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HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR LXVII—10

Hope College — H o l l a n d , Michigan

Praters, Dorians Sweep Sing,Knicks, Frosh Place Second F o r t h e first time in s i n g history, the F r a t e r n a l Society gained top place honors in the Ifith annual All College Sing last F r i d a y evening in t h e Hope Memorial Chapel. The Dorian Sorority w a s awarded first place in the women's division f o r the third consecutive year. The Knickerbockers s a n g to second place with their p r e s e n t a t i o n of "Green-Sleeves." T h e y were directed by Nick Pool. R u t h W r i g h t directed A l p h a S i g m a Alpha, the f r e s h m e n girls, to second position in their division with " W h e n Day is Done." Each of the eleven competing g r o u p s presented their society song and a s i n g selection. However, j u d g i n g was based solely on the group selection. Gordon Meeusen directed t h e F r a t e r s to t o p position with " S t o u t - h e a r t e d Men." Betty Schepers led the t h r e e - t i m e winning D o r i a n s with " P o o r Old J o n a than Bing."

Goldovsky to Present "Piano Portraits," Humorous Commentary on Classics Alcor-Blue Key Hold International Night I n t e r n a t i o n a l N i g h t jointly sponsored by Blue Key and Alcor will be held t o m o r r o w night a t D u r f e e Hall. The event was begun in 1950 in an effort to give due recognition to Hope's f o r e i g n s t u d e n t s . The t u r k e y d i n n e r will begin at six in the T e r r a c e Dining Hall. The p r o g r a m which t r a d i t i o n a l l y follows the d i n n e r is composed entirely of f o r e i g n s t u d e n t s who illust r a t e some f a c e t of t h e i r c o u n t r y ' s life. This y e a r ' s p r o g r a m will include a sword act, songs f r o m India, p o e t r y f r o m T h i a l a n d and m a n y o t h e r cultural as well as int e r e s t i n g activities. An exhibit will be shown b e f o r e and following t h e d i n n e r in t h e J u l i a n n a Room. Included in the exhibit will be c o s t u m e s and objects f r o m the v a r i o u s c o u n t r i e s r e p r e s e n t e d on Hope's c a m p u s . A r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f r o m the country will explain the o b j e c t s to those interested. The d i n n e r and p r o g r a m a r e open to all of Hope's s t u d e n t s and faculty as well as interested persons not connected with the college. Tickets m a y be p u r c h a s e d in the Blue Key Book S t o r e or f r o m an Alcor m e m b e r . T h e price f o r a dorm s t u d e n t is one dollar. All o t h e r tickets a r e $1.25.

& k MSBt

4 K. Don Jacobusse

Jacobusse Wins

The Co-chairmen of the 1955 Sing, j u n i o r Marcia P a s m a and sophomore Robert W i n t e r , presentK. Don J a c o b u s s e , r e p r e s e n t i n g ed the winning d i r e c t o r s with the Hope College in t h e Men's O r a t o r y coveted All College S i n g Cups. Contest of the Michigan I n t e r J u d g e s f o r the Sing w e r e all f r o m collegiate Speech League, held a t Holland, Mr. F r a n c i s Hodgeboom, W e s t e r n Michigan College last F r i Miss M a r g r e t Van Vyven, and Mr. day, continued in the t r a d i t i o n of Marvin Baas. the p a s t by w i n n i n g f o r the f o u r t h The Hope-Ives, a g r o u p of stuconsecutive time. d e n t s ' wives, and the D u r f e e W a i t P r e v i o u s w i n n e r s f r o m Hope Cole r s p r e s e n t e d selections a t the close lege w e r e Guy V a n d e r J a g t , 1952; of the competition. Mrs. Willard H a a k directed the Hope-Ives and Don Lubbers, 1953; and Bruce Van J a m e s Neevel the D u r f e e W a i t e r s . Voorst, 1954. In 1954 t h e event Nevin W e b s t e r led t h e capacity was held on Hope's c a m p u s . In t h i s audience in c o m m u n i t y s i n g i n g event, p e r h a p s t h e h i g h l i g h t of t h e while t h e g r o u p s waited f o r the forensic y e a r a m o n g the colleges j u d g e ' s decisions. Mr. R o g e r Reit- r e p r e s e n t e d in t h i s league, Hope is berg of t h e Music D e p a r t m e n t ac- r e p r e s e n t e d by the winners of the companied the audience on the local Raven and Adelaide contest. In the p r e l i m i n a r y contests, J a c o organ. O t h e r c o m m i t t e e s in c h a r g e of busse took five first place votes, t h e Sing were: F a c u l t y Advisor, or one f r o m each of the five j u d g e s , Dr. R. W. C a v a n a u g h ; P r o g r a m s , to q u a l i f y easily f o r the final round, L o i s T o r n g a ; p r o g r a m cover design, which he won. His victory in t h i s Ardis Bishop; Chapel Accommoda- event q u a l i f i e s him to p a r t i c i p a t e tions, Ann Bloodgood and Leonard in the National contest to be held Rowell; and Head U s h e r , Sewell a t N o r t h w e s t e r n University, E v a n s ton, Illinois, this April. Hayes.

State Contest

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V i r t u a l l y every m a j o r school in t h e s t a t e , with t h e exception of the University of Michigan is r e p r e sented in this league. S p e a k e r s f r o m W a y n e University and Calvin College took second place and third The first single-student a r t show place respectively. The contest was in the h i s t o r y of Hope College held on t h e c a m p u s of W e s t e r n opened last W e d n e s d a y in the Michigan College of Education in Science Building. The exhibit conK a l a m a z o o . J a c o b u s s e and Carol sists of t h e work of A r d i e Bishop, K u y p e r , who also p a r t i c i p a t e d in a senior f r o m N o r t h Muskegon. W o m e n ' s O r a t o r y , were accompaArdie is the first Hope s t u d e n t to nied on t h e t r i p by Miss Helen g r a d u a t e with a total of t h i r t y - o n e H a r t o n , a c t i n g c h a i r m a n of t h e h o u r s of a r t . She is an English Speech D e p a r t m e n t and o r a t o r y major. coach, and P r o f e s s o r L a m b e r t PonThe collection of a r t work shown stein, who acted as j u d g e s in the is t a k e n f r o m Miss Bishop's f o u r contest. y e a r s of a r t classes and h e r summ e r t r a i n i n g a t the a r t school in S a u g a t u c k . Included in t h e exhibit a r e e i g h t y d r a w i n g s and paintings, " A n o t h e r P a r t of the F o r e s t " t w e n t y - t h r e e pieces of j e w e l e r y and will be shown in the chapel baseseveral s c u l p t u r e s and ceramics. The d r a w i n g s and p a i n t i n g s are m e n t this a f t e r n o o n as t h e f o u r t h mainly Impressionistic and Realis- film in t h e Alcor film series. " A n tic with a f e w g e o m e t r i c . They o t h e r P a r t of the F o r e s t " w a s w r i t v a r y g r e a t l y in s u b j e c t m a t t e r and t e n by Lillian H e l l m a n and is a m a t e r i a l being done in pencil, pen sequel to " T h e L i t t l e F o x e s . " Also and ink, oil, w a t e r color, t e m p r a b e i n g shown is a s h o r t film, " W . B . Yeats — A Tribute," honoring the or c ra y on. A t w o by six f o o t c r a y o n paint- poet, Y e a t s , w i t h music and some i n g is f e a t u r e d by Miss Bishop of his p o e t r y . The e n t i r e s t u d e n t along w i t h h e r jewelry and a sculp- body and f a c u l t y is invited to a t t u r e entitled " E r n e s t i n e " f o r which tend t h e s e Alcor films t h i s a f t e r noon. (Continued on p a g e 3)

