e c e i v e d an i n t e r n s h i p . Mulder will w o r k f o r t h e Clevel a n d b r a n c h of the Wall S t r e e t Journal.

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March 12, 1965

Hope College anchor

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H I S W E E K Picsidciu Kerr and Chan( c l o r M e y e r s o n of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a a n n o u n c e d t h e y w o u l d resign t h e i r p o s t s . T h e i r r e s i g n a t i o n s , a l o n g with t h e c i r c u m s t a n c e s w h i c h led u p to t h e m , ( a n y i m p l i c a t i o n s l o r e v e r y A m e r i c a n college c a m p u s , i n c l u d i n g M o p e .

A s i n d i c a t e d o n p a g e o n e of t h i s issue n e i t h e r m a n w o u l d e x p l a i n his r e s i g n a t i o n , h u t t h e c o n s e n s u s o n t h e B e r k e l e y c a m p u s is t h a t t h e a c t i o n s w e r e t h e r e s u l t of r i s q u e words and posters which a c c o m p a n i e d small d e m o n s t r a t i o n s d u r i n g t h e past lew weeks. I h e s e c a m e a b o u t in a s i t u a t i o n of g r e a t l i e e d o m b e c a u s e of t h e lack of u n i v e r s i t y e n l o i c e m e n i oi " i n t e r i m r e g u l a t i o n s . " The d e m o n s t r a t i o n s h a v e b e e n d e n o u n c e d by b o t h the Berkeley s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t a n d the I ree Speech M o v e m e n t , previously the origin a t o r ol p r o t e s t r a l l i e s a g a i n s t p o l i t i c a l restrictions.

n r n i /

It is not o u r i n t e n t i o n to b l a m e a n y g r o u p , i n c l u d i n g t h e F S M , l o r t h e o b s c e n e a c t i o n , alt h o u g h clearly the i n d i v i d u a l s involved acted with u t m o s t disregard for c o m m o n sense a n d morality. I h e p o i n t is t h a t t h e r e is a lesson to b e l e a r n e d - b y t h e s m a l l c o l l e g e as w e l l as the "multiversity."

d.iScussion oix rnwuacj

of

H . S O

n

I

N ANY GENUINE ACADEMIC COMM U N I I Y, w i d e l a t i t u d e is o f f e r e d t o t h e m e m b e r s t o act a n d s p e a k as t h e y see fit. S u c h is c u r r e n t l y t h e s i t u a t i o n a t B e r k e l e y as well as H o p e C o l l e g e . B e r k e l e y s t u d e n t s h a v e the f r e e d o m to organize a Free Speech Movem e n t : a very f e w of t h e m - i t is e s t i m a t e d t h a t only o n e or t w o h u n d r e d a t t e n d e d the rallies h a \ e a b u s e d f r e e d o m with o b s c e n e signs a n d language.

Cfir/siianf/y

T U E S -

p r e s e n t e o

The Crisis of Freedom

f

A

Page 7

B y

H o p e s t u d e n t s h a v e m a n y f r e e d o m s also. A p r i m e e x a m p l e is t h e l a t i t u d e g i v e n b y t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n to the Inter-fraternity C o u n -

c

cil—in s p i t e of a r a t h e r p o o r p e r f o n . ar.ce last y e a r . So f a r t h e 1 F C h a s n o t c o m p l e t e l y p r o v e n its r e s p o n s i b i l i t y a n d r e l i a b i l i t y , f o r m a n y i n i t i a t i o n p r o c e d u r e s b e t w e e n first a n d second semester were poorly organized a n d inefle(lively controlled. Each i n d i v i d u a l f r a t e r n i t y m e m b e r has a s p e c i a l o b l i g a t i o n t o a b i d e by t h e l e t t e r a n d s p i r i t of t h e I F C p o l i c y a t p r e s e n t . The p h r a s e " T h e r e will b e n o h a r a s s m e n t of p l e d g e s at a n y t i m e d u r i n g t h e p l e d g i n g periou is a m b i g u o u s , b u t as a t B e r k e l e y c o m m o n s e n s e will p l a c e m a n y r e s t r i c t i o n s o n a n y reasonable person.

