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M a r c h 2005 blueberry

Hope College

Holland, Michigan

A student-run n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n

Serving the Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 117 years

Model United Nations conference begins b a t e s t h r o u g h o u t the day. T h e students h a v e T h i s T h u r s d a y and Friday, m o r e than 9 0 0 students f r o m 4 0 high s c h o o l s w i l l b e o n c a m p u s a s part of the 33

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M o d e l United Nations c o n f e r e n c e , sponsored by the political science department. Each of the students will be acting a s dele g a t e s to the n a t i o n s of the U N , w o r k i n g the 191 m e m b e r n a t i o n s in t w o G e n e r a l

b e e n w o r k i n g with a d v i s o r s for s o m e t i m e p r e p a r i n g for Ihe e v e n t a n d are i d e n t i f y i n g with the p o s i t i o n s of the countries they are representing. J u n i o r J a m e s G r a n d s t a f f f r o m University City, M o . , political s c i e n c e m a j o r , will s e r v e a s this y e a r ' s S e c r e t a r y G e n e r a l . D e p u t y Secretary G e n e r a l s will b e s e n i o r political s c i e n c e m a j o r s J o n a t h a n Hecksel ( ' 0 5 ) f r o m

A s s e m b l i e s , six S e c u r i t y C o u n c i l s , one

Flint and J a c o b Kain ( ' 0 5 ) f r o m Williamston.

International C o u r t of Justice, a n d one

H o p e C o l l e g e M o d e l U N is o r g a n i z e d by the political s c i e n c e s t u d e n t s w h o will serve

E c o n o m i c a n d Social C o u n c i l . T h e students will b e part of s i m u l a t e d e x e r c i s e s f o c u s i n g o n i s s u e s s u c h as A I D S , poverty, global w a r m i n g , and hum a n t r a f f i c k i n g . T h e p r o g r a m is d e -

as session c h a i r p e r s o n s . T h e director of the I n t r o d u c t o r y G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y will be J e n n i f e r S h u c k (*06). R a n d a l l O w e n ( ' 0 5 ) will direct the A d v a n c e d G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y , a n d

s i g n e d t o a l l o w s t u d e n t s t o search f o r

Scott N e c k e r s C 0 6 ) and M i k e D e Y o u n g (*06)

s o l u d o n s t o t o d a y ' s p r o b l e m s while act-

a r e the Security C o u n c i l directors. T i f f a n y West ( ' 0 7 ) will be the d i r e c t o r of the E c o -

ing as p r o f e s s i o n a l d i p l o m a t s . T h e E c o n o m i c and Social Council, Se-

n o m i c and Social C o u n c i l . T h e s t u d e n t s participating in the S e c u r i t y

VanderLaan ('06), A m y O ' C o n n e l l ( ' 0 7 ) , and David Nyitrav ('08). The General Assemblies s t u d e n t s are B r a d y Wilson ( ' 0 6 ) , B e n j a m i n Manting ('06), Erin Block ( ' 0 6 ) , S a r a h Jeltes ('06), Nicole Schrier ( ' 0 7 ) , Viktorija G r a u d i n s ('08), Brian Donnini ( ' 0 7 ) , Dan Van S t e d u m ( ' 0 7 ) , E l i z a b e t h Preston ( ' 0 6 ) , Kari C h a s e (*07), and Brandon Mcrsman ('06). The Economic and Social C o u n c i l includes Nathan Sayer ('08), Jennica Skoug ('06), D a n a M o e s ( ' 0 6 ) , Victoria B l a n t o n ( ' 0 7 ) , Blake V a n d e B u n t e ( ' 0 5 ) , and Katie M c K e e

Coldwater, C ol on, Covert, East Jackson, Fennville, Garden City, Geneva, Glenbrook North, Godwin Heights, Grand H a v e n , H . H . Dow, Msgr. H a c k e t t

C o u n c i l s e s s i o n s are L a u r e n M a r c h ( ' 0 8 ) ,

C06). T h e International C o u r t of Justice is c o m -

f o r the o p e n i n g b a n q u e t , led b y k e y n o t e

J a m e s Hile ('06), Krissy Anderson ('06),

p o s e d of Laura Stark ( ' 0 7 ) , A m y Ter H a a r

s p e a k e r S e n a t o r W a y n e K u i p e r s , repre-

N i c k E n g e l C 0 8 ) , Ben C r u m p l e r ( ' 0 7 ) , Alisa S w e n s o n ( ' 0 5 ) , M a t t B o o t e (*06), R o s i e

(*06), and L u c a s W o l f e ( ' 0 5 ) . Joel T o p p e n , assistant p r o f e s s o r of politi-

Rexford ('07), Agot Deng ('08),

Luna

c a l s c i e n c e , is t h e f a c u l t y a d v i s o r for the

S o u k p a t t a P h e t m i s y - T a t u m (*06), Elizabeth Scott ( ' 0 8 ) , K i m Van Sickle ( ' 0 7 ) , R a c h e l l e

Model UN. Participating s c h o o l s for this y e a r ' s pro-

R u a r k ( ' 0 6 ) , C h a r l i e K n o o h u i z e n ( ' 0 7 ) , Josh

g r a m are B l a c k R i v e r P u b l i c , B u r r O a k ,

ern Michigan Christian, Williamston,

B u r k h o u r ( ' 0 5 ) , Tisa T h o m p s o n ( ' 0 6 ) , T i m

B y r o n Center, C a l v i n Christian, C a n t e r b u r y ,

W i l l o w b r o o k , York, a n d Z e e l a n d .

curity C o u n c i l , a n d International C o u r t o f Justice will arrive o n T h u r s d a y night

01

sentative of the SO District. T h e m e m bers will then begin their s e s s i o n s foll o w i n g the b a n q u e t and carry o n t h r o u g h Friday. T h e G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y m e m b e r s will arrive F r i d a y m o r n i n g and hold their de-

C a t h o l i c C e n t r a l , H i n s d a l e 111. South, Holland, Holland Christian, Howell, Ithaca, J e n i s o n , K a l a m a z o o L o y norrix, Kelloggsville, Libertyville, Lowell, Mattawan, Midland, Morley Stanwood, Roeper, Saugatuck, South Haven, Vicksburg, W e s l e y a n Christian, West-

Arun Gandhi addresses issue of nonviolence w a s an o u t c a s t f r o m nearly every

Gandhi had already successfully

point of view, which is w h a t led h i m to subscribe to C h a r l e s Atlas b o d y -

led s e v e r a l e c o n o m i c a n d s o c i a l

M o h a n d a s K. G a n d h i will be visiting in spirit this w e e k t h r o u g h the

b u i l d i n g m a g a z i n e s for a m e a n s of

a d d r e s s of his g r a n d s o n A r u n G a n d h i . A r u n will present " N o n -

self d e f e n s e . W h e n his p a r e n t s learned of his r e a s o n i n g b e h i n d his s u d d e n inter-

r e f o r m s in India. In 1 9 9 1 , A r u n a n d h i s w i f e , S u n a n d a , b e g a n the M . K . G a n d h i

Haley.

est in p h y s i c a l exercise, they sent h i m t o India to visit with his g r a n d -

the institute is to p r o m o t e the non-

S p e a k e r Series. T h e S e r i e s is s p o n s o r e d b y Stu-

father, M o h a n d a s G a n d h i , w h o w a s l e a d i n g India in it's s t r u g g l e for in-

violent philosophy through out-

dent C o n g r e s s a n d is s u p p o r t e d by m a n y other o r g a n i z a t i o n s , i n c l u d -

d e p e n d e n c e . D u r i n g that 18 m o n t h

reach programs. G a n d h i has s p o k e n all o v e r the

slay, G a n d h i learned the philosophy of n o n v i o l e n c e a n d w i t n e s s e d the

world, including in Croatia, France, Holland, and Nicaragua, in addition

n o n v i o l e n t tactics first h a n d .

