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ope college

ollarvd, michigarv MARCH 5,1981

VOLUME 9 3 - I S S U E 18

Art department gets building and its location m a k e s it difficult for a united art d e p a r t m e n t to exist. "The art d e p a r t m e n t is not together," said John Wilson, c h a i r m a n of the art d e p a r t m e n t . F r e d Coates, director of the maintenance d e p a r t m e n t , r e m a r k e d , " T h e building, the way it's constructed, will not satisfy building codes." Rusk w a s donated to Hope in 1969 and used as the art facility until the college could a q u i r e the Sligh Building. " W e knew they w e r e going to move out," said Anderson. Renovation will be a complicated process. Twenty-four of Sligh's parking spaces will be eliminated and there will be an extension on 12th Street. The administration is making no promises, but, said Anderson, "Students m a y be able to use the new building a s soon a s second s e m e s t e r of next y e a r . " The m a i n t e n a n c e director m a d e it clear that " t h e r e will be more than 90 days of work a f t e r Sligh * leaves." The maintenance department will patiently wait out the renovation. " I t ' s less space than we have here but 1 think we can work it out," said Coates. " T h e m* \ new location will be better for our operation. We will have two loading docks which provide us with better receiving ends." The m a i n t e n a n c e d e p a r t m e n t acts as the receiving end for many college supplies, such as chemicals and furniture. " I t ' s centrally located, close to everyone's facilities," said Coates. "1 think the move has been a good one." The art d e p a r t m e n t s e e m s most The a r t d e p a r t m e n t will move from their c u r r e n t location, the Holland Rusk Building, satisfied. " T h e new art gallery will to take up residence in the Sligh F u r n i t u r e building across from DeWitt Cultural promise to be a good one," said Wilson. Center by spring s e m e s t e r , 1982. The gallery will be one and a half stories high, and visitors will look down into it a s

by Keith Grigoletlo The art and m a i n t e n a n c e d e p a r t m e n t s are eagerly awaiting the opening of their new b u i l d i r 4 the present Sligh F u r n i t u r e factory on 11th St. Sligh will move out in July. "We've been waiting for that building for a long t i m e , " said Bill Anderson, vice president for business and finance. The fire m a r -

1

shall h a s approved the building, and a budget of $700,000 has been allocated for renovation, ' i f we had to build it new it would cost about a million and a half,' 1 said Anderson. The Rusk Building, located on Eighth Street, presently serves as h e a d q u a r t e r s for the art d e p a r t m e n t . Only a portion of that building can be used by the division

they enter the door looking over the balcony. "It will be more d r a m a t i c , " said Wilson. "You'll be able to get back f r o m things. You won't have to look for it.". There a r e plans for a receptionist to greet visitors. As they gaze down the hall they will view sculptures and art studios. "They'll see s t u d e n t s working on p r o j e c t s , " said Wilson. In the south third of the parking lot there will be a sculpture court. "We hope to purchase some p e r m a n e n t sculptures to announce the building," envisions Wilson. "We also hope to have an inaugural exhibition in the fall of 1982." Wilson also mentioned a special student lounge. "They (art students) get dirty and feel uncomfortable about going to the Kletz," said Wilson. The lounge is also expected to help unify the d e p a r t m e n t . Class status will also have its r e w a r d s . "Senior students will have their own studios," continued Wilson. "Right now they're semi-private." Faculty studio space has been allocated as well. Students will learn as they look over the professionals. Building m a t e s for many years, the maintenance and art d e p a r t m e n t s s h a r e no grievances. "We use heavy tools and machinery such as drills and saws, and maintenance people are always helpful," Wilson said. In the f u t u r e the art department would like to expand to print making, and c r e a t e a m u s e u m education p r o g r a m . The new a r t building will be close enough for everyone to use. Teaching spaces in the new addition m a y be used by other d e p a r t m e n t s as well. Proposed " t r a f f i c " p a t t e r n s will keep artwork where it will not be t a m p e r e d with.

Honor system considered by Craig Potter Sinclair The Administrative Affairs Board is presently considering implementing an honor code for examinations and quizzes at Hope. An ad hoc c o m m i t t e e on the honor s y s t e m w a s formed last November on the suggestion of President Gordon Van Wylen, to r e s e a r c h this possibility. Van Wylen, who worked under an effective honor system a s dean of the University of Michigan School of Engineering, found that " t h e students take pride in it to m a k e it work." He also saw the presence of this s a m e type of pride in the University of Virginia alumni, saying " t h e g r a d u a t e s a r e proud of the honor s y s t e m ; they a r e proud they could be t r u s t e d . " For t h e s e r e a s o n s . Van Wylen r e c o m m e n d e d the establishment of an honor s y s t e m at Hope in his college address last fall. He said, "It would be in keeping with the type of school Hope is, and would enable students to be involved in the formation of integrity." A short time a f t e r his a d d r e s s , the a d hoc com-

mittee formed. The c o m m i t t e e found that many schools in the country, including Gettysburg, Kalamazoo and Oberlin, presently employ honor systems. The c o m m i t t e e put their report before the Administrative Affairs Board, and now is interested in feedback f r o m the students. As part of their r e s e a r c h , the ad hoc c o m m i t t e e compiled a list of the basic tenets included in most honor systems. These include a pledge by students, no faculty proctoring of tests, and an "honor b o a r d " to hear f r o m violators. Also, the c o m m i t t e e sent notes to a n u m b e r of faculty m e m b e r s asking for f e e d b a c k ; - a m o n g the returns, they received a letter f r o m two professors, J a c k Holmes and Robert Reinking. Holmes is very much in favor of using an honor s y s t e m . Since he c a m e to Hope, Holmes h a s used an honor systim with much success. He believes that " w h e n the students h a v e responsibility put on t h e m , they will and do r e s p o n d . " On the other hand, Reinking opposes

such a s y s t e m . After working under a similar s y s t e m , he h a s found the system "totally ineffective," adding that "it works to the d i s a d v a n t a g e of those who obey it, for enough will not abide by it that they will get a n a d v a n t a g e over those who do." This, according to Reinking, is the most obvious point against the honor system. He puts even more emphasis on the fact that " t h e knowledge of a cheating clause puts the student in a no-win situation. He has to take action (when he sees someone cheat) although he did nothing himself Our society doesn't like a tattletale, so either way he loses." Consequently Reinking is "strongly opposed" to the honor system, saying that not enough students will abide by the s y s t e m and too many students will be in situations where they have to compromise themselves. Depending on the reaction from the A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s B o a r d , the possibility of a n honor system may be a topic for a faculty meeting.

Profs granted sabbatical by Tim G o r t s e m a Three m e m b e r s of Hope's faculty w e r e awarded sabbatical leaves at the last meeting of the Status Committee: F r a n c i s Fike, associate professor of English; Ted Nielsen, associate professor of communication; and John Wilson, associate professor of a r t . Nielsen and Wilson will be on leave for the entire upcoming a c a d e m i c year, while Fike will return in the spring. A sabbatical leave, as its n a m e implies, is an option a Hope faculty m e m b e r has every seventh y e a r of his stay at the college. The p r o g r a m is designed to e n c o u r a g e the professional development of the faculty m e m b e r . This in turn will a d v a n c e the educational objectives of the institution. (continued

on p. 2)


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Seminar discusses sexual awareness David Nieuwkoop t h e Health Clinic and the Mortar Board recently sponsored an awareness s e m i n a r providing new insights into ourselves a s sexual beings, as well as examining c u r r e n t birth control methods.

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"Most people think of sex only in t e r m s o of sexual intercourse when it's so much W o m o r e than just the biological functions," said counselor Joyce Hanlon. " I n s t e a d , we need to understand our own m o r a l f r a m e w o r k a s we interact with our w family, church and peers. Likewise, we o must become a w a r e of our sexual health, X both physically and psychologically. Secondly, we must realize that communication is vital. We db h a v e a choice in the m a t t e r and w h a t e v e r is decided upon sexuality should be enjoyed by a person and not by the technique of 'slamb a m , thank-you-ma'am' often used in today's generation," said Hanlon. Carol Schuitema, a Planned P a r e n thood r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f r o m Muskegon, explained her views on the media exploitation of sexuality. "Misconceptions of sex a r e most h a r d hit by the media . . . especially today. I protest the TV shows degrading women as o b j e c t s with the mockery of sexuality, while building up m e n as m o r e w o r t h y , " said Schuitema. Dealing with the topic of birth control, Schuitema said that 95 percent of today's pregnancies a r e not planned or wanted, but the p a r e n t s r e f u s e to h e a r of birth control possibilities. " I g n o r a n c e is not a substitute for m o r a l i t y , " s h e said. In order to obtain a prescription for most any type of birth control, a history of the f e m a l e a s well a s a physical a n d pelvic examination must be completed. In this way, the prescription or device is designed specifically for each individual. One of the most common f o r m s of birth control involves a pill which prevents the ovaries f r o m releasing an egg, via synthetic hormones. Taken on a consistent 28-day cycle, it is 99 p e r c e n t effective. Other methods dealt with in the s e m i n a r r a n g e d f r o m withdrawal to r h y t h m , commonly used by people known a s p a r e n t s ; f r o m the d i a p h r a g m , 95 percent

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effective, to f o a m s . Jellies or c r e a m s , 85 percent effective. The condom, used exclusively by men, is 95 p e r c e n t effective in preventing p r e g n a n c i e s and venereal disease, and is easily available. " S o m e m e n c o m p a r e the u s a g e of condoms with taking a shower with a raincoat on," said Schuitema. "One drawback noted by thrifty college students is the condom is not r e c y c l a b l e , " she said jokingly. "However, when used simultaneously with foam the method is 100 percent effective.'' Still a n o t h e r method, t h e Intra-Uterine Device (1UD), is r e c o m m e n d e d only if the couple plan not to h a v e any children; since it is a foreign object inside the body, the risk of infection is increased. " I won't be surprised if lUDs will soon be ruled off the m a r k e t , " said Schuitema. P e r m a n e n t possibilities such a s the vasectomy for the male, or a tubal ligation for the f e m a l e , a r e two options open for preventing pregnancies. In both cases, one out of every 1000 operations fail. " N a t u r e h a s its own way of mending itself s o m e t i m e s , " said Schuitema.

Don't get excited, folks, just a r e m i n d e r that vegetable life does still exist, and a promise that spring will come . . . eventually, (photo by Lora Rector)

Gentile to receive grant

J a m e s Gentile, assistant professor of by crop plants; and finding out how crop biology, has recently received a $106,210 plants convert the h a r m l e s s herbicide grant f r o m the U.S. Environhis grant into a mutagen or carcinogen. with co-workers Michael Plewa of the Gentile's r e s e a r c h is also being funded University of Illinois a n d J a y Means of by other g r a n t s . He and P l e w a a r e cothe University of Maryland Chesapeake principle investigators in a $115,500 g r a n t , Among Hope students, f e m a l e s s e e m Biological Laboratories. also f r o m E P A , to detect mutagenicity of m o r e responsive in seeking information According to Gentile, herbicides a r e a g r i c u l t u r a l chemicals. In addition, he is about sexual c o n c e r n s than do m a l e s . coming into common agricultural use principle investigator on a $214,745 grant " I ' d like m o r e participation of m e n b e c a u s e chemical elimination of weeds f r o m the National Institutes of Endealing with their sexuality; however, f r o m fields is quicker, e a s i e r and c h e a p e r voronmental Health Sciences to study the birth control methods a r e currently than conventional weeding methods. activation of m u t a g e n s by green plants. predominantly dependent on the f e m a l e . These c h e m i c a l s must, however, be Gentile h a s published results of his The pill a n d IUD h a v e simply left m e n out d e m o n s t r a t e d to be s a f e for h u m a n s r e s e a r c h in m o r e than 20 scientific of the p i c t u r e , " said Schuitema. before they m a y be applied to crops, and p a p e r s , a n d h a s p r e s e n t e d talks on his m a n y herbicides have been proven not r e s e a r c h at many national and regional "1 see m o r e f e m a l e s a t the clinic but get h a r m f u l to h u m a n s and do not c a u s e meetings, and at a NATO Advanced quite a few phone calls f r o m m a l e s , " said cancer. Research I n s t i t u t e C o n f e r e n c e in Sharon Blanksma, clinic nurse. However, Gentile a n d others have Monaco; also, he w a s recently invited by Blanksma offered services to all Hope found that m a n y plants a r e a b l e to conthe National A c a d e m y of Science, the students a t the facilities a t the Dow vert s o m e of these a p p a r e n t l y h a r m l e s s most prestigious scientific society in the Center. "With a gynecologist a v a i l a b l e herbicides into other compounds which United States, to p a r t i c i p a t e in the E P A every other Monday seeing both male a n d can c a u s e mutations a n d a r e potentially hearings of the F e d e r a l Gene-Toxicology f e m a l e students, services include both carcinogenic. While h u m a n s c a n safely P r o g r a m . In S e p t e m b e r 1981 he will routine a n d pelvic examinations, and p a p ingest s o m e of the chemical herbicide s p e a k a t the International Conference on s m e a r s . P r e g n a n c y testing and coun- itself, h u m a n s cannot safely eat e i t h e r the E n v i r o n m e n t a l Mutagens, in Tokyo. seling a r e both f r e e of charge. All m a t plants on which these herbicides have - E a c h y e a r a p p r o x i m a t e l y 10 Hope ters a r e kept confidential," s h e said. been applied, or a n i m a l s which have s t u d e n t s h a v e the opportunity to work in Possibilities for f u r t h e r s e m i n a r s e a t e n those plants. Gentile's lab and p a r t i c i p a t e in his sponsored by the Health Clinic include the This g r a n t will allow Gentile to continue r e s e a r c h . E a c h of them has also authored topics of safety, r a p e and dealing in his r e s e a r c h on the conversion of hera p a p e r or talk on his or her research. general with c u r r e n t sexual concerns, bicides to m u t a g e n s and carcinogens by Gentile is a f i r m believer in the m a x i m depending upon student interest. green plants. This r e s e a r c h will be in " t h e best way to learn biology is to do t h r e e a r e a s : investigation of whether or biology." not S-Triazine by itself is mutagenic to plants or animals, or to a n i m a l s which eat Gentile, his wife Glenda and two-yearTreated p l a n t s ; developing better old son Michael live in the West Ottawa methods to detect activation of m u t a g e n s area of Holland.