M

ANY H O P E SI U D E N T S have unfortunately developed a negative attitude t o w a r d o t h e r s e c t o r s of t h e a c a d e m i c c o m m u n i t y . T h e i d e a is a b r o a d a m o n g s o m e students that everything that comes f r o m the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is by d e f i n i t i o n e v i l a n d t o be f o u g h t with full force. S u c h an a t t i t u d e is u n h e a l t h y ; it r e p r e s e n t s a f a i l u r e of c e r t a i n students to d e v e l o p a positive a n d responsible a t t i t u d e in a n a t m o s p h e r e of i n c r e a s i n g f r e e dom.

anchor editorial T r a g i c situations can d e v e l o p with a little c a r e l e s s n e s s a n d by i g n o r i n g a f e w s i m p l e things. B e r k e l e y is n o w r e a p i n g t h e r e s u l t s of i r r e s p o n s i b i l t y by a s m a l l m i n o r i t y o l students. H o p e s t u d e n t s will d o w e l l t o n o t e t h e lessons of B e r k e l e y a n d d e v e l o p a n a t t i t u d e of r e s p o n s i b i l i t y c o m m e n s u r a t e w i t h increasing personal liberty.

A Step Towards Voting Rights •I..

COMING EVENTS SATURDAY, MARCH 13 Sophomore

Class

Dance,

TUESDAY, MARCH 16 Car-

negie G y m n a s i u m , 8 p . m .

Clinic,

Carley

Room,

6:30-7:30 p . m . Lecture

on

Japanese

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17 Smoking Clinic, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Carley

Room,

Pan Hellenic Open Rush Meeting, G r a v e s 102, 6:30-7:30 p . m .

MONDAY, MARCH 15 Carley

Room,

Lecture on J a p a n e s e Music, T h e a t e r and Dance, Snow Auditorium, 8:45 p.m.

Musical

Instruments, Snow Auditorium, 4 p.m.

Smoking Clinic, 6:30-7:30 p . m .

Carley

Dorians' Ice C r e a m Social, Juliana Room, 8-10 p . m .

SUNDAY, MARCH 14 Smoking

Smoking Clinic, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Room, THURSDAY, MARCH 18

Winter Sports Banquet Dr. DeValois, Winants Auditorium, 7-8 p . m . Chapel Choir P a r t y , Room, 8:30-9:30 p.m.

Juliana

Smoking Clinic, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Carley

Room,

SATURDAY, MARCH 20

\ k J

i

«

I b i s past W e d n e s d a y , M i c h i g a n A t t o r ney G e n e r a l H a n k K e l l e y p r o p o s e d a m o v e t h a t is l o n g o v e r d u e . He announced plans to seek a c o - o p e r a t i v e l a w s u i t by 12 M i d w e s t e m stales to reduce ibe A l a b a m a Congressional delegation for d e n y i n g voting rights. H i s p l a n s ( j u i c k l y r e c e i v e d t h e s u p p o r t of ( . o v e r n o r R o m n e y , w h o h a d j u s t m a r c h e d in .i p r o t e s t r a l l y in D e t r o i t p r o t e s t i n g t h e c u r r e n t s i t u a t i o n in S e l m a , A l a b a m a . Kelley's p l a n s h i n g e o n a little-known provision of t h e F o u r t e e n t h A m e n d m e n t , p a s s e d in I8()8, w h i c h s t a t e s t h a t " w h e n t h e r i g h t t o vote at any election . . . is d e n i e d , . tiie b a s i s of r e p r e s e n t a t i o n t h e r e i n s h a l l b e l u l u c e d in t h e p r o p o r t i o n w h i c h t h e n u m b e r of s u c h m a l e c i t i z e n s s h a l l b e a r t o t h e w h o l e m n n b e r of m a l e c i t i z e n s t w e n t y - o n e y e a r s of age in s i u h S t a t e . In e f f e c t , t h i s m e a n s t h a t a s t a t e s C o n g r e s s i o n a l d e l e g a t i o n m a y b e red u c e d o n p r o o f of l a r g e - s c a l e d e n i a l s of t h e vote. T h i s r e p i e s e n t s o n e a l t e r n a t i v e t o massive f e d e r a l i n t e r v e n t i o n in t h e S o u t h t o g u a r a n t e e N e g r o v o t i n g r i g h t s , a l t h o u g h it d o e s not p r e v e n t o t h e r p o s i t i v e m e a s u r e s f r o m being taken. Its a p p l i c a t i o n w o u l d d e m o n s t i a t e t h e t r e m e n d o u s m o r a l i m p e r a t i v e felt