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Alcor Film Today

Artist Features "Romance of Piano" Boris Goldovsky, Metropolitan o p e r a b r o a d c a s t c o m m e n t a t o r , will a p p e a r here on S a t u r d a y March 19 in Hope Memorial Chapel. Mr. Goldovsky will present " P i a n o Port r a i t s " , a varied p r o g r a m of piano selections with c o m m e n t a r y , f o r t h e last of t h e annual Hope College Concert Series. The Boston Herald said of a recent Goldovsky a p p e a r a n c e , " A s always, his technical a s s u r a n c e a t the piano was complete. In his playing Mr. Goldovsky reveals his t r u e s t a t u r e a s a creative a r t i s t . " Boris Goldovsky The Boston Post had the following to s a y of his a p p e a r a n c e : " A s a c o m m e n t a t o r Mr. Goldovsky is in a class by himself, and not merely because of his c h a r m of m a n n e r . Little d a b s of i n f o r m a t i o n add up to a p o r t r a i t of a picture, and The Hope College O r c h e s t r a , ung e n e r a l l y a very vivid one. H e d e r the direction of Morette Rider, plays piece a f t e r piece a s neatly, will present the A n n u a l Children's t a s t e f u l l y and persuasively as you Concert a t 3:30 p.m. on March 17. could wish it." The concert is given every y e a r in Mr. Goldovsky was born in Mosan effort to p r o m o t e music educacow in 1908. His m o t h e r . Lea tion a m o n g children. Luboshutz, was a well-known conThe A m e r i c a n Association of cert violinist and s i s t e r of the reUniversity W o m e n is s p o n s o r i n g nowned p i a n i s t P i e r r e L u b o s h u t z the concert which is open to all. of L u b o s h u t z and Nemenoff duoHowever, tickets a r e being sold to piano f a m e . His f a t h e r was a children in g r a d e s t h r e e t h r o u g h lawyer. Goldovsky received his six in t h e classroom. first i n s t r u c t i o n f r o m his uncle a t the a g e of e i g h t . He l a t e r studied a t the Moscow C o n s e r v a t o r y , in Berlin w i t h Schnabel and K r e u t z e r , a t B u d a p e s t C o n s e r v a t o r y with Dahnanyi, and at the Sorbonne in Paris.

Orchestra To

Give Concert

Dr. Meinecke To Lecture On Early Medicine, Music

Ardie Bishop Holds Student Art Exhibit

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March 11, 1955

H e m a d e h i s first professional d e b u t with t h e Berlin Philharmonic D r Burno Meinecke, f o r m e r Pro- in 1921 a t the a g e of 13. F r o m f e s s o r a t Hope College, and now 1926-1930, he toured extensively P r o f e s s o r of L a t i n a t U n i v e r s i t y t h r o u g h o u t E u r o p e . F r o m 1930 on, of Michigan, will p r e s e n t t w o lec- he toured t h r o u g h o u t the United t u r e s on t h e Hope College c a m p u s S t a t e s , p a r t i c u l a r l y in the E a s t and on Wednesday, March 16. The an- Midwest, and a p p e a r e d as g u e s t nouncement of a r r a n g e m e n t s w a s soloist with the leading o r c h e s t r a s , m a d e by P r o f . E d w a r d J. W o l t e r s including t h e P h i l h a r m o n i c Orchest r a , the Cleveland Symphony, the head of the d e p a r t m e n t of L a t i n . (Continued on p a g e 4) Mr. W o l t e r s said t h a t Dr. Meinecke will p r e s e n t his first illust r a t e d lecture T h e First Golden P a t h w a y of Medicine a t 4:00 P.M. in Hope Memorial Chapel, while the second will be held in the s a m e A new m a j o r in Political Science place a t 8:00 in the evening. The has been added to the Hope College evening lecture is entitled Music c u r r i c u l u m by the H i s t o r y D e p a r t Among t h e G r e e k s and R o m a n s . ment. The m a j o r is to consist of An accomplished violinist. Dr. not f e w e r t h a n t w e n t y - f o u r hours Meinecke will p l a y t h e third move- in the d e p a r t m e n t plus a minimum m e n t of his own concerto, as a of twelve h o u r s in at least two p a r t of his evening lecture. He o t h e r Social Sciences such as Hiswill be accompanied by Mr. An- t o r y , Sociology or Economics. thony Kooiker of t h e college music The c o u r s e s offered f o r t h e m a j o r department. will include N a t i o n a l Government, Dr. Meinecke b e g a n his s t u d i e s S t a t e and Local G o v t , Political of ancient l a n g u a g e s and music a t P a r t i e s , Political G e o g r a p h y , I n t e r a n early a g e u n d e r his f a t h e r ' s national O r g a n i z a t i o n ( U . N . ) , Comt u t e l a g e . His f a t h e r , a m i n i s t e r , p a r a t i v e Govt., Political Theory, w a s a scholar interested in t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n a l H i s t o r y , U.S. Politiclassics and he f o s t e r e d t h e s t u d y cal P r o b l e m s , U.S. I n t e r n a t i o n a l of them and of t h e a r t s in his P r o b l e m s and Public A d m i n i s t r a f a m i l y according to the t r a d i t i o n tion. of old G e r m a n f a m i l i e s . Prof. To f a c i l i t a t e t h e addition of a Meinecke h a s followed t h a t p a t t e r n new m a j o r , some c h a n g e s h a v e since his childhood, a d d i n g t h e been m a d e in the r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r s t u d y of t h e H i s t o r y of A n c i e n t a H i s t o r y m a j o r . To q u a l i f y f o r a a n d Medieval Medicine as a n a u t h - H i s t o r y m a j o r a m i n i m u m of t w e n o r a t a t i v e field of r e s e a r c h . H e h a s ty-six s e m e s t e r h o u r s plus a minia t h o r o u g h musical b a c k g r o u n d , is m u m of t w e l v e h o u r s in a t least a violinist, pianis t, o r g a n i s t , com- two o t h e r Social Sciences will be (Continued on p a g e 4 ) (Continued on p a g e 3)

Add Political Science To Hope's Curriculum

Dr. Burno Meinecke

Career Available To Senior Men "1955" will be a w i s e r N e w Y e a r f o r 100,000 y o u n g men — college g r a d u a t e s and college g r a d u a t e s to be — who a r e now receiving their individual f r e e copies of C A R E E R . T h i s a n n u a l guide is published by 68 leading A m e r i c a n c o r p o r a tions who a r e in t h e m a r k e t f o r top q u a l i t y executive t r a i n e e material. E a c h c o m p a n y i n t r o d u c e s itself in a p a g e or two of words and pictures, t h e n s e t s u p a contact f o r t h o s e who w a n t t o l e a r n more. The new edition also f e a t u r e s a n opening l e t t e r f r o m S e c r e t a r y of L a b o r J a m e s P . Mitchell, a n a m u s ing article entitled, " H o w to Be (Continued on p a g e 4)


HOPE

Page Two

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HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

What's Past Is Prologue

EDITORIAL S T A F F

Chewing The Rag with

Ophelia

Gagmutz

by Larry Siedentop

PRESS

Editor-in-Chief Associate Editor Sports Editors Feature Editor Society Editors Rewrite Editors Photographers Typists Cartoonist

Robert Muilenburg Donna Raymer David Kempers, Jerold Veldman Frances Frye Dot Lindahl, Robert Winter Harvey Mulder, Ernestine Brummeler Len Rowell, Stanley Yin Virginia Hartsema, Mary Jane Rietveld Bill Coventry BUSINESS STAFF

Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Advertising Manager Circulation Manager

Eugene Ouderkirk Art Martin, Herbert Morgan Harold Ritsema John Soeter

MEMBER ASSOCIATED COLLEGE PRESS Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $1.00 per year. Published every other week by the students of Hope College except during holidays or examination periods.

From the

EDITOR'S DESK What's The Matter With Our Grey Matter? Many a t t e m p t s have been m a d e to analyze the college mind. But these a t t e m p t s have either been sensationalized to sell the article or toned down to minimize the issue. P a n t y raids, f r a t e r n i t y hazing, and drinking bouts have obscured t h e less colorful rebellions and, at the s a m e time, t h e basic problem. For, in most cases, the s t u d e n t who breaks a rule (whether it is c u t t i n g classes, ignoring dorm hours, or some more serious infraction) does it because he disagrees with the rule, and r e f u s e s to abide by it. He does not break the rule to be different, clever, or daring. He has t a k e n his stand as being a g a i n s t something a f t e r having t h o u g h t it t h r o u g h , and it would be j u s t as morally wrong f o r him to back down f r o m his stand as it would be f o r a person who believed in the rule, to break it. But this is a negative philosophy, and to m a n y minds, is childish and i m m a t u r e in t h a t if offers no new solution. This is t r u e , but it still does not obscure the f a c t t h a t the collegian has realized the folly of accepting a n y t h i n g (rule or tradition) on the blind f a i t h t h a t those who went before have the power to decide w h a t is r i g h t f o r him. He realizes the necessity f o r rules in any society, but he demands the r i g h t to make these rules f o r himself. The professors who teach t h e college student how to think, find themselves in a peculiar situation. They can inculcate the methods of thinking, but they cannot also supply the thoughts. They a r e like the insect who n u r t u r e s its young until they are about to hatch and then m u s t sacrifice its body and very being to its offspring. This is a hard and painful t h i n g to do. But, on the other hand, the collegian with his radical ideas must compromise. He cannot or will not run into the woods like Rousseau. His age h a s made him too much the practical realist. Instead he incessantly pricks at the bubble of established rule with the small pin of minor infractions. When this has no effect, he insults and ridicules the established a u t h o r i t y . This is not right. But more than t h a t , it is not s m a r t , f o r all it does is i r r i t a t e the sore spot. Instead the collegian with conviction should play a politician's g a m e , and say w h a t he f e e l s but do nothing about it. Enough voices speaking t o g e t h e r f o r a long enough time will prove any point.