to h u n d r e d s of c o l l e g e s a n d univer-

In 1 9 8 8 , G a n d h i c a m e t o t h e United Stales to finish research on

sities. H e is a n i n l e m a l i o n a l l y ac-

O f f i c e of the D e a n of Students. G a n d h i g r e w u p in S o u t h A f r i c a d u r i n g a t i m e of a p a r t h e i d a s a b o y of Indian h e r i t a g e in c o n f l i c t with both the blacks a n d the whites. He

ney Robert F. K e n n e d y Jr., M a y a Angelou, Ben Stein, and Alex are w e l c o m e to attend.

this T h u r s d a y at 7 p.m. in D i m n e n t C h a p e l a s a p a r t of t h e S t u d e n t

ing the P r e s i d e n t ' s O f f i c e and the

m a n y other g u e s t s , including attor-

Institute for N o n v i o l e n c e , run o u t of Christian B r o t h e r s U n i v e r s i t y in M e m p h i s , T e n n e s s e e . T h e goal of

violent R e s p o n s e s to Terrorism"

T h r o u g h the years, the Student Speaker Series has introduced

a c o m p a r a t i v e study of r a c i s m in

claimed speaker and can oifcr many n e w insights d u e to his first-hand

A m e r i c a . A t this point in his life.

experiences.

A d m i s s i o n is f r e e and all

Arts and Humanities Student Colloquium invites student work Campus

In a break wilh iradition. students t h e m s e l v e s aa- n o w invited to submit p a p e r s for presentation in this s e m e s t e r ' s A r t s and H u m a n i t i e s Student C o l l o q u i u m , s e h e d u l c d l o r April I I . P a p e r s w e r e f o r m e r l y s u b m i t t e d by s p o n s o r i n g faeulty. Hligible p a p e r s are those written d u r i n g the eurrent s e m e s t e r or Hall 2(M)4 for any e o u r s e in the Arts or H u m a n i t i e s divisions. F o u r e o p i e s . ineluding a u t h o r ' s n a m e and the n a m e of the e o u r s e and p r o f e s s o r for w h o m the p a p e r w a s originally written, should be submitted the E n g l i s h D e p a r t m e n t oil ice. L u b b e r s 3 2 1 . b y M a r c h 15. F o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n , c o n t a c t P r o f e s s o r K a t h l e e n V e r d u i n ( v e r d u i n C f h o p e . e d u . x 7 6 0 9 ) . T h e Arts and H u m a n i t i e s Student C o l l o q u i u m p e r m i t s s t u d e n t s t o present their work in a s e m i p r o f e s s i o n a l setting and is o f t e n an important m i l e s t o n e for the presenters. T h e best p a p e r will r e c e i v e a prize at the annual H o n o r s C o l l o q u i u m .

Inside A n c h o r 速 Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Dance 31

Phelps Scholars

International Students

NCAA Championship


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M a r c h 9, 2005

C A M P U S BEAT

Professor Cronkite named Teacher of the Year Amanda Zoratti C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

...

The Michigan Science Teachers Associa- he was named the co-recipient of the 1988 tion (MSTA) has named Donald Cronkile. H o p e O u t s t a n d i n g P r o f e s s o r E d u c a t o r professor of biology, ihe slate's 2005 "Col- Award. Professor Cronkite has also been invited lege Teacher of the Year." The MSTA was founded in 1953 and includes all levels of to present "The Role of the Zany in Teaching" as a demonstration of his imaginative educators. The goal of the association is to develop approach to teaching. In the past. Cronkite and advance science education state-wide. has had his students square dance to demonT h e awards ceremony took place last Friday strate the principle of cell-division. He has where the MSTA presented the honors at their also had his students design costumes exem52 ,,J annual conference at the Detroit Marriot plifying the distinctive features of the phyla. Cronkile holds a bachelor's and doctorate R e n a i s s a n c e Center, featuring the t h e m e degree in zoology from the University of "Science is Elemental." C r o n k i t e has also received recognition Indiana, but he is a specialist in genctics. He from several other associations, including the is most interested in teaching evolutionary " F o u r - Y e a r C o l l e g e B i o l o g y T e a c h i n g biology, science and human values, genetAward" f r o m the National Association of ics, cell biology, embryology, the history of Biology Teachers in 1995 and he was one of biology, and introductory biology. He has only 700 national faculty members to be rec- several publications, including "A Problemognized with a Sears-Roebuck Foundation Based Guide to Basic Genetics." which is Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership currently on its fourth volume. Cronkite has been a science curriculum Award in 1991. In addition to these honors.

consultant for 21 different colleges and has been involved with upgrading science programs at many high schools. He has directed outreach programs, including a ninth/ 10,h grade research club, a seventh/eight grade science demonstrators program, and a sixth/seventh science recreation program, funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In addition to these activities. Cronkite was the academic director of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation National Leadership Institutes for High S c h o o l B i o l o g y T e a c h e r s f r o m 1991 through 1997. He has held visiting research a p p o i n t m e n t s nationwide, including the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Maryland, the California-Santa Barbara, and the T o h o k u University in Sendai. Japan. He was formerly a professor at the University of Redlands in California.

Dance Marathon date arrives Student efforts come to fruition this Friday and Saturday at final event A m a n d a Zoratti C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

ter for young children and provides medical care that is not typically available at community hospitals. More than 7.300 admissions and 136,000 outpatient visits contribute

counties. The Children's Miracle Network is a non-profit international organization that seeks to help raise f u n d s and a w a r e n e s s f o r 170 children's hospitals across North America. Fourteen million diseased or injured children arc treated each year. "I t h i n k i t ' s a very w o r t h w h i l e project, raising money for the kids," said James Williams ('08). who will be a part of the lip-sync program. T h i s y e a r ' s total will be a n nounced at the end of the marathon. The moment will be celebrated by testimonies of the family's stories, a lip-sync contest, and various student and local group performances. All are welcome to observe the festivities. For more information, visit htlp://www.hope.edu/sludcnt/development/marathon/

Beginninsrthis Friday at 7 p.m., the Dance Marathon fundraiser will hold it's 24 hpurdance-a-thon in the Dow Center. T h e event is cond u c t e d o n b e h a l f of D e V o s Children's Hospital in downtown Grand Rapids to build awareness of the hospital and to raise funds for the efforts. Thus far. more than 400 students and 20 student organizations have c o n t r i b u t e d to the f u n d r a i s e r ' s to the 144.000 visits the hospital atcause. The work began during the fall semester and continues right up tends to annually. Last year alone, the hospital served children from 42 to the very nighi of the event. Stus t a t e s and nearly 80 M i c h i g a n dents w h o are interested in dancing or m o r a l i n g still have the opportunity to sign up before Friday. Throughout the event, i n d i v i d u a l s and local companies have contributed to the event's success. Each Tuesday, Papa J o h n ' s pizza donates a portion of their p r o c e e d s to s t u d e n t s w h o say " I t ' s f o r the A H C H O f f PHOTO COURTESY SCOTT HINZE kids" while ordering. Last year, Dance Marathon On Saturday, March 5, raised over $88,000 for the Cold S t o n e C r e a m e r y children of DeVos Hospital. d o n a t i n g a p o r t i o n of their sales to the effort, and students have sought donations with their cans in hand. Dance Marathon is one of more Amanda Zoratti than 70 similar efforts nation wide. CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR T h e college has continually exc e e d e d o t h e r ' s e x p e c t a t i o n s ; In t h e i r first y e a r , t h e e s t i m a t e d amount of funds was $5,000. The students blew this amount away with a grand total of more than $23,000 and the numbers have been growing ever since. Since 2000, Dance Marathon has contributed more than $266,000 and has been recognized with the "Youth in Philanthropy Award" f r o m the West Michigan Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2003. DeVos Children's hospital is the only western Michigan hospital designed to provide comprehensive President Bultman will serve care to children. It is also the only three-year term representing Children's Miracle Network hospimid-western colleges. tal on the western side of the state. The hospital acts as a referral cen-