Ambassador Gale to take Hope by storm Gale W. McGee will speak on Hope's c a m p u s March 11-13. McGee is a U.S. a m b a s s a d o r who represents . the U.S. government in crucial international deliberations on m a t t e r s such as El Salvador and the P e r u - E c u a d o r dispute.

Professors granted leave

WEDNESDAY. MARCH II 9 a . m . — "U.S. Foreign Policy: A P e r sonal P e r s p e c t i v e " (confinued from p. I) accomplishing the objectives of the leave. Location —- Wichers Auditorium The p r o g r a m is a privilege, not a right. They will not volunteer for nor be asked to 10 a . m . — "U.S. Foreign Policy: A P e r - F a c u l t y m e m b e r s can qualify by suba s s u m e d e p a r t m e n t a l , board, committee, sonal P e r s p e c t i v e " mitting a w r i t t e n proposal which or advising and counseling responLocation — Wichers Auditorium d e m o n s t r a t e s that the objectives of the sibilities." This clause e n s u r e s that the McGee is a f o r m e r college professor ' 12:30 p.m. —- " C u r r e n t Latin American p r o g r a m can be realized. professor will be f r e e to study his parand U.S. senator f r o m Wyoming. He will Problems" ticular field of interest without any ins h a r e his broad national and inLocation — Otte Room of P h e l p s ' F a c u l t y m e m b e r s a r e encouraged to terference. ternational political experience with 1:30 p.m. — " C h a n g e s in the U.S. reside and study outside t h e environs of Hope students when he s p e a k s on As M a r k e r stated, " T h e purpose is to Congress" Hope and Holland for the benefits that "Current Latin American P r o b l e m s , " get a w a y f r o m teaching and allow Location — Otte Room of P h e l p s m a y a c c r u e . However, this is not a scholarly work. One c a n c o m e back in"Changes in the U.S. C o n g r e s s " and r e q u i r e m e n t . According to provost David tellectually a n d scholarly r e n e w e d . " "U.S. Foreign Policy: A Personal PerTHURSDAY, MARCH 12 — H O P E M a r k e r , " T h e m o n e t a r y situation a n d the spective." F a c u l t y on a full-year leave will receive COLLEGE E N E R G Y SYMPOSIUM d e m a n d s of a wife and f a m i l y a r e just a half of their n o r m a l s a l a r y , while oneMcGee will also be f e a t u r e d during the 3:15 p.m. — " T h e Geopolitics of E n e r g y " couple of the reasons that p r e s s u r e people Hope E n e r g y Symposium, at which he . s e m e s t e r p a r t i c i p a n t s wiU receive the Location — Wichers Auditorium to stay around this a r e a . " will expound upon the topic " T h e entire sum. Normal f r i n g e benefits will F o r the people who choose to stay Geopolitics of E n e r g y . " McGee will still be g r a n t e d to all participants. FRIDAY, MARCH 13 - NINTH ANNUAL around Holland, a new clause h a s been deliver his final a d d r e s s a s the keynote Upon returning, a w r i t t e n report giving MODEL U N I T E D NATIONS inserted in the sabbatical policy. It r e a d s : s p e a k e r for the ninth annual Model the results of investigation, publication 10 a . m . — " T h e United Nations, the " P e r s o n s on sabbatical leave will United Nations. efforts, study, travel involved, etc. shall Organization of American States, and dissociate themselves f r o m c a m p u s S P E A K I N G S C H E D U L E O F AMbe m a d e by the leave holder a n d subWorld P e a c e " responsibilities a n d any community BASSADOR GALE W. M C G E E mitted to the provost not later than t h r e e Location ~ Dimnent Chapel responsibilities that would d e t r a c t from months a f t e r termination of the leave


Annual seminar is very effective by David Nieuwkoop The annual seminar on s t r e s s m a n a g e m e n t , s p o n s o r e d by the counseling c e n t e r , w a s held last T h u r s d a y a n d led by J a m e s Motiff, a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of psychology. " B y u n d e r s t a n d i n g what s t r e s s is and how it a f f e c t s us, we'll m o r e likely be a b l e to cope with i t , " s a i d Motiff. " S t r e s s is the r e s p o n s e to s t r e s s o r s which c a u s e the s t r e s s in the first place. Such s t r e s s o r s include both physical and psychological a s p e c t s of s t r e s s , like u n c e r t a i n t y , seeking change, depression and anxiety." S t r e s s o r s involve a s t i m u l u s like coffee,

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v i t a m i n s , e x e r c i s e , v a l u e s or o n e ' s s p i r i t u a l life- a n i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , in this c a s e , of the s i g n a l s or what Motiff calls

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i n u r c a i u i o a i n j h ee aa vV iHnKe^sbs in t n e a r m s a n a ieg^. The t h f r d s t e p is to c r e a t e a m e n t a l

c o n s u m p t i o n of l a r g e a m o u n t s of c a f f e i n e to s t a y a l e r t , or d r i n k i n g a n e x c e s s of alcoholic b e v e r a g e s to r e l a x . " S u c h m e t h o d s a r e not solving the p r o b l e m , " said Motiff. "A b e t t e r a l t e r n a t i v e is , Kr« a iffaKt not s t a r t i n g e a c h day with b r e a k f a s t not d r i n k i n g too m u c h coffee, a n d g e t t i n g

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Officials at Hope and Calvin Colleges a n n o u n c e d today that C y n t h i a E . Kielinen h a s been appointed c h a i r w o m a n of the newly e s t a b l i s h e d d e p a r t m e n t of n u r s i n g at Hope and Calvin Colleges. K i e l i n e n ' s a p p o i n t m e n t p a v e s the way f o r f u r t h e r d e v e l o p m e n t of the recently a n n o u n c e d • = Nursing (BS.N )

Kielfnen s e r v e d on the n u r s i n g s t a f f s S a l e m Hospital ind the D e n M a r N u r s m g H o m e in R o c k p o r t , M a s s a c h u s e t t s . S h e w a s a m e m b e r of the f a c u l t y of t h e S a l e m Hospital School of N u r s i n g f r o m 1965 to 1972 a n d w a s a p p o i n t e d to the S a l e m S t a t e College n u r s i n g f a c u l t y in 1972. At S a l e m S t a t e , Kielinen h a s b e e n

the new location " I t s c o n c e i v a b l e that t h e Skills C e n t e r will go b a c k into the l i b r a r y e x p a n s i o n , "

d e g r e e p r o g r a m to be o f f e r e d jointly by ^ ^ the two institutions.

a c t i v e in a v a r i e t y of a r e a s r a n g i n g f r o m coordinating s u m m e r nursing p r o g r a m s

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Skills Center moved s a i d N y e n h u i s . " W e would plan for m o r e conference rooms.

R a f f e t y a n d c r e w to m o v e to m o r e s p a c i o u s q u a r t e r s . " P e o p l e r e a l i z e d the need for the skills c e n t e r , " s a i d R a f f e t y . "We have a reputation." T h e Skills C e n t e r is now located in the Center f o r m e r Milestone office. T h e i n c r e a s e d worh area and comforlable surrmindings will allow m o r e s t u d e n t s to get the help t h e y need, w h e n they need it. " W e 11 h a v e two a p p o i n t m e n t s going on a t the s a m e t i m e , " said R a f f e t y ; " m a y b e even three S t u d e n t s will no lorjger feel like they a r e on " d i s p l a y " b e c a u s e of the big windows a t the c e n t e r ' s location in the b a s e m e n t of Van Zoeren L i b r a r y . T h e new location is m o r e p r i v a t e a n d fully c a r p e t e d . " W e will still be a b l e to h a v e a p p o i n t m e n t s in the ^ S S m a f ^ . nculties may 0

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by Keith G r i g o l e t t o The A c a d e m i c Skills Center h a s m o v e d f r o m the l i b r a r y to the b a s e m e n t of G r a v e s Hall. The m o v e c a m e a f t e r inc r e a t i n g r e q u e s t s for the s e n - i c e s o f f e r e d .— by the c e n t e r f o r c e d, d i r e c t o r Lynn

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n u r s . n g e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m s in 1979 a t T e a c h e r s College, Columbia U n i v e r s i t y .

Kielinen will a s s u m e h e r new duties l a t e r this s p n n g .

__ ^

H o l m e s , a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of political resolutions a n d vote on all proposals put grience • -to the floor. T h e topics f o r discussion in

w o r t h w h i l e a n d beneficial e x p e r i e n c e for

e x o a n d e d s p a c e will m o r e

involved

students Skills C e n t e r personnel awarded s p e c i a l t h a n k s to the A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s

N

^ ^

u n i v e r s i t y School of N u r s i n g in 1967 a n d * t i v e l y Kieiinen completed her r

& » H~p.ngar.er, Ml u n d i r e c t o r , feels the p r o g r a m is a

all who p a r t i c i p a t e .

p e S a . e . o r any d . s , r a d o n s , ' « a s s u r e d

E l u d e d

-

Hospital

to developing new p r o g r a m s to i m p r o v e the opportunities for r e g i s t e r e d n u r s e s to c o m p l e t e their B.S.N, d e g r e e . She h a s b e e n v e r y a c t i v e in the n u r s i n g profession, s e r v i n g a s a s p e a k e r a t m a n y p r o f e s s i o n a l m e e t i n g s a n d a s a n officer in

Students participate in Model UN

n r o b l e m in the w i n t e r but one a d a p t s to

t h a n com-

M

s

grow in proportion to 0in

Sa'ern, ^ g^ P

saidRattey.

B v e r y o n e a p ^ ^ content a m o v e which allows tbe Skills Cente

M()Ciei

T i m a g i n e (noisy) heat pipes will be a

Kielinen is p r e s e n t l y a n a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r a t S a l e m S t a t e College in

2 > ^ q = g

with

,,1,^1

international

problems

c u r ' e n ^ l a c . n e Ihe U m W l « « « • . J J s a ' d " A c t i n 0g a s d e l e g a t e s f r o m v a r i o u s ' . . . c r e S e n °"^ '^^ f ^i o [^o'therTtan of the c o t K e r n s of n a vetdif{icult

E a c h Hope s t u d e n t involved in t h e Model UN p l a y s an i n t r i c a t e role a n d

G e n e r a l A s s e m b l i e s A a n d B will b e H u m a n Rights a n d World Conservation,

c o n t r i b u t e s equally to the p r o g r a m ' s overall success. " T h e p r o g r a m d e p e n d s on e v e r y o n e , f r o m the G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y oresiders to the pages," said H o o p i n g a r n e r . " H o p e s t u d e n t s involved in this p r o g r a m l e a r n quickly how to h a n d l e responsibilities a n d to o r g a n i z e d e t a i l e d e v e n t s . S t u d e n t s l e a r n on a aeiai.ea

respectively. , .• ^ fu:c D u e to i n c r e a s e d i n t e r e s t , this y e a r s p r o g r a m h a d to a d d a n additional S e c u r i t y Council, m a k i n g t h r e e m all. High school f a c u l t y a d v i s o r s a r e enc o u r a g e d to s e l e c t their m o s t e x c e p t i o n a l s t u d e n t s to p a r t i c i p a t e in the S e c u r i t y Councils, Topics to be d e b a t e d will be t h e ^ in t h e m c r e a s e d problem

w r i t i n g resolutions and s i m u l a t i n g t h e r o l e s o f General Assembly, Security

with violence in E l S a l v a d o r a n d the I r a n / l r S q border dispute.

p As far a s s o u r c e s c a n r e m e m b e r the Skills C e n t e r h a s a l w a y s b e e n l o c a t e d id

schools begins e a r l y

-

" "

M

"

, M 1

c o n

"

n i t , e e

The Model UN f o r m a t consists of t h r e e — . ^ c l e l l S

i

m e m b e r s 25

r

v . « ^ — ^ ^ . riplecates and c l a s s i n s t r u c t i o n is p r o v i d e d by J a c k

XSL =;"r s e p a r a t e

locations, D i m n e n t C h a p e l a n d

mittee

where

students

can

debate

a

w h e r e a n i m m e d i a t e vote will be t a k e n .

delegates r e m a i n d e r of T h u r s d a y e v e n i n g In a n E m e r g e n c y Session. On F r i d a y , those involved with t h e G e n e r a l A s s e m b l i e s a n d Political C o m m i t t e e will a r r i v e . T h e m o r n i n g will be s p e n t listening to l e c t u r e s on the resolution topics a n d to the k e y n o t e s p e a k e r , A m b a s s a d o r G a l e W. McGee. T h e G e n e r a l A s s e m b l y and f u r t h e r S e c u r i t y Council sessions will fill t h e afternoon, with the final a w a r d s c e r e m o n y o c c u r r i n g a t 4 p . m . in D i m n e n t

E t h i c s c l a s s on W e d n e s d a y , M a r c h 11, a t 2:^0 p.m. in W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m . „ The public is invited to a t t e n d .