Critical Thinking Test Results In J a n u a r y of this year, t h e f r e s h m e n and seniors participated in an experiment designed to gain evidence of the ability of Hope students to "think s t r a i g h t " . The t e s t i n g instrument was The Watson Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, a test of 99 items, designed to^sampTe the following^abilities: to distinguish sound inferences; to recognize unstated assumptions in given assertions; to reason deductively f r o m given premises; and to weigh evidence. These a r e some of the specific abilities t h a t one calls in to play in analyzing and even solving problems and situations which he faces in his college study experience and in every day life. These a r e important skills. Granted their importance, however, there a r e still other questions to answer: Are these abilities " i n n a t e " or a r e they " a c q u i r e d ? " Is the study of some subjects b e t t e r f o r the development of these abilit i e s ? Do students become more a d e p a r t m e n t in these skills as they go through the college p r o g r a m ? From examination of the results of t h e t e s t s taken, the following generalizations can be m a d e : 1. There is a g r e a t r a n g e of these thinking abilities a m o n g our student. Out of 99 items, the number of correct a n s w e r s r a n g e f r o m 17 to 92. Interestingly, t h e lowest and h i g h e s t scores w e r e made by freshmen. 2. In general there was a positive correlation between the ACE psychological exam score and the Watson Glaser Appraisal. This is, s t u d e n t s who had a high score in the scholastic a p t i t u d e t e s t were likely (Continued on page 3)

It is avowedly the purpose of any columnist to criticize. I have used this p r e r o g a t i v e liberally in t h e past, and most likely 1 shall continue to use it in the coming months. Yet a purely negative approach can quickly become stifling — unmitigated criticism is selfdestructive. It is with the danger of this tendency in mind t h a t I make the following few observations, hoping t h a t they may in some way p a s s as being constructive. P r o p h e t s of doom a r e today r a m p a n t in the " f r e e " world. We a r e beset by an ever-expanding list of theories as to why and how Dear E d i t o r : Western civilization will undergo As a non-collegiate reader of the trial and radical t r a n s f o r m a t i o n . Anchor — every issue — I would Spengler, Toynbee, Sorokin, and like to compliment you on the even Lippmann m a y differ convigor and courage of your policy, siderably in their systems, but one and the clarity of your vision. transcending implication is to be While such contributors as yourfound in all: our world of Graecoself, Jim Van Putten, J o n a t h a n Christian origin will change to the Hinkamp and others, are studying extent of becoming unintelligible in Hope College, one can have high and f o r e i g n to us.' W h a t appals hopes of t h e student body. We one is their discomforting proxi h e a r much today about delinquent mity to the t r u t h ! youth, and low cultural levels, but Upon analysis the " f r e e " world I am inclined to think, a f t e r much a p p e a r s to be shaken, f a l t e r i n g , observation, that the delinquency a f r a i d . At this crucial moment and the v u l g a r i t y are found more when it must a p p e a r before the frequently i n o t h e r older age judging bar of history, Western groups. I particularly liked your civilization has either lost its nerve " F i g h t i n g Back" article, f o r unless or purpose — p e r h a p s both. We we know how youth think today, often speak of a " u n i t e d " f r o n t of how shall we know what will hapdemocracy a g a i n s t Communism. pen to t h e world t o m o r r o w ? Are And this is precisely the malady not the student bodies of colleges of our civilization. We have lost very much the electorate of which our common ideals and aspirations, Mr. Van P u t t e n s p e a k s ? and a r e united only in t h e negaHope is a f t e r all a college, and tive. We are a g a i n s t Russia, againnot a high school. From t h e r e s t Communism, against enslaveyoung men enter the a r m y and ment, a g a i n s t t h i n g s ad infinitum. business life, and young women But w h a t are we f o r ? m a r r y and become teachers and if To be sure most would retort they have no freedom of exprest h a t the " f r e e ' world is f o r liberty, sion, how can they g r a n t it in democracy, i n d i v i d u a l dignity, their t u r n ? brotherhood. But these woods have However brilliant a person has become empty in our time. They been in his or her youth; however are as f u t i l e as t h e "hollow m e n " broadminded and t o l e r a n t they tryof T. S. Eliot f o r they no longer to be, the very f a c t t h a t a g e slows conjure up hope and action in men's down their reflexes, and powers of Souls. When we genuinely admit a d j u s t m e n t to new ideas, tends to how b a r r e n W e s t e r n policy is of make them unduly critical of the positive, constructive ideals can we forward view of youth. C o n t r a r y express s u r p r i s e a t the precariousto general belief, youth is not selness of our international s i t u a t i o n ? fish and cruel — just realistic. It Can we be so certain t h a t righth u r t s to have one's cherished views eousness and the dynamic forces taken out of the cozy closet of one's a r e on our side? Could it be that mind, shaken and dusted and exthe E a s t is s t r o n g and growing posed to t h e brittle light of a new s t r o n g e r , the West weak and growday, but by the time one h a s aring w e a k e r ? Is it possible t h a t rived at — well — m a t u r i t y , one the whole movement of history is should have learned the secret of toward the Communist side? We good t e a m work — how to hand the might a t least be concerned! torch over quickly to the next runThe situation is not yet hopeless. ner in the race. It may be hard Inevitable as is t h e modification of to do, but it is a challenge, and we our way of life by t h e potent are a l w a y s telling youth how it forces now unleashed in the world, must be t h a n k f u l for challenges. it need not be destroyed. But to Let us "ancient ones" accept the preserve our basic concepts and challenge, and be t h a n k f u l ouraspirations we shall have to make selves. them live again. Very truly yours, D u r i n g a conference on interPhyllis G. E n g e l s m a n national relations I attended recently at the University of Notre Dear E d i t o r : Dame, I heard expressed on several I wish I could j u s t i f y the latest occasions the only philosophy I be- "In Review" column by t h e f a c t lieve can save Western civilization. t h a t t h e r e was nothing to review. That is, our culture must prove However, I cannot; and the statethat it h a s something b e t t e r to ments presented in t h e article show offer t h a n do the Communists. In a lack of the ability on the p a r t positive, peaceful action the West of the a u t h o r to evaluate culture. must prove its good f a i t h to the Culture does not depend upon size. f a l t e r i n g nations of the globe. We The University of Michigan may cannot d o this b y dominating present a concert in a h u g e audipaternalism, but only by tolerant torium; t h a t makes it no more culbrotherhood. tured t h a n the s a m e p r o g r a m preE f f o r t s such as SEATO in South- sented in the Hope Chapel. eastern Asia a r e not t h e answer. F u r t h e r m o r e , culture does not beTo the tired, oppressed people of long to a select f e w . F o r w h a t the world the peacemakers are al- reason is T.S. Eliot b e t t e r culture ways blessed, and we have allowed than M a r y Chase? P&M cannot the Communists t o u s u r p this, our produce t h e same t y p e of d r a m a r i g h t f u l role. While they a r e thus on each performance. R a t h e r , it enabled to move closer to t h e non- must p r e s e n t to the public a varied Communist peoples of Asia, we f u r t h e r antagonize the m a s s e s with h a t e f u l talk of a r m a m e n t s and our p e t t y differences. P e r h a p s we p r e p a r a t i o n s f o r war. The world m i g h t see a g r e a t e r d r e a m , a vision will not accept such a " s a v i o u r ! " whole. P e r h a p s we m i g h t well P e r h a p s we a t a professing "hope in God" f o r the f u t u r e of Christian institution m i g h t f o r g e t mankind.

