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HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

"SPERA IN DEO'

M A R C H 5. 2 0 0 8 • SINCE 1887

MIAA champs, NCAA bound

National study shows Hope's highs, lows Brittany Adams C A M P U S N E W S EDITOR

I PHOTO EDITOR DAVID MOORE

TEAMS ENTER NCAA TOURNAMENT RANKED TOP IN THE NATION— Jordyn Boles, ( 08) Is all smiles f o l l o w i n g Hope's 7 0 - 5 9 victory over Albion College In t h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t c h a m p i o n s h i p . The m e n ' s b a s k e t b a l l t e a m also t o o k t h e MIAA c r o w n w i t h a 8 8 - 7 2 v i c t o r y over Calvin College. See f u l l story on page 1 2 .

"It is a unique opportunity to receive such thorough and valuable data about our campus," said Scott Vanderstoep, chair of Hope College's psychology department, referring to the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education. "This project is the only one I am aware of that links effective institutional practices with student outcomes." Last year, 271 students from Hope's . class of 2010 took part in the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education. They spent two hours both at the beginning and at the end of their freshman year testing to show their cognition, motivation, beliefs and values. The study will last for four years, as the students will be tested again as seniors. All students who participated in the study were compensated. As of 2006, 10 other liberal arts colleges participated in the survey, including Alma, Bard and Wabash, and, according to the Wabash website, two community colleges and several larger schools, including Michigan and Notre Dame. A new set of schools was added in 2007.

Survey results

Pew lecturer

Barton-DeVries on diversity

speaks on

Sam Ogles

faith, research

During my two years living in Wyckoff Hall I had the opportunity to get to know and speak with Wyckoff's RD. Rosanne Barton-DeVries. In speaking with this seminary student and Hope instructor of dance, I had conversations about diversity that I had not encountered in any other setting within this community, neither academic nor social. It was for this reason that I recently sat down with Rosanne to ask questions about diversity and what it means for our community.

NATIONAL N E W S EDITOR

Kevin Haley GUEST W R I T E R

Despite having two master's degrees and a Ph.D., Dr. Everett Worthington is very familiar with failure, and he attributes much of his success as a forgiveness researcher to a prayer seminar from which he emerged an abject failure at prayer, he said. On Thursday, Feb. 28, Worthington, a professor of psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University, visited Hope College to give a lecture entitled, "Personal Christian Faith, Research, and Changing the World." His talk, the 11th annual Pew Faith and Learning Lecture, was sponsored by Hope's Pew College Society Program; the society exists to encourage students to pursue careers in college and university teaching as Christian service. Although Worthington is familiar with failure before God, the best word to describe his career is success. Worthington has published over 200 scholarly articles including a study on adolescent pregnancy that was presented to the U.S. House of Representatives. Much of Worthington's forgiveness research is done in conjunction with his students. "Influence feels like it's coming just from the professor to the student, but it isn't. It goes SEE P E W ,

PAGE 1 0

W H A T ' S INSIDE NATIONAL

VOICES

8

ARTS

SPORTS

11

Q : What does "diversity" mean to you? How do you envision diversity? A : Diversity starts with understanding yoursejf. It starts with knowing what makes you unique. So often we don't know who we are. We care about cultural definitions of who we are - stereotypes that become definitions once we accept them for ourselves. We haven't spent enough time with our own stories and therefore we have no experience for engaging other people's stories. Q : So what would be a good example of diversity or an interaction of diversity? A ! Every interaction includes elements of diversity. Every interaction is the possibility to encounter someone w h o ' s unique and whose life is so similar to our own and yet so different because they're unique.

==============================

"...diversity ter of faith.

really is a matBut we don't go

there!9 — Ro§anne B a r t o n - D e V r i e s , Wyckoff R D

Q : Well, is there any type of diversity that is more important than another or that should be stressed more than another? It seems that with your definition there would be no categories of diversity. A : If I see you as a sum of stereotypes, then I won't encounter (the real) you. If I spend time with you then I might encounter you rather than the just the categories. Stereotypes and categories should be peripheral instead of central to the conversation. Diversity is more about learning who the other person is and less of who "I think the S E E WYCKOFF, P A G E 2

Y o u n g voters— New demographic plays an increasingly larger role in elections. Page 3

— \ < \ x ^

Got a story idea? Let us know at anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 ^

Hope's results from the first year of the study were reported at a recent faculty meeting with the intention of finding ways to improve Hope's standing within the various departments. According to the study, Hope's strengths in= = = = = = = eluded psychoHope's weaklogical wellnesses included being, critical students9 level thinking and the desires to of curiosity, be spiritual, academic moto b e helpful to others and tivation, and to one day professional have a family, ambition. VanderStoep said. On the other hand, _ = = = = = = = = = = Hope's weaknesses included students' level of curiosity, academic motivation and professional ambition. By the end of the academic year, Hope showed improvements in the areas of critical thinking and the desires to encourage racial understanding and to be challenged in the classroom, both with their academics and their beliefs. The study also revealed some insight regarding Hope's institutional practices. Students reported superior interactions outside the clasroom with faculty, as with S E E SURVEY, P A G E 2

New at Lemonjellos— "Hurricane Hearts" and "The Skies Revolt" perform this week. Page 6


2

CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Thursday

March 6

Panel Discussion- Grad School

Diversity on campus: making Hope 'part of a world community' to keep because we find t h e m t o be good and right, but others w e will set aside.

• WYCKOFF, from page 1

S p o n s o r e d by t h e Pew Society. M a a s Conference R o o m . 1 1 a . m .

Meijer Run

o t h e r p e r s o n is. Q:

Q * S o w h a t is the o b s t a c l e in our c o m m u nity's way?

H o w w o u l d o n e d o that?

D e w i t t Flag Pole 8 p.m. - 1 0 p.m.

A : R e l a t i o n s h i p . Diversity is a b o u t "sto-

Yoga Club

MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

W h a t do you think h o l d s H o p e

b a c k f r o m this ideal?

Ql

H o w so?

A : I ' m c o n c e r n e d that they see the p e r i p h eral a n d n o t to the heart o f w h a t ' s g o i n g on - f o s t e r i n g u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the u n i q u e n e s s o f e v e r y h u m a n b e i n g . In t h e s e c a s e s , stu-

M o s t p e o p l e are m o v i n g from a per-

d e n t s e n c o u n t e r a m i x e d m e s s a g e w h i c h re-

the u n i q u e n a r r a t i v e o f e a c h p e r s o n ' s life. We need t o be willing t o s l o w d o w n and w o r k o n

spective o f "retributive justice," o f justice of

sults in c o n f l i s i o n and s u s p i c i o n a n d I t h i n k , to s o m e d e g r e e , d i s e n g a g e m e n t . A n d t h a t ' s

relationships with G o d , with self and with others, a n d w e need to s e e h o w these three stories

that is i n a p p r o p r i a t e , b e c a u s e it's not. But w h a t ' s i m p o r t a n t is u s i n g c a t e g o r i e s o f m u -

Chapel

are w o v e n together.

A n d w e can d o that at

tuality o f r e c o n c i l i a t i o n ( w i t h G o d , s e l f a n d

Katy Sundararajan. D i m n e n t Chapel.

Hope.

G o d is clear, a n d faith traditions and

scripture are clear about h o w w e are to e n g a g e

others). It's not a b o u t equality. T h a t ' s n o t the p r o p e r m e t r i c . " R e l a t i o n s h i p as j u s t i c e "

one another.

- restoring relationship between oppressor

Kollen Hall B a s e m e n t 8 p.m. - 9 : 3 0

ry." I think w e need t o learn h o w to e n c o u n t e r

p.m. O p e n to a n y o n e - b r i n g a yoga m a t or t o w e l . A d m i s s i o n is free.

Friday

March 7

1 0 : 3 0 a . m . - 1 0 : 5 2 a.m.

Children's M i r a c l e N e t w o r k A n n u a l 24-Hour Dance Marathon Dow Center.

Is diversity religious then?

A:

Well ... diversity really is a m a t t e r o f

March 9

Q : Is H o p e m a k i n g any p r o g r e s s ? A:

Absolutely. I ' m proud o f this c o l l e g e

for b e c o m i n g m o r e diverse, for m a k i n g initiatives t o w a r d b e i n g w e l c o m i n g , and I y e a r n for the d a y w h e n this c a m p u s reflects a sense that w e are part o f a world c o m m u n i t y . A n d I think p e o p l e h e r e h a v e a heart for that.

Q : Why?

e g o r i e s o f religion or o f e t h n i c i t y . We n e e d

ing this kind o f diversity?

to understand that our c o m m o n n e s s as G o d ' s

isn't a q u e s t i o n b e c a u s e you w o u l d i m m e d i -

look like?

qreat i on is w h a t ' s i m p o r t a n t . It's a m a t t e r o f developing virtue and Christly gestures that

ately r e s p o n d to any d i f f e r e n t i a l s that c a u s e

practically express the c o m m a n d m e n t to love Sunday

very frightening.

A l If y o u ' r e in r e l a t i o n s h i p , if y o u ' r e reconciled with G o d , self and o t h e r s , then j u s t i c e

fai t h. B u t w e d o n ' t go t h e r e . W e g o to cat-

Dow Center. A l l day u n t i l 7 p.m.

the o p p r e s s e d a n d the liberated. It's not that

a n d the o p p r e s s e d is the p r o p e r m e t r i c .

Ql

7 p.m. Fri. - 7 p . m . Sat.

Saturday March 8 C o n t i n u a t i o n of Dance Marathon

At

one another.

h a r m t o other people. Ql

Q l So how would Hope go about embrac-

A:

W h a t w o u l d that

T h e r e is an incredible diversity o f

g i f t s in all c o m e r s o f this institution. I think

D o e s H o p e d o a n y t h i n g that is c o u n -

t e r p r o d u c t i v e to diversity?

it w o u l d take a c o n c e r t e d e f f o r t together. For

A : I ' m c o n c e r n e d with a n y a p p r o a c h t h a t

instance artists u s i n g i m a g e s of s h a p e a n d f o r m , t h e o l o g i a n s u s i n g l a n g u a g e and faith,

c e n t e r s in c o n v e r s a t i o n s r e l a t e d t o p o w e r

scientists using the diversity o f the created or-

A I We c a n ' t say, "I d o n ' t h a v e stereotypes."

d i f f e r e n t i a l s - p r i v i l e g e o r lack o f p r i v i l e g e .