I think it's a very worthwhile project, raising money for the kids. —James Williams, ('08)

Dance Marathon Totals

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2005

NAICU elects President Bnltman The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) has been elected President Bultman to be a new member of their program. The election took place in February during the N A I C U ' s annual meeting in Washington D.C. The election grants him a three-year term during which he will represent all private colleges located in Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Michi-

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gan. Bultman has been a part of Hope since 1959, w h e n h e b e c a m e a s t u d e n t here. Bultman is the 1 l lh President of Hope College, having assumed his position in 1999. Prior to this, Bultman was a member of the education faculty. From 1976 to 1982, he chaired the department, and from 1982 until 1985 he acted as dean for the social sciences. In addition to his work in the classroom, Bultman also coached baseball and was the assistant coach for the football team. After leaching here, he moved to Northwest-

e m College in Orange City, Iowa to serve as their president before arriving at his current position. Bultman is a member of the Holland Rotary Club and the Holland Area Chamber of Commerce. He also serves on die Board of Directors at the Back of Holland and is a member of the College Sports Project, a group of select liberal arts colleges funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to keep athletics in perspective at Division III schools. The N A I C U has represented private schools on policy issues since 1976. It reflects the diversity of these nonprofit schools nationwide through it's 1.000 members and through it's school choices, including traditional liberal arts colleges, c h u r c h - and faith-related institutions, major research universities, women's colleges, two-year colleges, and historically black colleges.


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ARTS

M a r c h 9, 2005

Loh, Eire bring historical perspectives to VWS Fiction and Non-Fiction novelists share Knickerbocker Stage Evelyn Daniel SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Students w h o feci o v e r w o r k e d should stop their complaining and pick up a b o o k — a s long as it is Breaking the Tongue by Vyvyane Loh. A medical doctor, dance choreographer, and first-lime n o v e l i s t , Loh is the u n d i s p u t e d "queen of busy." B o m in Malaysia and raised in Singapore by Chinese parents, she moved to the United States in 1986. After graduating from Boston University, she went on to attend medical school, but g r e w restless and decided to travel the world as an air courier while completing her degree. While working in a hospital in

Brazil, Loh picked up yet another n e w h o b b y . In h e r f r e e l i m e , b e t w e e n medical school and her residency, she studied both AfroBrazilian dance and d r u m m i n g . Later, despile a private practice in medicine. Loh decided to pursue another degree: a Master of Fine Arts. Writing had c o m e back into her life. A l t h o u g h she f r e q u e n t l y w a s forced to write in bits and pieces while working the night shift ai the hospital or juggling as many as four part-lime jobs, Loh was eventually able to pull together a full-length novel. Breaking ihe Tongue, published in March 2004, is a c o m i n g - o f - a g e story set in Singapore during the World War II era. Following the life of Claude Lim, a high school student educated to c o n f o r m to a British lifestyle, the novel explores class distinctions and d i s c r i m i n a t i o n d u r i n g a t i m e of political chaos.

" L o h is an M D , a p r o m i n e n t dancer, and also a novelist— students need to stop saying they arc b u s y , " said H e a t h e r Sellers, professor of English at Hope. Sharing the stage with Loh will be Cuban writer Carlos Eire, author of Wailing for S n o w in Havana and 2003 recipient of the National Book Award for nonfiction. At age I I , Eire and his brother were a m o n g the 14,000 children a i r l i f t e d u n a c c o m p a n i e d o u t of C u b a shortly after the rise of Fidel Castro. H i s m e m o i r e x p l o r e s both the magical, happy m e m o r i e s of C u b a in his c h i l d h o o d and the abrupt, tragic destruction of the country when Castro c a m e to power. Eire d o e s nol hesitate to voice his strong anti-Castro sentiment, recalling events like d i s a p p e a r a n c e s , the g o v e r n m e n t shutdown of his Catholic school, and the broadcasting of executions on television during the revolution.

Although Eire originally p u b l i c i z e d his work as a novel, publishers rejecled this idea when they discovered that the book w a s nol actually fiction. Waiting f o r S n o w in H a v a n a is a m a j o r d e p a r t u r e f r o m E i r e ' s analytical w r i t i n g style as a historian and professor at Yale. T h e V W S staff sees the presence of such b i g - n a m e a u t h o r s on H o p e ' s c a m p u s as another w a y to put the collcge on the map. "Carlos Eire is o n e of the top w r i t e r s in t h e c o u n t r y . H e ' s a m a z i n g , hilarious, brilliant, and fabulous," Sellers said. "We are so incredibly lucky to have him here." V y v y a n e Loh and C a r l o s Eire, will read at 7:00 p.m. on March 15 at the Knickerbocker Theatre. " T h e r e a d i n g s are such an i m p o r t a n t p a r t of a c o l l e g e e d u c a t i o n , and they are f r e e — I e x p e c t t h i s o n e to be p a c k e d , " Sellers said. T h e public is inviled and admission to the reading is free.

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Sr Novelist Vyvyane Loh and Memoirist Carlos Eire.

Dance 31 concert prepares for surprises aplenty Inventive and entertaining display of ballet, tap, jaz and modern dance Lindsey Manthel SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Has it always been your d r e a m lo see an *08 Pull Coach dance the hula in a poinle ballci piece? Well then y o u ' r e in luck because you will see that and m a n y o t h e r s u r p r i s e s at the annual Dance 31 concert this weekend. The Dance Department will be presenting a diverse group of pieces at D a n c e 31. which runs Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. in the DeWitt main thcaler. "The diversity of the concert is staggering. T h e r e ' s straight laced classical ballel, tap. jazz, and modern. T h e r e really is something f o r e v e r y o n e , " said J a m e s Williams ( ? 0 8 ) w h o is part of A m a n d a S m i t h ' s original poinle ballel piece.

T h e annual concert is a teacher and guest c h o r e o g r a p h e d p r o d u c t i o n with s t u d e n t dancers w h o had to audition for each role. T h e audition process is selective, so what you w i l l s e e is t h e b e s t o f H o p e ' s d a n c e department. W h i l e p r o v i d i n g the a u d i e n c e with an entertaining e v e n i n g of v a r i o u s f o r m s of dance including tap, jazz, modern, and ballet, the concert also provides the performers with valuable experience. "Spending lime in the studio is worthwhile, b u t t h e o n l y w a y lo g a i n e x p e r i e n c e p e r f o r m i n g is to a c t u a l l y be o n s t a g e , " Williams said. The dancers, choreographers, and technicians have put hours of work inlo ihe performance to make il the a m a z i n g show thai it is. " W e ' v e been rehearsing for about a month and a half, two or three days a week. It's been a lot of hard work, but il will be well worth it in the end," said Carrie Brandis ('08), w h o is in Rosanne Barton-DeVries piece " B l u e s

on Tap." Dance 31 includes pieces by dance faculty members Linda G r a h a m , Rosanne BartonD e V r i e s , Amanda Smith. S t e v e n l a n n a c o n e , and Ray Tadio. Guest choreographers are A l i c i a D i a z and Matthew Thornton. Tickets may be purchased at the A / J C H O f f P H O T O BY L I N D S E Y M A N T H E I box office Dance 31 performers practice the ballet piece "Trace Monday-Friday the Feathered Way." This piece explores the world of 10 a . m . - 5 p . m . birds through the washed eyes of humanity. and until curtain will be held in the DeWitt Theatre, which is on Friday and Saturday. Adull tickets arc $7 located inside the DeWitt Student Center. and student tickets are S5. T h e performance

Orchid Ensemble is sweet to the ear Ensemble combines traditional and modern Chinese music to form a unique style

