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IMarcli 2003 Two d o w n -

Hope C o l l e g e •

Holland, Michigan • A student-run nonprofit publication •

S e r v i n g t h e Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 116 years

Briefs Calvin student faces ticketscalping charges Holland policc plan to file a c r i m i n a l c o m p l a i n t against a C a l v i n student, w h o s e n a m e has noi been released, for allegedly attempting to sell tickets to last w e e k ' s 8 0 - 8 1 H o p e M1AA t o u r n a m e n t s e m i f i n a l victory over Calvin. T h e student w a s trying to sell the tickets, which he got f o r free f r o m Calvin, f o r $20 each. At the time tickets to the g a m e were still available f o r S5 each. Michigan stale law allows g a m e tickets to be resold, but only at o r b e l o w f a c e v a l u e . Penalties for scalping tickets include u p to 93 days in jail and a $ 5 0 0 fine.

Video games debate date set T h e Student Congresssponsored J a m e s E. Bultman Speaker Series featuring a debate between attorney Jack T h o m p s o n and Rolling Stone editor David Kushner on violence in video games, has been scheduled f o r 7 p.m. March 25 in D i m n e n t Chapel. It is titled "Video Games: T h e Bottom Line, G a m e r s vs. Blamers: Are video games training killers or simply entertaining?"

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A/VCHOH P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A With his team standing behind him, women's basketball coach Brian Morehouse addresses a pep rally Sunday night. The Flying Dutch play their first-round game in the Dow Center Wednesday against Mount St. Joseph. The Dutchmen have a first-round bye and will host a second-round game on Saturday, m o r e H O O P S o n 8

Mock U.N. conference has busy agenda Kurt Koehler CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

its kind in the state, will bring about 9 0 0 students and faculty f r o m 45

W e a p o n s of m a s s d e s t r u c t i o n , sustainable development, terrorism, the global water crisis, global health care, and the status of w o m e n are issues w e hear about on television or read about in the paper almost daily. A s the United States fights to win support f o r a second Iraq resolution, these issues and others will be tackled this w e e k at Hope College's 31M annual Model United Nations conference. T h e conference, which is among the largest of

high schools to Hope. T h e conference opens T h u r s d a y with a keynote address by Bruce van Voorst, a retired correspondent for N e w s w e e k and Time magazines (see page 2 for more on van Voorst) and concludes on Friday. Organizers of the event believe t h e y will l e a v e b e t t e r i n f o r m e d about issues that confront the global community. " I think, through them, they will learn a lot about IR (International

Relations).. Furthermore, w e hope that the students take a w a y f r o m this conference debating skills and an interest in international relat i o n s . " s a i d E l i z a b e t h Van Houwelingen ('03), w h o is serving as secretary general. Jack H o l m e s and Joel Toppen, professors of political science, are serving as advisors to the conference. H o l m e s believes that the participants in the c o n f e r e n c e get a chance to look at the world f r o m a different perspective through their participation in the conference.

'T think they can get an idea of what it's like to represent another country and ideas and an idea of the issues and thought processes that c o u n t r i e s go t h r o u g h w h e n they consider issues of i m p o r t a n c e to international politics," Holmes said of the conference. T h e conference itself will be divided into the Advanced General A s s e m b l y , w h i c h will deal with w e a p o n s of mass destruction, and sustainable development; the Introductory General Assembly, which

more MODEL UN on 3

Global tastes delight guests Fair gives students and others an opportunity to experience exotic foods Kurt Koehler CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

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A M C H O R P H O T O BY

BOB ONDRA

Fairgoers enjoyed cuisines from many different cultures on Saturday night. The International Food Fair tradition dates back over 25 years.

Last Saturday night the cultural diversity of Hope College's international students was on display. The annual International Food Fair w a s held celebrating the many cultures these students represent and their cuisines. The fair was sponsored and organized by the International Relations Club and by the Fried International Center. The food fair w a s prepared by the international students themselves, w h o alone or in groups, cooked one of their respective culture's cuisines for the fair. Tables that were set up to feature the food also displayed educational materials concerning the food

and the cultures that it originated from. Students also dressed in traditional cultural attire while they served the food out to m e m bers of the Hope community. Not everyone w h o participated was an international student. M e m b e r s of the latina Sigma Lambda G a m m a colony also participated. A m o n g these was Susana Rodriguez, w h o e n j o y e d the experience. "I had a great t i m e , a n d I w i s h 1 had d o n e it b e f o r e , " Rodriguez said. 4 'My organization cooked rice, c o m and flour quesadillas, pico de gallo, and guacamole representing Mexico. I felt it w a s a great success. I met a lot of people, everyone liked our food, and w e had a blast. We are planning on doing it again next year, and maybe w e will represent another country." T h e proceeds generated f r o m the ticket sales at the food fair w e r e then donated to the Heifer project.

Inside •

Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Habitat Ceramics Campus, page 2

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Reality television Spotlight, page 3

Dance 29 Arts, page 5

Strength Training Sports, page 7


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Students learn for a good cause

Advanced ceramics class makes bowls to sell, for Habitat for Humanity charity Anjey Dykhuis CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

On Friday at lunchlime, the Ceramics section of the DePree Art Center will sponsor a fundraiser f o r Habitat for Humanity. For the p a s t s e v e r a l m o n t h s , s t u d e n t s of D a r y n L o w m a n ' s , professor of art. Advanced Ceramics class, Daryn Lovvman, and a few others have been crafting bowls to sell at the fundraiser. In the ceramics section of DePree Art Center, 16 students will sell bowls and soup to fill the b o w l s between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Half of the profit made will be donated to

Not ail ceramics is stuff you see at craft fairs. —Daryn Lowman,

the local Habitat for Humanity fund. T h e other half will go towards the college's Ceramics Guild. With this extra money, advanced students will be able to do more with their projects. This money will fund extra supplies that the budget would not necessarily be able to cover. "The idea to make b o w l s is not original, but what's n e w is the need for the ceramics department to not only give some example of students' work, but also to give something to a local cause," said L o w m a n . T h e students involved are creating almost 3 0 0 individually crafted bowls, all of which are microwave and dishwasher safe. S o m e b o w l s were gas-fired, s o m e wood-fired, and some salt-fired. T h e last of them will be fired tomorrow night, so the bowls as well as the soup will be fresh. Prices will range f r o m $5 to $50. For an additional $5, lunch can be added to a bowl of choice - o n e of three types of soup. Vegan, vegetarian, or chili. T h e w h o l e Holland c o m m u n i t y is invited along with all of Hope College. " W e ' v e also hit on Grand Rapids to c o m e out," L o w m a n

said. " Y o u r p u b l i c gets to k n o w s o m e t h i n g about ceramics. It's a technique that takes time to learn what you want. Not all ceramics is stuff that you see at craft fairs. W e ' r e learning about an object in order to design something that's functional. T h e a t m o s p h e r e is still about education," said L o w m a n . "I want the audience to be educated with an aspect of AMCHOff P H O T O BY A N J E Y D Y K H U I S pots that students h a v e Art instructor Daryn Lowman works on an original c o m e to explore. Serious bowl at a pottery wheel in DePree Art Center. research into elements of L o w m a n . "It takes time to get these details a bowl, an object of utility." Not each student is creating the same numtogether — making for this cause and energy ber of bowls, but between L o w m a n and the f r o m producing." " F o r each one to be completely unique is 16 students involved, the bowls will be ready a nice w a y to think about individuality," said f o r Friday. "Students have really g r o w n in enthusiasm as this has come to fruition," said Lowman.