C u l t u r e teaches us that, but we should set t h e m

Chapel

aside. It takes practice, intentionality, risk, be-

T h e s e are i m p o r t a n t t o be a d d r e s s e d , b u t n o t a s a c e n t e r for the c o n v e r s a t i o n . I t h i n k p e o -

der. (It would take) every area o f the institution c o m m i t t i n g . T h i s is s o m e t h i n g w e do together

ing involved with o n e ' s o w n self and evalua-

ple leading diversity programs understand

against other institutions.

Becky S c h m i d t , kinesiology d e p t . Dimnent. 10:30 a.m. - 1 0 : 5 2 a.m.

tion of the e n v i r o n m e n t s w e ' v e b e e n raised in. S o m e things ( w e ' v e learned) w e will c h o o s e

that.

clearly explained gr ound . . . and m a y b e it is.

Gathering Cloud of W i t n e s s e s - B a r t h o l o m e w , Trygve Johnson. D i m n e n t .

Monday

8 p.m.

March 10

Tuesday

Q : So we shouldn't recognize categories? You d o n ' t see stereotypes?

But I ' m n o t sure that the H o p e ' s stu-

and individually, and I would say not over and It needs to b e o u r

d e n t s do.

March 1 1

Actor a n d E n v i r o n m e n t a l i s t Ed Begley Jr.

Study shows Hope's highs and lows

He will present t h e a d d r e s s "Live Simply So T h a t Others May S i m p l y Live."

• SURVEY, from page 1

to practice advanced thinking. " W e are very excited a b o u t o u r

their p e e r s . I n s i d e t h e c l a s s r o o m , the s t u d e n t s r e p o r t e d h a v i n g q u a l -

participation in the W a b a s h study. E v -

S e a r c h i n g t h e Sacred Professor Greg S m i t h , history d e p a r t m e n t . CMU. M a a s Conference R o o m ,

ity p r o f e s s o r s a n d g o o d e x p e r i e n c e s with d i v e r s i t y . T h a t b e i n g

3 : 3 0 p.m. - 4 : 4 5 p . m .

Wednesday March 12 Young Leaders Initiative info table Learn a b o u t t h e T r a n s f o r m i n g Leaders P r o g r a m . Visit w w w . y o u n g l e a d e r s i n l a tive.net for m o r e info. S p o n s o r e d by Career Services. 1 1 : 3 0 a . m . - 1 : 3 0 p . m .

ery c o n s t i t u e n c y on c a m p u s can use the d a t a to find an area o f i m p r o v e ment. S t u d e n t s need t o be e n c o u r -

fac-

a g e d t o b e m o r e intellectually c u r i o u s , m o r e m o t i v a t e d , and t h o u g h t f u l

ulty n e e d s t o i m p r o v e its e x p e c t a -

a b o u t life g o a l s , " V a n d e r s t o e p said.

t i o n s o f t h e s t u d e n t s , a s well a s its

" P r o f e s s o r s need t o i m p r o v e on chal-

speed when returning assignments a n d tests, a n d t h e s t u d e n t b o d y lacks

l e n g i n g s t u d e n t s m o r e and p r o v i d i n g

diversity and meaningful conversa-

A n d the institution as a w h o l e m u s t strive to p r o v i d e i m p o r t a n t diversity

A "STOEP" IN THE RIGHT D I R E C T I O N - Scott

tions, a n d t h e y feel a s t h o u g h t h e i r coursework

e x p e r i e n c e s for o u r s t u d e n t s . "

t i o n of t h e Wabash service study.

said, the following improvements can

be

recommended:

does

Hope

not a l l o w

them

PHOTO BY K A L U E

faster f e e d b a c k on tests and p a p e r s .

WALKER

VanderStoep, Psychology chair, presented the Informa-

IN BRIEF -

DAFFODIL DAYS Even t h o u g h Relay For L i f e is m o n t h s away, you can still support the A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society by participating

in

Daffodil

Fairbanks

TauinhausEB

a y i j ii ; » « » : <v

Days.

F.onMore Information: info@fairbankstownhouses.com

H o p e ' s chapter o f Colleges Against

D m

C a n c e r is celebrating the c o m i n g of spring b y selling daffodils--the first flower o f spring and a s y m b o l of

hope

cancer.

in

the

fight

I I S h o m

• At the corner of 8th and River

against

All p r o c e e d s will g o t o

the A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society. To order y o u r f l o w e r s , stop by

392-4707

the S t u d e n t U n i o n D e s k in D e W i t t anytime between now and March m

6. F l o w e r s are SI e a c h and will be d e l i v e r e d o n c a m p u s the w e e k after Spring Break. For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n or t o get involved in Colleges Against Cancer, email

9 Month lease $400 per month per tenant

relay@hope.edu

WANTED: OA LEADERS Orientation assistant applications are now available for all students. Applications are due Thursday, March 13, to the Student Development office. Interview sign-ups started March 3. A p p l i c a t i o n s m a y b e picked up in the Student D e v e l o p m e n t o f f i c e o r f r o m the Student D e v e l o p m e n t w e b site. Questions? Please call

Amber

Sibley

in

Development at ext. 7942.

Student

m

m

w

.

Corner of Fairbanks 16th Street A V M H - A B I L - I T y

2 blocks from campus

Available starting

Across the street from the football stadium

12 Month lease $325 per month per tenant

mmmmmM 1620 Square Feet On 3 Levels, 4 Bedrooms (Maximum 4 tenants per unit), 4 1 / 2 or 3 1 / 2 bathrooms per unit. Full kitchen. Dinette, Living room, Full sized washer & dryer, Covered front porch. Garage ( 1 stall)

2nd semester

mmWMA 11® $50 Non refundable application fee $400 deposit Requires 2 with application fee & deposit to hold a unit

Honors Most Insurance Cards and

Find great jewelry at the Apothecary Gift Shop (nestled

in back of the Model Drug Store)

Mon-Wed 9:30-8;00pm Thur-Fri 9:30-9:00pm Saturday 9:30-6:00pm Closed Sunday www.modeldrugstore.com

Deposit is refunded if denied off campus


THE ANCHOR

The Academy Awards: Who was Oscar-worthy this year

Best Picture: "No Gountry For Old Men" Best Actor: Daniel DayLewis, "There Will Be Blood" Best Actress: Marion Cotillard, "La Vie En Rose" Best Director: Ethan and Joel Coen, "No Country For Old Men" Best Original Screenplay: Diablo Cody, "Juno" Best Song: "Falling Slowly" from "Once" Best Supporting Actress: Tilda Swinton, "Michael Clayton" Best Supporting Actor: Javier Bardem, "No Country For Old Men" Best Animated Feature: "Ratatouille" Best Score: "Atonement" Best Adapted Screen play: Ethan and Joel Coen, "There Will Be Blood"

Youth could sway 2008 elections Taylor Hughes ASSISTANT A R T S EDITOR

More than 17 years ago. Madonna, known for her unusual but effective antics, wrapped herself in an American flag and wriggled around in red panties, bra and combat boots — all for a public-service announcement to jumpstart a young voter's revolution. Scantily clad and rapping out memorable lines such as, "If you don't vote y o u ' r e going to get a spankie," Madonna attracted a new demographic of voters. It was among the first advertising tactics used to become what is known today as the "Rock the Vote" campaign. Other big name performers of that time signed on, including Ozzy Osboume, Megadeath, Iggy Pop and others. The success of the campaign proved to be phenomenal — 10,000 students on five California campuses alone registered to vote just days after the campaign launched. Youth vole jumped 20 percent two years later. M o s t ' remember the 2004 "Vote or Die" campaign. Inspired by Rock the Vote, this new campaign was run by Citizen Change. Founded by entertainer, producer and entrepreneur Sean John Combs (a.k.a. P. Diddy), this campaign brought a fresh face to the youth vote of GenerationWe. Its slogan, "Vote or Die," inspired by the war in Iraq, alluded to the idea that youth could con-

could explain candidates moving trol whether their peers or they towards more electronic and methemselves were sent into a war that could be evaded by voting. dia-directed campaigns; each has a website, a blog, MySpace and a Combs and other pop-artists such Facebook page that attract young as Joss Stone, Alicia Keys and 50 Cent succeeded in registering voters. Maggie Mohr ('09), a subover 1.2 million voters before the scribed member of presidential 2004 presidential elections. candidate Barack O b a m a ' s FaceErika Oglesby ('08), remembook-group said "It's a good way bers the event. "Vote or Die was a definite to reach youth ... candidates are making more of an effort in this topic of discussion ... it inspired some of my friends to vote," election." Even the Rock the Vote webOglesby said. page added new features helping Nearly 20 million under age youth regis29 voted = = = = = = = = ter to vote. in the 2004 Many are election, an "It's a good way to reach watching increase of are wak"The Daily 10 percent youth ... candidates Show" with from the ing more of an ejfort in this Jon Stewart 2000 elecelection." and "The tion. Presi- Maggie Mohr ('09) C o l b e r t Report" to dential get a comicampaign cal twist on advertisers their political fix, which makes are becoming smarter and more effective. They target specific talking about current issues and politics cool again. demographics to bring success to As political interest grows their campaigns. The youth vote within America's youth, their vothas now joined the Latino vote ing turnout grows as well. The as one of the most sought demographics for presidential hopefuls. directing of campaigns and media towards potential young voters Anyone 29 and younger will be empowers the youth of America the target of advertisements and and inspires them to embrace will have increased control on their freedom of speech—givcampaign issues. Making up 28 ing the power to the people in a percent of America's population, newer, younger way. young voters could sway the 2008 election. These are reasons that

Hope Cameroon project recognized H O L L A N D - A successful and growing Hope College service project focused on water quality and community health in the village of Nkuv in Cameroon has been named one of four finalists for Michigan's 2008 Carter Partnership Award. The Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Partnership Award for Campus-Community Collaboration is given annually by Michigan Campus Compact ( M C C ) to one partnership involving a Michigan college or university and a community group, with its $10,000 prize divided equally between the campus and c o m m u nity partners for working together in exceptional ways to improve people's lives and enhance learning in the process. The winner from among the four finalists will be announced and the award will be presented during the annual Governor's Service Awards this spring, on a date yet to be deter-

mined. The Hope program, which is partnered with the Life and Water Development Group of Cameroon, began during the 2005-06 school year as a service project for the college's then-new student chapter of Engineers Without Borders-USA ( E W B - U S A ) . with an emphasis on providing the remote village with purified water. During the first year the effort expanded to include the college's department of nursing, which surveyed the villagers' health and began working with them to improve hygiene, sanitation and nutrition. Although the established water filtration and health education projects remain, new projects are being developed for implementation this May. The team is focusing on a piping system to bring water closer to the village from a river that is up to an hour's hike away. The team is also emphasiz-

ing providing the training so that the villagers can help themselves and train other remote communities as well. The villagers now build their own filters based on the initial design brought to them by Hope College. Starting last year, the college's department of education became involved in helping to develop instructional materials that the people of Nkuv can use to teach themselves and others the health and hygiene lessons needed to improve health. The department of communication is becoming part of the project this year, with faculty member Ji Hoon Park and a communication student accompanying the team to film the work and training in action. Ultimately, the health and hygiene training materials and an instructional video will be posted online, available at no cost to anyone worldwide seeking to address similar needs in other villages.