C h i n a during the Tang Dynasty ( A D 598906). T h e strings are tuned lo a fifth, and are played via a b o w placed between them. Its popularity has spread in recent years, and the erhu has n o w b e c o m e a principle instrument in both instrumental and operatic

Nicholas Engel

music. T u n g s t u d i e d at the C h i n e s e C u l t u r a l University in Taiwan. " T h e a p p r o a c h [at the U n i v e r s i t y ) w a s m u c h the same as il is in the western classical t r a d i t i o n . . . . T h e f o c u s w a s very m u c h on technique and on written compositions. S o when my family moved to Canada in 1994, a n d 1 started m e e t i n g p e o p l e here that I wanted to play with and w h o had a j a z z o r w o r l d - m u s i c b a c k g r o u n d , it w a s hard at first." said T u n g "I fell very insecure having to give expression lo what I fell myself, rather than interpreting s o m e o n e else's m u si c . " A f t e r Lan T u n g ' s m o v e to C a n a d a , she i m m e d i a t e l y started p l a y i n g in C a n a d i a n c l u b s a n d c a f e s . S h e u s e d that time to experiment with improvisatory musical s t y l e s , p r i m a r i l y G y p s y a n d C e l t i c , in a d d i t i o n to h e r t r a i n i n g in the c l a s s i c a l

SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

T h e O r c h i d E n s e m b l e is p e r f o r m i n g tonight at 7:30 in the Knickerbocker Theatre. T h e E n s e m b l e is comprised of a trio of m u s i c i a n s : Lan T u n g , the f o u n d e r of the group; Mei Han, a product of the Cultural Revolution in China; and Jonathan Bernard, a percussionist with an extensive c o m m a n d of a r a n g e of percussive instruments and experience in multiple Canadian Symphony Orchestras. Lan T u n g w a s b o m in Taiwan, and began training in the erhu at age ten. 4, I w a s fortunate enough to be attending school when they w e r e looking for students my age to form a C h i n e s e orchestra. T h e orchestra and my father picked out the erhu for me," Lan T u n g said. T h e erhu is a two-string stick fiddle that is played from a resting position on the lap. The M o n g o l i a n s introduced the i n s t r u m e n t to

Chinese repertoire. One of the members is Mei Han, who plays

the zheng, a 21-siring zither with movable bridges. Like Tung, Han started playing from the age of 10. At 16, after graduating from high school, she joined a music ensemble in Northeast China. " M o s t Chinese, after they graduated f r o m high school, had to go to the country to help with farming. Playing the zheng gave me an opportunity to escape that," said Han. Later, she continued her education at X i ' a n Conservatory and studied with a professor w h o taught by Chinese oral tradition. Later, she transferred lo Beijing lo play with the Z h a n You E n s e m b l e , a r g u a b l y the m o s t prestigious ensemble in China. H a n a l s o s t u d i e d at t h e C h i n a A r t s Academy in Beijing. There, she had a chance to tour isolated mountain villages and learn their music. ' T h i s g a v e me a chance to open my e y e s and ears to the music that is nol k n o w n by the majority of Chinese. I had lots of chances lo contact really poor but pure and warmhearted people. That opened my heart," Han said. H a n i m m i g r a t e d in 1 9 9 6 to s t u d y e t h n o m u s i c o l o g y with an emphasis on Chinese music at the University of British

Columbia.

She is n o w part of Ihe Orchid

Ensemble. Jonathan Bernard is the third member of the ensemble. Unlike the other members, Bernard was b o m American. "While I ' m being introduced to their [Lan and Mei's) culture I gel to introduce th e m to the beauty of this country. That's part of the louring e x p e r i e n c e — lo see the areas w e go lo, the people, the sights and culture. It's very special to be involved in this exchange where I am learning about a whole other tradition w i t h c o l o u r s t h a t s t r e n g t h e n my o w n i n v o l v e m e n t in o t h e r s t y l e s o f m u s i c making," Bernard said. Jonathan Bernard plays the marimba and gamelan instruments in addition to typical p e r c u s s i o n i n s t r u m e n t s . He regularly p e r f o r m s with ihe E n s e m b l e S y m p o s i u m , Vancouver New Music, Four Gallon Drum, E n s e m b l e S y m p o s i u m , and several o r c h e s t r a s i n c l u d i n g the V a n c o u v e r a n d Victoria Orchestras. T h e p e r f o r m a n c e w i l l b e h e l d at the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t r e at 7 : 3 0 t o n i g h t . Tickets are available for $5 both at the door and at the DeWitt student center desk. The Knickerbocker is located on 8th street.


%\nchor

FEATURES

M a r c h 9, 2005

Phelps Scholar misconceptions: When cultural diversity represents more than a single cafeteria table SPOTLIGHT Scholars are White. Add in the n o n - P h e l p s S c h o l a r s Charles W. w h o live in Scotl, and about Green GUEST WRITERS two-thirds of the people in the building are W h i t e The Phelps Americans. Scholars Pro2. "Only some g r a m at H o p e C o l l e g e is f o r Charles W. Green, people h a v e a c h a n c e t o be P h e l p s S c h o l a r s . " Not f i r s t - y e a r s t u - Phelps Scholars true. E v e r y o n e w h o is acd e n t s interested Program Director cepted to Hope gels a broin learning about c h u r e and an application. race and culture. We take any and all. Established in 1999, b e t w e e n 5 0 3. " M o s t s t u d e n t s of c o l o r and 6 0 s t u d e n t s participate each year. In the Fall, Phelps Scholars a t H o p e a r e in Scott H a l l . " O n l y a minority of H o p e ' s students of lake F Y S together; in the Spring, color opt to be P h e l p s S c h o l a r s . they enroll in Encounter with CulF u r t h e r m o r e , b e c a u s e nearly all tures. We have meetings twice a month and lake optional field trips Scott residents are f i r s t - y e a r stud e n t s , u p p e r - l e v e l m i n o r i t y stuto places like the World Music Fesd e n t s live e l s e w h e r e o n c a m p u s . tival in C h i c a g o and the Islamic Center of America near Detroit. In T h e percentage of students of color w h o live in Scoil in any given year a d d i t i o n , d u r i n g their first year, Phelps Scholars live in Scotl Hall, is surprisingly small. along with other students w h o are placed ihere, loo. Bringing together a g r o u p of students to study race and culture is no controversial proposition. Having them live together, however, is something not everyone understands. W h y put these students in the same residence hall? Shouldn't they be spread around so they can educate others? And w h y do they sit together in the cafeteria? Are ihey trying to isolate t h e m s e l v e s f r o m the rest of c a m p u s ? T h e s e are sincere questions that deserve sincere answers. T h e residential component of our program is very important, and I will speak to that next w e e k . First, however, there are some common misperceplions to be addressed, and that will be ihe focus of this article. M i s p e r c e p l i o n s of the P h e l p s Scholars Program and Scott Hall 1. " M o s t Scott Hall resid e n t s a r e s t u d e n t s of c o l o r . " Actually, a liltle over half of all Phelps

" T h e P h e l p s S c h o l a r Program promotes cultural und e r s t a n d i n g b e t w e e n peoples, nations, and friends d o w n t h e hall."