Student Nurses Association brings RN to lecture Speaker takes cliche and transforms it to teach about nursing Stephanie Szydlowski S T A F F REPORTER

T h e old cliche "saving the world one person at a t i m e " has been applied to many causes ranging f r o m fighting for human rights and against hunger to religious evangelism. N o w it also extends to the profession of nursing. The Hope College Student Nurses Association is sponsoring " N u r s e s : S a v i n g the W o r l d O n e

Person at a T i m e ; " as part of its speaker series. Dorothy Bouwman, president of patient education company "Ludann Education Services," w i l l be p r e s e n t i n g the l e c t u r e , which is scheduled to be given tonight, at 7 : 3 0 p.m. D o r o t h y B o u w m a n h o l d s an M B A f r o m Davenport College, a m a s t e r of s c i e n c e in a d v a n c e d medical/surgical nursing from Wayne Slate University, a bachelor of s c i e n c e in p s y c h o l o g y f r o m Aquinas College, and her R N f r o m Blodgett School of Nursing. A s a m e m b e r of the A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a t i o n of N e u r o s u r g i c a l N u r s e s ( A A N N ) , the A m e r i c a n

Nurses Association, the Michigan Nurses Association and the Sigma Theta Tau International H o n o r Society of Nursing, B o u w m a n ' s perspective on the material is valuable to p r o s p e c t i v e n u r s i n g s t u d e n t s . T h e lecture will f o c u s on the leadership role played by nurses in patient education, and the material is currently used by nurses and physicians a c r o s s the country. D e b Sietsema, chair of the nursing department, encourages student attendance. "An integral role of the professional nurse is teaching clients utilizing a variety of resources to promote health. By attending this lecture, students will benefit by see-

ing how a specific patient education series can be utilized in teaching patients about their disease and the treatment n e e d e d , " S i e t s e m a said. Sietsema also provides that the patient education series is material easily understandable by the lay public. B o u w m a n is a favorite of Hope Nursing students. " [ B o u w m a n ] is a great professor. She knows h o w to take her enthusiasm and passion for nursing and instill it in her students. You can tell that nursing is more than a j o b for [Bouwman], it's p a r t of w h o s h e i s , " s a i d L i s a Elenbaas ( ' 0 5 ) . Students are enc o u r a g e d to attend, b e c a u s e , ac-

cording to Sietsema, the benefits of this lecture include " r e c o g n i z i n g the application of patient education in an effective and creative m a n ner." Heather Tobert ( ' 0 5 ) thinks that attending the lecture will help her prepare for a career in nursing. "The nursing lecture is something I ' m looking f o r w a r d to . . . to educate me [on] h o w I can be a better nurse f o r future patients," Tobert said. "Nurses: Saving the World O n e Person at a T i m e " will be presented free of charge in the Maas Center C o n f e r e n c e R o o m tonight at 7:30 p.m. and is open to participation f r o m the general public.

Mission trip prep winds down as Spring Break approaches Anjey Dykhuis C M A P U S BEAT EDITOR

W h a t do N e w York, California, and Latin America have in c o m m o n ? T h e s e are locations for C a m p u s Ministries sponsored mission trips over Spring Break. Students f r o m Hope are going to 23 different locations to help out with various ministries around North and Central America. Six of these groups are leaving the United States to go to the Dominican Republic, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Mexico. S o what are they doing right n o w with only 9 d a y s to go until s h o w t i m e ? Preparations, preparations, preparations. While some student participants may have just started getting ready f o r their trips, student leaders and non-student support m e m -

bers h a v e been planning for their trips since mid-October last semester. Each group takes one f e m a l e and o n e male leader. These were invited to lead the g r o u p s in October and set down a c o m m i t m e n t then. Ever since, t h e y ' v e been processing through the information f o r their trips. Students signed u p to go on Spring Break mission trips in early November, but s o m e have just begun planning over the past month o r so. Others h a v e been planning ever since they k n e w where they were going. Each trip differs in what is needed for preparation. S o m e g r o u p s have been meeting almost w e e k l y since they got their assignments. T w o leaders even traveled to their location to network with the people they'll be working with in

N e w York. Other trips have group and individual meeting times. "It all depends on h o w each group wants to spend its time," said Barb O s b u m , Outreach Director of C a m p u s Ministries. Leaders going on trips out of the country and requiring plane tickets also have responsibilities to have fundraisers to get what they need financially straight. ' T h o s e people were all asked to start in that before Christmas break, and w e keep track of it. T h e y ' v e been sending out support letters starling months ago. in December and January," Osbum said. Leaders also have the responsibility of sending out letters to parents of students going along to let them k n o w what will happen, h o w to reach the group in event of emer-

gency, and m a n y leaders included specific prayer requests for the group throughout the week. S o m e of the trips who have been meeting quite often meet so frequently not because they want to bond, although that is part of it, O s b u m notes, but because they k n o w they will have a lot of responsibilities w h e n they gel to their destination. " S o m e groups actually have to plan their menu for the w e e k , " said O s b u m . T h e trip to P o m p a n o Beach, Florida, will be participating in leading worship their first day on the j o b , so they have been p r e p a r i n g that f o r quite s o m e time. " T h e y ' l l also be doing a lot of evangelism throughout the week, and they have two skits

more MISSIONS on 3

International relations expert to address Model UN banquet Erin Riley SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

A M C H O f ? P H O T O BY

ROB ONDRA

Van Voorst addresses HASP.

Having a professional career that tallies m o r e than a m i l l i o n f r e q u e n t - f l i e r m i l e s surely brings a wide-range of experience and k n o w l e d g e along with it. Bruce van Voorst, Holland native and Hope a l u m ( ' 5 4 ) e m b o d ied that career and is visiting Hope this w e e k to share his knowledgeable insight on international a f f a i r s . H e a d d r e s s e d the H o p e Academy of Senior Professionals ( H A S P ) on Tuesday, and he will address more than 9 0 0 high school students and faculty on Thursday at the 31" annual Model United Nations as the keynote speaker. Van Voorst retired f o u r years a g o after 35 years of experience as a magazine correspon-

dent for both Time Magazine and N e w s w e e k where he covered a wide spectrum of international issues. However, before entering journalism he served with both the CIA and Department of State, following, he served on the Senate Foreign Relations C o m m i t t e e . Throughout his career, he spent near 2 2 years o v e r s e a s o n a s s i g n m e n t s f r o m B o n n to Beirut, Brussels to Buenos Aires. D u r i n g his career, van Voorst spent 2 0 years as the Senior Correspondent f o r National Security at T i m e M a g a z i n e and 15 y e a r s as D i p l o m a t i c C o r r e s p o n d e n t f o r N e w s w e e k reporting on the Gulf War, vario u s Mideast wars, the Cyprus fighting, the soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, the Polish revolution, and many others. In addition.

van Voorst has interviewed m a n y of the leading w o r l d f i g u r e s of o u r t i m e i n c l u d i n g G e r m a n y ' s Willy Brandt and China's Chou En Lai. In his diplomatic roles he has reported on relations involving the United Nations and other international bodies. He will be using these e x p e r i e n c e s in his keynote a d d r e s s Thursday titled, "The United Nations, To Be or Not To Be," which will address the office's e f f e c t i v e n e s s in regard to current international issues. "This is definitely one of the best s p e a k e r s w e ' v e had in a w h i l e , " said E l i s a b e t h van H o u w e l i n g e n ( ' 0 3 ) M o d e l U.N. Secretary G e n e r a l , "he is a class-A speaker with a lot of inlemational experience, w e are very excited."


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Campus craves junk of reality food TV From 'Joe Millionaire' to The Bachelorette,' students get sucked in to unreal 'reality'

O s b o u r n e s , " "American Idol," The Real World." "Fear Factor," "Are You Hot," and more. These shows are pretty much all about w a t c h i n g real p e o p l e h u m i l i a t e themselves on national TV. but as the girls in Dykstra, Gilmore. and Katie Taylor many other people at Hope make SENIOR STAFF REPORTER clear, a u d i e n c e s love this s t u f f . During the month of February on Even the males can't resist. Wednesday nights, the girls of clusJon Ploch ('06) and his friends ter 3 - 2 in D y k s l r a h a d a big never miss an episode of "Joe Mild a t e . . . w i t h their TV. T h e y all huddled around it watching "The lionaire." "We blew off class activities for Bachelorette" on F O X faithfully this show. If someone wasn't here every week, tuning in to see which , desperate men would remain in the to watch it, w e ' d tape it for them. We even met over winter break to race to win T r i s t a ' s heart. T h e stakes were high, not only for the watch it." g u y s on the show, but for these Though the reality series boom seemed to be started by Survivor Hope students watching them. At in the summer of 2000, the first the beginning of "The Bachelorette," they all bet $1 on the show to succeed with this true-life format was "The Real World." Its three men they thought Trista might choose. Feb. 19, in the show's fi- p r e m i e r e on M T V h a p p e n e d 10 nale, those who bet on firefighter years ago. It's understandable h o w high bachelor Ryan cashed in. ' T h e Bachelorette" isn't the only school and college-age men and television program people are gowomen could relate to the content ing crazy for. Gilmore Hall resiof the show. Without scripts, the dent director K r i s t e n B o c h n i a k "characters" interact with one anthrew her inhabitants a "Joe Milother realistically and deal with issues that all viewers face without lionaire" party for the show's twothe moral lessons usually included hour finale. "It was a good mixer; it helped in sitcoms. Another lure for viewpromote socialization within the ers is the fantasy of living in the hall, and plus, it's just an addictive exciting places the show features. show," Bochniak said of the get-toBig cities, big houses, trendy decor, hot tubs, pools, and living with atgether. Reality shows have become the tractive members of the opposite obsession of the viewing public and sex are all part of the fantasy. Best just about every channel is cashing of all, the college students watching know that they have a shot of in on their success. It's hard to keep track of all of them; "Joe Millionauditioning and being picked to appear on "The Real World" next aire,". "Celebrity Mole," "Big Brother," "Survivor," "The season.