SOURCE: WWW.OSCAR.COM. GRAPHIC BY DYLANA PINTER

IN BRIEF

CHINA INCREASES MILITARY SPENDING; US CRITICIZES BEIJING - China says it plans to increase military spending by nearly 18% this year, to 417.8 billion yuan ($59 billion). Just before the announcement, the US released a report criticizing China's mili-

tary spending. China rejected the Pentagon report as a "serious distortion of facts" that could harm its relations with the U.S. "It breaks international norms... We do not pose a threat to any coun-

try. The U.S. should drop its Cold War mentality," the foreign ministry said in a statement. In the report, Washington claimed that the real Chinese defense budget for 2007 was at least double the stated amount.

EU AND SUDANESE FORCES CLASH SUDAN - Sudanese forces have clashed with troops from the European Union Force in Chad after they crossed the border into the Darfur region, Sudan says. A Sudanese soldier and a civilian were killed during the exchange of fire, the Sudanese army says.

The EU Force (Eufor) says it was trying to recover one of its vehicles which had accidentally strayed into Sudan. A French soldier who was in the vehicle is still missing.


4"

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

Cuban presidency changes hands; a new Cuba? Fidel Castro gives presidency to brother Raul; Religion Professor Van Til gives insight Alex Quick STAFF W R H E R

b e e n Fidel C a s t r o ' s heir a p p a r e n t

T h i s will p o s s i b l y c h a n g e un-

as f r e e d o m o f s p e e c h , a s s e m b l y ,

for a l o n g t i m e , s o m e p r o s p e c t s

d e r o t h e r p l a n s b y Raul C a s t r o . A c c o r d i n g to the T i m e s , he has

religion and travel. T h e s e c o n d is f o c u s e d m o r e

already taken steps to decentral-

o f issues relating to w a g e s , e d u -

R a u l C a s t r o , in addition to other h u m a n rights. M u c h of the car-

ize certain a s p e c t s of the heavily socialized e c o n o m y , such as the

cation and u n i o n relations. A c c o r d i n g t o the T i m e s , p e o p l e a r e

d i n a l ' s visit w a s televised, s o m e t h i n g that w a s not p r e v i o u s l y al-

distribution o f milk, w h i c h he has

critical o f the n a t i o n ' s d e d i c a t i o n

lowed

to t h e s e rights b e c a u s e C u b a outl a w s o p p o s i t i o n parties and limits

tight control o v e r t h e C a t h o l i c c h u r c h ' s access t o b r o a d c a s t i n g .

for r e f o r m a n d h o p e exist o n the

A f t e r 4 9 y e a r s in p o w e r a s President o f C u b a , Fidel C a s t r o a n n o u n c e d that that h e w o u l d not

c o m m u n i s t island. Already, s o m e relatively dras-

s e e k a n o t h e r te r m in that office. D a y s later o n F e b . 2 4 , the N a -

tic steps h a v e b e e n t a k e n in a variety o f areas, politically, e c o n o m i -

tional A s s e m b l y o f P e o p l e s P o w er, the c h i e f legislative b o d y in

cally and religiously. A c c o r d i n g

a history o f doing.

t o the T i m e s ( U K ) , R a u l C a s t r o

C u b a , e l e c t e d t h e n - F i r s t Vice

h a s a l r e a d y a n n o u n c e d his intention t o o p e n u p m i n o r i t y stakes o f

In t h e mid 1990s, R a u l C a s t r o t o o k s t e p s to e n c o u r a g e private

President R a u l C a s t r o to the presidency. D e s p i t e the

fact

state o w n e d b u s i n e s s e s to foreign o w n e r s h i p in h o p e s o f b o l s t e r i n g

that

the e c o n o m y . T h e r e is also g o o d n e w s f o r the

Raul Castro has

^

enterprise, w h i c h in 1996 resulted in an 8 percent G D P g r o w t h , acc o r d i n g t o the T i m e s . H o w e v e r ,

c o r d i n g t o Reuters, h e discussed t h e fate o f political prisoners with

under

the

government's

civilian travel. It is also cited as

R e u t e r s reported that C u b a n of-

one o f the m o s t politically repressive n a t i o n s o n earth, with over

ficials p r o m i s e d the cardinal that the Church would have greater

2 0 0 political prisoners.

access t o written a n d b r o a d c a s t

these r e f o r m s b e g a n t o stagnate,

Faculty reflects on religion in Cuba

m e d i a in the f u t u r e . D o e s a Raul C a s t r o p r e s i d e n c y

average Cuban. Professor Kent

a n d Fidel C a s t r o a b o l i s h e d t h e m Politically, R a u l C a s t r o s e e m s

Van Til is a H o p e C o l l e g e p r o f e s -

m u c h m o r e willing to w o r k with

sor o f religion w h o specializes in p o v e r t y a n d t h i r d - w o r l d issues.

the international c o m m u n i t y . He

Religiously, Raul C a s t r o m a y

c a n s m a y be a b l e t o obtain C u ban cigars or eat in the streets o f

be o p e n to a l l o w i n g m o r e f r e e -

H a v a n a ? N o o n e k n o w s for sure.

" T h e a v e r a g e p e r s o n in C u b a

has already s i g n e d t w o treaties p e r t a i n i n g to h u m a n rights, both

d o m to p r a c t i c e religion.

lives in very very p o o r c o n d i -

o f w h i c h w e r e o p p o s e d b y his

President B u s h had said that the e m b a r g o will r e m a i n intact, but

tions. B u t there is not a n u p p e r

brother. T h e s e t w o treaties were,

" P e o p l e a r e n o t free to w o r ship. N e v e r t h e l e s s the c o u n t r y is

c l a s s that lives far better, perhaps excepting a f e w party

a s r e p o r t e d b y the International

culturally C a t h o l i c t o its b o n e s , "

fering o p i n i o n s . B o t h Clinton a n d

Herald T r i b u n e , the C o v e n a n t o n C i v i l a n d Political Rights, and

M c C a i n are s u p p o r t i v e o f the e m b a r g o until r e f o r m s occur, w h i l e

on

Van Til said. It is fitting, but s o m e w h a t surprising that the first f o r e i g n visi-

Cultural

tor that R a u l C a s t r o r e c e i v e d w a s

tain restrictions. F o r n o w , A m e r i c a n s c a n o n l y speculate a b o u t a

higher ups," Van Til said. GRAPHIC BY DYIANA PINTER

the

International

Economic,

Covenant

Social

and

R i g h t s . T h e first r e q u i r e s signa-

Cardinal

tories to e n s u r e basic rights such

V a t i c a n ' s s e c r e t a r y o f state. A c -

Tarcisio

Bertone,

the

m e a n that in the f u t u r e A m e r i -

presidential c a n d i d a t e s h a v e dif-

O b a m a is in f a v o r o f lifting cer-

future relationship with Cuba.

Model UN program starts Thursday; Hope students prepare to lead A m o n g t h e issues t o b e dis-

the r o l e s o f p r o f e s s i o n a l diplo-

Friday, M a r c h 6 a n d 7, H o p e C o l -

free. M o r e than 8 0 0 s t u d e n t s and

c u s s e d are the international d r u g

m a t s with the goal o f a c h i e v i n g

t h e y h a v e c h o s e n t o represent. D u r i n g t h e c o n f e r e n c e , they will

lege will s p o n s o r its 36th a n n u a l

faculty

trade,

a

share

Model United Nations Confer-

high s c h o o l s will b e p a r t i c i p a t i n g in this y e a r ' s M o d e l United N a tions. A c t i n g a s d e l e g a t e s from the

trade, w o r l d w i d e e d u c a t i o n , racism a n d racial d i s c r i m i n a t i o n a b o l i s h m e n t , global o v e r p o p u l a -

o b j e c t i v e s , w h i l e f o s t e r i n g a desired international c o n s e n s u s for real solutions to q u e s t i o n s f a c i n g

192 m e m b e r s o f the U n i t e d N a -

tion, the legality o f u r a n i u m en-

t h e m . T h e d e p a r t m e n t o f political

national problems. E C O S O C , Security Council,

t i o n s in t w o G e n e r a l A s s e m b l i e s ,

r i c h m e n t , crises in Iran a n d East T i m o r , a n d an E m e r g e n c y Crisis,

s c i e n c e at H o p e C o l l e g e s p o n s o r s

a n d ICJ m e m b e r s begin their ses-

as well as historic d e b a t e s r e g a r d -

the e v e n t . Participating

ing the F a l k l a n d I s l a n d s a n d the

been

U n i t e d S t a t e s ' I n v a s i o n o f Iraq.

in p r e p a r a t i o n for the c o n f e r e n c e , a n d h a v e b e e n i d e n t i f y i n g the cur-

o u t the day.

rent issue p o s i t i o n s o f c o u n t r i e s

SEE

(HOPE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; On Thursday and

ence. T h e e v e n t will i n c l u d e a keynote address by Congressman P e t e H o e k s t r a that

is o p e n t o

from

approximately 30

global

healthcare, free

w h o r e p r e s e n t s M i c h i g a n ' s Sec-

10 S e c u r i t y C o u n c i l s , o n e International C o u r t o f Justice ( I C J ) , a n d

o n d C o n g r e s s i o n a l District, will

o n e E c o n o m i c a n d Social C o u n c i l

s p e a k d u r i n g the c l o s i n g a w a r d s c e r e m o n y o n Friday, M a r c h 7, at

( E C O S O C ) , the s t u d e n t s will b e t a k i n g part in s i m u l a t e d e x e r c i s e s

M o d e l U n i t e d N a t i o n s is de-

3 : 4 5 p . m . in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l

f o c u s i n g o n i m p o r t a n t c u r r e n t in-

C h a p e l . A d m i s s i o n t o the talk is

ternational e v e n t s .

s i g n e d to g i v e high school stud e n t s an o p p o r t u n i t y t o t a k e o n

the g e n e r a l public.