Scholars are more involved on campus than other first-year sludenls. Phelps Scholars are part of athletic teams, c a m p u s clubs, academic organizations, and every other aspect of Hope College life. There is a strong sense of community in Scott Hall, but not at the expense of making friends with others across c a m -

Scott. 6. " S t u d e n t s of c o l o r s h o u l d be d i s t r i b u t e d a c r o s s c a m p u s , n o t c o n c e n t r a t e d in S c o t t H a l l , so t h a t t h e y will h a v e a g r e a t e r i m p a c t . " Set aside for a pus. minute the fact that students of 5. "Phelps Scholars spend color. like everyone else, are here all of t h e i r t i m e t o g e t h e r , s e p a r a t to get an education, not to "have i n g t h e m s e l v e s f r o m t h e rest of an impact." If you took all of the c a m p u s . " I believe that this miss t u d e n t s of c o l o r in Scotl a n d conception stems from the fact that spread them across the other halls, there is a "Scotl Hall table" (sevthey w o u l d m a k e no noticeable eral tables, actually) in Phelps C a f difference. T h e r e aren't enough eteria. A lot of Scott residents sit of them. Furthermore, spreading together at supper. And because students of color across ihe camthey are more ethnically diverse, p u s used to be the college policy. they are more visible than other soIt d i d n ' t work. T h e attrition rate cial g r o u p s lhal eat together (ina m o n g sludenls of color was very c l u d i n g g r o u p s f r o m o t h e r resihigh, primarily because they d e n c e halls). Not all of ihe Scolt lacked any real connection with r e s i d e n t s eat the college. The isolation reported together, bul by m a n y — n o t all, bul m a n y — w a s it's h a r d e r to d e e p and painful. Here's one c o m notice the ment f r o m a current student: "Last Scotl Hallers year, I w a s the only student of w h o are not at color in my wing, and sometimes the Scott Hall I felt very out of place and lonely, t a b l e t h a n to even though other students of color notice the ones were only a short distance away." w h o are. FurWith the Phelps Scholars Program, t h e r m o r e , not students of all backgrounds h a v e all of those at the option to live in a more diverse the Scotl Hall e n v i r o n m e n t d u r i n g that critical table are resifirst year. And the retention rate is d e n t s of Scott, Phelps scholars pose together in front of m u c h b e t t e r as a result. P h e l p s the Chicago skyline, re-emphasizing that but, again, Scholars, regardless of racial o r eththe Phelps Scholars Program will help that's not easy prepare students to succeed and to nic background, have a four-year to tell just by thrive in a world that is filled with people g r a d u a t i o n rale a b o u t o n e - t h i r d looking. In from many different backgrounds who higher than the c a m p u s as a whole. addition, hold many different views. Because there are more students of while it's plain color in Scotl Hall their first year, to see that there are more sludenls of color in many Scott Voorhees, C o o k , Phelps, and other H a l l e r s eat s u p p e r t o g e t h e r , it's 4. "Phelps Scholars are not halls f o r t h r e e m o r e y e a r s a f t e r more difficult to notice that after i n v o l v e d in o t h e r a c t i v i t i e s o n t h a t — s p r e a d a c r o s s c a m p u s and supper, they go their separate ways. c a m p u s . " Actually, our surveys of having an impact. All students tend to eat with those first-year students show that Phelps

"Scott Hall becomes your new home before you haue time to miss your old one."

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g e y i a i v i e l y care' a h o u t u f ra * i t u d e n t y . "

7. " S t u d e n t s of c o l o r a t H o p e d o n ' t w a n t to g e t o u t of t h e i r c o m f o r t z o n e s . " N o w think about lhal. H o p e College is 9 4 % While, and it's the students of color w h o d o n ' t want to leave their comfort zone?

they k n o w best and especially enj o y being around, but that doesn't mean that they are always together. It's the same for those w h o live in

" I c a m e to Hope f r o m a n Hfrlcan-Hmerican enulronm e n t . b u t n o t e u e r y o n e I luill m e e t in l i f e is g o i n g to be B l a c k . PSP has g l u e n m e a glimpse of t h e r e a l uiorld a n d t h e skills to d e a l u i i t h l u h a t euer cultural barriers might arise.n

The first Hope President, Philip Phelps gave students the opportunity to meet a wide variety of different people by diversifying the student body in significant ways. His commitment and name lives on in the Phelps Scholars of today.

S l u d e n l s of c o l o r s p e n d their days in class, in rehearsal, in the lab, in all the places students go. T h e y are s u r r o u n d e d by W h i t e p e o p l e nearly all the time. They knew it w o u l d be t h a t w a y b e f o r e i h e y came. It's what they signed up for. Bul if they spend some of their free time with other sludenls of color, or, in s o m e cases, with their While friends from Scolt Hall, is it really a matter of segregating themselves from everyone else? This assertion slems f r o m an unrealistic expectation that in a virtually a l l - W h i l e e n v i r o n m e n t no p e o p l e of c o l o r ever will opt to spend some of their free time together.

"Bems a P W p s Scholar will help

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Inquiring Minds presents: A discussion of Arun Gandhi's "Nonviolent Responses to Terrorism" ...meets immediately in the Kletz after the speech on Thursday


^Anchor

FEATURES

M a r c h 9, 2005

Being an Outsider... What's it like to be an international student at Hope? INFOCUS Erin L'Hotta INFOCUS EDITOR

"You can't make a difference on this camp u s . " T h i s is what Sayaka Nakaisuji ( ' 0 6 ) remembered her Liberation Theology class telling her. Nakaisuji. a student f r o m Japan, enrolled in L i b e r a t i o n T h e o l o g y l a s t s e m e s t e r . Nakaisuji w a s o n e of t w o minority students enrolled in this class w h i c h focused on viewing liberation through tradition and changing cultures. Conversation in class frequently caused Nakaisuji to be a representative for all minorities on campus. S h e later dropped the course d u e to prejudiced remarks she received as a minority student. ' i t hurl to hear people in class say nonaccepting c o m m e n t s towards any minority group, even if it wasn't specifically about me. One day a student in class said ' W h y do w e want M u s l i m s on c a m p u s ? ' and ihis really upset me," Nakaisuji said. "Even though 1 am a Christian, it affected m e personally bec a u s e 1 h a v e f r i e n d s o n c a m p u s w h o are Muslim." Nixon Omollo ('06). a student f r o m Kenya, agreed that Hope students have had hurtful c o m m e n t s and questions about his culture. Sometimes, he said, they don't even realize they are doing it. " W h e n people hear I ' m from Kenya, they sometimes say, 4 So. y o u ' r e on track,' or they ask, ' W h y aren't you a star runner?' Since

m a n y people f r o m Kenya do track, people make generalizations about my country and about what I d o , " O m o l l o said. "The o n e thing that 1 d o n ' t like about Hope is that sometimes people arc ignorant about Africa." D i v y a G a n t a ( ' 0 5 ) , a student originally f r o m India, agreed that students make generalizations about her because s h e ' s Indian. " W h e n I first c a m e to Hope, I w a s the 'token Indian.' People looked to me to represent India and asked lots of questions. I loved this most of the time. However, sometimes I fell like people expected loo m u c h of me, and it w a s overwhelming. It's as if I ' m the a m b a s s a d o r of India."

Struggles at Hope Ganta added that s h e ' s mostly enjoyed her attention as an international student and she personally hasn't experienced m a n y hardships living in a foreign environment. However, she mentioned, out of the 6 6 international students, she k n o w s many w h o struggle with living at Hope. Hope has international students f r o m Albania, Chile. Ethiopia, Israel, Nepal, Saudi Arabia, etc. Through these different cultural barriers. Ganta said, " m a n y times international students feel misunderstood. It's hard to communicate. It's hard to understand the culture, the innuendoes, the slang and the j o k e s . " Petya D o d o v a ('07), a student f r o m Bulgaria, agreed that it's hard to c o m m u n i c a t e with Hope students because they are different f r o m her.

I don't receive direct prejudice being African at Hope. Instead, they pretend they're OK with the difference. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tonzia Buor ('05)

O m o l l o mentioned that he also had a hard time c o m m u n i c a t i n g with H o p e s t u d e n t s when he first arrived on campus. "I didn't know h o w to talk to While people. So, I avoided it. But eventually. I adapted to the people," O m o l l o said. Tonzia Buor ( ' 0 5 ) , a student originally from Liberia, said that communicating between different languages, as well as different races is hard at Hope. " T h e r e definitely is a division b e t w e e n Blacks and Whites at Hope. If I ' m hanging out with o n e of my While friends, she usually doesn't k n o w what to do if a few of my Black friends approach us," Buor said. "I don't receive direct prejudice being African at Hope. Instead, they pretend t h e y ' r e OK with the difference, feel uncomfortable about it and then talk about me later."