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A M C H O F / P H O T O BY

We blew off class activities for the show.

-Jon Ploch ('06) But after ten years, isn't it getting a little old? When is it time to say enough is enough? T h e current season, "The Real World: Las Vegas", is a mess with practically the whole house taking turns sleeping with each other. For example, "American Idol" is a favorite for watching people make fools of themselves. The show is now in its second season. In the first season, singers from across the country competed to be the next

pop star. They were voted on by the American public through telephone calls, but judges on the show helped to influence voters. T h e new humiliation format is working: according to www.idoIonfox.com, 26.5 million people watched the first show of the new season, compared to the 22.8 who saw the first season finale of "American Idol." It's hard for most people to deny that reality T V is e n t e r t a i n i n g . Even those who want to hate it find that many of the shows are addicting. After all, once you saw one episode of "Joe Millionaire" (which concluded Feb. 17) you were dying to k n o w h o w those w o m e n might react once they learned that Evan wasn't a millionaire. Perhaps the attraction to these shows is the

MISSIONS

New ingredients to reality bites Haven't had enough yet? Check out these recent additions to primetime:

MTV " S o r o r i t y L i f e 2 , " Wednesdays at 10 p.m.

CBS "Star S e a r c h , " Wednesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m. The return of the popular ' 8 0 s show, minus Ed McMa. Live tournament-style competitions in 4 categories: adult singer, junior singer, comic, and supermodel.

" F r a t e r n i t y L i f e , " Wednesdays at 10:30 p.m. Pretty self-explanatory; it's a "Real World" for Greeks, following the rushing and pledging process.

ABC "I'm a Celebrity-Get M e O u t of H e r e ! " Mon-

NBC " M e e t M y F o l k s , " Mondays at 9:30 p.m. Reality game show where contestants must pass a "parental inspection" before they can go on their dream date.

FOX " M a r r i e d b y A m e r i c a . " Mondays at 9 p.m. F r o m t h o s e w h o b r o u g h t t o you " J o e M i l l i o n a i r e " . . . V i e w e r s call in to m a t c h f i v e couples, who have never met, to be married.

M O D E L UN

NICK DENIS

Students watch American Idol in the Kletz.

days at 8 p.m., Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 9 p.m. It's your chance to see celebrities roughing it in the Australian rainforest, without personal assistants, fancy cuisine or hotel suites. Like American Idol, viewers control who gets voted off. " A r e Y o u H o t ? " Thursdays at 9 p.m. This is exactly how it sounds. Contestants walk out on stage in beachwear and subject themselves to a numeric rating from three judges based on face, body, and sex appeal. Supposedly, it's the search for America's sexiest male and female.

fact that it reveals true human emotions however ugly they may be. In "Joe Millionaire's" case, it's golddigging. "It's like a car accident," said Rebecca Rooy ('06). "It's going to come crashing down in the end, and I want to witness it all." One of the things that the reality genre is consistently praised for is its ability to reach across races. On "Survivor," for example, the competitors c o m e f r o m all different backgrounds. ' T h e Real World" and "Road Rules" work the same way. Reality shows do not seem to be slowing down. "Survivor" is in its sixth season and seems to be running strong. As long as viewers continue to shape their evenings around their favorite reality shows, the genre should be safe for a while.

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they've been working on for when they gel there," O s b u m said. Another group will go to California and lead a retreat similar to a Young Life Camp. Some trips have very little planning to do because they arc through organizations that do all of the planning. They go and don't know what they will do until they arrive. There isn't much to prepare for other than to be ready with things they were asked to bring along, like clothing or food, and be ready to lend a hand wherever one is needed. Some groups whose itineraries for the week are already planned must spend time planning their financial situation to buy supplies and to have money on hand. "They spend a lot of time getting to know each other and praying for each other because most people don't know each other on the trips," O s b u m said.

To get involved with one of the Spring Break mission trips, information is posted on KnowHope in early November, and there arc announcements in Chapel notifying students that sign-up has begun. The Keppel House has information about the various trips each spring starting in late October or early November Many times Campus Ministries will send groups to the same location for consccutivc years. "There's a lot of really cool things that happen when we go to the same places. They get to know us, they look forward to us coming, there's a relationship there," said Osbum. "23 groups is the most w e ' v e ever had. But we want more guys on the trip. A lot of times we have a guy leader and two other guys with 12 girls," said Osbum. "But we don't turn anyone away. We'll fill you into a slot."

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deals with terrorism and the global water crisis; the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), which will deals with global health care, and the status of women; the Intemational Court of Justice, which will tackle the hypothetical case of the U.S. vs. North Korea and issue an advisory opinion on the legality of preemption; and the Security Council, where crisis in Colombia, the Middle East, the Congo. Kashmir, and Iraq will be addressed. "We divide them up so everyone can

have a good leaming experience rather than trying to throw them all together in one session that is somewhat unrealistic and where people don't get a chance to really deal with the issues," Holmes said. Over the past few months Hope students have put a great deal of preparation into making the conference happen. In fact model UN is a four credit class offered by the Political Scicncc Department. According to Holmes students taking that class are the driving force in putting

the conference together. "They work on preparing the issues. They direct the programs. They moderate the sessions. They generally direct the program and in the process of doing that they leam a lot about the issues facing the United Nations and how they can be addressed.," Holmes said. Van Houwelingen agreed. "There is a lot o f responsibility and organization that goes into creating a conference that hosts 1000 high school

students," Van Houwelingen said. "I feel honored that I have been trusted with this position (Secretary General)., however this is definitely not a single person position. 1 have two other deputy secretary generals w h o help alleviate much of the work load. Furthermore, there arc six directors that are in charge of the specific organs and 41 college students who are taking the course and helping with the conference. I have been working on this conference since June of last year."


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Increased classtime not all its cracked up to be A c c o r d i n g to t h e m i n u t e s f r o m t h e A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s b o a r d ' s m e e t i n g o n F e b . 25, f o u r - c r e d i t c l a s s e s a r e n o t meeting enough. F i v e y e a r s a g o , t h e c o l l e g e c h a n g e d its c o r e r e q u i r e m e n t s to four-credit classes b e c a u s e of these s a m e reasons. Since t h a t t i m e , a l m o s t e v e r y d e p a r t m e n t h a s run into v a r i o u s p r o b l e m s with scheduling the n u m b e r of classes they w a n t b e c a u s e of the long hours that classes meet. M u s i c a l e n s e m b l e s a n d extracurricular activities have had trouble w i t h s c h e d u l i n g b e c a u s e o f c l a s s c o n f l i c t s . R e m e m b e r that h o u r at 11 a . m . o n T u e s d a y s a n d T h u r s d a y s c a l l e d c o m m u nity hour? Originally, this hour was reserved for students to w o r k outside of their classes

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'Bowling' not shown as throwaway movie To the Editor: I a m w r i t i n g in r e s p o n s e t o Grelchen Schmidt's letter in the 2/ 19 edition of The Anchor about the movie "Bowling for Columbine." As Films Chair for S A C this year, I am very pleased to hear positive comments about our movies. Gretchen is not the only student to express this view; many people I have talked to had good things to say about this movie. Additionally, I heard students bring the movie i n t o d i s c u s s i o n in 3 d i f f e r e n t classes. Certainly this is a movie that impacted the campus c o m m u nity. Through Gretchen's letter, some unfortunate myths concerning this movie arose. First, the reason we brought the movie is twofold. In our survey of c a m p u s last semester.