Art exhibited B r u c e M c C o m b s , a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r of a r t . r e c e n t l y h a d p r i n t s p u r c h a s e d for the p e r m a n e n t collections of the U n i v e r s i t y of Louisville in Louisville, K e n t u c k y , a n d the United States State Department. M c C o m b s also h a d his work included in t h e following exhibitions: 18th B r a d l e y National P r i n t and Drawing Exhibition, Bradley University, Peoria, IL; Annual Winter Exhibition, Anderson Fine Arts C e n t e r , A n d e r s o n , I N ; " P r i n t s '81, s p o n s o r e d by t h e P h i l a d e l p h i a P r i n t Club a n d held a t the U n i v e r s i t y of D e l a w a r e ; a n d "Prints and Printmaking," Institute

. o T a i T r i S ^ i T r a r

c

Chairman talks of the A m w a y L'orporanon, win p r ^ c i u l e c t u r e to A r t h u r J e n t z ' s B u s i n e s s ^ n d

S

Chapel.

t

' v v "

•M£jw:

.v-

t t A t

-y

4, >-• '

;• v

-

>4 v - w

^

-

ps* .

• V,

of F i n e A r t s , W y o m . n g , P A . McCombs received a J u r o r ' s Mention a t the " F o u r t h S p o k a n e N a t i o n a l W o r k s on P a c e r E x h i b i t i o n , " held a t t h e Cheney Cowles Art Museum, Spokane,

9*4 « m i l I i , M a r k Weriey d i s c u s s e s w e e k e n d possibilities with a p a s s i n g f r i e n d , (photo by L o r a

Washington.

Rector)

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m .

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v

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Discussion is rescheduled The Community Hour scheduled for l a s t T u e s d a y , M a r c h 3, to discuss t h e DeWitt e x p a n s i o n p l a n s , h a s b e e n r e s c h e d u l e d f o r T u e s d a y , M a r c h 17 in Winants Auditorium. T h e C o m m u n i t y Hour is sponsored b y Student Congress.


w

a

Editorial Pledging isn't easy "But you don't understand! You're independent." Greek or indv, it takes no special label to understand human nature. Pledging can definitely put a damper on perception, however.

Ic o g 3 8 g o

you say? Is it just for the sake of Greek letters on a sweatshirt? Well, some of these kinds of questions have gone unanswered or unexplained because many of the things Greeks do for pledging weeks have to be kept a secret, under wraps. That's understandable. It's a tradition and traditions should be kept. Independents aren't asking Greeks to disclose the actual events of pledging; just a little understanding and explaining would help. Now, some Greeks may ask, why don't indies, try a little harder to understand the noise and confusion of pledging? That's what this editorial is about. Many independents want to understand pledging and put aside their negative feelings. This attitude can be hard for a pledge to accept if he doesn't even realize what pledging demands of him. For some it may mean the compromising of their own personal values, not to mention a suppression of their desire to speak out against some of the ridiculous expectations a sorority or frat may nave. All independents can offer Greeks is a dpsirp f n n p i w i v p

For The past two weeks, with still â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ill a week to go, this campus has witnessed a rash of humility and embarrassment. Watching ' ,es humble themselves to calling their own peers "madam" or "sir," make spectacles of themselves by singing "You are my sunshine to someone they don't even know, or just run all over campus trying to get signatures from Greeks or indies they may or may not know, many independents may wonder just what perpetual motion compels these people to be so dedicated. Just because an active joined a year earlier doesn't necessarily mean they deserve respect. The most popular response, of course, is usually, "All for the sake of unity and friendship." Hard to comprehend, you say? A ? t h e y aS k 01 Why do people have to hurt their I S a few explanations l H fh and the" friends, maybe even their assurance that Greeks can roommates, just so they can comprehend some Of thefr own become part of the organization. beliefs about pledging.

\

A contagious attitude of genuine concern about cam] issues prevails at Hope semester. It's a refreshing change to find members of the Hope community willing to make thoughtful, committed opinion statements about what's happening here. People are paying attention to the Board of Trustees' decision to build a new earth-sheltered administration building, to renovate the DeWitt Student and Cultural Center, and to enlarge library facilities, for example. Most individuals can make a strong yes or no statement if asked whether they favor these building plans, instead of asking, "what ouilding plans?" or shrugging shoulders and mumbling, "Idunno." Each week, the anchor receives a staggering number of letters to the editor. People feel strongly enough about the activities and ideas around them to air their views. Could we label this the radicalization of the Hope community? Whatever it is, involvement and interest, c o m p a r e d .with apathy demonstrate a positive trend iiin Hopeites' attitudes. We must bear in mind, as the fervor of the movement toward

LL

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"

T H E G U t s r cpeAxen FOR THE. tNE-KGC SYMPO 5/um...

. V

^

Foreign students irked In one of our meetings held by the International Relations Club (IRC) on Dec. 19

ÂŤ0. we discussed the courses offered at

^ about South America, Asia and Africa. We would like these courses to emphasize more the history, religion, culture, politics and literature of these continents.

monitoring students' interests as the basis for their decisions. And perhaps Hope administrators are guilty of forgetting to ask students what they need sometimes when they should. It is very easy to slip into complacency to assume that our way is the only way. And often input comes only from a few familiar students who represent only a small sampling of student opinions. Any individual, especially with a vested interest in a decision, should take the responsibility to make some noise. After all, there are two sides to any coin.

Since Hope is a liberal a r t s school and the e m p h a s i s is on a b e t t e r knowledge of different fields and subjects, we would like to ask the religion d e p a r t m e n t ol Hope to offer a course on Islam. To our knowledge, the Academic Affairs Board of the school h a s been discussing this m a t t e r for years. We have talked to s o m e faculty m e m b e r s and they have been interested in this p r o g r a m and a r e willing to cooperate with us. We, the m e m b e r s of IRC, a p p r e c i a t e your supporf and effort toward reaching these goals. Sincerely, Zahra Tavakoli R e p r e s e n t a t i v e of IRC in Student Congress.

As Hope's campus vibrates with individuals who are voicing their concerns, it is more important than ever for us to look at what we think, why, and perhaps most Importantly, what We are planning to do about it. Violent yelling and screaming rarely accomplish their intended end. Nor does telling an administrator what has gone wrong and making accusing statements, which put individuals in an offensive/defensive position. However, often when we can articulate our suggestions clearly, and in a helpful manner, our vision can become reality. ) i ii 1; y.

t

i

>pv collegr

olUnd, weekly ^1 mi her of the P u b l i s h e d through dv^v-iareo September A p r i l , except during eoueciare PkOSSi exam periods and

EP

college

vocation

and

holiday

periods,

24

issues per year, by and for the students of

Hope College,

under

the

Holland,

authority

Communications

of

Michigan,

the

Media

Student

Committee.

Subscription price: $8 per year. M e m b e r , Associated

Collegiate

Press.

Office

located on l o w e r leveJ of the DeWitt Cultural

. \ If f.uI

\ A ^ 1* -

\&o0(m

Students concerned over issues articulating ideas intensifies, that it is essential to take our suggestions to the people involved and to the vehicles which can impact change. Griping quietly in a corner makes no impact, except perhaps to increase an individual's bitterness and cynicism. Don't just talk about the problems and mistakes that you detect around you; instead, make innovative suggestions to someone who can take action on them. Often, when a student offers input about a Hope policy to an administrator, the student's ideas enlighten and instruct. In many cases, administrators have no way to be sensitive to student concerns unles confronted with them. Most administrators welcome a fresh perspective on a day-to-day concern, especially when presented constructively. From the registrar to the dean of students to the president, most adminstrators are impressed favorably if a student is willing to take the initiative involved in making a suggestion heard. Perhaps impressed enough to implement a student's suggestion; if not, they are at least concerned enough to offer an explanation or a consolation. Certainly administrators must take some initiative in

" > A2L

The

Center,

opinions

telephone

on

this

page

394-6577. are

not

necessarily those of the student body, faculty or College.

administraHon

of

Hope

I I Editor

Betty J. Buikema

News editor

Richard L. Kuhrt

Feature editor

A m y Purvis

Sports editor

Eva Dean

Photo editor

Lora Rector Co-ProductK>n managers Thomas Berens Matthew VonderBorgh Copy editor â&#x20AC;˘ Heod typist

Andrew Bimer >

Co-AdvertJsing managers

Jeryl Houston Diana Beytr Steve Pop#

Second-doss postage paid at Holland, Ml 49423. POSTMASTER: send address changes to Hope College anchor, Hope College. Holland, Ml.

U}"

h* i


Opinion

Heading toward Washington, D.C m

O

, itcrKfor

Ronald R e a g a n ' s inauguration, the controversial confirmation hearings for Alexander Haig and David Stockman, the r e t u r n of t h e A m e r i c a n h o s t a g e s — t h e s e a n d other e x c i t i n g e v e n t s h a v e h a d a n i m p a c t on t h e lives of all A m e r i c a n s in the l a s t few m o n t h s a n d 21 of your fellow H o p e s t u d e n t s a r e f o r t u n a t e enough to b e in t h e n a t i o n ' s capitol a t t h i s m o m e n t o u s period in o u r c o u n t r y ' s h i s t o r y . Though e v e r y d a y is not filled with s u c h l a n d m a r k o c c u r e n c e s , one c a n n o t help but be i n s p i r e d by t h e c u l t u r a l w e a l t h a n d historical significance that are W a s h i n g t o n D C. As m a n y of you a r e a w a r e (I h o p e ! ) , t h e 1981 W a s h i n g t o n H o n o r s S e m e s t e r is well u n d e r w a y . S t u d e n t s f r o m a v a r i e t y of disciplines h a v e , for the l a s t six w e e k s ,

t a k i n g a d v a n t a g e of all t h a t it h a s to o f f e r . F i v e s t u d e n t s gladly p a r t e d w i t h a portion of t h e i r s c a r c e m o n e t a r y r e s o u r c e s in o r d e r to a t t e n d the I n a u g u r a l Youth Ball, one w h i c h w a s g r a c e d with of P r e s i d e n t R e a g a n a n d h i s lovely little w i f e N a n c y . ( A n u m b e r of u s a t t e n d e d the o n s t a g e p e r f o r m a n c e of " T h e y ' r e P l a y i n g Our at t h e National Theatre, and future t h e a t r e p l a n s e n t a i l " T h e K i n g a n d 1, s t a r r i n g t h e k i n g h i m s e l f , Yul B r e n n e r . N a t u r a l l y w e ' v e all visited the v a r i o u s S m i t h s o n i a n Institutions, a b s o r b i n g t h e l a r g e

t h e

S

o

S

t

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v a s t history t h e y m a i n t a i n on e v e r y subject imaginable, from Archie B u n k e r ' s c h a i r to the S k y l a b S p a c e Shuttle to the golden t r e a s u r e s of

Concepjion S

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If you r e a l l y w a n t to play b a s k e t b a l l a t the Dow C e n t e r : 1. D o n ' t go on S a t u r d a y a f t e r n o o n b e c a u s e the g i r l s ' tennis t e a m will h a v e all t h r e e c o u r t s r e s e r v e d . 2. Don't question Hope a u t h o r i t y o r H o p e ' p o l i c y ' a n d for h e a v e n ' s s a k e ,

_

A - . J

«

4

they do not know 6. Don't a s k P r e s i d e n t Van Wylen to o u t b e c a u s e he'll tell you, " I t ' s y o u

/-4

financial wasteful the level get the question

use.