Letters to the Editor

Dear Mom and Dad: Spring has finally a r r i v e d ! We have actually seen the sun several times. Joe s a y s we'll still have a lot more cold weather, but I'm sure we won't. I mailed all my winter clothes home, today, so you should be g e t t i n g them any day now. Please send all my cotton t h i n g s right away because all I have here is a formal and a linen dress. Be sure and send my bathing suit, too! L a s t S a t u r d a y , Joe and I went on a bike hike and it was f u n most of the time, only I wanted to ride to Benton H a r b o r and Joe wanted to go to Zeeland. I didn't mind so much not g e t t i n g my way, it w a s just that Joe didn't even consider my suggestion. He complained p r e t t y much of the time too, cause he said it was too cold to be riding bikes. He's still t a l k i n g about it. He's been in the clinic all week and everytime 1 go to see him he just coughs and g e t s t e a r s in his eyes. When I told him y e s t e r d a y t h a t he had proved his point and could come out now, his face got so red, I t h o u g h t he was h a v i n g some sort of an a t t a c k . The nurse said I'd b e t t e r leave or he might. I did, but I think he's acting awf u l l y childish. Guess w h a t ! We took second place in the Sing! Isn't t h a t m a r velous? We were so thrilled we didn't know what to do. I've never had so much f u n in one night. It really is exciting. All the girls in each sorority dress alike and they look just beautiful when they all g e t up on the s t a g e . I was so nervous when we were up t h e r e t h a t I f o r g o t myself and s t a r t e d to sing, but the girl next to me punched me and I stopped r i g h t away. She said no real h a r m was done. The Dorians won first place f o r sororities and they really screamed when they announced the winners. It's the third y e a r in a row t h a t they've t a k e n first place so they get to keep the cup, now. The F r a t e r s took first place f o r t h e f r a t e r n i t i e s a n d everyone screamed when they won, too. 1 really t h o u g h t the roof was going to come down (not really, Mother . . just kidding. The chapel's fine!). I don't exactly u n d e r s t a n d why there was such a commotion, either, cause it w a s n ' t t h e i r third win. In fact, someone said it was j u s t t h e i r first. Anyway, it s u r e was f u n . Well, back to t h e studies. W r i t e soon. Your d a u g h t e r , Ophelia

p r o g r a m containing a s a m p l i n g f r o m all t y p e s of thinkers. Likewise, the Chapel Choir presents an excellent repertoire, r a n g ing f r o m the period of Bach to the period of Will J a m e s . Is P a l l e s t r i n a the only t y p e of choral music t h a t can be classified as c u l t u r e ? The reviewer h a s a p p a r e n t l y overlooked the concert series which brings a r t i s t s of world-renown to our campus. The college goes to g r e a t expense t o b r i n g these a r t i s t s here, and the concerts a r e very well attended. Also seemingly overlooked a r e t h e college o r c h e s t r a and symphonette which p l a y prog r a m s of music by Mozart, H a d y n , Franck, and other g r e a t composers. Student recitals give t h e s t u d e n t body an o p p o r t u n i t y to h e a r fine (Continued on p a g e 4)


HOPE

IN REVIEW

Prater Frolics

To Satirize

College Life

Therefore, without f u r t h e r preable, I herewith offer f o r the approval of our a s t u t e readers the first showing of the other side of my wormeaten leaf: a sweetnessand-light column. As a s t a r t e r , I shall recant some previous statements which, I understand, were considered both nasty and uncalledfor. Unhappily, I must record that the superb selection of tracts, which I believe to have contained some o f t h e g r e a t e s t literary achievements since Longfellow's "Excelcior", is no longer on sale at the Blue Key. As f o r the repertoire of the Chapel Choir, I'm sure t h a t even so g r e a t a composer as M a r g a r e t S a n g s t e r could find nothing to criticise. The work done by t h e Pallette and Masque is no doubt unparalelled since the lamentable disappearance of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" f r o m the American stage. I'm sure all will agree t h a t the lovely little stories in the S a t u r d a y Evening P o s t are infinitely superior to the a w f u l , depressing trash printed by those unAmerican literary magazines. T u r n i n g to f r e s h subjects, I simply must say t h a t the orchestra played positively divinely last Sunday a f t e r n o o n , and the s m a r t alecs who dared to imply t h a t they were at times slightly off key should have their mouths washed out with soap. T h a t lovely piece f r o m the "Cavalier Rusticana" was absolutely heavenly. The crowning event of the semester thus f a r , however, was, without a doubt, the All College Sing. Besides being a marvelously improving cultural event, I think t h a t the Sing is a wonderful, h e a r t w a r m i n g , tradition, and t h a t its u n i f y i n g and u p l i f t i n g effect on campus social life is unparalleled. All the girls and boys who took p a r t deserve a big cheer f o r having sung so beautifully, and I think it would be j u s t wonderful if t h e y all got t o g e t h e r and put on another fine p r o g r a m real soon. This is about as f a r as I can go on my first a t t e m p t , I hope it is enough to s a t i s f y all t h e fine, sincere people who have ( f o r my own good, I'm sure) b r o u g h t pressure to b e a r upon me to see t h i n g s the

A N C H O R

Page Three

Reed, Abbott

By Jon Hinkamp

The devoted readers of the staid inner pages of the Anchor will p e r h a p s be pleased to read that t h e vicious, nasty, and probably atheistic w r i t e r of this column has. bowed to popular demand and is t r y i n g to r e f o r m . Having received, in the past months, a liberal (please pardon the t e r m ; no doctrinal aspersions a r e intended) dosage of righteous disapproval f r o m t h e massed phalanxes of right-thinkers, uplifters, do-gooders, sentimentalists, Mom-and-Dad's D a y committee members, a n d nature-lovers, 1 have discovered my offensive arThe eleventh annual production rogance to be badly undermined. of the F r a t e r n a l Society's variety I find myself beginning to believe show, the F r a t e r Frolics, will be that, as so many have implied, presented this y e a r on April 21st, several hundred Dutchmen can't be 22nd, and 23rd, a t the Ladies' Litwrong. e r a r y Club, Frolics Director K. Don Thus shaken, my first impulse was to turn my dubious talents in some less controversial direction, such as i n t e r p r e t i n g visions or g h o s t - w r i t i n g term papers. A f t e r much deep meditation, however, 1 concluded t h a t not only would such a course verge on sheer cowardice, but also would involve shirking my m a n i f e s t d u t y to college and count r y . My duty, it seems, is to do w h a t I can to right the colossal wrongs which, I am told, I have done to Hope's earnest Strivers A f t e r Beauty. In answer to any c h a r g e s of inconsistancy, I can only humbly suggest t h a t conf o r m i t y is the better p a r t of safe journalism.

COLLEGE

Jacobusse announced last week. According t o Jacobusse, t h e theme of the Frolics this year will be college life, with both humorous and serious a c t s w r i t t e n around the various phases of life on the c a m p u s of a modern college or university. W r i t e r s i n c l u d e David Kempers, J o h n Winter, Robert Muilenburg, K. Don Jacobusse, Dale Maxam, Peter Bylenga, Bob Winier, Bob De Wilde, Carl Reisig, Blaine Timmer, Matt Peelen, David Dethmers, David Spaan, J a m e s van P u t t e n , Bob Hoeksema, Dick Ortquist. Jack De Pree, and Bob Johnson. The intent of this year's Frolics was summed up by Director Jacobusse as being " B i g g e r and better than ever." Some of the means which will be used to achieve this end will include expanded use of scenery, backdrops, and make-up, and selections by a selected chorus of F r a t e r s . This chorus will be directed by Gordon Meeusen, who recently led t h e entire f r a t e r n i t y to first place in the All-College Sing. Among their selections will be a novelty tune, "The Wild Necktie." Other f e a t u r e s of t h e program will include a piano duet f e a t u r i n g Tom Keizer a n d D a v e V a n Eenenaam. Business M a n a g e r f o r the event is Milt Lubbers; Earl De W i t t and George Pelgrim will head t h e stage crew, and Henry Doele is in charge of make-up.

Join Faculty Miss Julia Reed, a new addition to the English D e p a r t m e n t , comes to us f r o m Purdue University as a replacement f o r Dr. Lotus Snow, who recently left the faculty to join the staff of Albion College.

i

Miss Reed was born and has lived all her life in L a F a y e t t e , Indiana, where her f a t h e r has a position on the staff of P u r d u e University. She g r a d u a t e d f r o m t h a t school in 1946 with a m a j o r in m a t h e m a t i c s and English. Following graduation, she did research and statistical work — using her t r a i n i n g in m a t h e m a t i c s — b u t found this not to her liking. Thus she went to the University of Michigan, which is well known for its excellence in the field of English, and received her Master's degree there in 1953. She w a s teaching at P u r d u e when she accepted her post at Hope. Miss Reed's special interests lie mostly in music, t h e a t e r , and travel. She told the r e p o r t e r that she spent the s u m m e r of 1948 at the University of Oslo, Norway, where she took a survey of Norwegian a r t and l i t e r a t u r e and had an o p p o r t u n i t y to travel in and become acquainted with that beautiful country.