Multicultural Visions for Hope Through listening to international students, the recurring theme seems to be that students

lack education about other cultures. Through D o d o v a ' s experience, she's found students have " f u n n y misconceptions about the world." Dodova, along with other international students, said that they hope to try and change these misconceptions by educating students on their culture. Buor said her wish for H o p e ' s c a m p u s is that students w o n ' t use where they live as an e x c u s e to not be open to other cultures. Omollo said he wants to "help students not fall into ignorance." He hopes to educate students on Africa and help them learn about the history and good achievements of his roots. Nakatsuji's dream for Hope is to d o what her Liberation Theology class said she can't. She hopes to make a difference on this campus. " M y wish is that everyone will be friends, real friends, with international students. This means sharing your opinions and listening to theirs, even if they may be different or hard to c o m m u n i c t e with. If this is done, I think H o p e ' s c a m p u s will change a little for the good," Nakatsuji said.

International students gathered in the Pine Grove last fall after taking part in a parade in which they marched carrying their natinal flags.

Students from Africa say no crucial need to educate on AIDS On Jan. 23 Bruce Wilkinson, founder of " D r e a m for Africa." asked Hope students to fill a 747 jet to Swaziland, Africa, to educate teenagers on abstinence in hope of stopping the spread of AIDS. Wilkinson stressed the dire need for the education of abstinence in Africa. Wilkinson made this point by saying: "Every 15 days the amount of people that died in the tsunami die in Atrica because of AIDS." Wilkinson also mentioned a story in which every person in an African church knew a close relative w h o was dying of AIDS. After telling these stories, over 200 students c o m m i t ted to do mission work this s u m m e r in Swaziland, Alrica in order to help end this cpidemic. H o w e v e r , a c c o r d i n g to A f r i c a n s t u d e n t s at H o p e , "people in Africa already are educated on abstinence and safe sex." Nixon Omollo ('06), f r o m Kenya, said that in his country, people are educated on A I D S awareness.

'In Kenya, people make a point to talk about AIDS. Rallies aboul AIDS are held in over 4 0 different dialects in Kenya to make sure everyone knows what to do, O m o l l o said. He added that he doesn't think there is anything wrong with Hope students educating on abstinence, but he said that in Kenya this information isn't a dire need. Tonzia Buor ('05), originally f r o m Liberia, said that she thinks it's a misconception that Africans don t know how to stop the spread of AIDS. " T h e r e are groups all over Africa working against AIDS, li is true that some aren't educated on abstinence. However, there are a fair amount of women in Alrica who have been raped. Educating a sexually assaulted woman about abstinence will only cause her more hurt and more blame," Buor said. Buor. like Omollo, wasn't opposed to Hope students educating on abstinence, but both didn't believe it w a s as crucial of a need as Wilkinson made it seem.


Vsjrichor

M a r c h 9, 2 0 0 5

OPINION T77TT

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Your voice

Your voice

Editor's voice n r

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Minding our manners It's the m i d d l e of ihe second semester. F o r many, m i d t e r m e x a m s h a v e j u s t e n d e d . W e ' r e all w o r n out. A n d on lop ol all that, it's still w i n t e r w e a t h e r outside. It's easy to be c r a n k y , t o

Dance Marathon more than just a fundraiser To the Editor, With Dance Marathon rapidly

think only of o u r s e l v e s and o u r i m m e d i a t e needs. H o w e v e r , this d o e s n o t g i v e us the right to b e inconsiderate to others, a s w e

a p p r o a c h i n g , ihe last m i n u t e plann i n g h a s r e a c h e d a feverish pilch.

o f t e n can b e d u r i n g these t i m e s . F o r e x a m p l e : A friend of m i n e w a s o n c e practically p l o w e d into

In the m i d s t of it all, budget plan-

a s n o w b a n k b y a g r o u p of p e o p l e all w a l k i n g next to e a c h o t h e r on the s i d e w a l k w h e n she w a s c o m i n g f r o m the o p p o s i t e direction, none of t h e m b o t h e r i n g to m o v e out of way. M y f r i e n d w a s o n c r u t c h e s at the time. I m y s e l f can recall several t i m e s w h e n I h a v e b e e n a l m o s t run o v e r b y a service v e h i c l e or public safely car w h i l e c r o s s i n g 12 ,h

students lo e x p e r i e n c e the i m p o r tance of philanthropy. A c a d e m i c k n o w l e d g e is incredibly important.

cantly less than that of several other

T h e p u r p o s e of the c o l l e g e institu-

series of great events for the c o m m u n i t y , if e v e r o u r e x p e n s e s ex-

tion, t h o u g h , is so m u c h m o r e e x pansive than mere book knowl-

n i n g for next year c o n t i n u e s . It is i n d e e d true that as a n o f f i c i a l student activity. D a n c e M a r a t h o n rec e i v e s f u n d i n g f r o m the S t u d e n t A c t i v i t i e s f e e . W i t h o u l t h i s , it

edge. If w e are not e n c o u r a g e d in a lifestyle of c o m m u n i t y i n v o l v e m e n t and r e s p o n s i b l e s t e w a r d s h i p , o u r c o l l e g e e x p e r i e n c e has failed us. In r e g a r d s t o b u d g e t c o m p a r i -

o r g a n i z a t i o n s (the Anchor inc l u d e d ) . W h i l e w e try to p r o v i d e a

c e e d e d o u r f u n d r a i s i n g , o u r effort w o u l d be an utter failure. M y w i s h is that H o p e C o l l e g e will lake a d v a n t a g e of this a m a z ing organization. Please join us this Friday-Saturday (7p.m.-7p.m.) lo

s o n s , t e n s i o n is h a r d t o a v o i d .

e n j o y it! We h a v e b e e n p l a n n i n g this d a y for a n entire y e a r ! I h o p e

T h e r e will a l w a y s b e a n a b u n d a n c e of o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d c a u s e s that

thai w e will all be a b l e to j o i n tog e t h e r a s a c a m p u s t o celebrate the student spirit that m a k e s H o p e C o l -

life of t h o u s a n d s of children, it is also intricately linked t o involving

need m o n e y , and a s h o r t a g e of f u n d s t o p r o v i d e it. T h e b u d g e t i n g d e c i s i o n s of the A p p r o p r i a t i o n s

o u r c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y in the p r o -

C o m m i t t e e are public, however.

p l a n n e d just for y o u . H e a r stories of true miracles and of h o w f a m i -

then h a v e t o c l i m b o v e r a pile o f s n o w b e c a u s e s o m e o n e p a r k e d

cess. As such. Dance Marathon d r a w s o n e of the largest participa-

A n d they should b e . A c c o u n t a b i l ity is essential w h e n w e are s p e n d -

right in f r o n t of the s i d e w a l k . F o r m e , this is s i m p l y a hassle, b u t

tion r a t e s of all c a m p u s o r g a n i z a -

ing student f u n d s . W i t h o u l b e i n g

p u s ' e f f o r t s . D e m a n d m o r e out of y o u r H o p e e x p e r i e n c e than class-

for t h o s e s t u d e n t s with disabilities, it just b e c o m e s e v e n more of a

tions. N o t only d o e s D a n c e M a r a -

f o r c e d t o rely on r u m o r s , s t u d e n t s

room learning and catch the passion

thon provide a 24-hour event packed with great entertainment

for living g e n e r o u s l y !

challenge. I h a v e a l s o h e a r d stories f r o m m a n y students a b o u t interactions

are f r e e t o see h o w the Student Ac-

with m e m b e r s of H o p e ' s staff that h a v e b e e n less than pleasant.

o p e n t o the entire c a m p u s , but it

tivities f u n d is a p p r o p r i a t e d . Although it s e e m s fairly irrelevant, the