"Bowling for C o l u m b i n e " scored very high. While other new movies did score higher, "B o w l i n g " was definitely popular enough to bring to campus. The reason the movie was shown on such a busy w e e k e n d (Valentine's Day, Winter Fantasia) was almost completely beyond our control. Most of the popular movies were not available until after March 1. In order to show "Bowling for Columbine" as well as other popular movies, we had to show it during that weekend. I knew that it would have a tough time doing well during that busy weekend, but I had hope that people who wanted to see it would come out anyway. Student and faculty did come out. 214 of you came out to the movie, roughly the same number that attended "Divine Secrets of the Ya Ya

Sisterhood" and 30 less than 'Mr. Deeds". Indeed, the movie did fairly well. I am sure that it would have done better on another weekend, but we did not have that luxury. We needed a good movie on that weekend, and "Bowling" was the most popular one available. I regret that "Bowling for Columbine" was seen by many as a filler for a busy weekend. It was not the case at all. It was one of Hope's top picks that just happened to be released to the college market at a bad time. T h a n k you to all that supported the movie, and I hope that SAC can continue to bring movies the Hope community wants to see. We are always open to feedback at sacjester@hope.edu.

—Daniel

Morrison

(*04)

h e l d s a c r e d in this f a s h i o n . B o t h o f t h e s e t i m e s h a v e b e e n e n c r o a c h e d on due to the increasing d e m a n d for m o r e c l a s s t i m e . S o m y q u e s t i o n is, if all o f t h e s e ^ c l a s s - f r e e " times are no longer class-free, h o w are w e not spending e n o u g h t i m e s in t h e c l a s s r o o m ? It s e e m s t o m e t h a t , if t h e s e t i m e s a r e b e i n g s c h e d u l e d o v e r , s o m e t h i n g is w r o n g w i t h t h e c u r r e n t c o r e s y s t e m . In all o f m y e x p e r i e n c e , t h r e e h o u r s o f c l a s s t i m e is s u p p l e m e n t e d w i t h h o u r s of h o m e w o r k e v e r y n i g h t . T h e c o m b i n e d time spent on class a n d h o m e w o r k is e n o u g h to satisfy a four-credit class. T h e a s s i g n m e n t of outside w o r k seems to b e a d r i v i n g f o r c e b e h i n d t h i s p o s s i b l e c h a n g e . If this is t h e case, I h a v e s o m e n e w s for the folks on the A c a d e m i c Affairs board: for the majority of classes, having m o r e c l a s s t i m e will n o t r e d u c e t h e a m o u n t o f a s s i g n e d h o m e w o r k , but only increase the a m o u n t of material that the h o m e w o r k c o v e r s . A l o n g w i t h n o t s o l v i n g t h e p r o b l e m that it is m e a n t to, this s o l u t i o n will o n l y i n c r e a s e t h e c l a s s c o n f l i c t s throughout the w e e k . Instead of aiming to increase the a m o u n t o f t i m e that w e s p e n d in c l a s s , o u r r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s should focus on getting us our class-free time back.

Poor student writing result of laziness, not faculty To the Editor: After reading your editorial in the Feb. 26 edition of The Anchor regarding writing and whether Hope College is producing graduates with good writing abilities or not, I decided to comment. I don't think that the writing issues at Hope can be blamed entirely on the faculty. Students' laziness and apathy toward assignments is a more likely source of the problem. I k n o w f r o m e x p e r i e n c e , even b e f o r e being c a l l e d "grammer man" in The Anchor.that I have a tendency to fall short of the expectations of my teachers and professors in my writing. Apart from actually starting a paper on time (which, admittedly, was rare), I tried my hardest to ensure that the paper was quality. I always read and re-read papers to ensure that spelling, grammar, punctuation, and formatting were correct. Sure, it might take a little more time to do, but it en-

War is not always against Christian values To the Editor:

Anchor

Staff

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff Anchor

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editor-in-chief Nick Denis production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Anjey Dykhuis Kurt Koehler arts editor Maureen Yonovitz sports editor Dave Yetter photo editor Rob Ondra business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants ad manager Ana Santibanez '/.amora production asisstant Jason Johnson advisor Mark A. Lewison SeniorStaff Reporters: Erin RHey, Katie Tayior

sures a quality product in the end. Not many students are self-motivated enough to do that until they are in the marketplace and have to write well in order to keep a job. Perhaps that is where the faculty can step in— give the students strategies to edit writing before a paper is turned in, or give them examples of good writing. It is definitely better to teach someone to do something correctly the first time than it is to let someone fail time and time again. I like the recommendation given to students in the last paragraph of your column: "...resist taking the easy route and show your professors what you can really do." I think that's the best advice that someone can give. W e ' r e all lazy and apathetic, to a point., It's time to change that, and start taking the road less traveled. Take ownership of your own work, create a quality product in the end, and be proud of all you can accomplish. —Paul Jackson ('02)

I have tried my best not to get involved in the debate on whether we s h o u l d g o to war with Iraq. While normally I enjoy debating any topic, I just don't feel like 1 know enough about the whole situation to decide whether war is the answer. I do believe that it should be our last resort, but in my opinion, we may be at that now. What I do know, however, is that somet i m e s w a r is n e c e s s a r y . I r e a d C h a d ' s editorial about h o w war should never be an option for Christians, and I just think that it was a little s h o r t s i g h t e d . I c o m p l e t e l y

agree that Christians are called to be peacemakers, but I don't believe that this rules out every case of war. I don't believe that going to war to stop Hitler f r o m murdering innocent people was wrong, and there are many other examples of this. I agree that the best way to deal with conflict is to compromise and find nonviolent means for action whenever possible. I would just like to comment though that we don't live in a perfect world, and these idealistic goals are not always possible. 1 guess I am not arguing for war in the case of Iraq as much as against the notion that war is never acceptable. I especially reject the idea that

Christianity rules out the option of ever going to war. I believe that in some cases, especially when dealing with unreasonable people, compromising will never do any good. A compromise only works under the premise that both parties can be trusted. As I stated earlier. I don't p r o f e s s to k n o w nearly e n o u g h about the whole situation to claim that we are beyond the point of compromise. I do realize that fact that it is entirely possible though, and in that case I fully support going to war against Iraq and I don't feel that this would be going against my Christianity in any way. —Wendy Schroeder COS)

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e within t h e college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t to edit d u e to s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s

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No p e r s o n a l a t t a c k s , p o o r t a s t e o r a n y t h i n g potentially libelous L e t t e r s chosen o n a first c o m e first serve basis, or a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y verify identity of w r i t e r

Photo Assisstant: Anneke Meeter

T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t to r e f u s e publication of any letter s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s o v e r 500 w o r d s in length will not b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r publication

Vie Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the A

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2003 spring semester, Issue #20 of 25

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of D e w i t t , b e h i n d W T H S ) , or e - m a i l A n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u


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Dance 29 comes to DeWitt, presents variety of styles For 29 years, dance students and professors have c o m e together to choreograph, rehearse, and perform in H o p e ' s longstanding annual dance concert. This year, the popular Dance 2 9 will take place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday in the DeWitt Main T h e atre. ' T h i s is the dance event at Hope College," said Julio Rivera, visiting associate professor of dance. " F o r a long time it was the only dance event that w a s happening on c a m p u s until w e started to introduce dance through different venues." Rivera's dance in the concert is a m o d e m piece entitled, "Forever Without E n d . . .As It Was." He explains that his inspiration f o r the piece w a s the idea of birth and the cycles through which things come to be. T h e dance is in three parts. T h e first, "the angels watch," represents divine order; second is "origins," which represents birth; and the third "beyond t o d a y . . . m a y b e t o m o r r o w " b e g i n s with a nightmare scene to represent the happenings of today's world and ends with the hope that there will be a better life afterwards. Rivera is i m p r e s s e d with the work the dancers in his piece have done leading u p to the concert. T h e dancers have similar feelings. "I h a v e really enjoyed working with Julio, although there have been struggles along the road, he stood by me, encouraged m e and never lost faith in me," said Sona Smith ('06).