Hoekstra,

particular

J a m e s

i^larch 12 a t 8pm Knickerbocker Theatre 35 y / Hope ID, 310 f o r Rjblic Tickets available a t tine Hope College Ticket o f f i c e i n the DeV/os FieldtTouse

, S" r-"

y

'

THEOLOGICAL

w i t h their

high

A s s e m b l y m e m b e r s arrive o n Friday m o r n i n g , d e b a t i n g t h r o u g h -

HOLLAND, Ml admissions@westernsem.edu 1-800-392-8554

actively

school a d v i s o r s f o r several w e e k s

SEMINARY

www.westernsem.edu

and

sions on Thursday evening, continuing all d a y Friday. G e n e r a l

WESTERN â&#x20AC;˘

knowledge

e n g a g e with their p e e r delegates, striving to r e s o l v e p r e s s i n g inter-

have

and B a n d

Seth Bernard and Daisy May Aaron Roche

national

students

College' Concert

F y l e r

country's

working

In addition to their s e s s i o n s ,

MODEL UN, PAGE 10


THE ANCHOR

MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

WA 4 \rÂť

-r

Showcase kigkltglits J-iope musical talent S h o w c a s e s i n c e its f o u n d i n g 20 years a g o and will b e retir-

Laura Stritzke STAFF WRITER

O n ihe e v e n i n g o f M a r c h 3, sounds of Hope College sludenls

ing a f t e r this year. The Showcase highlighted

filled DeVos Place in d o w n t o w n

a variety of H o p e p e r f o r m e r s ,

Grand Rapids when Hope's music d e p a r i m e n l hosted its annual

a n d i n c l u d e d a n array o f m u s i c g e n r e s including j a z / . o p e r a ,

Musical S h o w c a s e . D e V o s Place w a s full o f H o p e s l u d e n l s . f a c -

piano a n d orchestra. C a t h e r i n e Ellis CIO) p l a y e d

uliy a n d m e m b e r s of ihe c o m muniiy w h o c a m e oul lo e n j o y

in the both w i n d s y m p h o n y and the o r c h e s t r a p e r f o r m a n c e s .

ihe c o n c e r t . President

" T h e S h o w c a s e is a lot of James

Bullman

fun b e c a u s e you not only get to p e r f o r m , but you g e l lo see ev-

opened the event, expressing h i s d e e p p r i d e in i h e m u s i -

e r y o n e e l s e ' s p e r f o r m a n c e also."

cal

sludenls

Hllis said. "I a m s o p r o u d of all

a n d in t h e m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t f a c u l t y ' s ability to c u l t i v a t e

the talent w e h a v e at H o p e . . . t h e S h o w c a s e is a c o l l a g e (so) y o u

those gifts. He also paid trib-

get l o hear e v e r y o n e ' s specialties

ute to p r o f e s s o r s C h a r l e s As-

o f m u s i c . It's also great to s h o w o f f all of the hard w o r k y o u ' v e

gifts

of

Hope

chbrenner and Roberta Kraft w h o h a v e been a part of the

Photos and page design by P h o t o Editor David M o o r e

put into y o u r m u s i c . "


ARTS

6

MARCH 5, 2 0 0 8

Lemonjellos heats it up with pop, rock and open mic

T H I S WEEK IN A R T Wednesday March 5 Kletz Student P e r f o r m e r s Mari Jo Koedyker & Kim Jongsma 9 p.m. Robert Flavin. 1 0 p . m

Thursday March 6 Guest Musical Artists

sic as " D u t c h p o p . " T h e i r m u s i c

tronic-rock b a n d Death By D a n c -

owner of the coffeehouse. "It's a

is a m i x o f soft acoustic guitar

great w a y to get p e o p l e to c o m e o u t a n d p r o m o t e t h e m s e l v e s in

s o n g s , up-beat i n d i e - p o p s o n g s and e v e n s o m e s o n g s with elec-

ing. T h e S k i e s Revolt, a b a n d that

t h e arts." Types of performances range

tronic k e y b o a r d playing. R e c e n t l y back f r o m a trip to

o f attention, has j u s t finished rec o r d i n g their n e w C D , w h i c h will

f r o m m u s i c a n d c o m e d y t o po-

Spain, the b a n d ' s m u s i c reflects

b e out m i d - A p r i l . A t F r i d a y ' s s h o w , they will b e p l a y i n g s o m e o f their n e w s o n g s

Julie Kocsls

event,"

STAFF W R I T E R

It's that t i m e o f year again. T h e t i m e w h e n y o u ' r e not quite sure you can m a k e it until S p r i n g Break. You're surrounded by h a l f - m e l t e d pi l es o f icky, b r o w n

said

Matthew

Scott"

M e g a n Sharp (soprano) & Jonathan

s n o w and a stale daily r o u t i n e .

etry and e v e n short-story telling.

s o m e o f the s o u n d s heard while

Schakel (harpsichord)

P e r h a p s it's t i m e to b r e a k that r o u t i n e . P e r h a p s it's t i m e t o get

So b r i n g y o u r f r i e n d s , b r i n g your guitar, or j u s t c o m e and e n j o y

abroad. Jes Karper, t h e s h o w ' s o p e n e r ,

Wlchers A u d i t o r i u m . 7 : 3 0 p.m.

Friday.

March 7

Dow. Dance M a r a t h o n 9 : 3 0 p.m.

I A m Legend - SAC movie

Lemonjellos coffeehouse.

w e e k you h a v e not one, not t w o ,

12 a.m.

but t h r e e c h a n c e s to b r e a k f r e e o f y o u r daily r o u t i n e . S o h e r e ' s March 8

C o m b i n e d Junior Recital

M a r c h 6, at a b o u t 6 : 3 0 p.m. to

y e a r s in Belize, has recently ret u r n e d t o the U.S. a n d is p l a y i n g

play and t a l k a b o u t the n e w tracks

N i g h t t h e first W e d n e s d a y o f every m o n t h .

several s h o w s a r o u n d the area.

This

L e m o n j e l l o s hosts a n O p e n M i c

This

Vanderwerf 102. 7 p.m.. 9 : 3 0 p.m..

Saturday

it. Karper, w h o spent the past 10

is a free e v e n t that starts at 8:30 p . m and lasts until a r o u n d 10 p.m.

h a p s it's t i m e t o c h e c k o u t s o m e o f the great n e w acts p l a y i n g at

John Rush p e r f o r m s

p l a y s folk that h a s both a n A m e r ican a n d South A m e r i c a n feel t o

w h a t others h a v e t o offer.

and

Per-

live t o p r o m o t e their u p - c o m i n g a l b u m . T h e b a n d will also b e on W T H S 89.9 F M this T h u r s d a y ,

o u t o f y o u r 6 ' by 6 ' d o r m r o o m d o s o m e t h i n g new.

h a s recently started getting a lot

a s well. A d m i s s i o n t o the s h o w is only $ 3 at t h e d o o r a n d starts at 8:30

H e d e s c r i b e s h i m s e l f as a r a m b l i n g b l u e s a n d folk s o n g w r i t e r

Hurricane Hearts

p.m. L e m o n j e l l o s is o p e n M o n d a y -

a n d string plucker. T h i s e v e n t is

w h a t g o i n g o n o v e r at 9 t h Street O n T h u r s d a y , M a r c h 6, Hur-

and College.

F r i d a y from 6 : 3 0 a.m. to m i d n i g h t a n d 8 a.m. t o m i d n i g h t . For a list

free a s well a n d b e g i n s at 8 p.m.

r i c a n e H e a r t s will b e p e r f o r m i n g

Tori Barr (violin), Jo-

at L e m o n j e l l o s with special guest J e s Karper. H u r r i c a n e Hearts, a

The Skies Revolt

5,

band formed by Hope College

L e m o n j e l l o s will b e h o s t i n g a n

students Joseph Barker ('09) a n d K a y Gillette ( ' 0 8 ) , o n t h e i r

P e r f o r m i n g at L e m o n j e l l o s o n Friday, M a r c h 7, will be h e a d l i n -

Open Mic Night

seph Stodola (viola) Wichers A u d i t o r i u m . 4 p.m.

I A m Legend - SAC m o v i e

This

Vanderwerf 102. 7 p.m.. 9 : 3 0 p.m..

12 a.m.

Wednesday.

March

Open Mic Night. " T h i s is a pretty

M y S p a c e p a g e d e s c r i b e their m u -

informal

of up-coming show check them out online at w w w . m y s p a c e . c o m / l e m o n j e l l o s or w w w . l e m o n j e l l o s . com.

ing act T h e Skies Revolt, with p o p - p u n k b a n d K a l i n e and elec-

IN BRIEF

JOHN RUSH THE'HUMAN IPOD'TO PERFORM J o h n R u s h is a v i r t u o s o guitar-

REVIEWS

'Penelope' a 'delightful tale of love and self-acceptance'

ist with a praised voice. H e has been called the " H u m a n i P o d " b e c a u s e h e plays original m u s i c

Abby D e V u y s t

get a picture o f Penelope, sends

ed to Ricci despite her turned up

STAFF W R I T E R

an

nose and floppy ears, and James McAvoy puts on a very believable

un-lucky

gambler

M c A v o y ) in to get the j o b done. W h a t he d o e s n ' t expect is t o fall

and c o v e r s d e p e n d i n g u p o n w h a t

I w a s p l a n n i n g o n writing

the a u d i e n c e requests, letting the a u d i e n c e c h o o s e t h e s o n g s for

a r e v i e w for the m o v i e " S e m i P r o , " b u t a f t e r seeing it I real-

t h e s h o w . R u s h has w o n C a m p u s

ized I had very little to say a b o u t

being

Activities M a g a z i n e Entertainer o f the Y e a r a n d C a m p u s A w a r d s

it. D o n ' t g o see that m o v i e . It

right up bringing is forced to

M u s i c i a n o f the Year. He has also b e e n s h o w c a s e d at N A C A N a tionals in 2 0 0 5 . R u s h has o p e n e d

(James

in love with Penelope, but not

u s e s i n a p p r o p r i a t e c o m e d y to try and s h o c k laughter f r o m the

of

the

a u d i e n c e , but all it really d o e s is

for b i g - n a m e b a n d s such a s F u e l ,

c r o s s the line. H o w e v e r , the g e m I f o u n d in

E v e 6, Vertical H o r i z o n , E d w i n

the film " P e n e l o p e " pleasantly

M c C a i n a n d m a n y m o r e . He will

surprised m e .