St

N a m e W i t h h e l d

^

*u:»ir i k ^

stored a w a y , f o r g o t t e n . t e r n s ^ pulled out occasionally, glanced at, and then p a w a y a g a i n ,. When w n c n 1i f o u n d out t— h a-t p r o p o s e d new Kletz would be p l a c e d b a c k .... into a b a s e m e n t (it h a d been in t h e b a s e m e n t of V a n R a a l t e b e f o r e DeWit S t u d e n t a n d C u l t u r a l C e n t e r w a s built), I being

^SSrifound-

g ^ j e n l s s l i u n t ^ a r o u n d their ideais a r e b e i n e d i s c r e d i t e d DeWitt S t u d e n t a n d

s " P ^ t of WTAS can i n d ^ b e a wore x p e n d i t u r e of s t u d e n t f u n d s . It

q

ents

v

S

b

S

a n e m e r g e n c y m e a s u r e d u e to the Van

Slsteoce pnillTrihia Cottaee 1 r e s p e c t his of C o l u m b i a Cottage. 1 pec s u g g e s t i o n t h a t C o l u m b i a be r e s t o r e d and I u n d e r s t a n d his r e a s o n s for m a k i n g this s u g g e s t i o n but I think t h a t in this c a s e s e x i s t a t t i t u d e s a r e n ' t the p r o b l e m . I n s t e a d , the p r o b l e m is t h e adm i n i s t r a t i o n ' s obsession with financial r ^ ^ Y n m h i n Cottaee doesn't have

opinion you r e p a y i n g ) .

The r e s u u .

^ coiwk

t h w h i l e

CultSral Center w a s designed for the

stmpfy " bM;alBe

the

administration

^rtiTthem » ^ ^ TJ. s t u d e n t s m u s t not let t h e i r ideals a n d g o a l s b e t r a m p l e d o v e r . By s a y m g D e W i t t , w e a r e p r e s . r v i n g e u . m w j t y ^

l

J

W h a f s e r v i c e d o e s WTAS p r o v i d e t h a t

r e m a i n s ; is WTAS w o r t h the s t u d e n t . . . . . , m o n e y s p e n t on it? T h e second option is to d e c i d e t h a t

i S m . n d r e C u l 3 ^ ™ s ? J ? T , a , ; * n t u s a g e that is the to.metem. ^ e a m p ol t h e a d m W s t m t l o n w a s h

Columbia gains support

EHSrHr- -

over DeWitt; h a v e b e e n p u s h e d a n d hjdcien b a s e m e n t Not only a r e t h e

o c c u p i e s p a r t s of t h e building does not

*

your input is of p r i m a r y i m p o r t a n c e . S t u d e n t Congress WTAS T a s k F o r c e Philip VanderHaar Lora Rector George Caravella Lynn Forth Kevi^Torer

Liz Hoisington

forgotten,

S

wUl

r a a Up f i r p - n e v e r t h e l e s s , th

St

w a s upset.

SJud™. C o n g a s

S ^ m a k i T a S a ^ d e n t s e r v i c e 9 It does p r o v i d e a n e d u c a t i o n a l

Students get trampled e

Kathleen M.Stratton

s u f f i c i e n t need to w a r r a n t a s t u d e n t - r u n

in this t o w n a n d , collectively, w e a r e

t

p a s t few m o n t h s .

s u p p o r t . We feel t h a t it is to continue s p e n d i n g m o n e y a t w e h a v e been if we continue to p r e s e n t level of r e s u l t s . T h e b e i n g a s k e d is w h e t h e r t h e r e is

s- — r = ,

a

s « u r i t , of t h e H o p . e n v i r o n m e n t » m the t u r b u l e n t s t r e e t s of P o l a n d or A f g h a n i s t a n or within t h e daily g r i n d of a C o n g r e s s p e r s o n ' s o f f i c e s h o u l d m a k e no d i f f e r e n c e . E a c h s i t u a t i o n is c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of life in the r e a l w o r l d . On t h a t note I will r e t r e a t b a c k into the f a s t - p a c e d , politically d o m i n a t e d world of W a s h i n g t o n D C. in which I h a v e so c o m f o r t a b l y s i t u a t e d myself for these

l a r g e r lis tener s hip. T h e focus of t h e investigation is not on the m a n a g e r i a l o r p r o g r a m m i n g policies of t h e WTAS s t a f f , and t h e task f o r c e does not wish to lay b l a m e on the p a s t or p r e s e n t s t a f f s of WTAS. T h e question is, r a t h e r , a b r o a d e r one: w h a t role should a r a d i o s t a t i o n p l a y on Hope's c a m p u s and how can it b e r e a l i z e d ? T h e t a s k ft o r ec e h a s decided d e c i o e o t. h. .a. t. t h e r e a r e essentially two options r e g a r d i n g WTAS. O n e is to discontinue s t u d e n t

Hope a l u m n i c a p a b l e of c o n t r i b u t i n g f u n d s to a new g y m n a s i u m for s t u d e n t

. ^

,

s o l d ' i e r

p«.tlngtandredSP<?mll»

d a y s e f f o r t s for s u c h is s i m p l y not t h e c a s e T h e r e is m u c h to be s e e n and done

. I

m

s i g n i f i c a n t n u m b e r of s t u d e n t s . T h e s t a t i o n h a s a n u m b e r of t e c h n i c a l obs t a c l e s to o v e r c o m e in o r d e r to obtain a

" f o C r w o r r y , t h o u g h ; you'll soon be

'Basements.

a

Th^earStudentCongross^torn^

because

.

s

don't

" 3 . P t e t s e d m ° t t h r o w f r l s b e e s In the hall while w a i t i n g for t h e six tennis people to get done u s i n g the whole g y m n a s i u m .

h e l p

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And what of WTAS?

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interns in various as served _ o. neg r e s s i o n a l offices, government C agencies and private organizations. The experience and knowledge gained from t h e s e i n t e r n s h i p s is i n v a l u a b l e to the s t u d e n t s involved. F o r m a n y of us, myself included, it is a n o p p o r t u n i t y to w o r k in a n a r e a t h a t w e h a v e s t u d i e d only f r o m a textbook for the last t h r e e a n d a half y e a r s . One soon b e c o m e s a w a r e of t h e l i m i t a t i o n s of a college e d u c a t i o n in d e t e r m i n i n g s u c c e s s o r f a i l u r e in a given p r o f e s s i o n . It is not m y intention to d e n i g r a t e t h e h a r d - e a r n e d college d i p l o m a ; h o w e v e r , 1 h a v e l e a r n e d t h a t a c h i e v i n g a c a d e m i c s u p e r i o r i t y in t h e c l a s s r o o m d o e s not n e c e s s a r i l y ens u r e s u c c e s s in the nine-to-five world. C o n v e r s e l y , n e i t h e r is t h e " a v e r a g e " s t u d e n t a u t o m a t i c a l l y d o o m e d to t h e ffe'ld8There a r e s o ' m a n y

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h o m e s t e a d . And t h e r e is a l w a y s U f a b u l o u s s o u r c e of i n f o r m a t i o n , t h e downtown a r e a which someone somehow o n c h o r , spots to to o b t a i n a copy of e a c h w e e k . n u t r , t ' ® ^ ^ r r e a ^ Bill L o c k h a r f s w e l l - w r i t t e n a r t i c l e on ""J"? J ^ k chaT\ie's Clyde's, the m e d i o c r i t y a n d s i n g l e - m i n d e d n e s s of ^ B1 ck ® 'f1®' ® ^ , the H o p e a t m o s p h e r e d e s c r i b e d a n at- > d btedlv' strike a fnd of t i t u d e " h i c h I once held. Although Hope & chOTd ^he . . t h c a n 0 f t e n s e e m like a d r e a m l a n d , totally x S t S limK to the c o m p l e x i t i e s of t h e " r e a l f r and ° p * w o r l d , " I ' v e s i n c e c o m e to b e l i e v e t h a t <g life o{fers shopping, gh t h e r e is n o u n i v e r s a l conception of w h a t " the " r e a l w o r l d " a c t u a l l y is. able One s t a r r y y mnatina To m e t h e r e a l w o r l d is typified by a to fulfill his a d o l ^ e n t d r e a m g innocently in a s a n d b o x , o r 0 n

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G r e e t i n g s f r o m a b o u t 200 miles n o r t h of t h e e q u a t o r - Bogota, Colombia. W h a t ' s it like down h e r e ? W e l l . . . . T h e f i r s t few w e e k s c a n be a little r o u g h . T h e biggest q u e s t i o n in m y m i n d is u s u a l l y , " ' D i d s h e s a y w h a t I thought she s a i d ? " S h e p r o b a b l y d i d n ' t . T h e n of c o u r s e t h e r e a r e the slight d i e t a r y c h a n g e s — like no v e g e t a b l e s and no milk for two w e e k s in a row, or p o t a t o e s and r i c e and noodles and b a n a n a s twice a d a y , e v e r y d a y . And f i g u r i n g out t h e bus s y s t e m — all the r o u t e s m u s t be m e m o r i z e d ; t h e r e a r e n o m a p s . Or l e a r n i n g t h a t p e d e s t r i a n s do not h a v e the right-of-way. Ah, t h e n t h e r e ' s school. H a v e you e v e r g o t t e n lost listening to D r . Doyle or D r . D y k s t r a ? Well, j u s t i m a g i n e w h a t it's like in a n o t h e r l a n g u a g e . I h a d n e v e r r e a l i z e d h u m a n beings w e r e c a p a b l e of s p e a k i n g so r a p i d l y . My p h r a s e f o r the s e m e s t e r is, " P o r favor, despacio." "Please, slowly." (It d o e s n ' t s e e m to h e l p m u c h . ) Remember t h o s e 100-page r e a d i n g a s s i g n m e n t s ? Colombian s t u d e n t s get the s a m e thing — a n d so do I. If m u r d e r i n g m y Spanish-English dictionary were a c r i m e . I'd be s e r v i n g a life s e n t e n c e by now. But t h e r e a r e c o m p e n s a t i o n s : like m y f i r s t m i d - J a n u a r y s u n t a n . (By the w a y , h o w ' s the w e a t h e r in Holland n o w ? ) And h a v i n g m y a f t e r n o o n s f r e e (no l a b s ! ) . The students are friendly, always asking w h a t m y n a m e is and w h e r e I ' m f r o m . One t i m e I m i s u n d e r s t o o d a n d thought t h e guy h a d s a i d religion i n s t e a d of region! F o r t u n a t e l y , m y s e m e s t e r h e r e is t e a c h i n g m e a lot m o r e t h a n just m a t e r i a l

for a n e c d o t e s . Although Colombia h a s b e e n g r e a t l y i n f l u e n c e d by t h e U.S., nothing c a n c h a n g e its I n d i a n a n d S p a n i s h h e r i t a g e , nor t h e i n f l u e n c e of the Catholic C h u r c h , the l a t t e r r e p r e s e n t i n g a v e r y d i f f e r e n t political e n v i r o n m e n t t h a n in the U.S. C o l o m b i a n s h a v e lived with r a c i a l d i s c r i m i n a t i o n f o r s o long, s i n c e 1503, that t h e y usually don't e v e n r e a l i z e it exists. But it does. T h o s e in i m p o r t a n t b u s i n e s s a n d g o v e r n m e n t positions a r e usually l i g h t e r c o m p l e c t e d . My Colombian little s i s t e r is a l w a y s w i s h i n g s h e h a d blond h a i r like all the TV s t a r s s h e sees. Such j u x t a p o s i t i o n s also exist in t h e f o r m of unbelievably r i c h b u s o w n e r s who p a y t h e i r d r i v e r s $4 for a 10-14 hour w o r k d a y . So it's no w o n d e r Bogota is full of thieves. They a r e n ' t out to " g e t " a n y o n e ( p h y s i c a l a s s a u l t s a r e lower h e r e t h a n in the S t a t e s ) ; t h e y ' r e j u s t h u n g r y . I know that, y e t I still get s c a r e d e v e r y t i m e a g a m i n e ( s t r e e t kid) a p p r o a c h e s m e to beg. I still h a v e t h e N o r t h A m e r i c a n prejudices against those who look destitute. Thankfully, generosity and c o m p a s s i o n a r e slowly winning out. I c a n ' t e v e n i m a g i n e w h a t I would feel like if put in their s i t u a t i o n s . S o m e of you half-jokingly p r e d i c t e d I w o u l d n ' t m a k e it out of Colombia a l i v e b e c a u s e of all the t e r r o r i s t s . It is t r u e that being a n A m e r i c a n is not a s p e c i a l ticket to being loved by all, a n d it is a l s o t r u e that one does not walk outside at night ( a n d for sure, not a l o n e ) , but most of us wouldn't do that in a n y l a r g e city. Adm i t t e d l y , I w a s s h o c k e d when a n A m e r i c a n m i s s i o n a r y I know w a s kid-

NEED A RIDE?? TRY INTERCOUNTY NTERCOUNTY is a deluxe Van service

by C r a i g P o t t e r S i n c l a i r When w e think, w e think with words, words that were d e v e l o p e d over t h o u s a n d s of y e a r s by a g r a d u a l , i n t r i c a t e p r o c e s s . All t h a t w e a r e is e m b e d d e d in a n d d e p e n d e n t on a c u l t u r a l h i s t o r y . F o r the United S t a t e s this c u l t u r e is one of p r o g r e s s a n d e x p a n s i o n , m o d e r n i z a t i o n a n d i n d u s t r i a l i z a t i o n , t h e land of plenty f o r those w h o a r e able. O u r s is the land of t h e individual, d e v e l o p i n g himself to his full potential.