and a person." Another m o d e m piece in the show is "On the R o a d A g a i n . . . A g a i n . . . A g a i n . . . A g a i n . . . " c h o r e o g r a p h e d by S t e v e n lannacone, associate professor of dance. Another highlight of the concert will be the dance " N o t All Islands Are Surrounded by Water," choreographed by Avi Kaiser, a guest choreographer f r o m Europe. T h e dancers point out that this piece may be a little different than what audiences may expect f r o m a dance concert. ' T h e choreography throws you f o r a loop, and is very u n p r e d i c t a b l e , " said B e t h a n y W h i t e ( ' 0 3 ) . " P e o p l e might be c o n f u s e d , bored, and even strongly dislike it, but others will be intrigued." Kathleen Davenport ( ' 0 4 ) agrees, but also believes that even those w h o do not like the piece will be able to get something out of it. ' T h i s is a piece I honestly d o n ' t think people will 'get' or necessarily understand," Davenport said. "But I think that every person will take something different f r o m the piece." T h e concert w o n ' t be entirely without classical dance pieces, however, as will be shown in the en pointe ballet piece, "Albinoni," choreographed by A m a n d a Smith, lecturer in dance. D a n c e r Peter H a m m e r ( ' 0 6 ) says that others will find "the display of grace and beauty through the classical ballet" to be interesting in this piece.

Craioveanu performs Professor preps for Carnegie Hall with local recital Glenn Lester STAFF REPORTER

This spring, a world-class violinist will take a trip a w a y f r o m Hope. But first, he will present a concert right here on H o p e ' s

Mihai Craioveanu performs Sunday. ite pieces," Craioveanu said. He plans to balance two "large-scale, c o m p l e x " sonatas in the first half with shorter pieces that are "virtuoso in character." T h e piece by Henri Vieuxtemps, "Sovernir d'Amerique 'Yankee Doodle' Variations Burlesques," is particularly challenging. Originally performed in the 1940s, it was recently republished, according to Craioveanu. Craioveanu, w h o has performed all over the world, said he sought a variety of music, ranging f r o m standard classical repertoire to "jazz to popular and folk-inspired tunes."

What's Hangin'? Cool B e a n s C o f f e e h o u s e Paul Rabaut 9 - , 1 tonight T h e Kletz

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"1 believe that working with him has strengthened me in many w a y s as a dancer, an artist,

Maureen Vonovitz A R T S EDITOR

campus. M i h a i C r a i o v e a n u , violinist and professor of music, will perf o r m in C a r n e g i e H a l l ' s Weill Recital Hall on March 29. T h i s Sunday, he will give a preview concert as part of H o p e ' s Faculty R e c i t a l S e r i e s at 2 p . m . in Dimnent Chapel. Admission to the concert is f r e e and all are w e l c o m e to attend. Craioveanu was first invited to Carnegie Hall last year and was invited back for this year. "I was selected and r e c o m m e n d e d by v a r i o u s p e o p l e in t h e m u s i c world," Craioveanu said. "The concert was successful." T h i s Sunday, he will p e r f o r m the same program he will be performing in N e w York. He and pianist Irina Kats will play pieces by Mozart, Strauss, Vieuxtemps, Porumbescu, Gershwin and Sarasate. T h e s e are " s o m e of my favor-

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A n o t h e r

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P m ' S ! 1 "Tickets $ 2

A M C H O H P H O T O BY

ROB ONDBA

Dancers rehearse Julio Rivera's piece for Dance 29, "Forever Without End ... As it Was," which is presented Thursday through Saturday. Lightening the m o o d a bit will be the j a z z piece " B l u e r P a s t u r e s " c h o r e o g r a p h e d by D a w n Mcllhargey, lecturer in dance. D a n c e r J e f f r e y Kurtze ( ' 0 5 ) describes this piece as a "jazzy, musical theatre, country western number." "It is very lighthearted and I laugh almost every time we do it," Kurtze said. "I think the audience will enjoy the spirit of the piece and have a chance to laugh out loud during what is s o m e t i m e s believed to be a serious dance concert." Kurtze is also in "Captured in Passing (En Passant)," choreographed by Linda Graham, associate professor of dance and co-coordinator of Dance 29. T h e dance features a reenactment of a chess game. "It is a serious and sensual game of love

and war," Kurtze said. Picking u p the pace will be " 1 9 2 7 TimeSteps 2003," a tap piece choreographed by Roseanne Barton-DeVries, lecturer in dance, and the high-energy j a z z piece, " O v e r the Top," choreographed by Ray Tadio, visiting assistant professor of dance. T h e dancers have worked hard in preparation f o r the concert. " W e spent about 2 0 hours a week for 3 weeks in November rehearsing, learning, and c h o r e o g r a p h i n g (our) p i e c e , " said D a w n Flandermeyer ( ' 0 5 ) . Tickets for Dance 2 9 are $7 f o r regular admission and $5 for senior citizens, students and Hope faculty and staff members. They are n o w available in the DeWitt ticket office, open w e e k d a y s from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Oleksiy Koltakov is second Van Cliburn piano finalist him play. "Usually those coming out of the Van C l i b u m have not recorded yet. We book th e m based on th e m being finalists in the competition and reviews," Emerson said. Katie Taylor SENIIOR STAFF REPORTER A c c o r d i n g to r e c e n t r e v i e w s , Hope has reason to look forward to T h i s year, f a n s of piano music Koltakov's arrival on campus. T h e d o n ' t h a v e to l o o k f a r to f i n d f e e d b a c k on h i s r e c e n t p e r f o r entertaiment. Thursday night at 8 mances has been more than posip.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel, tive—audiences have been amazed the Great P e r f o r m a n c e Series will at the talent of this pianist. f e a t u r e t h e s e c o n d y o u n g Van Joanne Sheehy Hoover wrote a Cliburn piano finalist of the year, review of Koltakov's February 16 Oleksiy Koltakov. concert for A l b u q u e r q u e Journal, Even if music buffs haven't heard titled " P ia n is t' s passion is infecthis n a m e yet. they probably will tious." The program Koltakov soon. Koltakov was a finalist in the played was the same one planned Eleventh Van Cliburn Competition for his appearance at Hope. of 2001, a prestigious international " ( K o l t a k o v ) clearly set out to piano contest. Needless to say, this w o w the audience with his Placitas was quite an accomplishment for Arts Series concert, and indeed he s o m e o n e just 23 years of age. did, leaving th e m literally shouting Though young, Koltakov w a s not for m o r e , " Hoover wrote. by any means inexperienced when T h e program is made up of works he entered Van Clibum. T h e Ukraiwritten by Chopin and Liszt, two nian had already toured the United 19,h century musicians. T h e pieces, States twice and performed in other including C h o p i n ' s Sonata No. 3 countries such as Germany, France, and Liszt's Sonata in B minor, are Israel, China and Australia as part bold compositions to attempt. T h e y of i n t e r n a t i o n a l m u s i c f e s t i v a l s . require physical strength to pull off Since the age of 13, Koltakov had the rapid, raging movements, yet studied piano under the guidance of both pieces call for the pianist to the r e n o w n e d pianist Victor be gentle and intricate at t i m e s . Makarov. According to H o o v e r ' s article, the A s a prize f o r advancing to the loaded program "allowed few finals of the Van Clibum, Koltakov spaces in which to catch a breath." received career m a n a g e m e n t and Still, Koltakov managed it excepconcert engagements f o r two years. tionally well. He was also featured in a documenC r a i g S m i t h of T h e S a n t a Fe tary, directed by Peter Rosen, on the N e w Mexican reviewed the same piano competition titled " T h e performance and wrote, Clibum: Playing on the E d g e . " "(Koltakov) radiated healthy selfH o p e A r t s C o o r d i n a t o r Derek confidence and muscular, glittering Emerson is enthusiastic about hostt e c h n i q u e a s he b a r n s t o r m e d ing K o l t a k o v ' s p e r f o r m a n c e , through Liszt and Chopin.. .always, though no one with the Great Perthere w a s an exuberant quality in f o r m a n c e Series has actually heard

GPS performance is 8 p.m. Thursday in Dimnent Chapel

AKCHOff P H O T O DEREK

COURTESY EMERSON

The 23-year-old pianist Oleksiy Koltakov arrives on Thursday for an oncampus recital. his playing." Perhaps this is the kind of piano playing that only a y o u n g , energized musician such as Koltakov could pull off. And with such positive responses to his drastic, emotionally charged recital, it is likely that this talented pianist will not remain u n k n o w n for long. Hoover predicted: "If this young m a n ' s artistic mastery keeps pace with his instrumental virtuosity, he should have quite a career." For those wishing to experience the m u s i c of O l e k s i y K o l t a k o v , tickets are available in the theatre lobby box office in DeWitt. T h e cost is $5 for Hope students and children, $14 for the general adult public, and $12 for senior citizens. Tickets will also be available at the door.