It is a n unlikely

and, in her sad-

fairytale o f a cursed girl (Chris-

life

dren's Hospital Dance Marathon f u n d r a i s e r this Friday at 9 : 3 0 p.m.

tina Ricci) w h o is b o m with the

goes

in the D o w . A d m i s s i o n is free.

her to break the curse is to marry " o n e o f her o w n , " and her frantic

f a c e o f a pig. T h e only w a y for

and to embrace the things that make us

ness, she flees

be p l a y i n g at the D e V o s Chil-

sheltered style

and

out

into

a n d b e a u t i f u l set d e s i g n s . T h i s film is fit f o r e v e r y per-

Thisfilm challenges you to look at yourself in a different light

is the last straw for the poor girl,

her

stantly greeted with n e w sights

Reese Witherspoon offers an enjoy-

= = = = = = = = = = =

leave her. T h i s

different from one another.

the world. It is a delight-

= = = = =

t o w a t c h as y o u r e y e s a r e c o n -

brooding

American accent and personality.

o r f u l p o p with h e r v i b r a n t personality. T h e w h o l e film is a j o y

able cameo, and

son o f e v e r y a g e . It not o n l y o f -

a character unlike any 1 have

fers a n e n j o y a b l e plot line, b u t also g i v e s a sincere m e s s a g e

seen

from

her

that is w o r t h hearing. Y o u n g

yet She traded in

has her

girls finally h a v e a role m o d e l w h o t a k e s control o f h e r o w n

pink high heals

life despite her i m p e r f e c t i o n s .

and B M W

This

leather and

a

Without ing the

for

film

challenges

you

to

boots

look at y o u r s e l f in a d i f f e r e n t

vespa.

light a n d t o e m b r a c e the t h i n g s that m a k e u s d i f f e r e n t from o n e

stealshow,

another. As I said b e f o r e d o n ' t

Witherspoon

w a s t e y o u r t i m e with Will Far-

DUO TO PERFORM 'AMOROUS' PROGRAM

parents w a s t e no t i m e in p a r a d -

fill tale of love and self-acceptance. There

are

adds even more brightness and

r e l l ' s flop o f a film " S e m i - P r o , "

ing a multitude o f b l u e - b l o o d e d

very few down points in the film

fea-

suitors that are drawn to the

comedy to this film: T h e c o l o r i n g o f the film is a

b u t d o take t i m e o u t to see d i r e c tor M a r k P a l a n s k y ' s w o n d e r f u l

Hope

and even in the dark moments

promised dowry. An anxious reporter, w h o lost an eye trying t o

the character of Penelope shines through. It is easy to feel connect-

lovely mix o f g r a y s and b l a c k s

film " P e n e l o p e . " I w o u l d g i v e it

Sharp

that m a k e P e n e l o p e ' s bright col-

an eight out o f 10.

College

will

ture

soprano

Megan

and

harpsichordist

Jonathan

S c h a k e l , t w o g u e s t art i s t s w i t h local

connections,

on

r

Thurs-

day, M a r c h 6, at 7 : 3 0 p . m . in W i c h e r s A u d i t o r i u m . T h e public is invited. A d m i s s i o n is free.

challenge

T h e p e r f o r m a n c e is titled " T h e Birds & the B e e s ; ' and will fea-. ture B a r o q u e m u s i c c o n c e r n i n g all things avian, apian and a m o r o u s . The music

program by

will

contain

composers

includ-

G R A D U A T C

and

Francois

Schakel and band-and-wife

T H U R S D A Y ,

in

1 1:00

Couperin.

MAAS

-

M A R C H

1 1:50

6

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P A n C

S T R E T C I T Y OOUUFR W I N G S

ing Henry Purcell, G e o r g e Frideric Handel, Jean-Philippe Rameau.

S C H O O L

Charlottesville,

Va.,

and p e r f o r m together frequently. T h e y both g r e w u p locally a n d

HOW HOW

TO PICK G R A D U A T E PROGRAMS TO F I N A N C E G R A D U A T E THE

APPLICATION

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FEATURES THE ANCHOR MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

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SPRING INTO VOLUNTEERING Community involvement 'starts with having a servant heart' M e g h a n Fore A S S I S T A N T FEATURES E D I T O R

Beautiful, colorful tulips will soon appear out of the cold, rfark spaces underground, bringing new life to our Holland community in high hopes for spring. Springtime brings new begmnings, giving students the perfect chance to get involved in volunteering. Brittnee Longwell ( ' 0 9 ) and Caitlin Lamade ('09), co-student coordinators of Volunteer Services, are working hard to bring many volunteer opportunities to Hope College students.

"We try to go to as many conferences as we can. We try to go to a lot of the things put on by the community where we can learn more about different programs and bring them to H o p e " Longwell said. Volunteer Services offers a vast array of volunteering options ranging from onetime events such as the Cinderella Project to long-term involvement such as AmeriCorps. AmeriCorps is an American network compiled of non-profit organizations that reach out to the community in different ways. Students looking for summer positions or something that offers stipends should contact Volunteer Services for more

information. For something more local students can serve in their communities. Students do not have to travel throughout the country to make a difference in the lives of others; they can just walk down 13th Street to Western Theological Seminary. The Community Kitchen at the seminary feeds around 100 people everyday. Students can volunteer to serve on their own, with friends or even with their church. "One Tuesday a month they have a larger event where they need more servers," Longwell said. "It's a great opportunity for meeting and building relationships with people."

Students are encouraged to explore the volunteering opportunities that are available to them. "Holland needs a lot of volunteering and a lot of people who are willing to give of their time and their hearts," Longwell said. "It starts with having a servant heart." For specific details about volunteer opportunities, visit the Volunteer Services website at www.hope.edu/volunteer Each month Volunteer Services showcases one event: Look for details regarding the Moonlight Serenade Mixer on March 28. a party/dance for senior citizens at Evergreen Commons.

Mentor a child, build a house, help the homeless Teaching and Social W o r k

Youth Ministry

Boys and Girls Club of Greater Holland

Golgotha Church: Underprivileged High School Students

The Boys and Girls C l u b of G r e a t e r Holland w o r k s with area y o u t h . O p p o r t u n i ties are available at b o t h t h e Central Unit o n Van Raalte Avenue and t h e N o r t h Side Unit located at Pine Creek E l e m e n t a r y School. You m u s t b e 18 years of age a n d will b e s u b j e c t e d to a b a c k g r o u n d check prior to receiving any volunteer responsibilities. Please call Brian Van Kley at (616) 392-4102 or email b v a n k l e y ÂŽ

G o l g o t h a C h u r c h is looking for college v o l u n t e e r s or interns (unpaid). They are a n o n - p r o f i t youth m i n i s t r y for underprivileged high school s t u d e n t s . W e d n e s d a y night m e e t i n g s consist of hanging out with t h e teens t h a t a t t e n d b y playing g a m e s , s k a t e b o a r d i n g and playing pool. They also m e e t o n Saturday a n d Sunday nights for guys a n d girls Bible studies. Golgotha's vision is to create a s t r o n g c o m m u n i t y in w h i c h y o u n g adults feel consistently accepted a n d loved. G o l g o t h a is located at 412 W. 2 4 t h St. (just west of Holland High School). If interested please c o n t a c t John Kapenga at jkapenga@gmail.com or (616) 834-1652.

bgch.org for m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n .

Wrap Around Mentoring Spend just two h o u r s a week with a y o u t h involved in t h e mental health, child welfare or juvenile c o u r t system. Participate in c o m m u n i t y activitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;fishing, playing sports, going bowling, eating o u t , m i n i a t u r e golfing, doing crafts, etc. This is a paid o p p o r t u n i t y that requires a m i n i m u m of a o n e - y e a r c o m m i t m e n t and your o w n t r a n s p o r t a t i o n . Please c o n t a c t Tesha Post at tpost@cac-ottawa.org for m o r e information!

The Bridge

Children's Ministries The Children's Ministries d e p a r t m e n t at Central Wesleyan C h u r c h has o p p o r t u nities t o help with special n e e d s children at 9:15 a.m. o n Sundays. T h e r e a r e also o p p o r t u n i t i e s t o teach S u n d a y school classes at t h e 10:50 a.m. service. Classes have b e t w e e n 10 -15 children and are great practice for aspiring t e a c h e r s . If interested, please email Kay at kbusscher@centralwesleyan.org.

The Bridge is a y o u t h c e n t e r for middle school kids in Zeeland. The Bridge h a s several different p r o g r a m s , including a recreational a f t e r - s c h o o l p r o g r a m o n Tuesdays a n d Thursdays (kids just c o m e in t o play g a m e s a n d h a n g out), an alt e r n a t i v e s u s p e n s i o n p r o g r a m and a basketball t e a m . The biggest need for volu n t e e r s right n o w is with t h e Bridge to Excellence p r o g r a m , w h i c h m e e t s M o n d a y s , W e d n e s d a y s and Fridays f r o m 2:45 p.m. - 5 p.m. M e n t o r s m u s t c o m m i t t o at least o n e day a week to c o m e to t h e Bridge and t u t o r s t u d e n t s . They build lasting relationships with t h e stud e n t s and help t h e m t o succeed in school. T h e r e is also a n e e d in t h e Explorers' Club, w h i c h is a p r o g r a m for e l e m e n t a r y stud e n t s o n M o n d a y s after school. If you are interested in any of these things, please c o n t a c t Jackie

Bilingual Tutors Holland Public Schools is in n e e d of o n e or two v o l u n t e e r s t h a t would be willing to work with high school s t u d e n t s two t o t h r e e t i m e s a week. They need to b e bilingual in Spanish and have an interest in m a t h and sciences. They would be working w i t h t w o Latino s t u d e n t s at t h e high school f r o m 12:30 t o 2 p.m. If interested please c o n t a c t John Vega at (616) 494-2164.

Accounting and Management Tax Preparer G o o d w i l l Industries of M u s k e g o n is looking for s t u d e n t s w h o wish t o aid low i n c o m e families with filing their taxes. A n y interested s t u d e n t should c o n t a c t v o l u n t e e r services o r G o o d w i l l Industries at (231) / 2 8 -

at (616)772-3238 o r j m r l 0 0 3 5 5 @ h o t m a i l . c o m .

7871.