M a y b e it's just me, but 1 w o u l d think that the registrar, h u m a n

a l s o p r o v i d e s a n o p p o r t u n i t y for

D a n c e M a r a t h o n b u d g e t is signifi-

w o u l d b e hard to p r o v i d e t w e n t y -

Street f r o m Kollen to DeWilt. It i s n ' t e v e n a real street and the

f o u r h o u r s of c o n s t a n t e n t e r t a i n ment! While Dance Marathon's

p e o p l e w h o d r i v e o n it c a n ' t b e r e s p e c t f u l of the s t u d e n t s w h o

Mission S t a l e m e n l is b a s e d on rais-

w a l k o n it? O n e of m y m a i n p r o b l e m s with v e h i c l e s on c a m p u s is with the places p e o p l e c h o o s e t o park. W i t h s o m a n y p a r k i n g regulations, I k n o w it c a n b e hard to f i n d a spot, b u t a s a full lime p e d e s t r i a n I find it a pain to h a v e t o d o d g e t h r o u g h a street lined with cars a n d

ing f u n d s t o i m p r o v e the q u a l i t y of

lege u n i q u e . E n j o y 24 h o u r s of fun

lies h a v e b e e n blessed by the c a m -

Megan Niergarth

('05)

r e s o u r c e s and b u s i n e s s o f f i c e s are meant to serve the students a n d h e l p m a k e their c o l l e g e e x p e r i e n c e a little less stressful. B u t instead, p e o p l e arc c o m i n g o u t of these places e v e n m o r e f r u s trated. M o r e than o n e p e r s o n has told m e they h a v e b e e n s o upset by the r u d e n e s s of the p e o p l e w h o w o r k in these o f f i c e s that they almost h a d t o l e a v e , c a l m t h e m s e l v e s d o w n a n d c o m e back later. W h e n 1 applied f o r the A n c h o r e d i t o r position last year, I received an e-mail telling m e to call the student d e v e l o p m e n t C o m e r of 8 t h & College

o f f i c e a n d m a k e an a p p o i n t m e n t f o r an interview. W h e n I did. the girl w h o a n s w e r e d the p h o n e w a s very impolite d u r i n g the entire c o n v e r s a t i o n a n d h u n g u p while 1 w a s still talking. At lirsl I thought w e had b e e n d i s c o n n e c t e d . S o I called back lo m a k e sure she h a d h e a r d the l i m e I told h e r t o m a k e the a p p o i n t m e n t and she acted like I w a s an idiot and a s k e d if 1 had s o m e sort of p r o b l e m . I c o u l d n ' t b e l i e v e that s o m e o n e w h o w a s that d i s c o u r t e o u s o n the p h o n e w o u l d actually be e m p l o y e d lo a n s w e r it. I k n o w o u r liv e s o u r busy. I k n o w we h a v e a lot to d o and think a b o u t . But this is n o e x c u s e not to be at least civil to e a c h other. We are all old e n o u g h lo k n o w h o w l o act by now.

Anchor Staff Maureen Yonovitz Amanda Zoratti Jordan Wolfson Erin L'Hotta Jenny Cencer Katie Burkhardt Kirsten Winek Rachel Dondistribution manager Garrison Dyer production assistant Sean Daenzer advisor Mark A. Lewison editor-in-chief campus beat editor arts editor infocus editor spotlight editor sports editor copy editors

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.Anchor

2005 spring semester, Issue #19 of 26

T h e A n c h o r reserves the right to r e f u s e publication of any letter s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s o v e r 5 0 0 w o r d s in l e n g t h will n o t b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n

V

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind WTHS), or e-mail Anchor@hope.edu


March 9, 2005

Classified THE ANCHOR WANTS YOU! Have y o u ever wanted to see your n a m e o n the front page of the paper? Here is your chance! C o m e to our meeting tonight at 8:30 p.m. in the Anchor office...It's in DeWitt behind the radio station and Student Union Desk. C o m e find out w h a t it takes to be part of a newspaper staff! I recall a difficult sea search that would mark the beautiful integrity of my travels Murray- I think you're cute. What are you doing this weekend? -your secret admirer

'Anchor

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE LISTEN TO 8 9 . 9 F M

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Fletcher-well, if you're going to take that attitude, I'm not letting y o u play with my laser pointer anymore. - the girl next door W a n t e d - S o m e o n e w h o specializes in ion sourcery and acceleration of particles for help in a top secret mission. May get dirty. Process my job! Safety R e p o r t s : S t u d e n t s ' Right t o K n o w - R e a l events h a p p e n i n g on YOUR c a m p u s Posted Thursday, March 3 Mcdical - A student cut himself on a paper cutter in the Dcpree Art Center, he was transported to Holland Medical Center for treatment. General Assist - A student w a s found intoxicated in a hallway in a resident hall.

Give 'til it heals.

$2.10

Posted Friday. March 4

Monday-Egg Sandwich Tuesday-Blueberry Pancakes Wednesday-Breakfast Taco Thursday-Two {Eggs, Hashbrowns, & Toast

Medical - A student fell in the stairwell at Scott Hall and injured her ankle. She was transported to the Holland Hospital by AMR for treatment. Miscellaneous - A Residential Life Coordinator requested assistance with some students that were having a disagreement.

- r r

T T

M a k i n g t h e w o r l d a b e t t e r place starts w i t h individuals w h o give their time, talents and dedication t o cultural understanding. C o n t a c t t h e Peace Corps t o d a y , a n d change your idea of w h a t " c h a n g i n g t h e w o r l d " is all a b o u t .

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Posted Monday, March 7 Alarm Activation - A smoke detector w a s activated at Brumlcr Apartments due to burnt food. Posted Tuesday. March 8 Property Check - T h e H u m a n R e s o u r c e s d o o r w a s f o u n d unlocked, the area was checked and the door secured. Property Check - The mail room door and the Public Relations door * was found unlocked in the Dewitt Center, both areas were checked and secured.

0

March 7-10 6:00-10:00 PM

Larceny - A student reported that she had some money stolen from her room.

Alarm Activation - A smoke detector in Voorhe^s Hall was activated due to dust. The detector was cleaned and replaced.

Breakfast at Night!!!

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Dutchmen skate to fourth at nationals and Jeff G u y C07) each scored twice for the T h e m e n ' s hockey learn finished fourth in ihe A C H A Division III l o u m a m e n l in Pillsburgh Ihis weekend, concluding iheir season with an overall record of 24-5-1. Hope, ranked firsl in ihe lournamenl. began a promising w e e k on Wednesday, defeating ihe University of Texas at Austin by a c o m m a n d i n g score of 9-4. T h e leam scored five goals in the first period and added t w o more in the second to put the game away. Jonathan Shaver ( ' 0 8 ) . Mike C h o v a z (*05),

Dutchmen. T h e second game of the l o u m a m e n l saw H o p e c o n t i n u e their s t r o n g play as they d o w n e d Wright State 3-2 in a thrilling overtime shootout. Peter Vollbrecht ( ' 0 7 ) and G e r o g e Dickinson ( ' 0 5 ) provided the scoring in regulation, but Wright Stale tied the g a m e with just over a minute to play. Both t e a m s w e r e scoreless d u r i n g ihe overtime period, forcing a shooloul lhal saw Vollbrecht and Kye Samuelson ( ' 0 6 ) score goals to se-

T h e team's hopes of a national c h a m p i o n ship c a m e to an end on Thursday, unfortunately, as the Dutch were beaten 6-4 by thirdseeded Florida Gulf Coast. T h e teams wenl back and forth for most of the game until Florida look the lead early in the third period and added an e m p t y net goal to assure victory. H o p e saw M i k e Banducci ( 0 7 ) score t w o goals in a valiant effort in spile of

cure the victory.