by t h e g r e a t m a j o r i t y of A m e r i c a n s t o w a r d t h e t r a g i c s i t u a t i o n in S e l m a a n d i n d e e d throughout the South. Yet it w o u l d a v o i d t h e b r u t e f o r c e of f e d e r a l o c c u p a t i o n o r c o e r c i o n a n d s u b s e q u e n t ill will w h i c h m u s t necessarily a c c o m p a n y t h e a p p l i c a t i o n of f e d e r a l force.. I h e m a i n r o a d b l o c k to t h e e n f o r c e m e n t • of t h i s C o n s t i t u t i o n a l p r o v i s i o n is legal, f o r it will b e n o easy t a s k t o p r o v e in c o u r t t h a t t h e v o l e is a c t u a l l y b e i n g d e n i e d . In m a n y s o u t h e r n c o m m u n i t i e s t h e m e t h o d s of w h i t e s u p r e m a c y a r e e x t r a - l e g a l , u t i l i z i n g m o r e int i m i d a t i o n t h a n law. A n d w h e r e t h e l a w is used, t h e laws themselves a r e not discrimina t o r y b u t m e r e l y t h e i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of t h e m . I h i s m u s t n e c e s s a r i l y be s o m e w h a t a r b i t r a r y a n d l e f t t o t h e d i s c r e t i o n of t h e local official in c h a r g e . l*or t h e s e a n d o t h e r r e a s o n s , t h e s u i t p r o p o s e d by K e l l e y s h o u l d n o t b e c o n s i d e r e d t h e f i n a l s o l u t i o n t o t h e v o t i n g p r o b l e m in t h e south. B u t t h e i d e a is a s o u n d o n e a n d 85 years overdue. It d e s e r v e s t h e s u p p o r t of e v e r y o n e as a p r a c t i c a l a n d e f f e c t i v e w a y of e x p r e s s i n g c o n c e r n over v o t e r d e n i a l s a n d as a construclive m o v e toward remedying the situation.

All College Sing, Civic Auditorium, 8 p.m.

TSeus from Other Cam pi:

anc

PRESS

Boaz Finque Is A Frustrated Man

Ion c o u m i

OLLAND, MICHIOAN Published weekly of the college year excel,! vacation, holiday and exammat,on periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland Mich., under the authority of the Student Senate Publications Board. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at the special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, Oct., 3, 1917, and authorized Oct. 19, I9IS. Subscription: per year. Printed: Zeeland Record. Zeeland, Michigan. Member: Associated Collegiate Press, Michigan Collegiate Press Ass. Represented for national advertising by National Advertising Service. Office: Ground Floor of Graves Hall. Phone 396-2122.

EDITOR-CHARLES

N exo

. * Academic sports Critiques Headlines Editorial senbroek, Photo

I.

MENNING

FACULTY ADVISOR-DR. E. E. BRAND BOARD OF EDITORS JnhTl MuMer Proof Nancy Erickson Paul Hesselink Business Jack Koch James Mace Advertising Boh Schroeder Alan Jones Assistants Kathleen

Maren Kiefer ..Nina BosVerduin. Tom Renner

Copy

Mary

Hakken

Columnists . Robert Donia, Don Kardux, David Von Ins. Cartoonist Mark Menning

(Editor's note: The following article appeared in the Earlham Post and was written by Post staff member, Boaz Finque.) Man, like, I mean it's really gettin ! bad. I mean like sick, man, sick. I mean, the protection of propriety is great and all that, but so is self-preservation? Like, I been protecting it for the pas^ month with tooth and eyeball (as the bard sings), but to no avail . . . myself, I mean. Like take last Saturday night. No Suzie all week and now I'm free. Dad, free. We bug out to the ol' burying ground. We get there. Great, moonlight, starlight, gaslight, redlight. I'm froze. My feet are froze. My hands are froze. My nose is froze. All is froze. I speak. "Suzie sweetie . . ." Nothing. She's froze! So what to do. I pick her up, balance her on the shoulder bone,