A scene from the forthcoming production of " P y g m a l i o n " by Palette and Masque scheduled for presentation March 11, 12, 14, and 15.

ADD POLITICAL SCIENCE . . . STUDENT ART EXHIBIT . . .

(Continued f r o m p a g e 1) (Continued f r o m p a g e 1) A new m e m b e r of the Spanish required. History 13, 14 and 33, 34 E r n i e Brummler, a n o t h e r senior, D e p a r t m e n t is Mr. J a m e s Abbott, will be the basic courses f o r a posed. a native of La Cross, Florida. He History m a j o r . Fourteen s e m e s t e r The show, which opened Wedearned his A.B. and Master's de hours in History courses numbered nesday night, will continue f o r apgrees in Spanish and French at above 50 will be required and proximately three weeks. It will the University of Florida, and he should include courses in as m a n y be open to the public d u r i n g the has completed all the work, with a r e a s as possible. Each m a j o r in day and between p e r f o r m a n c e s of the exception of his thesis, which his senior year m u s t elect a senior Pygmalion in the f o u r t h floor of is required to receive a Ph.D. in p r o s e m i n a r and students who in- the Science Building. Hispanic Studies f r o m U.C.L.A. tend to continue their studies in While t a k i n g his schooling in Cali- g r a d u a t e school a r e advised to t a k e f o r n i a , he t a u g h t Spanish classes. two modern languages. Patronize Our Advertisers! He also h a s studied a t the Univ e r s i t y of Mexico.

CRITICAL THINKING . . .

This is Mr. Abbott's first experi(Continued f r o m page 2) ence in a small college, which he f e e l s differs f r o m a large one only to score high in the test of the thinking skills. There were however a in the first two years, and he is n u m b e r of exceptions — enough to indicate that the two were not impressed by the friendly people identical m e a s u r e m e n t s . 3. There is real evidence of improvement in thinking skills beh e r e and the courtesy of the stutween the f r e s h m a n and senior year. 73% of the seniors scored higher d e n t s in class. t h a n the median or middle f r e s h m a n score. 74% of the f r e s h m e n scored lower t h a n the median senior score. These statistics, however, m u s t be examined cautiously. The only positive way to measure improvement is by testing the same person twice at different stages of his career. At this stage of t h e testing, such a procedure has been impossible. Is it valid to a s s u m e that the present senior class would have a p p r o x i m a t e d the scores of t h e present f r e s h m e n had t h e y taken the t e s t three years ago? Using the ACE by Harvey Mulder Psychological T e s t Scores obtained f o r both groups in t h e i r f r e s h m a n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e symbols, cony e a r as a common basis f o r comparing the scholastic a p t i t u d e of the Approximately 14 months ago Dean Hollenbach wrote an editorial cepts, and processes t h a t man uses two groups, t h r o u g h statistical processes the difference between the f o r the Anchor to explain the pur- to meet the various problems t h a t f r e s h m a n and senior scores is not quite as g r e a t but it is still pose and scope of the Ford Founda- he faces every day. Through these significant. tion g r a n t and the f a c u l t y Curricu- courses it is hoped t h a t the student 4. In a comparison with t h e other college percentile norm establum self-analysis. Most Hope stu- will not only develop the habits lished f o r the t e s t , the f r e s h m a n scores fall slightly below, and the dents now recognize this study and skills of sound thinking, but senior scores slightly above those of the norm group. The norm group group as the " F o r d Study Group." that he will also increase his un- was based essentially on 1940 cases, the test given in an E a s t e r n UniThis past week the sub-committee d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e thinking pro- versity during t h e f r e s h m a n year. on Critical Thinking released a cesses themselves, and gain an In comparison with national high school (11th and 12th g r a d e ) a w a r e n e s s of their application in s t a t e m e n t to t h e Anchor of the obnorms, the f r e s h m e n scores a r e considerably higher t h a n the norm jectives of two proposed courses different situations. g r o u p . 88% of the f r e s h m e n score above the median or middle score which would reflect curriculum This will be accomplished by f o r t h e high school group. changes to m e e t the re-thinking on analyzing the thinking process of 5. In t r y i n g to a r r i v e at some indication as to w h e t h e r various the purposes and p r o g r a m of the o t h e r s as t h e y meet concrete situa- disciplines studied make any difference in the development of these liberal a r t s college. Below the An- tions, and in the exercise of their skills, the seniors were divided into t h r e e broad groups, those who chor presents a condensation of the t h i n k i n g powers in problem situa- m a j o r e d in some area of science, those in the social sciences, and those report of t h e committee on "think- tions. The courses will be inciden- in t h e humanities. ing:" In the science group were placed those m a j o r i n g in Biology, Chemtally concerned with the developOn the broadest level these m e n t of an understanding of such istry, Physics, and Mathematics. In the Social Science groups, m a j o r s courses seek to help the student causes of inept thinking as inac- in History, Political Science, Sociology, Psychology, and Economics and acquire the basis f o r sound con- c u r a t e perception, " f u z z y " or un- Business Administration. In the humanities group, m a j o r s in English, structive thinking in all a r e a s of sound concept f o r m a t i o n , and phys- Foreign Language, Philosophy, Religion and Music. The science group scored highest in the test, the Social Science living. This chiefly involves an un- ical or psychological blocks. The courses in " t h i n k i n g " f u r t h e r hope second and H u m a n i t i e s last. When a d j u s t m e n t s were m a d e in t e r m s t o supply a ' basic understanding of t h e ACE Psychological Test scores, t h e Social Science g r o u p traded r i g h t way and to join the placid and vocabulary which should enable places with t h e Science. Says P r o f . Dahnke of t h e Michigan S t a t e fold. To t h e m , congratulations on every college i n s t r u c t o r to proceed College Board of E x a m i n e r s " T h e r e is a t least the suggestion here t h a t a Job Well Done in t h e Cause of more efficiently in helping his stu- the Social Science group, who a p p a r e n t l y have t h e least ability on t h e Right Thinking. P e r h a p s this new d e n t s to develop his thinking pow- a v e r a g e , is g e t t i n g the best t r a i n i n g in critical t h i n k i n g o r w h a t e v e r method of pseudo-criticism is in- ers. And by pointing out some of it is t h a t the W a t s o n Glaser really m e a s u r e s . " Conversely, t h e t r a i n i n g nocuous enough to purchase the t h e general processes and principles in t h e H u m a n i t i e s seems weakest at this point. approval of t h e Good Fellows and employed in sound thinking t h e Individual scores and percentile r a t i n g s are now available in t h e Guardians o f R e a l American s t u d e n t should be able to t r a n s f e r Dean's Office and can be secured at any time. Values. W h a t price i n t e g r i t y n o w ? Dr. J o h n Hollenbach (Continued on page 4)

Ford

Study

To Improve

Plans

Student

Courses

Thinking


Page Four

HOPE u

Y's Centennial • T h e Y W Centennial Celebration reached a p l e a s a n t c u l m i n a t i o n in the Tuesday evening YW meeting. A film d e p i c t i n g t h e beginning, t h e p r o g r e s s ^and t h e a c h i e v e m e n t of t h e Y W C A t h r o u g h t h e p a s t onehundred years was shown. A f t e r t h e film a b i r t h d a y p a r t y was held w i t h a l a r g e cake a s t h e c e n t e r of attraction. T h e c o n t e n t s of t h e " b i r t h d a y b a n k s " totalled $58.77. $27.15 h a d previously been collected by selling c a r d s so a total of $85.92 was cont r i b u t e d to t h e N a t i o n a l Y f u n d . C e n t e n n i a l c h a i r m a n Dianne Vicha and h e r c o m m i t t e e consisting of Lois H o e k s e m a , Carol K u y p e r , E v o n S o u t h l a n d and J a n Conklin a r e to be c o n g r a t u l a t e d on a fine job.

CAREER AVAILABLE . . . (Continued f r o m p a g e 1) an E m p l o y e e " by P e t e r D r u c k e r , and some v e r y good h i n t s f o r t h e job-hunter f r o m Florence Watt, p l a c e m e n t d i r e c t o r a t t h e University of S o u t h e r n C a l i f o r n i a . You'll also see a s a m p l e r e s u m e p r e p a r e d by T h e H a r v a r d G r a d u a t e School of B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . C A R E E R , first published in 1950 by u n d e r g r a d u a t e s of Yale Univ e r s i t y , is given w i t h o u t cost to senior men in some 400 colleges and u n i v e r s ities . Hope College is included in t h e g r o u p of schools. Senior m e n can g e t t h e i r copy of C a r e e r at t h e office of a d m i s s i o n s , VR-110.