Health Services Lakeshore Habitat for Humanity Holland Rescue Mission The Holland Rescue Mission is a n o n - p r o f i t organization c o m m i t t e d t o serving t h e h o m e l e s s and less f o r t u n a t e in W e s t Michigan. The store serves t o m a k e t h e Mission less d e p e n d e n t o n individual d o n a t i o n s and m o r e self s u p p o r t ing. They are looking for a n y o n e w h o is willing to d o everyt h i n g f r o m m a i n t e n a n c e t o w i n d o w displays. To learn m o r e , check o u t t h e website at www.hollandrescue.org.

This organization is a p a r t n e r s h i p , h o u s e building and h o m e o w n e r s h i p Christian ministry in t h e greater Holland area. It is based o n t h e principle that all G o d ' s p e o p l e deserve a d e c e n t place to live a n d that o u r c o m m u n i t y is a better place w h e n that occurs. They a r e looking for v o l u n t e e r s for t h e following positions: General Office Administration - This o p p o r t u n i t y has m a n y different aspects ranging f r o m a n s w e r i n g p h o n e s t o data entry. It's a great way to m e e t n e w people and m a k e n e w c o n t a c t s for your future, as well as s h a r p e n your typing a n d basic c o m p u t e r skills.

Jordan River Ministries Jordan River Ministries is an agency d e d i c a t e d to helping w o m e n w h o a r e recently o u t of jail or d r u g rehab. They are in n e e d of volunteers t o help with special projects. Please c o n t a c t Patricia at (616) 405-2185 or email p s p s s i m m o n s @ y a h o o . com.

Warm Friend The W a r m Friend, located at 5 East 8th St., is looking for activities assistants w h o will assist t h e activity c o o r d i n a t o r with various activities (birthday parties. Bingo, outings). Monday, Tuesday and Thursday day t i m e s are available.

M o r e than Just H o u s e s - Habitat for H u m a n i t y is looking for volunteers to put o n their work b o o t s and help t h e m build s o m e houses. Lakeshore Habitat for H u m a n i t y has built over 80 h o u s e s in t h e Holland area over t h e last 17 years, all with t h e help of volunteers. Retail M a n a g e m e n t a n d Service - If you are looking for a good t i m e while helping great people, consider serving at t h e Lakeshore Habitat for H u m a n i t y ReStore. You will learn t h e basic "ins and out's" of w h a t it takes to r u n a retail store as you volunteer. If interested in any of these o p p o r t u n i t i e s , c o n t a c t S h a n n o n M o r t o n : s m o r ton@lakeshorehabitat.org or (616) 393-8001, ext. 103. SOURCE: WWW.HOPE.EDU/VOLUNTEER, GRAPHICS BY DYLANA PINTER


8

VOICES MARCH 5, 2 0 0 8

THE ANCHOR

In pursuit of knowledge Emily Papple

I voted for her My hope is that 10 years from now. after I 've been across the street at work for a while, they '11 all be glad they gave me that wonderful vote. -Sandra Day O ' C o n n o r I am a political science minor, and yet I tend to avoid situations which force me to put my two cents in on political issues. When conversations turn to politics, even the most civilized human beings tend to morph into donkeys and elephants. They spit rude remarks and vague viewpoints across the table at one another so fast that even they have difficulty keeping up. These people hope to gain a tiny bit of

satisfaction in the other person's conceding to their side of the issue on the table. Considering this, it is somewhat difficult for me to write this column, and yet, I feel it necessary to admit that I did indeed vote for Hillary Clinton in the Michigan primary election. Before you count me out as a complete nut case and move on to the next column, please read on. it seems clear that regardless of who is sworn into office in January, our country will still be at war. The national budget will still be in deficit, and there still will be discussion on how much money should go to education, health care and foreign aid. The debates over abortion and homosexual marriage will continue. Furthermore, regardless of how much the candidates try to persuade us now there is a certian reality check which comes with the final vote count. The proportion of what is actually accomplished once sworn in will be much less than 100 percent of the candidate's lofty goals and dreams which are currently being plastered across our TV

Of these 43 presidents, all have been male. All white. All over the age of 42. All, to some extent, of the Christian faith. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in his famous "1 Have a Dream" speech stated: "1 have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." Since the time that M L K delivered this speech, our country has made many advancements in this area. Equal rights laws. Title IX and other political advancements have helped us in shaping a country where minorities have equal rights. While we have come along way since the day of the "I Have a Dream" speech, we still have along way to go. I voted for Hillary Clinton not because I agree with her on every issue but because, in my opinion, the fact that Clinton is female is a deciding issue. Emily was shocked to discover that, according to the BBC. a 21-year-old British man recently fathered his seventh child, albeit all seven were by different women.

screens, newspaper pages, radio waves and front lawns. I know these realities are sometimes difficult for our optimistic American ideologies to come to terms with in the midst of pre-election season. Considering to some extent these factors are true, is it wrong to consider what can possibly be resolved in the upcoming term other than the issues which are currently on the table? Is it crazy to consider what can possibly be accomplished by electing a female or minority member of society into office? Furthermore, is it crazy of me to think that in electing a female or minority member of society to the highest and most esteemed position in the country something amazing can possibly be accomplished outside of the Oval Office? I don't think so; in fact, I predict that, if elected, a female or minority president will break more barriers and thus be more effective than a male WASP president would be regardless of the political affiliation of the future president. The U.S. has had 43 presidents to date.

From the inside out those months. Whatever the cause, the spring semester slump hit Hope hard this year. According to my calculations, social interaction has dropped drastically and procrastination has reached an all-time high. It seems like the entire campus is waiting breathlessly for any sign of spring. But w h o knows how long that will take, and is it really worth the wait? "Is it worth it?" A few of my friends asked me this thought-provoking question the other day. I think the question "Is it worth it?" applies directly to the spring semester slump and our time here at Hope. Think about all that y o u ' v e invested here at Hope. If y o u ' r e like me, you spent hours compiling your application and essay to be admitted to Hope College. Once accepted, you forked over a deposit followed by a hearty year's tuition. But money isn't the only thing y o u ' v e invested here. Think about the hours you've invested in

i

Ashley DeVecht

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Is it w o r t h it? Over the past month or two, the atmosphere at Hope College has changed. The air has grown heavier, the Pine Grove is deserted and Hope College students are embracing the hibernation season. Some of you may know what I'm talking about: the spring semester slump. It usually hits the student body between the months of January and March. Its symptoms are laziness, grouchiness and sometimes depression. Some blame it on the weather; others say it's due to a lack of holidays between

your education. If my math is right, I have spent about 1,408 hours in class or doing homework (16 credit hours multiplied by the 88 weeks I've been in school) during my college career. That's no walk in the park. A third aspect that some may not consider is that y o u ' v e invested yourself. Every time you interact with other students, you add to the Hope College experience — the atmosphere, if you will. Your presence alone adds value to this thing called Hope. Hope is more than a place, and it's more than the classes we take. Hope is a social environment. "Is it worth it?" What are you doing right now to make all that you've invested worth while? Are you meeting as many new people as you can? Are you diving into the class content and taking from it as much as you can? Sometimes that can be hard. But this whole "college experience" is what you invest in it. It's a lot like the stock market —

the higher the risk, the greater the reward. When was the last time you stepped out of your comfort zone and took a risk? For some, taking a risk is raising their hand in class. For others, it means sitting down at a new table at Phelps and making friends with strangers. Do something that you never thought you would do. W h o knows, maybe the person you meet at Phelps will become your best friend. Maybe after completing your biology class you'll decide to become a surgeon for a non-profit organization like Operation Smile. The risk and investment may seem tough now. But just like winter melts into spring, your time here can be worth it if you welcome the risks and make the most of every second. Ashley DeVecht is looking forward to the spring weather and the joy that it brings. She intends to spend all of her time in the Pine Grove as soon as the snow melts.

LETTERS TO T H E E D I T O R S To t h e E d i t o r s : With the completion of my first semester at Hope College in my back pocket, I have begun to notice some things, things some may find significant and noteworthy. Thus, a significant note seemed only fitting to write you. I currently reside in Scott Hall. To me, this dormitory has been a great blessing as a haven for beginning my studies here at Hope, not only for its warm atmosphere and pleasant living arrangements, but also for my fellow residents of whom I speak with only the highest regard. These individuals have been key in my quest for a greater grasp of what defines a community. Along with its great people, Scott houses the Phelps Scholars Program THE

(PSP), which is a program that encourages diversity by gathering a mixed-race community and requires its members to take their diversity-centered first year seminar class together. As much as I admire these ideas to increase diversity and its awareness, I feel that Hope and, more specifically, the PSP itself should reconsider how it houses its culturally rich members. If the program's main goal and purpose is, in fact, diversity, then why would its members be huddled together in one dormitory? Not only does this single-out Scott as being the ifcweird dorm," but it just does not make much sense to encourage a diverse outlook on our world and community and then keep the people who value that outlook most constrained. Now, some

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tiple studies show that students who have been exposed to and work with diversity generally do better academically. Hope's vision statement states that, " H o p e will increasingly reflect the presence and influence of students, faculty and staff from diverse racial and cultural b a c k g r o u n d s . . . " If this is to be true, then w e must rethink the current housing arrangements on campus are for the Phelps Scholars Program, thereby giving more opportunity for the rest of the student body to experience the diversity that Hope has to offer. Do we as a college want to be viewed as one that gives an impression of segregation? We as a student body are a vast majority Caucasian-American; why shove diversity in a comer? —Trevor Coeling ( ' I I )

2 0 0 8 SPRING SEMESTER STAFF

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EDITOR-IS-CHIFJ

coordinators may think it impossible to accomplish a successful program and, at the same time, have its members scattered from 10th Street all the way to 13th Street I say, let us compromise. Take a look at the three small dormitories on Hope's south side, just a mere 30 feet apart from each other - Lichty, Scott and Wyckoff. These housing units are still close together, yet this rearrangement would open up more opportunities for more people to appreciate the diversity we have here on campus. I believe this plan would give more opportunities to students who do not come into much contact with the Phelps Scholars to fiise strong friendships with them, therefore facilitating active participation in discussions inspired by the PSP's first year seminar course. In addition, mul-

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VOICES

MARCH 5, 2 0 0 8

THE ANCHOR

Beautiful feet Enter Jesus. The passion and devotion a mother shows to her child or a good husband has for his wife are only imitations, small replicas of the incomparable love God has given us in Christ. Isaiah 54:10 says, " ' T h o u g h the mountains be shaken and the hills be removed, yet my unfailing love for you will not be shaken nor m y covenant o f peace be removed,' says the Lord, who has compassion on you." One might think, 44A mountain, huh. What about this 4 blaa' I feel in my chest? What if he saw my life in shambles?" According to the Bible, Jesus isn't known for bailing out when life hits winter (or more accurately, when winter hits life). Think of Peter who denied him, Thomas who doubled him or Paul who persecuted him. Did they stop G o d ' s love? Nope. In fact, if we could see the son clearly and hear God's voice through the clouds, 1 imagine he would say something like this: Dear child, think of the passion 1 had for the world over 2000 years ago when I died

on the cross—this is the same love 1 have for you today. I am at war against all that comes between us and I long to show you my grace. The battering ram of my goodness is T H U D , THUD, THUD-ing on the door of your heart, the temple where you now sit enthroned. Let M E come in and take control. I love you more than you love yourself. Though it seems this good news couldn't possibly get any better, there's more: You will have bad days! You used to think, "bad days are bad days; days when I am unloved by God." But, m y precious bride, this is not so. The winter seasons in your life have never been, and never will be a sign that my faithfulness is weakening, or my joy is leaving or my love is fading. N E V E R ! In fact, I've designed these times special so that I can be faithful, I can love and 1 can impart j o y to you in a special way that doesn't come when the sun is shining. You might not feel these good gifts of mine. In fact, you probably w o n ' t , but I'm still at work all the same.