A n c h o r

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Anchor Emo joke of the week: What kind of Emo is constantly apologetic? Sorry-mo! The Anchor wants you!!! Do you know how to write? Do you wonder what it is like to be on a newspaper staff? It is not too late to join up! Many staff positions are still available for the rest of the year. For information, email anchor@hope.edu, or come to our next meeting, tonight at 8 in the DeWitt Student Center behind W T H S in t h e S t u d e n t M e d i a hallway.

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o n e s separating t h e m s e l v e s . " I have heard these statements, a n d s o m e similar to t h e m . T h e y c o n j u r e up f e e l i n g s of hurt a n d d e v a l u e f e e l i n g s r e g a r d i n g the l y n c h i n g , rapes, beatings, and m e n t a l scars i m b e d d e d d e e p within A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n s . A l t h o u g h disheart-

v. B o a r d of E d u c a t i o n and later Plessy v. F e r g u s o n , w e r e all actions taken because many citizens of the United Stales of A m e r i c a desired t o maintain the status q u o . Historically B l a c k C o l l e g e s and Universities, the N A A C P and other o r g a n i z a t i o n s

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of the history of o u r country.

participating in the n o r m a l activities of A m e r i c a n society,

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learn a n d set a p o s i t i v e

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research knowledge suggests

The Milestone is just up ahead!

problem."

A Student Paper Contest

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Race Issues

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Any Hope student may submit a paper addressing the issue of race. It may be a research paper or scholarly essay. Papers submitted for coursework are allowed.

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$50 prize for the winning paper!

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Applications are available in the Student Development Office.

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o r d e r f o r m for the

Paper Deadline: 3/12/03

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The Philadelphia Center

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Live, Work and Study in Philly!

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A n c h o r

S P O R T S

M a r c h 5, 2003

Track athletes tune up with indoor meet At U. of Chicago meet, Hope men and women finish second overall

1500-meter run ( 4 : 0 4 . 9 5 ) and the 3 0 0 0 - m e t e r run (8:53.89). O t h e r n o t a b l e p e r f o r m a n c e s by the D u t c h i n c l u d e d C r a i g B i g g e r ( ' 0 6 ) , w h o f i n i s h e d s e c o n d in the 8 0 0 - m e t e r run (2:02.51) and Ed P e r e z ( ' 0 3 ) , w h o finished second in the

Dave Yetter SPORTS EDITOR

T h e m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s track t e a m s traveled t o Illinois this past w e e k e n d t o c o m p e t e in the C h i c a g o Invitational.

4 0 0 - m e t e r dash (:51.89). T h e L a d y D u t c h also c o m p e t e d in the m e e t this w e e k e n d a n d finished s e c o n d . Host C h i c a g o set the p a c e with 2 1 9 points, f o l l o w e d by H o p e with 129 points. D u P a g e C o m m u -

K a r a Van A s s e n ( ' 0 3 ) f i n i s h e d s e c o n d in the triple j u m p ( 3 2 ' 2 " ) and L i n d s e y Kuipers ( ' 0 5 ) f i n i s h e d second in the shotput ( 3 6 ' 3 " ) . C o a c h D e r e k C h a v i s s e e m e d pleased with the w a y that his t e a m c o m p e t e d over the w e e k e n d . " O v e r a l l , I w a s very pleased with the w a y we p e r f o r m e d , " he said. " O u r t e a m is starting to feel m o r e c o n f i d e n t and are

t u n e u p b e f o r e the spring trip over spring break. T h e m e n ' s t e a m finished second in a s i x - t e a m field. T h e M a r o o n s , w h o h o s t e d the t o u r n a m e n t , w e r e the w i n n e r s with

nity C o l l e g e and B e n e d i c t i n e f i n i s h e d third and f o u r t h , re-

b e c o m i n g more c o m p e t i t i v e . C o a c h C h a v i s thinks that the t e a m is l o o k i n g g o o d g o i n g

spectively. Christy W a t k i n ( ' 0 4 ) w a s H o p e ' s only d o u b l e winner. S h e

into the spring trip. " W e are in a g o o d position right n o w , " he said. " T h e kids

146 points. T h e D u t c h m e n f i n i s h e d with 9 4 points, f o l l o w e d

w o n the l o n g j u m p ( 1 7 ' 4 " ) a n d the 5 5 - m e t e r dash (:07.74).

by H a r p e r C o m m u n i t y C o l l e g e with 7 3 points and D u P a g e

S h e also f i n i s h e d second in the 2 0 0 - m e t e r dash (:27.42).

that are injured are starting t o fell better and we just w a n t to take a healthy b u n c h d o w n south. If we d o that, we can start

T h e meet, hosted by the U n i v e r s i t y of C h i c a g o , w a s the last

C o m m u n i t y C o l l e g e with 67. T h e Flying D u t c h m e n w o n the 4 x 4 0 0 - m e t e r relay with a time of 3:35.03. S o p h o m o r e Peter D e f b y w a s the only individual winner, f i n i s h i n g first in t w o e v e n t s . H e c a p t u r e d the

Senior Kristen Post w a s a n o t h e r H o p e winner. S h e w o n the 3 0 0 0 - m e t e r run with a t i m e of 11:10. O t h e r top f i n i s h e s for the D u t c h i n c l u d e d K a r e n C l a r k ( ' 0 3 ) , w h o finished s e c o n d in the 2 0 0 - m e t e r dash (:27.42).

s t e p p i n g u p our training and h a v e a g o o d meet. H o p e ' s next m e e t will be their spring trip. Both t e a m s will travel t o S a m f o r d , A l a b a m a o n M a r c h 15 and then to E m o r y , G e o r g i a o n M a r c h 22.

Conditioning bonds players Phil Butler

out in f r o n t so e v e r y o n e c a n see

a s a w o r k o u t , " K r e p s said. A w o r k out is exactly w h a t it is. T h e c l a s s

J u m p i n g ropes, r u n n i n g sprints,

is m a d e up of a 3 0 - m i n u t e period

t h e m , " K r e p s replied. Nick Conrad ('02), a defensive

getting stronger, sweat, a t e a m c o m ing together, you see all of these

in the g y m d o i n g f o o t w o r k drills a n d sprints, a n d then the r e m a i n -

b a c k , a d m i t s that the class really helped in their c h a m p i o n s h i p r u n s

t h i n g s in H o p e C o l l e g e f o o t b a l l coach Dean Kreps' conditioning

i n g t i m e is s p e n t in the w e i g h t

in the 2 0 0 0 a n d 2 0 0 1 seasons.

class. T h i s class is o f f e r e d f o r credit f o r any student but is mostly filled with

room. " T h i s is a great opportunity t o see

" C o m i n g together in the o f f - s e a son really c a r r i e d o v e r into the sea-

w h a t k i d s are willing to w o r k hard

son.

and earn a spot o n the team. It helps with t e a m unity and b r i n g s out the

m a d e us quicker, stronger and, most importantly, it m a d e u s closer. We

leaders," K r e p s said. E v e n t h o u g h it is a c o n d i t i o n i n g class, a t t e n d a n c e and participation

w e r e in the g y m as a t e a m t h r e e

F r i d a y s f r o m 3 to 5 : 3 0 p . m . K r e p s s p e a k s h i g h l y of the po-

days a week, sweating, cramping v o m i t i n g as we ran sprints, a n d the

Keith Jonofski ('05) w o r k i n g on his lateral pulldowns.