and back to civilization. The thaw So all right. So awright already. is always the worst part. S'okay. So now my Friendly hihihi So all right. So awright already. spirit is bent a little, but Suzie i s , S'okay. I got the right friendly pacific (Malibu) and cools it. I hihihi spirit. I grin and bear it. cool it. We all cool it. In fact the But it wouldn't be so bad if the raw cool is about the only place cold was the only problem. It left. ain't. Like last Wednesday. . So like I sez, it's gettin* bad. Carpenter Hole. Late. D a r k / Real bad. I mean like, it ain't Quiet. Warm. We sneak through healthy. Read Freud (pronounced dimlit halls. I force the door to Prude, as the bard sings it) Read Goddard. She darts in. I give a Jung. Read the Bible. I mean, like, quick look around, slip in after. there never was any place to do Dark. Quiet. Warm. We sit down. any good, healthy, now-we-are"WHADDYA IN MY COTTONyoung -and -redblooded-americanPICKIN LAP FOR?" youth loving around here and now People? with all the windows in the doors "WATCHYER ELBOW, FELand the doors all locked everyLA!" where and the night blotch'em Suzie with a bass voice? I jump with all the keys and the college up. We move. We sit. Quiet. Dark. with the propriety . . . well where? Warm. I pull her close. Soft hair, I mean it's depressing. Worse, it's soft cheek, soft ear . . . disgusting.. Worse still, it's repres"Not the ear, fella, not the ear." sing. Bad for pimples. Bad for This is too much. We go. family relations.


Page 8

Hope College anchor

March 12, 1965

j

THE PIN—One of the m e m b e r s of the Hope wrestling team brings his opponent to the m a t in a flurry of a r m s and legs while the r e f e r e e looks on for a successful pin.

Hone Wrestlers Pinned Twice Hope's first y e a r wrestling t e a m finished its season with back to back d e f e a t s at the h a n d s of the Kalamazoo Hornets and the Olivet Comets in the final week of February to finish its campaign with an 0-7 record. Although the Flying Dutchmen failed to win a meet this past season they showed signs of real progress, and the 26-6 loss to Kalamazoo was not indicative of Hope's true potential, while the 18-16 loss to the Comets c a m e about due to two forfeit wins for the host squad. Against

Kalamazoo

Hope

was

forced to forfeit three m a t c h e s due to injuries and the absence of one man who had an evening class. This allowed t h e Hornets to pick up 15 points, and even victories by Dutchmen Danny Howe in the 137-pound class and Chris Miller in the 157-pound division were not enough to offset t h e forfeitures. In the match between the Comets ancl t h e Flying Dutch at Olivet, Hope again had to forfeit in the 123-pound and 147-pound classes and subsequently was unable to m a k e up the 10 points. Howe and Miller again c a p t u r e d

their m a t c h e s by decision in their respective weight classes, while Bernie Brower and J o h n Wormuth pinned their men in the 167 and 177 - pound classes respectively. Mike Vogas, making his first app e a r a n c e in the heavyweight class, was decisioned, while Dave Lubbers was pinned in the 13(>-pound division.

At Sports Banquet

cheerleaders

and

f a n s had

many

moments such as this during the basketball season. In recognition of the t e a m ' s winning the championship, the dance tomorrow night will be held in their honor. The dance is sponsored by the sophomore class and will be held in Carnegie Gymnasium. In addition, next Monday night a banquet will be given in honor of the basketball and wrestling t e a m s . The s p e a k e r at the banquet will be Mr. John Erickson, head basketball coach at the University of Wisconsin.

Dee Vander Vlucht, who tallied 10 points, led all the Dutch scorers, while Elaine Danhot scored 16 m a r k e r s to capture g a m e honors for the Knights.

the Knights, Previously Calvin had t: ken a 48-20 triumph at Knollcrest in Grand Rapids. Calvin's victory gave the Knights a 7-1 record for the season with their only loss coming a : the hands of the Michigan State women. Hope finished its season yesterday with a contest against the Western Michigan University women.