T h e n , S u n d a y a f t e r n o o n , t h o u s a n d s of f a m i l i e s s t r e a m out of Bogota to s p e n d the d a y t o g e t h e r in their f a v o r i t e field or stop a t a r o a d s i d e s t a n d to buy f r e s a s can crema ( s t r a w b e r r i e s with w h i p p e d cream). R i g h t now y o u ' r e p r o b a b l y a s k i n g . "So. do you like it or don't y o u ? " I like it. W h y ? M a y b e b e c a u s e of the b e a u t i f u l l a n d s c a p e a n d all the f l o w e r s . M a y b e b e c a u s e the people a r e so f r i e n d l y a n d kind. M a y b e b e c a u s e I love s t u d y i n g new s u b j e c t s like a n t h r o p o l o g y a n d L a t i n A m e r i c a n l i t e r a t u r e or living in a new and challenging situation. Maybe s o m e t h i n g else. Or m a y b e j u s t b e c a u s e I like it. If a n y of you h a v e thought of s t u d y i n g o f f - c a m p u s , m y a d v i c e is DO IT. exp e c t i n g it to be e v e r y t h i n g you don't expect. Barbara Smith P.S. J u s t found out I ' v e pulled a m u s c l e in m y leg. T h e d o c t o r s a i d a h o t - w a t e r bottle would help. H o w e v e r , 1 l a t e r d i s c o v e r e d that t h e r e is no s u c h t e r m in m y d i c t i o n a r y , so I e n d e d up a s k i n g f o r a " b o t t l e t h a t is f o r hot w a t e r " to put on m y s o r e leg. Well, I got one all r i g h t — a l a r g e Coke b o t t l e full of hot w a t e r !

We view m a n a n a n a t u r a l l y p e a c e f u l a n d r a t i o n a l being, a n d m o r e than a n y t h i n g w e like to r e m a i n at p e a c e . But w a r c a m e , a n d it h a d to be dealt with. Although w e e n t e r e d both world w a r s l a t e , w h e n w e did. w e w e n t " a l l o u t , " f i g h t i n g for the " h i g h e r i d e a l " of maint a i n i n g f r e e d o m f o r all p e o p l e f r o m the a g g r e s s i v e " o p p r e s s o r . " We w a n t e d to fight a total w a r , or h a v e total p e a c e and nothing in b e t w e e n . But the t i m e of total w a r h a s e n d e d . In the n e v e r - e n d i n g c y c l e of c h a n g e , we h a v e found o u r s e l v e s a t t h e f o r e f r o n t of the w o r l d w i d e b a l a n c e of p o w e r . More t h a n a n y t h i n g w e w a n t e d to p a c k u p and l e a v e E u r o p e at t h e close of World W a r II. but this, a s w e f o u n d , is i m p o s s i b l e . In o r d e r to c h e c k R u s s i a in the b a l a n c e of p o w e r w e h a v e to m a i n t a i n m i l i t a r y p r e s s u r e upon t h e Soviet s p h e r e . T h e all(continued

on p 7)

More about female Hopeites

A| | F N ' Q

HAIR CARE CENTER FAMILY HAIR STYLING

connecfing Holland, Zoeland, Hudsoaville, Jenison, Grandville, Kentwood, Wyoming and Kent County International Airport.

Competition for U.S.

n a p p e d h e r e in Bogota by a f a c t i o n of the M-19, a n u r b a n g u e r r i l l a g r o u p . But their motives were primarily antigovernmental; the m a n ' s nationality was less i m p o r t a n t . . At h o m e , though, C o l o m b i a n s f a r outclass us Americans at courtesy. Family m e m b e r s g r e e t one a n o t h e r with a kiss on the c h e e k , or at least w i t h a h a n d s h a k e . In middle- and upper-class homes everyone g a t h e r s in the s e n o r a ' s r o o m to w a t c h TV and talk. O t h e r r e l a t i v e s a n d f r i e n d s a r e a l w a y s visiting — e s p e c i a l l y S a t u r d a y afternoons.

.'LllturtzeJ Profnuonaf ^Uuir Mtplmtmenl APPOINTMENTS DAILY CALL

396-5095 CLOSED MONDAY

17 W 16th HOUANO

•nWEIN IIVH A GENUAL

I will be s u c c i n c t r e g a r d i n g the r a s h of l e t t e r s w r i t t e n by Hope w o m e n in r e c e n t anchors. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , it took a pompous p l a g i a r i z e r to elicit r e s p o n s e s f r o m Hope w o m e n on one of t h e m a j o r conc e r n s in o u r nation today. T h i s i l l u s t r a t e s that m o s t f e m a l e H o p e i t e s m e r e l y r e a c t ; they d o not t a k e t h e initiative. M a n y of the l e t t e r s s a i d , in e f f e c t , that the p r e v a l e n t a t t i t u d e s t o w a r d w o m e n need to c h a n g e . With this I will a g r e e , but do not f o r g e t , you oh-so-outspoken c r i t i c s , that a c t i o n (not s i m p l y r e a c t i o n ) is required f r o m those whose attitudes a r e p r o g r e s s i v e to e f f e c t s u c h c h a n g e . E r i c D. B r u m m e l

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2 75

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iommuter Tickets, Too — 45 % discoun For further informotion and time tables call your full-service travel agent or

Intercounty at 392-3669

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Deregulation spurs competition by G e o r g e W i s i y n s k i " T h e completion of oil d e r e g u l a t i o n will not s p u r h i g h e r fuel c o s t s , " T h e C h r i s t i a n S c i e n c e Monitor r e p o r t e d in l a t e J a n u a r y . " T h e c u r r e n t oil glut coupled with the U . S . ' s a c t u a l declining c o n s u m p t i o n of e n e r g y will f o r c e the m a j o r oil c o m p a n i e s to a b s o r b the h i g h e r costs b r o u g h t on by O P E C and d e r e g u l a t i o n . " In other w o r d s competition, a grand result of d e r e g u l a t i o n , a l o n g with a lower d e m a n d a n d a h i g h e r s u p p l y will at least stabilize oil p r i c e s .

exist. E v e n oil c o m p a n y e x e c u t i v e s a d m i t this f a c t . R o b e r t E . Y a n c e y , p r e s i d e n t of Ashland Oil, said, " I t ' s a m y t h perp e t u a t e d l a r g e l y by the m a j o r s (oil companies) . . . . There hasn t been a f r e e m a r k e t in c r u d e oil for y e a r s a n d t h e r e isn't likely to e v e r be one a g a i n . " If the m a j o r A m e r i c a n oil c o m p a n i e s formed a confederation such as OPEC, t h e F e d e r a l g o v e r n m e n t would i n t e r v e n e a n d e n f o r c e t h e a n t i - t r u s t laws. What is O P E C ? I t ' s a g r o u p of oil-producing c o u n t r i e s w h i c h c o o p e r a t e in p r i c e s e t t i n g in o r d e r to m a x i m i m z e p r o f i t s for its

A gallon of g a s in J a n u a r y cost a b o u t $1 25. Today a gallon of g a s costs about $1.35. The obvious question a r i s e s : Why did p r i c e s go u p ? T h e a n s w e r is :hat c o m p e t i t i o n in the A m e r i c a n oil industry s i m p l y does not

members. T h e r e a s o n , a c c o r d i n g to r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of oil c o m p a n i e s , t h a t oil p r i c e s in t h e U.S. h a v e i n c r e a s e d lately is t h a t O P E C ' s p r i c e s a r e so m u c h h i g h e r t h a n the U.S.'s. So the U.S. c o m p a n i e s m u s t r a i s e their p r i c e s in o r d e r to m a t c h

Russian and our culture (continued from p. 6) out w a r is o v e r and a quiet s u b t l e w a r h a s t a k e n its place, s o m e t i m e s involving only w o r d s , but s o m e t i m e s limited w a r s a s in K o r e a and V i e t n a m . But A m e r i c a n s don't like the idea of limited w a r . F o r us it h a s to b e all or nothing. We wouldn't allow troops to s t a y in V i e t n a m , a n d now all the lost troops a r e for nought. - But can w e k e e p our a n t i q u a t e d views in t h e e v e r - c h a n g i n g world? In all a r e a s of life A m e r i c a n s will h a v e to realize t h a t t h i n g s will soon be d r a s t i c a l l y c h a n g i n g . T h e r e a r e no new lands for e x p a n s i o n , and no new r e s o u r c e s to k e e p us going. We a r e in a c o m e r a n d a r e going to h a v e to a d a p t . . W a r and d i p l o m a c y a r e also d r a s t i c a l l y c h a n g i n g , a n d w e will h a v e to flow with the b r e e z e . No longer can w e be involved in total w a r for the f e a r of p e n d i n g disaster T h e ~ R u s s i a n s h a v e a l r e a d y been a d a p t i n g a n d m o d e r n i z i n g their t a c t i c s . T h e y a r e g r a d u a l l y winning the T h i r d World w a r , the Cold W a r , by initiating revolution and overthrowing s m a l l governments in their worldwide revolution. T h e Soviets fight limited w a r s e v e r y t i m e they s u p p o r t a c o m m u n i s t revolution, a n d win a limited victory e v e r y t i m e a new Soviet-backed c o m m u n i s t r e g i m e t a k e s over a new r e g i m e . T h i s is the a r e a in which w e will h a v e to m e e t the R u s s i a n c h a l l e n g e . We will need

to fight limited instead of " a l l - o u t " w a r s , c h e c k i n g the R u s s i a n s with their own tactic.

can't afford it." We should r e c o n s i d e r oil i n d u s t r y regulation. We should s t u d y w h a t will OPEC." h a p p e n to s u p p l y , p r i c e s and profits. . But w h a t about the s m a l l oil comHas the e c o n o m i c t h e o r y which p a n i e s ? Surely it s e e m s that d e r e g u l a t i o n p r o n o u n c e s t h a t with d e r e g u l a t i o n will would allow t h e m to b r i n g c o m p e t i t i o n come extended exploration and research, into this i n d u s t r y . With d e r e g u l a t i o n of oil a n d t h e r e f o r e a n i n c r e a s e d supply of oil p r i c e s c o m e s the c e s s a t i o n of p r o g r a m s which will c o n s e q u e n t l y lead to a a n d s u b s i d i e s a i m e d a t a i d i n g the s m a l l stabilization of oil p r i c e s due to a lessened c o m p a n i e s which m a i n l y r e f i n e m o r e d e p e n d e n c e on i m p o r t e d oil, been e x p e n s i v e i m p o r t e d oil. anything more than theory? Since 1959, s e v e r a l F e d e r a l g o v e r n m e n t In 1979 P r e s i d e n t C a r t e r w a s f o r c e d to , p r o g r a m s h a v e m a n d a t e d t h a t l a r g e oil include d e r e g u l a t i o n in his e n e r g y c o m p a n i e s p r o v i d e the s m a l l oil c o m p r o g r a m . H a s the d e v e l o p m e n t a n d exp a n i e s with c h e a p e r U.S. oil, a n d h a v e ploration m a t c h e d the i n c r e a s e in p r i c e s ? provided g o v e r n m e n t s u b s i d i e s for s m a l l Is t h e r e a n y e v i d e n c e other t h a n companies. These provisions have •'blackboard e v i d e n c e " to s u b s t a n t i a t e allowed for a s m a l l m e a s u r e of f r e e enthe economic t h e o r y which s t a t e s that t e r p r i s e to exist within the oil i n d u s t r y . with d e r e g u l a t i o n c o m e s c o m p e t i t i o n ? With these Federal programs F i n a l l y , should oil, a basically inelastic discontinued t h e r e will exist absolutely no product, be u s e d to fill the p o c k e t s of the c o m p e t i t i o n in the i n d u s t r y . According to rich oil i n d u s t r y with the m o n e y of the William H. Bode, of the E m e r g e n c y S m a l l poor in this c o u n t r y ? After c o n t e m p l a t i n g Independent Refiners Task Force, at t h e s e questions, p e r h a p s oil regulation is least 75 r e f i n e r i e s will be f o r c e d out of not such a dirty word a f t e r all. b u s i n e s s a s a result of d e r e g u l a t i o n . Is (Quoted i n f o r m a t i o n a n d d e t a i l s a r e this the f r e e e n t e r p r i c e R o n a l d R e a g a n f r o m Congressional Q u a r t e r l y Weekly promised? R e p o r t ( J a n u a r y 31,1981).) With O P E C setting U.S. oil p r i c e s a n d