tential b e n e f i t s of the class.

is t a k e n very s e r i o u s l y t o e a r n a

w h o l e t i m e y o u had g u y s p i c k i n g

a p r o b l e m , t h e y all w o u l d b a c k

and I,will hear the football t e a m in

grade.

you u p and c h e e r i n g you on. N o w

m e , " B a u m b a c h said. T h e c l a s s is o f f e r e d f o r o n e

the g y m , c h a n t i n g e a c h other on, c l a p p i n g it up, and I just get chills

c r e d i t , a n d it c a n o n l y b e t a k e n t w i c e for credit. T h i s is nice f o r

r u n n i n g t h r o u g h my b o d y - and I a m

GUEST WRITER

athletes f r o m the football team, m e e t s M o n d a y s , W e d n e s d a y s and

"I look at this not as a c l a s s but

the c l a s s s h o u l d b e r u n ,

that is a cool f e e l i n g . " Captain Josh Baumbach ('03)

and that is w h y he r u n s

said it best w h e n a s k e d about the

t h i n g s that w a y . "It is very s i m p l e : I tell

w e i g h t l i f t i n g part of the class. " W h e n you k n o w the g u y s y o u

you w h a t you d o and you d o it that way. It is not

are g o i n g to battle with on Satur-

K r e p s thinks this is h o w

d a y s h a v e b e e n in the weight r o o m working hard all year long, it m a k e s

r o c k e t - s c i e n c e , it is disci-

A/VCHOff PHOTOS

the p l a y e r s b e c a u s e if the p l a y e r s g o and w o r k hard, you will get rew a r d e d w i t h an A f o r t h e c l a s s , which will h e l p y o u r C P A . Not only is this class a g o o d t i m e for the football players, f e l l o w

BY D A V E Y E T E R

not e v e n a part of the team. It is just cool h o w they are six m o n t h s a w a y f r o m their season and they are w o r k i n g t h a t h a r d a n d get t h a t p u m p e d u p . It m a k e s you w a n t to c h e e r f o r t h e m in the fall."

F o o t b a l l is a lot a b o u t trust with your t e a m m a t e s , a n d this c l a s s defi-

classmates enjoy this time also.

For m o r e information on this c l a s s , e i t h e r c o n t a c t K r e p s , at

Tyler D a n e k ( ' 0 5 ) talks a b o u t h o w

k r e p s @ h o p e . e d u , o r c o n t a c t the

c a u s e the w h o l e t e a m will run while the p e r s o n w h o

nitely builds trust.

I k n o w that I

it is great t o see a t e a m c o m e to-

registrar's o f f i c e o n c a m p u s .

got all of my t e a m m a t e s ' backs, and

m a d e the m i s t a k e stands

I a m 100 percent sure that, if I had

gether. "I will be o n the track, r u n n i n g .

you w a n t to d o a n y t h i n g f o r them.

pline. If you d o n ' t d o it right then you will not m a k e f r i e n d s very f a s t b e -

Eli Cryderman ('06) curls.

Conditioning class really

Rand

F R O M /ME STANDS

Guest Writer " N u t s and bolts, n u t s and bolts, we got S C R E W E D ! " T h i s is a c h e e r that is o f t e n used b y c h e e r i n g sections w h e n they feel the o f f i c i a l s m a d e a bad call in a basketball game. The D e w Crew would n e v e r use su c h w o r d s in the Civic Center, but n o w that both H o p e t e a m s are calling the D o w C e n t e r h o m e , I n o w feel it's appropriate. O n S u n d a y night there w a s a g e t - t o g e t h e r in the M a a s C e n t e r for both t e a m s and

Nuts and Bolts g a m e S a t u r d a y night in the D o w

poll of the s e a s o n H o p e w a s

p.m. on S a t u r d a y in the D o w

c o m i n g f r o m the M I A A

Center. T h e second surprise, w h i c h w a s

r a n k e d s e c o n d in the nation, only f i v e points o u t of first place on

C e n t e r against the w i n n e r of the Thursday match-up between

Champions. Second-team honors were

the inspiration for this c o l u m n ' s

the d 3 h o o p s . c o m poll, h o w e v e r

M i l w a u k e e S c h o o l of E n g i n e e r -

headline, w a s that the H o p e w o m e n — w h o w e n t a perfect 28-

the one that matters is the regional rankings. T h e y said

ing ( 1 2 - 1 6 ) a n d W i s c o n s i n -

a w a r d e d to C o l l e e n C o r e y ( ' 0 3 ) for the D u t c h . For the

0 on the year — g o t "slapped in the f a c e " twice by the c o m m i t t e e .

H o p e w a s only the t h i r d - r a n k e d t e a m in the G r e a t L a k e s region,

O s h k o s h (22-6). A s m u c h as the H o p e m e n w o u l d love to play in the f r i e n d l y

Not only did the N C A A m a k e the

let alone the nation. C o a c h Brian M o r e h o u s e said it

c o n f i n e s of the C i v i c Center, the D o w has b e e n a very w e l c o m i n g

best a f t e r learning w h a t the

to the D u t c h m e n . H o p e has g o n e

c o m m i t t e e had d o n e to his Flying Dutch. " W e ' r e just g o i n g t o play

7-1 in N C A A g a m e s in the D o w

can you leave C h a d C a r l s o n off the M I A A first team, w h i c h

since 1995. MI A A h o n o r s w e r e recently

included three kids f r o m Albion and t w o f r o m A d r i a n ? C h a d d e s e r v e d m o r e f r o m the

w o m e n play a f i r s t - r o u n d g a m e , but if H o p e ( I ' m sorry, W H E N H o p e ) w i n s that g a m e the Dutch h a v e to travel all the w a y to P e n n s y l v a n i a for their second-

with a c h i p on o u r shoulder." H e

D u t c h m e n it w a s G r e g I m m i n k ( ' 0 5 ) and brothers, C h a d ( ' 0 3 ) and Jeff C a r l s o n ( ' 0 6 ) . T h i s is w h e r e m y final " N u t s and B o l t s " c o m e s f r o m . H o w

also a d d e d three strong w o r d s :

their f a n s to w a t c h the live video f e e d of the N C A A

round g a m e on Saturday. Only one other t e a m in the nation went u n d e f e a t e d , a n d it

" B r i n g it o n ! " T h e w o m e n will b e h o s t i n g a

a n n o u n c e d , and both H o p e c e n t e r s w e r e n a m e d the M I A A league MVP: Don Overbeek ('03)

selections a n d pairings. It w a s s u p p o s e d t o be a t i m e of

e a r n e d a bye a n d then a second r o u n d host on Saturday. T h e other

g a m e tonight in the D o w C e n t e r

for the m e n and A m a n d a Kerkstra

M I A A c o a c h e s . T h e r e are s o m e p l a y e r s on that list w h o C h a d absolutely shut d o w n all

h a p p i n e s s f o r the H o p e basketball p r o g r a m , but it d i d n ' t turn out c o m p l e t e l y that

slap on the f a c e w a s w h e n you look at s o m e of the other t e a m s

at 7 : 3 0 against Ml. Saint J o s e p h of O h i o . M t . St. Joe c o m e s into

( ' 0 3 ) f o r the w o m e n . T h i s w a s K e r k s t r a ' s s e c o n d straight M V P

season long. T o n i g h t it all starts for Hope,

the g a m e 19-9 o n the s e a s o n . T h e s e t e a m s actually m e t o n

a w a r d , a n d the first one f o r the

and I will go A N Y W H E R E in

N o v e m b e r 2 3 in the s e c o n d g a m e of the year for the F l y i n g D u t c h .