DR. MEINECKE . . .

South.

(Continued f r o m p a g e 1) Boston S y m p h o n y and m a n y o t h e r s . A t p r e s e n t besides his m a n y concerts, Goldovsky is M a s t e r of Ceremonies on t h e Metropolitan O p e r a News of t h e A i r b r o a d c a s t s . He h a s a widely-selling record, Companion to Carmen, which cons i s t s of piano, voice and discussion. He h a s produced and directed the first A m e r i c a n p e r f o r m a n c e of Moz a r t ' s o p e r a Idomeneo a t B e r k s h i r e F e s t i v a l in Lenox, M a s s a c h u s e t s . In addition he h a s introduced several practically f o r g o t t e n , a s well as several new o p e r a s . A m o n g them a r e Rossini's Turk in Italy, Gluck's Iphigenia in Tauris, and M o z a r t ' s La Finta Giardiniera. He is a r t i s tic d i r e c t o r of t h e New E n g l a n d O p e r a T h e a t e r and has r e c e n t l y published a book. Accents on Opera. In his p r o g r a m subtitled "Rom a n c e of t h e P i a n o " , Godovsky covers p r a c t i c a l l y t h e whole field of piano l i t e r a t u r e f r o m S c a r l a t t i to B a r t o k . T h e p r o g r a m is well a d a p t e d to lay audiences as well as with music t e a c h e r s and s t u d e n t s a s t h e p r o g r a m is i n t e r s p e r s e d with f a s c i n a t i n g and h u m o r o u s i n f o r m a tion. T h u s by m e a n s of h u m o r o u s l e c t u r e a s well a s piano recital, Goldovsky m a k e s the music and its c o m p o s e r s come alive f o r his audience. To p r e p a r e himself f o r his double role of p i a n i s t and c o m m e n t a t o r , Mr. Goldovsky h a s acquired a collection of r a r e books and m a n u s c r i p t s . He is a l s o a l i n g u i s t a s he s p e a k s fluently French, I t a l i a n , G e r m a n , Russian, Spanish, H u n g a r i a n and E n g l i s h .

T. W a y n e Rieman f r o m ManREASONABLE PRICES c h e s t e r College in N o r t h Man*.* *.* *.* V ••• •.• *,* *.* *,* *,* ** *,* »,• »,• • c h e s t e r , I n d i a n a visited our C a m p - » • • > * * • * • > • > • « • # V# * • «*• »« «'• • • • • « • • • •'# • » • • •»« us on March 10 to e x a m i n e t h e »• #.• •,» »,• #.• *,* *,* *.• #.• » . • » . » » . • *.* *.* Km *.* *.* *.* religious life and activities. Mr. R i e m a n s p e n t a f u l l d a y on c a m p u s , 1 A U T O M A T a t t e n d i n g Chapel in t h e m o r n i n g SELF SERVICE L A U N D R Y and s p e n d i n g the r e s t Of the day I c o n f e r r i n g with both f a c u l t y and Open 9 A.M. — 6 P.M. 17th & Columbia s t u d e n t s on the v a r i o u s p h a s e s of religious life. M a n c h e s t e r College is a church related college of a b o u t seven hundred s t u d e n t s . It is s u p p o r t e d by t h e Church of t h e B r e t h r e n .

Don't Drive

By — D r i v e

RUSS

FORD STUDY . . .

ALL

STEAK

» . • » • #.• #,» * ' j

In

HAMBURGS

Home M a d e Pie, Ice Cream

(Continued f r o m p a g e 3) more readily t h e t h i n k i n g h a b i t s learned in one course to those of another.

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Course A (Logical R e a s o n i n g ) is designed to help the s t u d e n t acquire an u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e processes which a r e involved in d e t e r m i n i n g correct and incorrect t h i n k ing, so he will t h u s be able to think soundly and creatively. It will help t h e s t u d e n t acquire some e l e m e n t a r y skill in e m p l o y i n g his r e a s o n i n g processes in p e r t i n e n t s i t u a t i o n s . The courses will specifically f o c u s around u n d e r s t a n d i n g s in recognition and classification of an a r g u m e n t , recognition of s e m a n tic c o n f u s i o n , recognition of a p p e a l to emotion, u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the principles of deductive r e a s o n i n g , u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e principles of inductive reasoning, and t h e a n a l y sis of e v a l u a t i v e j u d g m e n t s .

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Custom Recordings h a s announced t h a t records of the 1955 AllCollege Sing a r e available. It is possible to g e t any or all of t h e selections, including the H o p e - I v e s and t h e D u r f e e W a i t e r s , a t e i t h e r 33% or 78 record speeds. I n t e r e s t e d p e r s o n s should contact Bill Allen a t radio s t a t i o n W H T C . •,»

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• # • •• # • #,« #„•».»*,• #.• #.• *» *j C o u r s e B ( Q u a n t i t a t i v e Think- «t* *,* *,* #,• *,* #,• #.•»• #.• • # • •• # • •• • #• »• ••«• «• • • *,• • • #• «.•»• «• # • ••«* • ing) is designed to help t h e s t u d e n t HAVE YOUR DORM AGENT CALL acquire a n u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e T h e Athletic D e b t D i g g e r s h a s symbols, concepts, and processes given a television set to t h e s t u d e n t t h a t a r e employed to work out body. Installed l a s t S a t u r d a y , t h e p r o b l e m s involving q u a n t i t a t i v e reset is located in D u r f e e Lounge. lationships. It will help t h e s t u d e n t For Pick-up and Delivery It is a t w e n t y - o n e inch S p a r t a n acquire some e l e m e n t a r y skill in television set in a blond console. e m p l o y i n g these symbols and pro'THE HOUSE Of stRvic-e' cesses in p e r t i n e n t s i t u a t i o n s . :: Course B will specifically focus Letters . . . a r o u n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g s and skills (Continued f r o m p a g e 2) solo music; the H o p e S t r i n g Q u a r - in such a r e a s as k i n d s of r e a s o n i n g t e t p r e s e n t s an excellent r e p e r t o i r e used, place of symbols, a x i o m s , t*i>K****.* ».**.* *.**.**,* *.*•>*.* *.* ».• *,* *.* *,**,* *.* *.*•*,• *•*,>*•*.#*•*,»*• »*.•*»*.• #**.• *»*. **.**.* * . * •'» * .•'»*»'#*V#. * »'» * •*# . *«•»f• >*»•»*»•» J* • # • # • • • # •'# > of c h a m b e r music. There is an ex- p o s t u l a t e s , a n d definitions, t h e » • • • # • # • » • # • » tensive record l i b r a r y in t h e Chapel n u m b e r concept, t h e a l g e b r a i c processes and t h e i r r e l a t i o n s h i p to basement. No, H o p e College h a s a d e q u a t e a r i t h m e t i c and practical problems, c u l t u r e . One could not a s p i r e to t h e g e o m e t r i c a l processes a s rel o f t i e r h e i g h t s in c u l t u r e ; indeed, l a t e d to q u a n t i t y r e l a t i o n s h i p s , cont h e m a j o r i t y of s t u d e n t s do not s t r u c t i o n s , indirect m e a s u r e m e n t t a k e full a d v a n t a g e of all t h a t is and g r a p h s , statistical processes a s offered. A m o v e m e n t to i m p r o v e r e l a t e d to m e a s u r e m e n t s , display IS READY TO SERVE Y O U the c u l t u r a l s t a n d a r d would defin- of d a t a , s a m p l i n g , simple probabilThese Attractions itely be crippled, due to t h e sole ity and statistical p r o o f , and t h e reason of t h e lack of a need f o r basic ideas of calculus a s r e l a t e d SOUPS — HAMBURGS — CHEESE SANDWICHES to t h e t h i n k i n g process. such a m o v e m e n t . CHEESEBURGERS — HOT CHOCOLATE David M a r t i n SODAS A N D SUNDAES — ROLLS A N D COFFEE