When the Soviets s u p p o r t a revolution a s they h a v e in El S a l v a d o r , they should know that they a r e r u n n i n g the risk of d r a w i n g A m e r i c a n opposition. E l S a l v a d o r can be the beginning of a new a w a r e n e s s of R u s s i a n a c t i v i t y on the p a r t of the United S t a t e s , a n d m o r e imp o r t a n t l y , the s t a r t of a new a n d r e a l b a l a n c e of p o w e r . After developing this position of equality w e can m o v e into a s t a t e of d e t e n t e . A f t e r R e a g a n a p p l i e d p r e s s u r e in E l S a l v a d o r e , the R u s s i a n s c a l l e d for a s u m m i t m e e t i n g to r e - e s t a b l i s h d e t e n t e and normalize trade. The way w e view the world is a d i r e c t result of o u r history, a n d the conditions f r o m which our c u l t u r e developed. But things n e v e r stay the s a m e and w e m u s t f a c e up to t h e new c h a l l e n g e s . If R u s s i a w a n t s to fight s m a l l , with limited w a r s , w e m u s t m e e t their o f f e n s i v e or s u f f e r the c o n s e q u e n c e s l a t e r on down the r o a d . One thing goes without q u e s t i o n : no longr a n g e policy c a n exist without the s u p p o r t of the A m e r i c a n people, a s w e s a w in V i e t n a m . P o p u l a r s u p p o r t will be the key f a c t o r involved in the s u c c e s s or f a i l u r e of R e a g a n ' s opposition to R u s s i a n exp a n s i o n i s m . This s u p p o r t will n e v e r exist if w e c o n t i n u e to think big in our view of

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s m a l l oil c o m p a n i e s gone t h e r e will be absolutely no c o m p e t i t i o n u i ' t h e oil industry. Senator J. Bennett Johnston ( D . - 2 LA) h a s said, ' ' A n y b o d y who b e l i e v e s ^ t h e r e is a f r e e m a r k e t in oil is e i t h e r v e r y n n a i v e or v e r y foolish." S e n a t o r D a l e ^ , Bumpers (D.-AR) believes thatg d e r e g u l a t i o n will p r o v i d e e n o r m o u s o i l ® c o m p a n y p r o f i t s , " a l l paid by people who

O P E C ' s . T h i s does not sound like competition to m e . And f u r t h e r m o r e , a r e n ' t we, in the U.S., a l m o s t totally in a g r e e m e n t t h a t O P E C ' s p r i c e s a r e unscrupulously high? Senator Henry J a c k s o n of Washington put it this w a y : ••Decontrolling oil p r i c e s r e m o v e s a n incentive for d o m e s t i c p r o d u c e r s to fight O P E C p r i c e i n c r e a s e s . As O P E C p r i c e s r i s e so will d o m e s t i c prices. It p l a c e s our total s u p p l y a t the p r i c i n g w h i m of

392-1

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Commentary

Van Wylen gives boot to gallery i

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b} Robert G. Wilkie Holland, MI; P r e s i d e n t Gordon Van Wylen announced today that he w a s moving his office into the P e a l e Science Center. Van Wylen will t r a n s f e r his office to P.S. 204 a s of next week. The new q u a r t e r s for Van Wylen a r e presently a c h e m i s t r y laboratory classroom used by students for their weekly lab classes. No i m m e d i a t e plans h a v e been m a d e to r e p l a c e the laboratory facilities. Before all you science students begin griping and moaning, be a s s u r e d that this news brief is totally i m a g i n a r y . In fact, you can bet your life (or at least your Organic Chem book) that such a s t a t e m e n t a s the above would n e v e r a p p e a r a s fact in the achor or the News F r o m Hope College. The reason for this is simple. The sciences at Hope a r e f a r too important to be held back or int e r f e r e d with in any way. However, isn't it odd that not a word was uttered when the President decided to move into the a r t gallery on the second floor of the DeWitt Cultural Center? Yes. Hope did have a n art gallery. Up until late last spring, the students, faculty and community m e m b e r s > e r e served by a fine although somewhat secluded a r t gallery. E a c h y e a r the gallery was used to present an excellent variety of shows f r o m various m u s e u m s and private

collections, as well a s faculty and student exhibitions. But now almost a y e a r h a s passed since the a r t gallery was used a s an exhibition environment. The fact of the m a t t e r is that it will be yet another y e a r until Hope opens its new gallery. The renovation of the Sligh building, complete with a new art gallery, is scheduled to be finished by this time next y e a r . The projected gallery facility in the new home of the a r t d e p a r t m e n t promises to be of even better quality and utility than the preceding one, but it still r e m a i n s that the entire community of Holland will be without any kind of a r t exhibition facility until next y e a r . This raises a very pertinent question. How can a college which describes itself as a liberal a r t s institution justify not having an art gallery for close to two y e a r s ? The a n s w e r is disgustingly simple. There is no justification. The administration h a s n ' t even a t t e m p t e d to provide another facility. Their a t t i t u d e a p p e a r s to be one of a p a t h y ; the newgallery will be ready in a year so why bother with anything now. The only art exhibition of any kind since last spring has been a student show in various p a r t s of Van Zoeren Library. The exhibition turned out to be a w k w a r d not only for the viewers, who could not mingle and discuss the works of a r t . but

The Pulse

Should DeWitt be rebuilt? by Anne Brown and Ingrid Anderson On J a n . 22 and 23 the Board of Trustees approved a plan for c a m p u s development which h a s raised much u p r o a r a m o n g Hope students. We asked 47 students, "Do you a g r e e with the renovation of DeWitt according to the plans that were approved by the Board of Trustees at the end of J a n u a r y ? " Despite the campus-wide controversy, the results were:

Yes No I don't know

40% 34% 26%

Most of the students who answered positively felt there was an obvious need

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for added space since the Van Raalte fire and that something .should be done. Several students c o m m e n t e d that they would like to see the college expand. The revamping of the Kletz seemed to be one of the key concerns of those students who answered " n o . " The s t a t e m e n t " I don't feel that the administration should take over the Kletz" w a s representative of the opinion of m a n y students. A m a j o r i t y of the students c o m m e n t e d that the DeWiitt Center was meant to be a student c e n t e r a n d should r e m a i n a student center. One Hope student pointed out that the present 19,000 s q u a r e feet of student s p a c e will be reduced to 6,000 s q u a r e feet a f t e r the renovation.

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also for the students who wished to study in a library and not in a n exhibition hall. You can b e s u r e that if the P r e s i d e n t had displaced a laboratory in P e a l e Science Center, c h e m i s t r y s t u d e n t s would not have had to p e r f o r m their titration exp e r i m e n t s a m o n g the stacks. Before you could say oxymetazoline hydrochloride, a plan for new laboratory s p a c e would h a v e been d r a w n up and executed. To most students, this m a t t e r of an art gallery b e a r s virtually no consequence and is of miniscule interest. However, the implications of this situation a r e far m o r e serious than they a p p e a r . T h e a b s e n c e of

an art gallery on c a m p u s can only mean that Hope is neglecting the a r t s , or. at best, not taking them a s seriously a s the sciences. This is not only tragic but grossly u n f a i r to a student who a t t e n d s Hope in o r d e r to study the a r t s . It would be a b s u r d for the i m a g i n a r y news brief at the beginning of this article to a p p e a r at Hope, and e v e r y o n e at this institution knows it. However, when the equivalent action takes place concerning an art d e p a r t m e n t facility (for what is an a r t gallery to an a r t student but a l a b o r a t o r y ) , no one thinks twice of it Something is very wrong.

Heart in Lincoln Common by Kim Vender Bie I spent five days in San F r a n c i s c o last s e m e s t e r . . . but I did not leave my heart there. I left my heart at Lincoln Common. Lincoln Common, a Christian community located on the site of an old lumber mill, is tucked a w a y in the Cascade Mountains of southern Oregon, and is the site of the Oregon Extension. The Oregon Extension is a s m a l l community of learners. E a c h fall and spring about 30 students f r o m various colleges and universities study with the five faculty families who m a k e up the p e r m a n e n t community. The fall s e m e s t e r examines the n a t u r e of c o n t e m p o r a r y society. The spring s e m e s t e r conc e n t r a t e s on environmental studies. Trinity College in Deerfield, IL sponsors a n d fully accredits the 15-semester-hour program. As a m e m b e r of the Lincoln c o m m u n i t y last fall, I had the most incredible, and broadening, learning experience of m y life. My " c l a s s r o o m s " included the Oregon coast and the California Redwoods. the Shakespeare t h e a t e r in Ashland, a duck m a r s h . San Francisco, and a library on Highway 66. to n a m e a few.

In addition to four bearded men, one clean-shaven dude, and one w o m a n â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the designated " p r o f s " at Lincoln - m y teachers included a Mennonite couple, a five-year old boy n a m e d Scotty. a street musician, fellow students, and neighbors who lived on "Lincoln's" mountain. What I learned, and heightened realizations I experienced, varied a s m u c h as the people, place and events that I learned f r o m . I lived in a cozy, rustic cabin with t h r e e other girls, a welcome c h a n g e a f t e r two y e a r s of life on a " c o n c r e t e c a m p u s . " Sharing household responsibilities in that environment w a s an education in itself I learned to cook n a t u r a l foods, to compost and recycle g a r b a g e , and to m a k e a f i r e in a wood-burning stove. In the town of Ashland, located about 20 miles west of Lincoln, I was able to s e e some plays during the annual S h a k e s p e a r e Festival. I also put in s o m e

hours of work at Ashland's n a t u r a l food co-op. of which we students w e r e members. Field studies included in the curriculum allowed m e to do s o m e of my favorite things and to try some new adventures for the very first time. I went b a c k p a c k i n g for five days and, for the first time, drank w a t e r that didn't c o m e out of a faucet. (It w a s delicious!) 1 cross-country skied in the " w i n t e r w o n d e r l a n d " of C r a t e r L a k e National P a r k , and went rock climbing in the gorge that surrounded one side of Lincoln. I walked h a l f w a y a c r o s s the Golden Gate Bridge, and c h a t t e d with comm u t e r s on a cable c a r . I read, thought, talked a n d listened I realized, m o r e than ever, that persistent c a r e and feeding of the mind is essential for one to grow a s an individual, a s a scholar, and especially a s a Christian. I realized that internal action is equally as important a s e x t e r n a l action in Christian discipleship. I realized that h u m a n p r o b l e m s and environmental p r o b l e m s a r e inseparable, and that being a responsible s t e w a r d of this planet is an integral p a r t of Christianity. I gained a new a p p r e c i a t i o n for the word " c o m m u n i t y . " I felt love) in action with people who s h a r e d c o n j m o n concerns and who believed that living by their values was the best way to deal with these concerns. And now I a m back in the " r e a l " world T h e r e a r e m a n y things about c o n t e m p o r a r y society that trouble me. But I b e a r in mind a thought by Russian w n t e r Leo Tolstoy: " E v e r y b o d y thinks of changing h u m a n i t y , and nobody thinks of changing h i m s e l f . "

Correction An a r t i c l e in last w e e k ' s onchor was entitled " H o p e ' s f o r e i g n e r s . " T h e headline did not a c c u r a t e l y reflect the content of the article, a n d any negative c o n n o t a t i o n s p e r c e i v e d w e r e unintentional a n d do not reflect the views of the author or the anchor s t a f f .