Remember Lazarus? He was dead, yet I brought him back to life. Like a husband planning a surprise for his wife, I'll bring your heart alive too. When darkness falls on you and all your hope is buried in snow, remember this, I love you. You will think, "yes, but not the l m e ' 1 am right now." Then I will say, " N o ! When I say, 4 1 love you,' I mean Y O U . Not 4 you' version two, or the 4 you' you used to be, or the 4 you' you may be someday, but you, sitting on your bed crying, stressed out with school and money and love and life. You. I love you. The world might flip upside down with j o y when you hear me—but maybe not. If not, I ' m right here ready to tell you again and again and again. 1 love you. Behind the clouds, the sun is still shining bright as ever. Cheer up; spring is knocking at the door. Bryant is wishing a very happy birthday to his homehoy, Brent Martin. Have a good one, pal.

tennis balls and Frisbees. Really, what Elvis is famous for is figuring out the optimal route when running into the lake to catch a Frisbee. From what I understand. Dr. Tim Pennings' theory is that nature, including dogs and other animals, automatically figures out the easiest, quickest path — like water running down a hillside or lightning

any milk. And let's not even talk about how much 1 complicate interpersonal relationships. That would just be embarrassing. M y question is, then, are we natural beings? Yeah, we die and we live to procreate, which means we are alive. We have hair and give live births and nurse our young, which I guess makes us mammals. Yet w e have this self-awareness that no other animal seems to have — what is the meaning of our lives? — and it seems to stifle our evolutionary process. I wonder, does Elvis worry about whether he is catching Frisbees the easiest way possible? Does he worry if fetching tennis balls means anything? I kind of think that he just likes to play fetch. In other words, why do we worry about what our lives mean or if we are doing things efficiently? Maybe with the very act of questioning our meaning, we render ourselves inefficient and our lives mean-

ingless. Sorry. I didn't start out writing to take it this close to nihilism. But I guess my point is, instead of worrying about meaning, w h y don't we just live; eat and procreate

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Bryant Ross

W i n t e r blues

Winter is kicking my butt. How about you? Tve met dozens of people who are sick of the ice and snow, not to mention all the crud that goes along with it. These weary months can leave us feelingisolated, low on energy and far from God. And on top of it all there's still that Spanish test you have to study for (can I get an t 4 amen!"?). Winter can be a pain. I ' v e heard of G o d ' s love being compared to the sun—giving us energy and hope throughout the day. Then again, March is looking pretty cloudy. What is God thinking on days like today?

Rumbleweeds Jeremy Benson

The simple life I think there are three primary traits that make Hope College what it is: one, its pairing of high-quality liberal arts educating with Dutch-Reform religious traditions; two, all the students, faculty and staff who aren't exactly purveyors of those religious traditions (just don't tell the donors!); and three, Elvis, the calculus dog. W e ' v e all seen Elvis running across campus, sniffing out students who haven't done laundry since their last trip h o m e ; chasing down the abominable Squabbit; and calculating bifurcations, tangents, antiderivatives and multifications of various

striking. Certainly, that makes sense ... for dogs and lightning. But, when compared to my own experience, it just doesn't add up (or FOIL out). I complicate everything. Take an average afternoon o f running errands — go to the bank, buy milk, cheese and frozen pizza, deliver top-secret folio to my correspondent on the north side and meet friend for coffee on the south side — by the time I get to the coffee shop, 1 realize I forgot to buy milk. Not only that, but I never even went to the bank. At the end of the day, I've toured all of Ottawa and Allegan counties, and I still don't have

and die. So. What are you doing after graduation? — Wait a second. — You know? I don't agree with anything I just wrote. Truth be told, all those complications are what 1 enjoy about life: getting lost, falling in love, heartbreaks—the loud scenic route. So, I take it all back. Hey—anyone want to play some Frisbee? Jeremy Benson would like everyone to remember he is an English major, with very little background (outside of his liberal arts education) in math, science or philosophy. Forgiveness and/or corrections may be sent to anchor@hope.edu or Jeremy benson@ hope.edu.

LETTERS T O T H E E D I T O R S To t h e E d i t o r s : On behalf of the 2008 Hope College M e n ' s Lacrosse Team and staff, we would like to thank the Hope students, Hope College Athletic Director, Mr. Ray Smith, the college administration including President Dr. James Bultman, Director of Public Relations Mr. Tom Renner and his staff, and The Anchor and Co-Editors Ms. Emily Papple and Ms. Evelyn

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Ferris State University at Holland Municipal Stadium at 7 p.m. Thank you again and we look forward to seeing you. — The Members of the 2008 Men's Hope College Lacrosse Team, Head Coach Mike Schanhals, Assistant Coaches Tom Theile, Andy Shults, Tyler Osbum and Team Physician Dr. Todd Harbum.

Daniel for all the support you have given our team in past years and the present. It is greatly appreciated. We would also like to extend an invitation to all Hope College students, faculty and administration to come out and attend our games this season. We look forward to an exciting season, which is already underway. The first home game is scheduled for April 2 against

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10

NEWS

THE ANCHOR

MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

Pew Society brings lecturer

Model UN to come to Hope

â&#x20AC;˘ PEW, from page 1

â&#x20AC;˘ MODEL UN, from page 4

Worthington has influenced many people, from the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission to the president of the John Templeton Foundation, to focus on forgiveness in many all aspects of life. Professor Marc Baer, director of Hope's Pew Society program, believes that the topic of Worthington's work, forgiveness, is something worth considering. "1 think forgiveness, for Christians and non-Christians alike, is one of the hardest things we confront," Baer said.

both ways," Worthington said. In his lecture, Worthington focused on his personal experiences with God that came out of his research. He emphasized the occasions in his life when he fought with God. "I defeated God,'' Worthington said numerous times during his lecture. However, every time he thought he defeated God, Worthington proved himself wrong. By following God instead of his own wishes.

u D c o m i n q shows

E C O S O C , Security Council and 1CJ members also attend an opening banquet on Thursday. The Hope College Model United Nations is organized by students in two political science courses aimed at developing an understanding of international politics and the United Nations' role in international disputes. The Hope students serve as session chairpersons and perform other administrative tasks throughout the planning and execution of the event. The secretary generals for this year's conference are sophomores Ethan B. Morrical, a political sci-

ence major with a pre-med focus from Yorktown, Ind., and Nate Clements, an international studies and Japanese double major from Lowell. The high school coordinator isKendall Ramsden, a recent Hope graduate from Grand Haven. Senior Stelios Alveraz, a French, Spanish and international studies major from Paris, France is serving as media coordinator. Sophomore Alison Benoit of Muskegon is director of the Introductory General Assembly, while senior Stephanie Kirkham of Springfield, III., and sophomore Ally Veldermanof Hollandare directors of the Advanced General Assembly. Seniors Luke Heerema of Oak Park, 111., and Colin Law-

rence of Sterling, III., as well as sophomore Jordan Fullerof Leesburg, Ind., are the Security Council directors. Sophomore Megan Sweet of Salida, Calif., and junior Jeff Ichesco of Saline are directing the Economic/Social Council. Sophomore Stephanie Bogema of Kalamazoo is serving as the director of the International Court of Justice.

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SPORTS Athlete profile: Track sophomore Joanne Gabl Former U of M track and cross country runner excels on Hope College teams erything is a n o n y m o u s . " Gabl has also been impressed by the outlook of the cross country and track teams at Hope. Team m e m b e r s are not only focused on themselves but have pride in representing their college and their fellow classmates during their meets. "At Michigan, athletics are all about personal achievements without any focus on the t e a m , " Gabl said. " A t Hope, I feel like I am more a part of the team, and 1 am more involved in the team's success." Gabl also felt that when she was a m e m b e r o f Michigan's cross country and track teams, running consumed her entire

PHOTO BY JEFF VREDENBURG

R E A D Y T O R U N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joanne Gabl ( ' l O ) s t a n d s o u t s i d e t h e Dow Center g e t t i n g ready for another t r a c k p r a c t i c e In p r e p a r a t i o n for t h e 2 0 0 8 season. Chris Lewis SENIOR STAFF WRITER

J o a n n e G a b P s story is different compared to most o f her fellow teammates on Hope College's track team. Gabl (MO) began her college education at the University of Michigan and ran cross country and track for the Wolverines. However, she decided to leave one of the most wellknown colleges in the nation to attend Hope. Gabl did not feel comfortable as a m e m b e r of the University of Michigan's cross country and track teams. She also did not view herself as fitting in at the large campus. 44 At U of M, I felt like I had

made the w r o n g decision. 1 just had this feeling that I was not where I was supposed to be," Gabl said. Gabl is a nursing major, as well as a cross country and track runner where she specializes in the 3K and 5K. At Michigan, she felt she had to be either a student or an athlete. Academics were not as much of a factor at Michigan as they are at Hope. " M y former coach at Michigan wanted me to choose between being either a nursing maj o r or a runner," Gabl said. Gabl is impressed by Hope's nursing program, which she feels is much stronger than Michigan's. Gabl also likes the focus

Hope students have on their classes, a trait that is not shared by many athletes at the University of Michigan. "1 can really be a student athlete at Hope. I do not have to c o m p r o m i s e academics here," Gabl said. The community that Hope students and faculty have has certainly helped Gabl feel more at ease about her decision to transfer. "1 love the small college atmosphere here. When 1 walk across campus, people actually smile and say 4 hi,' even if I do npt k n o w t h e m , " Gabl said. "At Michigan, everyone is listening to their iPods. Everyone and ev-

life. "While 1 ran for Michigan, I not only felt like I was running for myself on a team that did not have any real team atmosphere, I also felt like, running was my entire life and that everything 1 did was focused on running," Gabl said. However, transitioning to Hope was not a completely easy decision for Gabl. "I was flip-flopping on whether or not to transfer last spring. Then I went to my twin sister's Hillsdale College meets and saw her team there," Gabl said. " W h e n I saw the chemistry that her team had as a smaller college, I knew I had to transfer." Gabl has enjoyed running for Hope College so far and feels comfortable when she is with her teammates. "I have felt so w e l c o m e d by the team," Gabl said. " M y love for running has come back again."