Loses to K-Zoo

To Deliver Speech

HOURS—Hope

Hope's WAA basketball squad dropped its fifth g a m e in six tries when it lost a 49-26 decision o the girls from Calvin on F e b . 17.

Junior Varsity

Wisconsin Coach

FINEST

Fifth Defeat by Calvin

The loss was Hope's second to

The Hope J.V. basketball squad rounded out their season on Feb. 27 with a contest with the Kalamazoo Hornet J.V. squad. Having split two previous contests, both t e a m s played their last g a m e with great e n t h u s i a s m . The Little Dutch however, ran out of s t e a m at the end and ended up on the short end of a 79-71 score. Mike Paliatsos, Tom Pelon, J i m Thomas, and Ed Heneveld all accounted for 11 points to lead the Hope balanced attack. Jeff Hollenbach followed the leaders closely by scoring 10 counters. The Kalamazoo attack w a s led by Ralph Wellington, who b a r r a g e d the ne. for a total of 24 points. Coach Siedentop's squad finished with a 7-win, 10-loss record this season. Leading the way in scoring for the J.V.'s throughout the season was Tom Pelon. Pelon and crew did a very c o m m e n d a b l e joD for Coach Siedentop, especially considering the loss of two s a r t e r s to the varsity during the season.

THE

CHARGE—Elaine Danhot of Calvin tries to fight her way through Hope defenders Norma Kens (right) and Delia R a e Kuiper (left).

Monday evening the varsity basketball t e a m , the junior varsity basketball t e a m , t h e wrestling squad, and their respective coaches will attend a banquet given in their honor. The highlight of the banquet will be a talk presented by Mr. John Erickson, the head .basketball coach at the University of Wisconsin. Mr. Erickson is also very active in the University of Wisconsin chapter of the FCA, Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Area high school basketball coaches will also be attending thebanquet. The coaches will bring with them players who might attend Hope in f u t u r e y e a r s . All a r e a FCA m e m b e r s a r e also invited to h e a r Mr. Erickson's speech.

4i:h%M

SCHOLARSHIP—President Dr. Calvin VanderWerf accepts check f r o m George (Joey) Bosworth for the establishing of a scholarship for athletes. Bosworth, a f o r m e r Hope student, is presently playing for the K a n s a s City Athletics.

Bosworth Donates Scholarship George (Joey> Bosworth, f o r m e r Hope College student, expressed his thanks for his education at Hope recently with the presentation of the Bosworth Scholarship to President Calvin VanderWerf. Joey completed two years at Hope before being chosen to be a m e m b e r of the U.S. a m a t e u r baseball federation that played in Papan durin gthe Olympics. Ultima ely offered a position with the K a n s a s City Athletics, he signed a bonus contract Dec. 23. 1%4 for an estim a t e d $35,000. In a le'ter to Bruce Neckers, Bosworth stated that as a newly enriched baseball player he decided to present a gift to his a l m a m a t e r . This resulted in the form a ion of a unique scholarship to Hope College. The scholarship, donated by a young m a n who received a scholarship himself for his education, will support the needs of other deserving scholarathletes.

"An unusually thoughtful and generous act in helping the college that had helped him in the p a s t , " r e m a r k e d President VanderWerf. "This is a shining example of a high r e g a r d for education and education at Hope, underscoring his own determination to finish college." " I t is my intention to complete my A.B. degree. I'll study in the fall and play baseball the b a l a n c e of t h e y e a r . " Bosworth stated. The owner of the K a n s a s City A hletics, Chuck Finlay, e n c o u r a g e s him in this endeavor and his bonus money will provide the means. Knowing Joey more intimately and having viewed his g r e a t potentials as an athlete and an allaround personality, Mr. Sieden op, Hope's baseball coach, stated that he w a s "not surprised, just p l e a s e d " over Bosworth's gift, adding " I ' m going to miss him." Bosworth won ail-MIAA honors last spring in leading Hope tO the MIAA championship.

Profile for Hope College Library

03-12-1965  

03-12-1965  

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