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Critical Issues Symposium Energy

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March 11,12 1981 tn

Energy: everyone's on expert, right? What's the issue here? by Donald H. Williams Since everyone is affected by energy everyone h a s an opinion on the subject. F o r m a n y people that is the basis of expertise, that and an occassional blurb on the television. F o r others that opinion and that blurb the basis of growing curiosity and interest about energy. Surely the subject d e s e r v e s inspection; it is important. One might say that it is vitally important. We all must become e x p e r t s if we a r e not a l r e a d y , at least to s o m e degree. F o r most environmentalists energy is the "bottom line." Most clean-up e f f o r t s s e e m to m e a n that energy efficiency m u s t b e sacrificed. To re-gather s c a t t e r e d r e s o u r c e s or to r e p r o c e s s most m a t e r i a l s will cost even m o r e precious energy. But truly the 4 ' s c a r e " presented to us about dwindling resources is really just a s c a r e about energy . . . isn't it? * T h e resources h a v e n ' t really left the planet yet, have they? They a r e s p r e a d out or mislocated and exist in f o r m s that will ' r e q u i r e energy-intensive reprocessing. That sounds like there will b e new d e m a n d s for energy (and that sounds like energy is going to cost us even

i Do you suppose we really need any c h a n g e is in order? Will there be m o r e nuclear power plants? Don t you rationing or revolution or . . . ? hope that everyone else will go unS o m e a r e even asking how long the derground with their houses so that present world order can b e maintained energy d e m a n d (and prices?) will with global i m b a l a n c e s in energy sources decline? Isn't someone in the P e a l e and needs. Are simple or serious Science Center or the Physics-Math economic a d j u s t m e n t s called for? Are Building working on s o m e sort of political overhauls in line? Surely energy, r e s e a r c h b r e a k t h r o u g h ? If any of these if not the bottom line here, is a m a j o r q u e s t i o n s can be a n s w e r e d in a consideration and related to Mideast reassuring m a n n e r a r e n ' t you and 1 instability. Are you interested yet? Do putting our f u t u r e in the hands of others, you know of one single, all-knowing exfor a r e n ' t we just looking to technology or pert? to other folks to solve our problem? This Almost every a r t i c l e written begins in approach leaves it to other experts. This the m a n n e r that this one has, so m u c h so a p p r o a c h puts our f a t e in the hands of that m a n y r e a d e r s a r e finding their minds wandering instead of wondering. others. And this is about the place most articles s t a r t the statistical review building a case for a doomsday scenario. If you w e r e not expecting that then you w e r e probably ready for a long a r g u m e n t dismissing the t e r m energy " c r i s i s . " Is t h e r e a crisis or

more). ^ 4 But other environmentalists a r g u e persuasively that t h e r e a r e clean nonpolluting lifestyles that also use m u c h less energy. Is this the a n s w e r ? All that s called for a r e d r a s t i c and wide-spread c h a n g e s ! ! Changes . . . t h a t ' s each of us a g a i n . Serious proposals a r e being m a d e about how f a r we travel, how often and with whom. Already most of us a r e d re s s i n g m o r e w a r m l y . Our lifestyles a r e beginning to change. How much m o r e

c~ntr* and details Hofoilc before hpfnr* us. In the panel facts discussion and in all of the concurrent mini-sessions that follow we will h a v e a our c h a n c e to get specific information from well-informed sources, sources known to be good p r e s e n t e r s with inf o r m a t i o n or insights not readily available to the entire c a m p u s community. After lunch a d e b a t e f o r m a t h a s been chosen to get a the truth about the issue of nuclear power. P r o and con advocates will respond in turn, first to questions f r o m a panel of three and l a t e r to written questions f r o m the audience.

The C.l.S. and the day will close, a f t e r the debate, with a choice of workshops for us all based on this general question: "How do we r e s p o n d ? " After having thought about the issue, a f t e r having brought good questions to the keynoter, the panelists, the mini-session leaders, and the d e b a t e r s , we will be led in w a y s to respond, and we will now be able to do so in a m o r e e x p e r t fashion. This will be the case especially for those who e x a m i n e the material placed on r e s e r v e in the Van Zoren Library, the m a t e r i a l supplied to us by key participants. F u r t h e r m o r e , our s p e a k e r s have all The Critical Issues Symposium (C.l.S.) been instructed to provide a b s t r a c t s of for 1981, to be held Wednesday evening, their presentations for this special M a r c h 11, and during the day T h u r s d a y , anchor f e a t u r e (see the fourth section of M a r c h 12, is designed to present a n s w e r s this article) and other publicity. 'Hie goal to these and related questions. This y e a r t h r o u g h o u t is to m a k e t h e d a y the topic is energy. F o r this whole academically a n d intellectually useful to a c a d e m i c y e a r a broadly based comall of us. If that w e r e not enough, the mittee of a d m i n i s t r a t o r s , faculty and s p e a k e r s and panelists have been told students h a s worked to put together a day that our overall objective is to enable designed to help every one of us i n c r e a s e each of us to m o r e effectively f o r m u l a t e our level of expertise significantly. an a p p r o p r i a t e response to the energy This c o m m i t t e e h a s done a lot m o r e " s i t u a t i o n , " a response a p p r o p r i a t e f o r than plan a p a r a d e of s p e a k e r s . A definite citizens who receive their college outline a n d plan a r e in mind. After a n education a t a value-centered institution. overview on Wednesday evening, by a n E a c h s p e a k e r and discussion leader economist with widely diverse interests knows of our overall t h e m e and of the and expertise, a chance will be given day's p r o g r a m . Now all that you a n d I everyone to m e e t and to challenge inmust do is a p p r o a c h the day a s e x p e r t dividually all the participants, both the learners. The s p e a k e r s h a v e every r e a s o n keynoter and those to speak on T h u r s d a y . to expect our active participation. Thursday morning is designed to put

Philosophy

not? You m a y have expected a diatribe denouncing oil companies or the n e a r e s t l a r g e utility. Aren't t h e r e a b u n d a n t r e p o r t s of newly discovered natural gas? Isn't it simply a m a t t e r of applying known technologies to our own a b u n d a n t coal r e s e r v e and turning it into gas, gasoline or alcohol? Isn't t h e r e a simple a n s w e r out t h e r e s o m e w h e r e just waiting for the proper economic climate? When most e x p e r t s tell you that simple a n s w e r s a r e nonexistent a r e n ' t they just trying to r e m a i n in business, telling you that you still need e x p e r t s around to do the complicated? Maybe you h a d best b e c o m e your own expert, if you h a v e the t i m e and energy.

Coal Miners Get t h e Shaft

of C.l.S. '81

Energy at Hope

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What began last spring as an allcampus energy audit is in the process of being carried out, according to Bill Anderson, vice-president for business and finance. The program was designed to monitor buildings on campus and evaluate them for electricity, fuel and water consumption. The buildings were ranked in order of their potential for energy savings:

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1. Peale Science 2. Dow Center 3. Van Zoeren Library 4. Physics-Math 5. DeWitt Cultural Center 6. KollenHall

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8. Graves Hall 9. F r a t e r n a l - E m e r s o n i a n

10. Gilmore Hall 11. Wichers Music Building 12. Dykstra Hall 13. Lichty Hall 14. Lubbers Hall 15.DurfeeHall 16. Dimnent Chapel To conduct the study last spring the college was awarded $17,300 from the Department of Energy. This funding was used to pay the engineers of Fairbrother and Gunther, who supplied the technical assistance to specify what each building project should consist of. Hope con(contlnued on p. 12) «<s»

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1 Who exactly is in store for C.l.S Wednesday evening President Van Wylen will introduce the symposium and the keynote s p e a k e r Wednesday at 7:30 p . m . in Dimnent Chapel. E d w a r d Wolff's a d d r e s s is entitled "Should the Government Subsidize New E n e r g y P r o j e c t s ? " Wolff is weU qualified to help our thinking on this important question. He w a s a national merit scholar at H a r v a r d , g r a d u a t i n g magna cum laude in 1968. His M.Phil, and Ph.D. w e r e e a r n e d a t Yale. He is presently an associate professor of economics at New York University, w h e r e he has been since 1974. He h a s had several national appointments and serves or has served as a consultant to a very large n u m b e r of important institutions and committees. He h a s published m o r e than two dozen articles and is finishing a book. In the next section of this article is an a b s t r a c t of a recent article that Wolff h a s co-authored that investigates the relationship of subsidies to energy stockpiles. A unique event will take place shortly a f t e r Wolff's presentation. The symposium will move to the Phelps c a f e t e r i a . There will be a response and reception at 8:45 p.m. on Wednesday. T h e participants for T h u r s d a y ' s p r o g r a m s will be introduced. They will be given a brief opportunity to respond to points m a d e by the keynoter. They will preview their role in the events of the next day. We will have the chance to c a r r y on discussions with Wolff. We can visit with any or all of the participants. All of this will happen in a relaxed and informal setting and, best of all, it will happen over light refreshments. Here we can plan our participation for the next day.

Panel discussion

Before he joined the D.O.E. and the Atomic E n e r g y Commission in 1972 he worked with the Shell Oil Co. During Thursday morning's session he will be p r e p a r e d to discuss legal obstacles and aids to r e s e a r c h and development in a l t e r n a t i v e energy prospects. Smith m a y h a v e to u s e his legal expertise to keep the other two panelists peacefully productive. On t h e other hand, they m a y feel that the g o v e r n m e n t is the problem preventing progress in this a r e a . We m a y h a v e a lively t i m e learning acc u r a t e l y what the outlook is for nontraditional energy sources.

Morning By 10:30 a . m . on Thursday we must begin m a k i n g s o m e decisions. F i v e different mini-sessions or workshops will be held concurrently. In these concurrent sessions we can get specific with our questions. The sessions will introduce some new infomation a n d allow investigation of topics brought up earlier.

Mini-session E will f e a t u r e a n e c o n o m i s t f r o m Western Michigan University. Salim H a r i k e a r n e d his Ph.D. a t Wayne State University specializing in international and petroleum economics. Besides teaching a g r a d u a t e course on the subject, h e h a s been f e a t u r e d on a r e a TV p r o g r a m s m a k i n g s e n s e of a f u t u r e with fewer g o v e r n m e n t regulations. His session on " G o v e r n m e n t Deregulations of E n e r g y M a r k e t s : I m m e d i a t e and Longrun Implications" will be held in Winants Auditorium.

Session F Mini-session F will f e a t u r e Amb a s s a d o r Gale McGee speaking on "National Leadership and the E n e r g y Question" in Physics-Math 118. All sessions will conclude around lunchtime.

Some energy numbers E n e r g y used in the United States: in 1960 by 180 million people 44 q u a d s in 1979 by 220 million people 79 quads World and (U.S.) proven r e s e r v e s of energy in q u a d s ; Oil 3,721 (157) Coal 16,482 ( 4.577» Gas 2,653 ( 200) U r a n i u m 855 (234) E a c h y e a r the sun shines upon our country almost 500 times m o r e energy than we consume. E n e r g y production in the United States in 1980 in q u a d s : Nuclear 2.9 Other 3.1 Coal 15.8 Gas 20.5 U.S. Oil 20.5 Imported Oil 15.2

Session A In concurrent session A to be held in PSC 50 a t 10:30 a . m . David Solomon will tell us about " N u c l e a r F u s i o n . " Solomon is vice president and project m a n a g e r of K.M.S, Fusion of Ann Arbor. This p r i v a t e f i r m is a l a r g e part of a ten-and-a-half million dollar project m a k i n g laserinduced fusion happen. They help o p e r a t e our nation's most powerful visible light laser. He will h a v e a short videotape showing us the s t a t e of the a r t in this project a s he begins his presentation.

Session B In concurrent session B, also at 10:30, P e r a l t a of Exxon will c a r r y f o r w a r d m a t e r i a l h e mentioned in the panel discussion earlier. We expect him to be specific about various "synthetic f u e l s " that Exxon is developing. He will be available in Wichers Auditorium.

On Thursday, M a r c h 12, a busy day will begin when dean Sheldon Wettack introduces a panel discussion on 'Energy Alternatives" back in Dimnent Chapel. The panel will be moderated by one of our Ross is back with his favorite topic for own physics professors, Bryant Hichwa. the third concurrent session. He will It will begin at 8:30 a . m . Three indiscuss the "Efficient Use of Sustainable teresting people will present very difE n e r g y S o u r c e s . " J u d g i n g f r o m notes he ferent perspectives about the outlook for h a s provided for us (see the next section a l t e r n a t i v e sources of energy. of this article) he h a s much to s a y abut Manny P e r a l t a is an i m p o r t a n t how our lifestyles might change. His executive of the Exxon Corporation, presentation will take place in the DeWitt where he heads up the synthetic fuels Theatre. division. He looks a f t e r their projects in coal gasification, s h a l e oil and t a r sands Sharing the panel with P e r a l t a will be an evnironmentalist, William Ross f r o m Calgary, Alberta. Ross is the associate dean of the faculty Session D w ill be conducted by our own of environmental design at the University physics professor, P e t e r Jolivette. He will of Calgary. He has p e r f o r m e d scholarly be in PSC 219,220 at 10:30 a . m . discussing studies on the Alberta Oil Sands one of his c u r r e n t a r e a s of study, "Risk Development and he has-helped develop Assessment of E n e r g y S o u r c e s . " No e n e r g y c o n s e r v a t i o n p r o g r a m s for energy surce comes without s o m e risk schools. F o r this panel, it is interesting to but information about how the risks a r e 4 o note that he is the Alberta r e p r e s e n t a t i v e be assessed v a r i e s often with the point of for the F r i e n d s of the E a r t h development view of a p a r t i c u l a r advocate. F u r of a Canadian Soft E n e r g y P a t h . Ross thermore, d a t a is s o m e t i m e s not readiluy was educated at McGill University in available. Jolivette will give us help in physics. sorting out this information and will help The third m e m b e r of the panel us interpret it. We can look f o r w a r d to a represents, perhaps, the key to energy presentation of genuine utility. alternatives, the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of E n e r g y . David Smith is the assistant chief counsel for the regional Office of the Council for the U.S. D.O.E. Smith s t a r t e d his education a t the Central State University in Ohio and e a r n e d his law d e g r e e at De Paul University in Chicago.