Softball opens season with three wins at indoor tourney Nick Hinkle S P O R T S EDITOR

A new snow-covered stadium did not stop the Hope College w o m e n ' s softbal| team from accumulating its first f e w wins of the season. On Feb. 29 and March 1, the Flying Dutch traveled to Marquette to play in the Finlandia tournament held in an indoor dome. Hope won three out o f its four g a m e s with the team's only loss coming to UW-Oshkosh 110. Hope's wins c a m e against Mount Mary 11-0, Concordia 14-1 and UW-LaCrosse 8-4. T h e event was the first time the team has played in an indoor tournament. T h e indoor dome was different compared the outdoor experience the team had experienced in past years, especially the difference between the turf and dirt surfaces. "Its was really cool," coach Karla Wolters said. "We have never played in a dome before. We had a lot of questions going in but it was a neat experience." The tournament also provided Wolters and the team with an idea of where the team is right

11

THE ANCHOR

MARCH 5. 2 0 0 8

the Dutch look ahead to the now physically and mentally. spring trip and M1AA competi"This was my first time starttion. H o p e ' s first M I A A game is ing (the season) before Florida," April 2 against Albion College. Wolters said. "It was a good measuring stick. Also, it was a The Dutch defeated Albion last season 5-1. Last year, Hope fingood bonding experience, with ished 25-13 overall and 12-4 in 18 plus hours you can't help it." the M I A A , which earned them a After the tournament showthird place finish in the confering, Wolters was pleased with ence. the t e a m ' s effort. Despite having to wait for " O u r defense played solid," M I A A Wolters c o m p e t isaid. "We tion, Hope only had "We have a hungry bunch, has already a couple and they are hungry to do set some of errors p r e s e a son welir in four goals. games. We - C o a c h Karla W o l t e r s " C e r had very tainly, we few mental = = = = = want to win mistakes = = = = = the confernot giving ence and go on to the national away easy outs." tournament," Wolters said. "We However, the team still has arhave a seasoned team with a lot eas for improvement. Especially of third and forth years." on Saturday, the team faced good The Albion game will also be pitching, which revealed some of the first time Hope steps out onto H o p e ' s current weaknesses. it new field, Wolters Stadium. "We still need to work on our The stadium is named in honor plays and get more aggressive at the plate against good pitching," of Wolters and her husband Tom. Both are graduates of the Hope Wolters said. In closing out its indoor play. class of 1973.

"It is a tremendous facility," Wolters said. " W e want more grass and less snow. The girls are so eager." Wolters is excited to see how the new stadium will impact home games and o f f e r fans higher, more viewer-friendly seating. "With the new stadium, we will draw larger c r o w d s , " Wolters said. "We have always had a fan base, but with more seating more people will enjoy it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; young and old alike" Wolters Stadium features permanent stands for fans, a press box, spacious dugouts and public restrooms. Fans will have a clear view of the new playing field, along with seating for approximately 2 5 0 fans. Also, the area has a patio suitable for tailgating. For now, the Hope softball team will have to wail and prepare over spring break for their conference season, but they are looking forward to making their 2008 debut in the M I A A . "We want to play well every time we take the field," Wolters said. "We have a hungry bunch, and they are hungry to do well."

T H I S W E E K I N SPORTS Friday March 7 W o m e n ' s Basketball NCAA t o u r n a m e n t first round vs. Juniata College In Berea, Ohio at 5 p.m.

Saturday Men's Basketball

March 8

NCAA t o u r n a m e n t first round vs. TBA a t DeVos Fleldhouse a t 7 p.m.

M e n ' s Tennis Away vs. John Carroll In Oberlin, Ohio a t 8 a.m.

I N BRIEF

HOPE BASKETBALL PLAYERS RECEIVE CONFERENCE HONORS Men's honors: MIAA MVP Marcus Vanderheide Senior forward All-MIAA first team Tyler Wolfe Senior guard All-MIAA second team Derek Van Solkema Senior guard Women's honors Defensive Player of the Year Julie Henderson Senior guard All-MIAA first team Jordyn Boles Senior guard Philana Greene Sophomore guard All-MIAA second team Lindsay Lange Senior center

WOMEN SWIMMERS RECEIVE NCAA INVITATION Four Hope College women swimmers received an invitation to the 2008 N C A A swimmng and diving championships on March 13-15 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Hope's 400-yard medley relay qualified seventh with a time of 3:56.23. The four swimmers invited include Laura Ansilio ('09), Angela Griffore ( M l ) , Brittaney Reest ('09) and Kate Williams (MO). The team's invitation also makes them eligible to swim the 400-yard freestyle relay, 800-yard freestyle relay, 200-yard freestyle relay and 200-yard medley relay. Reest, seeded fifth, also qualified individually in the 100-yard backstroke.

HOCKEY BOUND FOR NATIONAL TOURNAMENT The Hope hockey team will face Fairfield University March 12 at 7 p.m. in the first round of the ACHA national hockey tournament. The game will lake place at the Rochester Rec Center in Rochester, Minn.


1 2

THE

SPORTS

ANCHOR

MIAA

M A R C H 5. 2 0 0 8

CHAMPIONS- Derek

Van Solkema ('08), left, passes the ball down the court In the MIAA championship game. Women's head coach Brian Morehouse, below, prays with the t e a m after their tournament victory. Three Man Ben Thomas ('11), right, crowd surfs during the Calvin game to pump up the fans. Both teams captured the MIAA tournament and automatic NCAA bids.

I

I

PHOTO EDITOR DAVID MOORE

DOUBLE DUTCH:

From the Outside In Regional coaches weigh in on Hope's teams

Teams win MIAA; enter NCAA tournament ranked number one Gordie Fall STAFF W R I T E R

Men

Nick Hinkle SPORTS EDITOR

Capital University Coach Damon Goodwin "Every year Hope has been a very strong team, they always have excellent athletes. This year is obviously no exception; they have shown that they are one of the best teams in the nation."

W h e a t o n College Coach Bill Harris " W h e n we played Hope early in the year I thought that they were one o f the best teams in the nation and they obviously have proven that."

Women H o w a r d Payne University Coach Chris Kielsmeier "From what I know, Hope has great depth, a talented roster of players throughout their lineup. All of the members of the team play a lot of minutes and there are bench players who could easily be starters on other teams, without a doubt."

Juniata College Coach Danny Young "We are expecting a physical game. We know that Hope will come out with everything that they have. So we need to match them with our physicalness and aggressiveness."

On March 1, both m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s basketball teams walked off the court as MIAA champions. The men defeated rival Calvin College 88-72, while the women defeated Albion College 70-59. The m e n ' s team was presented with both M I A A conference trophies, one for the season title and one for the tournament title. In the 2007-08 season, Hope won their 34 M I A A title and their seventh M I A A tournament. Hope's win on Saturday night won the M I A A tournament title and clinched an automatic bid in the N C A A tournament. Along with beating Calvin, Hope defeated Adrian 83-64 and Alma 75-51 during the week. In Friday's semifinal, guard Derek Van Solkema's ( ' 0 8 ) half court buzzer-beater proved to be the difference, as Hope used that momentum to build a 22point second half lead. Along with Van Solkema's 13 points, Hope's scoring attack featured forward Marcus Vanderheide's 24 points and Tyler Wolfe's ( ' 0 8 ) 18 points. " W e ' v e got a lot of guys playing well and playing well together, especially since it's the most crucial time of the season," Van Solkema said. After this tournament, Hope was undefeated against rival

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Calvin this season going 3-0. "(The victory . over Calvin) was one of our goals at the start of the season, and it was a really good feeling to do," Van Solkema said. "We executed well and ended their run. It really shows our character." Hope begins the NCAA tournament by hosting a second round tournament game. The Dutchmen earned a first round bye and will play the winner of the Capital/Bethany game on March 8 at 7 p.m. in DeVos Fieldhouse. The w o m e n ' s team experienced equal success in defeating Albion. With the victory, Hope captured the tournament championship, completed its undefeated regular season (27-0) and received an automatic bid into the N C A A tournament. "Obviously, one of our goals was to win the last three games to go undefeated, but receiving an automatic bid was huge," guard Jordyn Boles ( ' 0 8 ) said. In Saturday's game, Hope had many standout performances including Lindsay Lange ('08) who finished with 13 points, three blocks and six rebounds. Carrie Snikkers ( ' I I ) also had a solid performance with 10 points and seven rebounds, while Philana Greene (MO) tied Lange for high point with 13 and had five assists and four steals. "Saturday was one of our best games," Boles said. "We got excited about the little things."

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In addition to a team effort, Hope had stellar defense, which included excellent rebounding. Hope had 14 more rebounds and six more steals than Albion. "We played really good defense," center and forward Courtney Knox ('09) said. "If we out rebounded them, then we knew we would most likely win." This tournament title marks Hope's seventh in the past nine years. However, this year's championship was a bit different. In commenting on this y e a r ' s championship, Knox, who won the title freshman year, said, "It was kind of different being undefeated and being more experienced. It was awesome to do it again." Now, the team looks ahead to the N C A A tournament. Hope will face Juniata (18-9) in the first round in Berea, Ohio on March 7 at 5 p.m. "We are expecting our best game," Knox said. "We will take one game at a time." Also, the Dutch are rethinking how they look at the N C A A bracket. Hope's immediate fourteam bracket includes D'Youville (22-5), Juniata, Baldwin-Wallace (26-2) and Hope. "Most teams look at it as a 64team bracket," Boles said. "We are focused on this weekend as a four-team bracket. Anything can happen and w e will leave it all out there."

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