"Diesel." T h e only other H o p e p l a y e r t o j o i n K e r k s t r a and O v e r b e e k on

the c o u n t r y H o p e is playing, c h e e r i n g the m e n all the w a y to

H o p e w o n by 18. T h e w i n n e r of t o n i g h t ' s g a m e

the M I A A first t e a m s — out of 14 additional first-team selections —

will travel t o 23-1 W a s h i n g t o n & J e f f e r s o n for a g a m e o n Saturday.

was Amy Baltmanis ('03). That just d o e s n ' t s o u n d right for only

w a y b e c a u s e there turned out t o b e t w o surprises that night. T h e first surprise — a h a p p y one — w a s that the m e n ' s t e a m , which went 2 3 - 4 o n the year, e a r n e d a f i r s t - r o u n d bye and will host a s e c o n d - r o u n d

with first-round byes. T h e r e are t e a m s with four, five, six, and e v e n seven losses o n the season that get t o host this w e e k e n d after having Wednesday off. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , this w a s s o m e t h i n g that H o p e f a n s h a d seen c o m i n g all season. In the last

T h e H o p e m e n will play at 7

three total players o u t of 16

Virginia, and the w o m e n all the w a y to Indiana. I should be abl e to hit the b o o k s hard d u r i n g all t h o s e half-times, as always. N o p r o b l e m , profs. B R I N G IT O N !


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Hope hoops are going to the big dance Mens and womens teams make national tournement Holly Russcher GUEST WRITER

F o r H o p e C o l l e g e ' s m e n and w o m e n ' s basketball teams, March Madness took on a whole new meaning this past weekend. For the second straight year, and only the fifth time in the school's his14 tory, both teams

P a . , to f a c e W a s h i n g t o n a n d Jefferson College on Saturday. The only disappointment this year for the Dutch is that despite their f l a w less record, they did not receive a first-round bye as the m e n ' s team did. T h i s seeming act of disrespect may provide a further push to the D u t c h j u g g e r n a u t , w h o hold the M I A A regular season and tournament championship spots this year. T h e 11thranked Dutchmen (23-4), d u e to t h e i r b y e e a r l y in the week, m u s t w a i t to see w h o their o p p o n e n t is for S a t u r d a y ' s

clinched berths in t h e N C A A playoffs after winning their MIAA confersecond-round ence tournag ame. They ment g a m e s on Katie Nienhuis ('03) puts up will host the Saturday. This a three-pointer. winner of the makes tonight's g a m e between tournament kickoff doubly momentous for W i s c o n s i n - O s h k o s h and the Milw a u k e e S c h o o l of E n g i n e e r i n g . Hope. S a t u r d a y ' s winner goes on to the The undefeated Flying Dutch sectional semifinal on March 14. (28-0), ranked second a m o n g Division III w o m e n ' s b a s k e t b a l l For men's basketball coach teams this season, host Mount St. G l e n n Van Wieren, in his 26th season at Hope, Saturday's win had yet J o s e p h of C i n c i n n a t i t o n i g h t in another special dimension: it w a s first-round play. T h e winner of that his 500th win. T h e Flying Dutchg a m e will travel to W a s h i n g t o n ,

m e n h a v e a tidy 7 5 p e r c e n t win margin under Van Wieren, and have g o n e to the N C A A p l a y o f f s 15 times in that span. Women's coach Brian M o r e h o u s e had multiple reasons to celebrate as well, since this was the first perfect season in H o p e ' s hist o r y f o r e i t h e r the m e n ' s or w o m e n ' s basketball teams. He has led the Dutch to tournament play five times in the last seven seasons, with a record of 152-41 (78 percent). In last year's N C A A tournament, both t e a m s made early exits: the w o m e n lost in the sectional semifinals and the m e n in a second-round g a m e . T h e D u t c h w o n the 1990 N C A A c h a m p i o n s h i p , but the D u t c h m e n had to settle f o r second place in 1996 and 1998. For both teams, especially the unbeaten w o m e n ' s squad, this y e a r ' s playoff appearance is extra-special because they get to open the tournament at home. A m o n g the opposing teams only M o u n t St Joseph, making their first N C A A appearance, has faced Hope this s e a s o n . T h e D u t c h d e f e a t e d them on the first w e e k e n d of the season 78-60. On the m e n ' s side, the Milwaukee School of Engineering has never reached tournament play before while WisconsinO s h k o s h has done so five times in

>*

X

A/S/CHOH

P H O T O S BY ROB ONDRA

Colleen Corey ('03) looks to pass around the Alma defense. the past eight years. Tickets for the m e n ' s game go on sale at 8:30 A M today, and those f o r the w o m e n ' s g a m e went on sale yesterday. Prices f o r both games are $5 f o r adults, $3 f o r children, students and senior citizens. Hope stu-

dents must s h o w I D b e f o r e purchasing tickets, and can only buy one ticket per ID. T h e n again, with both teams doing so well, there will be no problem getting Hope students to flash their I D cards this time.

Men's and Women's Records, 2002-03 Women's basketball results

Men's basketball results Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope

82, Northwestern, Iowa 79 79, Trinity Christian, 111. 6 6 80, Cornerstone 6 9 103, G r a n d Valley 8 0 91, Trinity Christian 64 96, Orchard Lake St. Mary's 5 0

Aquinas 76, H o p e 6 9 Hope 94, Grace Bible 5 8 Hope 92, North Central, 111. 7 6 Hope 84, University of C h i c a g o 66 Hope 63, E d w a r d Waters, Fla. 54 Warner Southern 87, H o p e 6 9 Hope 64, Adrian 5 9 Hope 101, A l m a 51

Calvin 74, Hope 7 0 Hope 57, Albion 52 Hope 99, Olivet 9 0 Hope 100, K a l a m a z o o 35 Hope 83, Adrian 67 Hope 108, A l m a 7 9 H o p e 92, Calvin 7 6 Albion 69, Hope 65 Hope 90, Olivet 73 Hope 70, K a l a m a z o o 5 9 Hope 101, A l m a 75 Hope 81, Calvin 8 0 (ot) Hope 61, Albion 4 8

Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope

88, 78, 80, 74, 89, 72, 88, 85, 94, 61, 74, 76, 90, 89,

O h i o Northern 77 Mt. St. Joseph 6 0 Cornerstone 6 9 Calvin 6 0 Rochester, Mich. 31 North Central, III. 54 Westminster, Pa. 4 9 Benedictine, 111. 51 Hanover, Ind. 91 Marian, Ind. 6 0 Univ. of Chicago 4 7 Adrian 55 Saint Mary's 73 Alma 66

Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope Hope

89, Calvin 51 72, Albion 4 9 91, Olivet 6 0 56, K a l a m a z o o 52 78, Adrian 54 77, Saint Mary's 37 70, A l m a 57 88, Calvin 72 70, Albion 5 6 70, Olivet 56 63, Kalamazoo 4 6 77, Saint Mary's 5 0 65, Albion 41 63, A l m a 4 9

MIAA eyes shorter sport seasons New proposal would limit participation for all sports Dave Yetter SPORTS EDITOR

A proposal before the M I A A is t h r e a t e n i n g to d o w n s i z e H o p e sports considerably starting with the fall 2 0 0 4 season. T h e p r o p o s a l , s u p p o r t e d by President Bultman, could lead to limiting participation in national tournaments, shortening season lengths, and eliminating the spring non-traditional season. If the proposal passes, basketball, volleyball, soccer, football, softball, and baseball would all be affected.

The proposal, entitled M I A A C o m m o n Principles, would affect all schools in the M I A A if passed. T h e proposal states that "a fixation on N a t i o n a l C h a m p i o n s h i p s can lead to increased cost, missed class time and other negatives that need specific control." T h e proposal then outlines a list of changes that would take effect if the action is passed. T h e r e would be a new f o r m a t f o r Division III national tournaments. National Tournaments would be limited to 2 - 3 w e e k e n d s d e p e n d i n g on the sport and there would be no Sunday competition. For football and soccer, a regional rather than national tournament is r e c o m m e n d e d as a possible solution to p l a y i n g

title games later in the year. T h e proposal states that measures need to be taken to stop the "creeping g r o w t h " of longer seasons and that non-traditional seasons are inconsistent with the M I A A view of the student-athlete. A s a result of this "creeping g r o w t h , " a n u m b e r of measures are planned to correct them. First, the spring non-traditional season will be eliminated. Second, intercollegiate contests w i l l be l i m i t e d b y a b o u t 1 0 % . Thirdly, beginning dates will be set for the preseason that are more restrictive than current N C A A deadlines. For example, the date for winter sports w o u l d be N o v e m b e r 1 and the date for spring sports would be February 1.

HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR 141 E 12TH ST PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D Ml 49422-9000

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Hope College

03-05-2003  
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