the loss. *il hurls because w e lost to a pretty good team," said Kye Samuelson ( ' 0 6 ) . " L o s in g lhal game got us d o w n because we k n o w how much the coach wanted to win. From that point on, we knew that w e didn't have a shot at the title and lhal hurl our mentality." Hoping to rebound from a lough loss and gain a third place finish, the Flying Dutchmen took on Penn State-Berks on Saturday. Both teams scored two goals in the firsl period. with Hope receiving contributions from both George Dickinson ( ' 0 5 ) and Jonathan

Shaver ('08). Outstanding defense took center stage in ihe second and third periods, and neither leam could break through with a goal. Despite an o u t s t a n d i n g 4 7 s a v e s f r o m H o p e ' s goalie Steve Pels ( ' 0 8 ) and an amazing effort by the leam. Penn S t a t e - B e r k s finally b r o k e through, scoring with 22 seconds left in the o v e r t i m e period. T h e Dutch finished the weekend with a record of 2-2 and a fourth place finish in the tournament. Colorado and Florida Golf finished first and second in the tournament, respectively. While ihe l o u m a m e n l was a disappointment, the team has made great strides, placing in the national l o u m a m e n l in each of the last four years. "The growth of the hockey team since its inceplion has really been a sight to see." Samuelson said. "We have better lalent and ihe fans are really starting to c o m e out. 1 think lhal the program has a bright future."

Hope prepares for NCAA Championships .. . . r ..i. oc ..â&#x20AC;&#x17E;.i H o p e s w i m teams for ihe past 25 years, and assistant meet director. She says she " n e e d s his expertise." With the excitement that a c c o m p a n i e s the Folkert notifies lhal u p c o m i n g 2005 N C A A S w i m m i n g and Diveach night of the meet, ing championships being hosted by Hope and over 300 "very dedibeing held at the Holland Aquatic Center, cated athletes" and questions also arise. W h y at H o p e ? H o w coaches will be on Ihe d o e s the staff at Hope feel? Is the college deck, along with over making any profit off this? H o w do other 100 workers and vols w i m m e r s at schools across the country feel unteers. It can also be about c o m i n g to Holland, M i c h i g a n ? e x p e c t e d to s e e b e T h e Holland Aquatic Center, according to iween 600 and 700 a D e c e m b e r article by the Sentinel's Patrick spectators in t h e Revere, w a s ranked at the lop of its class in stands. Aquatics International, a Los Angeles-based S t a f f a l H o p e is magazine. T h e facility " w a s ranked on the " e l a t e d , " F o l k e r t exbasis of the c e n t e r ' s p r o g r a m s , facilities, p l a ins. The staff growth rate, c o m m u n i t y involvement, misk n o w s of the meet's magnitude and prestige. sion statement, and ability to meet goals." S h e has even had faculty from departments Meg Cassell of Denison University states, outside of the Kinesiology department c o m "The excitement for me d o e s n ' t lie in the ment on their excitement. "The total c a m place of the championships bul in the expep u s c o m m u n i t y ' s support is encouraging and rience of s w i m m i n g at a highly competitive greatly appreciated." sa y s Folkert. meet against the best in the nation." Cassell Along with the staff, sludenls and other is seeded second in the lOO-yard backsiroke. athletes al Hope are excited as well. T h e meel It is obvious by the dedication and hard needs volunteers to run smoothly, so students work lhal the athletes must pui into qualifyand s w i m m e r s w h o didn't qualify can actuing for the meet, bul there is so much that ally help on the deck as b a c k u p timers and must go on "behind ihe scenes" to make the be there to cheer on their team. meet run smoothly. Meet director and SeD o e s Hope m a k e a profit off the hard, toilnior W o m e n ' s Administrator at H o p e , E v a ing work? T h e answer, surprisingly, is " n o . " Dean Folkert, can attest to the a m o u n t of T h e N C A A p a y s f o r the expenses. work and planning. Corporate partners of the N C A A include Not only did she have to communicate with C o c a - C o l a . A s Dasani water is a product of the Holland Fire Marshall to m a k e sure the Coca-Cola, the athletes and coaches will be Aquatic Center w a s up to c o d e and alert him able to c o n s u m e 160 cases of Dasani water lhal more bleachers were being added to the free of charge over the course of ihe meel. already large spectator area to further in"The corporate partners are needed to procrease sealing capacities, but she also had to vide the financial resources necessary to conline u p an evacuation plan in case of an emerduct national championship meets," explains gency. With the evacuation plan, she had to Tom Renner. the Sports Information Direcgel enough security people to implement lhal plan if need be. Along with lhal. the meet software had to be checked to make sure it w a s compatible for Ihe N C A A standards. Much correspondence with staff at Hope and the Holland Area Visitors and Convention Bureau went

tor. R e n n e r states. ' T h e 'profit' is the national media visibility gained by the college and community. There is an e c o n o m i c benefit gained by businesses wilh hundreds of hotels r o o m s filled and t h o u s a n d s of meals

on as well. F o l k e r t c o m m e n t s that she k n e w h o w much work would need to go into this. Hope has been planning this eveni for the past nine months, Al firsl. there w e r e conference calls once per month, and the past four months, the conference calls have b e c o m e more frequent at once per week. She could not have done it withoul the "invaluable" John Patnolt, head coach of ihe

served during the two-week period." To show their involvement and support ol the meel, the area hotels and motels offered special rales for attendees al the championships. T h e Holiday Inn Express c o m m e n t e d lhal they offer a group rate, and because ihere are a number of out-of-town swimmers and families coming to the meel and needing a place to slay, they o f f e r a rale lower for lhal lhal

k ^ ^ ^days v c h pbefore f n m t hthe p pevent, v p n t thAvston group. T Thirty ihey stop admitting people under group rate and the block of rooms is the maximum n u m b e r of r o o m s that the s p e c i f i c group can occupy w i t h the r e d u c e d rate. T h e Holland Inn o f f e r s the s a m e block g r o u p rate. T h e i r r o o m s wilh the rale cost $89. T h e reason these hotels promote this "group rate" is that it d r a w s in groups, namely parenls of a specific leam w h o all plan to slay at the same hotel. With the locations f o r the 2006 and 2007 Division III N C A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s already set in the large cities of M i n n e a p o l i s and Houston, the question is raised: W h y Holland. Michigan? Why H o p e ? Renner states that Hope w a s chosen because of the "quality of the aquatic center and the c o m m u n i t y ' s ability to host such an event." H e refers to the accessibility to hotels, restaurants, a major airport, and H o p e ' s ability to administer the event. Renner also notes, " T h a n k s to C o a c h John Patnolt, Hope e n j o y s a good reputation in college athletic and s w i m m i n g circles. We are k n o w n for hosting N C A A events in a first-class man-

h a v e the meet held in a large "And I larse town. low think that it really d o e s n ' t matter where a N C A A c h a m p i o n s h i p is held; whether in a big city or a small town, the excitement f o r m e d o e s n ' t lie in the place of the championships but in the experience of s w i m m i n g at a highly competitive meel against the best in the nation." Marie M a r s m a n of Carl ion College agrees. t4 l have heard nothing but good things about [Holland). I d o n ' t think any of [the team m e m b e r s ] have been to Holland before and | w e ) are looking forward to exploring the town." M a r s m a n is seeded first in the 50yard freestyle. Renner forecasts, "We believe this champ i o n s h i p will be m e m o r a b l e for athletes, coaches, and fans. We have worked to create an environment that provides for maxim u m performance for the athletes and offers a pleasant experience for those attending as spectators. W e ' r e ready!" Folkert agrees lhal Holland is ready to host the championship. The meel crew is i l very excited to get this going. W e ' v e been working on this a long lime." The women will compete March 10-12 and the men will compete March 17-19. Preliminaries begin at 11 a.m. and finals al 6:30 p.m.

ner." Cassell says because she is f r o m a small town in Oregon, it is not important to her to

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03-09-2005