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(Continued f r o m p a g e 1) poser and o r c h e s t r a conductor. He is t h e a u t h o r of special studies d e a l i n g w i t h the h i s t o r y of medicine and of two L a t i n books, " T h i r d Y e a r L a t i n " and " R a p i d Reviews in L a t i n . " His doctoral t h e s i s w a s a s t u d y of t u b e r c u l o s i s a m o n g t h e a n c i e n t Greeks and R o m a n s . A n a t i v e of S t a t e C e n t e r , Iowa, his f a m i l y l a t e r moved to Detroit, w h e r e he w a s educated in the public schools. He received h i s bachelor's d e g r e e f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of T e n n e s s e e and b e g a n h i s t e a c h i n g c a r e e r in t h e high school of E a s t Liverpool, Ohio. His t e a c h i n g c a r e e r h a s included head of t h e Classic d e p a r t m e n t s in C a r l e t o n College, Missouri, 190910; L u t h e r a n Ladies' College, Minn e s o t a , 1910-11; Midland College, K a n s a s , 1911-16; H O P E C O L L E G E , 1917-22; a n d Car leton College, M i n n e s o t a , 1922-25. In each college he also t a u g h t music, and a p p e a r e d in n u m e r o u s concerts and recitals a s soloist and c o n d u c t o r . H e ret u r n e d to the f a c u l t y of the Univ e r s i t y of Michigan in 1925, w h e r e he h a s been since, a t t a i n i n g the r a n k of P r o f e s s o r in 1951. D r . Meinecke is a m e m b e r of Phi K a p p a P h i , t h e A m e r i c a n Philological Association, t h e Medieval A c a d e m y , t h e A m e r i c a n Association of t h e H i s t o r y of Medicine, t h e Classical A s s o c i a t i o n of t h e A t l a n t i c S t a t e s , and t h e Classical Association of t h e Middle W e s t and

COLLEGE

Phone 2 3 2 6

9 E. 10th St.

WASHERY 210 CENTRAL A V E N U E


HOPE

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

Prats Plan Informal Parties,

Sororities

Elect Spring Term Officers

ASA T h e m e m b e r s of ASA a r e now e n j o y i n g t h e i r series of joint m e e t ings with t h e o t h e r sororities. T h e y have a l r e a d y met with t h e D o r i a n s and Sibs and a r e looking f o r w a r d to t h e i r joint m e e t i n g s with t h e T h e t a s , Delphis, a n d Sorosites, which will be coming up in t h e near future.

Knickerbocker

Cosmopolitan

Joe Martin h a s been appointed second s e m e s t e r R u s h i n g C h a i r m a n f o r the Knicks t h i s year. F o r t h e K H N D a t e N i g h t , the c h a i r m a n is Chuck P e t t i n g i l l , and not Chuck Lindahl, a s previously s t a t e d . Chuck Lindahl, however, is in c h a r g e of t h e Knick-Sib joint meeting. A r t J e n t z h a s been selected to t a k e c h a r g e of t h e S p r i n g P a r t y f o r the Knicks. A n o t h e r successful open house w a s held f o l l o w i n g t h e All-College Sing last F r i d a y night, where the Knickerbockers took second place. Fraternal

Page Five

All College Sing Winners

At t h e last l i t e r a r y meeting, it was announced t h a t Bob Van W a r t and R a y De Does w e r e selected as the two o u t s t a n d i n g pledges of 1954-55. Del K o m e j a n gave a serious p a p e r on " C i g a r e t t e s and L u n g C a n c e r " , and Bob V a n W a r t Delphi gave t h e h u m o r p a p e r . Paul Duey The Delphi f o r m a l , " S a v a n n a h acted a s m a s t e r critic. S w i r l " , will be held t o n i g h t a t t h e F u r t h e r plans a r e being made f o r Blithefield C o u n t r y Club in Grand the Cosmo S p r i n g P a r t y a t T a b o r Rapids. P r e c e d i n g the f o r m a l will F a r m s in Sodus. J e r r y Kruyf is be a coketail p a r t y at the home of chairman. J a n i c e E v e r t . Music f o r the f o r m a l The joint m e e t i n g of the " Y " 's will be f u r n i s h e d by Bob F o r t i n e r on March 7 will be conducted by and his Collegians. B a r b a r a Kruizthe Cosmos and the Delphi. Dick e n g a and E r m a Van Dyke a r e Huls will be in c h a r g e f o r the p a r t y co-chairmen. Newly-elected officers f o r t h e Cosmos, and Mary Lee Rozeboom Dorian S p r i n g T e r m a r e a s f o l l o w s : K. will r e p r e s e n t Delphi. The Dorians and their d a t e s had Don J a c o b u s s e , p r e s i d e n t ; Robert a good t i m e a t the Dorian D a t e Muilenburg, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; Tom N i g h t , " D e e p In . t h e H e a r t of Keizer, r e c o r d i n g s e c r e t a r y ; H a r T e x a s " , on F e b r u a r y 25. A f t e r vey Mulder, c o r r e s p o n d i n g secreg o i n g out on a t r e a s u r e h u n t t h e t a r y ; George P e l g r i m , t r e a s u r e r ; Lois Maier, c l a r i e n t i s t , will pre- g r o u p r e t u r n e d to the g y m f o r J a c k D e P r e e , i n t e r - f r a t e r n i t y coun- sent h e r Senior Recital on March s q u a r e d a n c i n g , a p r o g r a m , and cil r e p r e s e n t a t i v e ; a n d Carlton 17 in t h e Hope Memorial Chapel r e f r e s h m e n t s . Co-chairmen of t h e Failor, k e e p e r of the archives. at 8:15 p.m. Miss M a i e r , a music p a r t y w e r e Ann Bloodgood and P r e s i d e n t J a c o b u s s e p r e s e n t e d m a j o r , is f r o m the class of A r t h u r D o r o t h y Hesselink. o u t g o i n g p r e x y Don M a x a m with Hills. Sibylline the t r a d i t i o n a l gold gavel l a t e r in The Sibs had an e n j o y a b l e t i m e Included on the p r o g r a m is a the meeting, which was held March Woodwind q u i n t e t and Miss Nelvie a t t h e i r A S A joint m e e t i n g on 3rd. W o r k on t h e F r a t e r Frolics J o n k e r , f r o m the class of N o r m a F e b r u a r y 2 5 w i t h M a r y J a n e p r o g r e s s e d , and Frolics D i r e c t o r B a u g h m a n , will also sing. A d a m s a c t i n g a s c h a i r m a n . The K. Don J a c o b u s s e announced t h a t Sib a l u m n i baked cakes and cookies production d a t e s would be April which t h e Sibs sold in t h e g i r l s ' 21, 22, and 23. Patronize Our Advertisers! d o r m s last T h u r s d a y n i g h t . The B a k e Sale w a s enjoyed by the Sibs and t h e dorm gir ls . Sorosis Sorosites are having a literary L I G H T I N G FOR BETTER SEEING m e e t i n g t o n i g h t centered a r o u n d a t h e m e of music. Sorosites led chapel l a s t W e d n e s d a y m o r n i n g DE FOUW'S ELECTRIC SHOP with Joyce B r a a k t a k i n g c h a r g e of a r r a n g i n g t h e service and w i t h special music provided by J e a n Kromann. Theta ECONOMY T h e T h e t a s a r e busy p l a n n i n g ODORLESS t h e i r joint m e e t i n g which will t a k e AND LAUNDRY DRY place n e x t F r i d a y night in D u r f e e SERVICE CLEANING Lounge. Lucille Tysse and R u t h STUDENT ECONOMY SERVICE P r u i s a r e t h e T h e t a co-chairmen FIRST FIVE POUNDS, $1.00 for the meeting.

1

All College Sing winners, (above) Dorian Society and (below) Fraternal Society who won with presentations of "Poor, O l d Jonathan Bing" and "Stouthearted M e n " respectively.

Senior Recital

EACH ADDITIONAL POUND, 12c SHIRTS FINISHED IN THIS BUNDLE 17c EACH PICK-UP

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Religious Emphasis Chairmen Named

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Page Six

HOPE

COLLEGE

A N C H O R

SPRING SPORTS BEGIN ACTION Adrian Stops Dutch In Season's Final 0

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6RANDSTANDIN6. by Kempers and Veldman Closing out the season with a 98-78 loss to Adrian, the Hope College cagers wound up one of their worst seasons in the past several years.

This loss gave the Dutch a 8-6 conference record which put

them in f o u r t h place and gave them an overall standing of 10-10. In the first half of the M.I.A.A. race Hope managed only 3 victories out of 7, while they came on to take 5 out of the last 7 contests. Beaten decisively only 3 times in the league the final s t a n d i n g s could have been somewhat different had Hope played the caliber of ball they were potentially capable of. Lacking the appearance of a well knit quintet at times during the season the squad worked as a unit only periodically and a s a result play was r a t h e r spotty. Although the total record was not the most impressive, by taking a look a t this years squad we see t h a t coach Visser was faced with a n u m b e r of problems. One of the f o r e m o s t was the f a c t t h a t he had only five v e t e r a n s on hand and t h e r e f o r e had to rely heavily on f r o s h for depth.

Even though the f r e s h m e n came through at times, the

experienced depth of veteran squad members was clearly shown to be lacking and as a result the team showed a weakness here.

Two seniors saw final action with the Dutch cagers in the Adrian contest. Bob Hendrickson, Hope's veteran center and t h r e e time AllMIAA choice, set two all-time records in the Dutch athletic annals. Scoring a total of 1,351 points during his f o u r year career, Bob set an additional record, s t a r t i n g in 79 consecutive basketball games. As a f r e s h m e n , Hendrickson s t a r t e d all 17 games, scoring 219 points f o r an a v e r a g e of 12.9. The following y e a r he poured t h r o u g h 448 tallies for a 20.4 average. Over the last two years. Bob has scored identical totals of 342 points, a v e r a g i n g 18 points in 19 g a m e s last year and 17.1 points f o r the 20 g a m e s this season. In addition, Hendrickson led the Dutchmen with 338 rebounds this year. Following the Adrian contest, Bob was named Hope's most valuable player. I n t e r e s t i n g to note is Bob's phenomenal shooting a v e r a g e f r o m the floor, 44 and 41 percent for t h ^ last two years respectively. The other g r a d u a t i n g senior who saw his final basketball action is Willie Rink, the Dutch All-MIAA baseball hurler. Though his action as a f r e s h m a n was limited, Willie has come to be the leading Dutch playmaker. F r o m his g u a r d position he dropped in 208 points this season f o r a double figured a v e r a g e of 10.4.

A d r i a n ' s victory over Hope gave the Bulldogs a 12-2 MIAA record, tying them with Calvin f o r the conference championship and creating a playoff situation. Adrian went on to d e f e a t Calvin 76-67 in a contest which under the MIAA rules had no bearing on the championship, though Adrian, because of the victory, picked up the first place points toward the All-Sports t r o p h y . Representing the MIAA conference, the Bulldogs d e f e a t e d Detroit Tech in the s t a t e NAIA playoffs, allowing Adrian to r e p r e s e n t Michigan in the N A I A t o u r n a m e n t . Monday night, however, Adrian was eliminated f r o m the t o u r n a m e n t by Texas Southern, 102-83.

By Dave Spaan

With basketball over and Spring just around the corner, the coaches are p r e p a r i n g this y e a r ' s contendThe Adrian College Bulldogs ers in baseball, tennis, golf, and walloped Hope's cagers, 98-78, track. throwing Adrian into a tie f o r the The coming season will see two MIAA championship along with changes in the coaching staff at Calvin and setting the Dutch down Hope. J o h n Visser, who last y e a r to f o u r t h place in the final standcoached t h e golf team, will handle ings with a conference record of the baseball t e a m ; while Mr. Albert 8-6. Hitting the basket on 46 perTimmer, r e t u r n i n g a f t e r a few cent of their shots, the Bulldogs years' respite f r o m t h e coaching dominated the entire contest. staff, will direct the golf squad. Adrian jumped out to an 11 point Returning to the court and cinder lead before Hope countered. Open- reins respectively will be Ken ing the lead to 15 points, the Bull- Weller and L a r r y Green. dogs kept the m a r g i n most of the first half. In the final five minutes of the half the Dutch t h r e w on a man-to-man defense which sliced t h e lead to 11 points, Hope trailing 49-38 at h a l f t i m e . Despite the f a c t A combination of a Cosmos loss t h a t Adrian was unable to crack Hope's zone defense, their accuracy in the " B " League and the F r a t e r f r o m outcourt was sufficient to d e f e a t of t h e Cosmos in the " A " League gave the F r a t e r s and the maintain the lead. Cosmos identical totals of won and Continuing to hit f r o m the floor in the second half, Adrian built the lost f o r the co-championship of lead to a 20 point spread. The i n t e r f r a t e r n i t y basketball. Dutch were particularly hampered In the " A " League, the F r a t e r s by personal fouls as most of the grabbed t h e championship on the r e g u l a r s missed a good deal of the s t r e n g t h of a 9-1 record, while in contest through this route. Coach the U B " League, the Independents Visser then being forced to call on walked off with the honors with a his reserves f o r about half the 7-3 record. contest. Adrian maintained their T h o u g h t h e overall co-championsubstantial lead, going on to win ship will remain as such, a meetby a 98-78 m a r g i n . ing of the f r a t e r n i t y athletic comm i t t e e will decide w h e t h e r a playoff shall be held. The customary procedure h a s been f o r the " A " QUICK SERVICE League champ to meet the " B " L e a g u e champ f o r a mythical OLD NEWS PRINTERV 74 W . 8ih St. P h o n e 2020 championship.

Fraters Tie Cosmos For Championship

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O 1953, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY

Coach Visser has already issued his call f o r baseball candidates and the team will officially begin practice on Monday, March 14. Visser's biggest problem this y e a r will be the lack of depth, especially in the pitching staff. T h e r e is also a l a r g e g a p to be filled at first base due to the g r a d u a t i o n of Don Lubbers. With seven lettermen r e t u r n i n g f r o m last y e a r ' s championship team, Hope should be as good, if not better this year. Although the pitching staff is lacking in depth, the hurling of All-MIAA pitcher Willie Rink, always a dependable p e r f o r m e r , should keep the Dutch on top. S t r e n g t h at the plate should remain constant with the r e t u r n of captain Don York and Dick Ortquist, both h i t t i n g over 300 last year. Hope will open its baseball season in Holland on April 15 a g a i n s t F e r r i s Institute of Big Rapids. This year's tennis team, under the direction of Ken Weller, seems to be s t r o n g e r and should be able to b e t t e r last year's third place record. Although Kalamazoo is favored to retain the title, a spirited and talented Hope a g g r e g a t i o n should not be counted out of the picture too soon. The addition of J o h n Jeltes, l a s t year's high school singles champ, and Ron Sisson, another talented frosh, should bolster the team considerably. A n o t h e r f r e s h m e n . T i g e r Teusink, should add to the doubles s t r e n g t h . An improved crop of letter winners include K. Van Wieren, W. Coventry, A. Bieri, J . Schrier, G. DePree, and J. W a r r e n . Mr. T i m m e r should find a promising group of golfers awaiting him. R e t u r n i n g f r o m last y e a r ' s squad to f o r m a nucleus f o r this season will be Hutton, Holt, and Hondorp. Also r e t u r n i n g will be a n o t h e r letter winner. Bill K r a m e r , who, a f t e r spending some time in the service, is ready to take his place as one of Hope's leading golfers. Leading the f r e s h m e n candidates will be Ray DeDoes, an accomplished t o u r n a m e n t g o l f e r f r o m Kalamazoo who should help the team considerably. The track t e a m , under Mr. L a r r y Green, will officially open practice on Monday, March 7. Green's response to his call f o r candidates revealed t h a t there will be much new blood added to the team this y e a r ; and if these f r e s h m e n and new men live up to their potential, Hope could annex its third MIAA track title in f o u r years. R e t u r n i n g lettermen include MIAA champions Don York, javelin; John DeVries, broad j u m p and pole v a u l t ; and Bob Hendrickson, shot put. Other first line r e t u r n e r s include Tom Carey, dashes; Dave Hondorp, 880; Don Brookstra, hurdles; and Ron Den Uyl, distances. They should be strengthened considerably in the hurdles by t h e addition of Paul Wiegerink, J i m Hilmert, and Ev Nienhouse, all o u t s t a n d i n g perf o r m e r s in last year's s t a t e meets. Jim Cooper, a n o t h e r b e t t e r t h a n a v e r a g e hurdler, proved this fall t h a t he could go over distance and will probably team with Hondorp in the 880. Hope a p p e a r s to be s t r o n g in the pole vault also with the r e t u r n of Dave Kuyers, being a u g m e n t e d by Blaine T i m m e r and J o h n P a d g e t t , a r e t u r n i n g servicem a n who, it is rumored went over twelve f e e t . Dick Gantos will aid in t h e field events by t h r o w i n g the discus and John DeFouw, a good shot p u t t e r , will probably provide Hendrickson with some competition in t h a t event. The track t e a m opens its season with an a w a y meet a g a i n s t F e r r i s I n s t i t u t e a t Big Rapids on April 27.


03-11-1955