Session C

Session D

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Energy terms Barrel — A liquid m e a s u r e of oil, usually c r u d e oil, equal to 42 gallons or about 306 pounds. Barrel of oil equivalent — E n e r g y equal to a barrel of c r u d e oil — 5.8 million Btu Biomass — Living m a t t e r , plant and a n i m a l , in any form. Btu (British thermal unit) — The amount of heat necessary to raise the temp e r a t u r e of one pound of w a t e r one degree F a h r e n h e i t . About a q u a r t e r of a calorie. Carcinogen — A s u b s t a n c e or agent producing or inciting c a n c e r o u s growth. Cogeneration — The production of two useful f o r m s of energy f r o m the s a m e process. In a factory, f o r instance, s t e a m needed for industrial processes of s p a c e heating is first run through turbines to g e n e r a t e electricity. Efficiency - The ratio of useful work or energy output to total work or energy input. Fossil fuels - F u e l s such as coal, c r u d e oil or natural gas, f o r m e d f r o m r e m a i n s of plants and animals. Gasohol — In the U.S., a mix of 90 percent unleaded gasoline and 10 percent ethvi alcohol. Geopressured g a s - N a t u r a l g a s that is dissolved in hot brine and trapped under great p r e s s u r e deep within the e a r t h . Greenhouse effect - The w a r m i n g effect of carbon dioxide and w a t e r vapor in the

atmosphere. These molecules are t r a n s p a r e n t to incoming sunlight but block i n f r a r e d (heat) radiation escaping f r o m the e a r t h . Megawatt — A unit of power equal to 1.000 kilowatts, or one million watts. A gigawatt is a billion watts. O P E C — The Organization of Petroleum E x p o r t i n g Countries, 13 nations that aim at developing c o m m o n oil-marketing policies. Photovoltaics — The process by which radiant (solar) e n e r g y is converted directly into electrical energy using a solar cell. Quad — A quadrillion Btu. T h e energy contained in eight billion gallons of gasoline, a y e a r ' s supply for 10 million automobiles. Renewable energy source — One that is constantly or cyclically replenished, including direct solar energy and indirect sources such as b i o m a s s and wind power. R e s e r v e — That portion of a r e s o u r c e that h a s been actually discovered but not yet exploited and which at present is t e c h n i c a l l y a n d e c o n o m i c a l l y extractable. Synfuels — F u e l s synthesized from s o u r c e s other than c r u d e oil or natural g a s and used in place of them or their derivatives, p r i m a r i l y for transportation and heating boilers.


Nuclear debate

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11,1981

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P r o v o s t D a v i d M a r k e r will i n t r o d u c e the nuclear debate. "Nuclear Energy — P r o a n d C o n " will be p r e s e n t e d a t 1:30 p . m . in t h e c h a p e l . D a v i d R h e m , a j u n i o r , will m o d e r a t e a d e b a t e to be c o n d u c t e d in t h e s t y l e of the r e c e n t p r e s i d e n t i a l d e b a t e s . O u r two g u e s t s will e a c h b e r e s p o n d i n g to ques tions g e n e r a t e d by a p a n e l of t h r e e a n d l a t e r to w r i t t e n g q u e s t i o n s f r o m the a u d i e n c e . 5 50

"Should The Government Subsidize New Energy Projects?" Dr. Edward Wolff, economist at New York University, whose recent work has been in the energy field. Dimnent Chapef

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THURSDAY, MARCH 12,1981 -.2 z </) 8:30 A.M. "Energy Alternatives"

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Panelists include Dr. William Ross, and advocate of soft energy paths and conservation, and consultant to Friends of the Earth; Dr. Manny Peralta, Project Director of the Synthetic Fuels Program, Exxon Corporation; and David Smith, Assistant Chief Counsel, from the Dept. of Energy Regional Office. Dimnent Chapel

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"Energy—The State of Affairs" A.

Nuclear Fusion David Solomon. Vice-President and Project Manager of KMS Fusion, Ann Arbor Peale 050

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Synthetic Fuels Manny Peralta, Project Director of the Synthetic Fuels Program. Exxon Corporation Wichers Auditorium

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Efficient Use of Sustainable Energy Sources William Ross. Associate Dean, Faculty of Environmental Design. University of Calgary. Alberta. Canada DeWitt Theatre

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E. -Government Deregulation of Energy Markets; Immediate and Long-Run Implications Salim Harik, Assistant Professor of Economics. Western Michigan University. Winants Auditorium

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"Energy—Responses To The Crisis" A.

Geo-Politics of Energy Gale McGee. former Senator and history professor, and current Ambassador to the Organization of American States. Wichers Auditorium

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Passive Solar Design and Architecture Sally Pillsbury Harkness, Vice-President and Principal, The Architects Collaborative. Cambridge. Massachusetts. Winants Auditorium

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Legal and Political Ramifications of the Energy Crisis David Smith, Assistant Chief Counsel of the Chicago Regional Office of Department of Energy. Peale 219-221

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The Christian/Ethical Response Wes Michaelson, former Managing Editor of Sojourners Magazine, Legislative Assistant to Senator Mark Hatfield, and Hope graduate of 1967. DeWitt Theatre,

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Energy Links Between Canada and The United States William Ross, Associate Dean, Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Peale 050

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T h e a d v o c a t e of n u c l e a r - g e n e r a t e d x power is a p r o f e s s o r of p h y s i c s f r o m t h e 5* U n i v e r s i t y of P i t t s b u r g h , B e r n a r d Cohen, g Cohen w a s e d u c a t e d a t C a s e , t h e ® U n i v e r s i t y of P i t t s b u r g h a n d C a r n e g i e Tech. He has worked at three national labs on n u c l e a r p r o c e s s e s : O a k R i d g e , Los A l a m o s , a n d B r o o k h a v e n . He h a s w r i t t e n e x t e n s i v e l y in j o u r n a l s a n d m a g a z i n e s (see below) a b o u t the r e l a t i v e s a f e t y of n u c l e a r p o w e r r e a c t o r s . The contrary position will be r e p r e s e n t e d by M a r c Ross, a p r o f e s s o r of physics a t the University of M i c h i g a n . H e h a s j u s t co-authored a book, " O u r E n e r g y : R e g a i n i n g C o n t r o l . " In t h i s book, r e v i e w e d in Business Week ( F e b . 9, 1981), h e e m p h a s i z e s t h e i m p o r t a n c e of e n e r g y c o n s e r v a t i o n . H e does not believe that w e c a n a f f o r d to tie our c o u n t r y ' s c a p i t a l u p in the c o n s t r u c t i o n of n u c l e a r power p l a n t s , nor does he b e l i e v e that w e need to d o so. He h a s w r i t t e n in the New York T i m e s a n d the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists that new logic and p e r s p e c t i v e s about e n e r g y s e r v i c e s a r e c a l l e d for ( s e e below). Ross h a s been e d u c a t e d a t Q u e e n ' s U n i v e r s i t y and the U n i v e r s i t y of Wisconsin. He h a s worked at B r o o k h a v e n National L a b and I n d i a n a U n i v e r s i t y . His r e s e a r c h i n t e r e s t s include e n v i r o n m e n t a l physics. Asking questions initially of our s p e a k e r s will be a p a n e l t h a t includes Dai D e e P u n , a Hope senior. D a v i d T a n i s , a s c i e n c e t e a c h e r at Holland C h r i s t i a n High, will be joined by Owen Davis, a n a c t i v e civic l e a d e r f r o m G r a n d H a v e n . T h e s e p a n e l i s t s w e r e chosen b e c a u s e it is known t h a t they h a v e e x p r e s s e d c o n c e r n s o r r a i s e d q u e s t i o n s often e x p r e s s e d by t h e g e n e r a l public. T h e f o r m a t f o r the d e b a t e m a y not yield s p e c t a c u l a r f i r e w o r k s , but, like the w h o l e p r o g r a m , it is designed to p r o d u c e subs t a n c e . " L i g h t but not h e a t " w a s the w a y one c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s t a t e d the goal. T h e p o p u l a r p r e s s or m e d i a m a y not b e a t t r a c t e d b e c a u s e of t h e a c a d e m i c n a t u r e of the e v e n t s . T h e p r o g r a m r e f l e c t s our c o m m i t m e n t to l e a r n i n g , to b e c o m i n g o u r own e x p e r t s . T h e C.l.S. closes, a p p r o p r i a t e l y , w i t h f i v e m o r e c o n c u r r e n t mini-sessions, or workshops, dedicated to proper r e s p o n s e s . Decision t i m e will b e 3:15 p . m . a s w e c h o o s e a m o n g t h e s e options.

Hours changed Library Dow Center Closed

March 11-12, 1981

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tributed $14,000 of additional f u n d s t o put the a u d i t into operation. The g r a n t received w a s p a r t of $6.3 million a w a r d e d to 163 Michigan schools, hospitals and other public facilities to p r o m o t e e n e r g y conservation measures^ F r o m the r e p o r t s t e m m i n g f r o m the e n e r g y audit, s e v e r a l suggestions w e r e m a d e of m e a s u r e s that Hope could institute to r e d u c e energy consumption. F o c u s i n g on P e a l e , s e v e r a l r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s w e r e m a d e : to r e d u c e the t e m p e r a t u r e to 65 d e g r e e s a s well a s r e d u c e the hot w a t e r t e m p e r a t u r e , install ventilation interlocks, m e t e r and monitor e n e r g y use, and install m o r e efficient and lower voltage o v e r h e a d l a m p s . This fall, a m a t c h i n g g r a n t f r o m the F e d e r a l G t ' e m m e n t w a s a p p r o v e d to fund half ?f i h c P e a l e Science C e n t e r project. The p r o j e c t is due to begin this s u m m e r . Cost for the work totals $115,000. F o u r i m p r o v e m e n t s will be covered by the f u n d i n g f r o m this g r a n t . One is for insulation to be a d d e d to the roof or ceiling. The second i m p r o v e m e n t involves c o n v e r t i n g the c u r r e n t ventilating s y s t e m , which issues a constant s t r e a m of air, to a V a r i a b l e Volume S y s t e m . Relocation of the pre-heat coils constitutes t h e third, coils which heat the incoming air f r o m the outside. Bett e r m e n t will focus on reducing heat loss. Finally, the last i m p r o v e m e n t can be classified a s chiller optimization, which m e a n s c h i l l i n g w a t e r only w h e n n e c e s s a r y , for such things a s air cnditioning. Beyond what c a m e f r o m the g r a n t proposal, the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s a w a r d e d $52,000 f o r o t h e r e n e r g y - c o n s c i o u s m e a s u r e s . Many buildings on c a m p u s a r e in the process of benefitting f r o m the findings of the a l l - c a m p u s e n e r g y audit. Anderson claims that the g r e a t e s t s a v i n g can c o m e f r o m monitorization of heat a n d ventilation s y s t e m s . T h e r e is a g r e a t w a s t e of energy if the s y s t e m s a r e in operation when r o o m s or buildings a r e not in use.

T h e cost at Hope for electrical light a n d power, fuel and g a s heat h a s been recorded by accountant Jeff W a t e r s t o n e f r o m the 1976-77 fiscal y e a r a n d includes f o r e c a s t e d f i g u r e s until 1982-83. T h e plotted costs show how e n e r g y h a s b e c o m e m o r e expensive over t h e recent years. Light and P o w e r Fiscal Y e a r 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82 82-83

Cost $335,430 377,603 457,132 571,415 714,269

Fuel and G a s Fiscal Y e a r 76-77 77-78 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82 82-83

Cost $220,523 251,787 309,431 362,152 432,132 540,165 6?5.206

An e n e r g y saving p r o g r a m , according to Anderson, is not only e v a l u a t e d in t e r m s of b e t t e r utilizing energy, but in financial t e r m s in relation to the imm e d i a c y of the pay-back period. An e n e r g y s y s t e m will be i m p l e m e n t e d if its r e t u r n i n v e s t m e n t is quicker t h a n if the money h a d been put in t h e bank. Otherwise, it is only " s a v i n g e n e r g y to s a v e e n e r g y / ' s a y s Anderson.

F o r e x a m p l e , t h e m e a s u r e s intended for P e a l e h a v e a p r o j e c t e d p a y - b a c k of two y e a r s , which is positive. T h e a v e r a g e r a t e for other c a m p u s buildings is 4.4 y e a r s , a n d the college looks f o r an e s t i m a t e of f i v e y e a r s or less for the payback time. Anderson c o m p a r e d t h e two y e a r s for P e a l e resulting f r o m e n e r g y conservation p r o g r a m s to m o n e y held in the bank for s e v e n y e a r s . _ Of the buildings in which energy consumption is being d e c r e a s e d , most of the e m p h a s i s is on controls for heating. This is true of D i m n e n t Chapel, Kollen Hall, DeWitt C e n t e r , Nykerk Music, and Van Zoeren. In Physics-Math, controls for shutting off f a n s a n d lowering the v o l u m e of air flow through the building when not in use is being instituted, a s well a s in Dimnent. Another i m p r o v e m e n t s l a t e d for D i m n e n t is the addition of s t o r m windows. This plan, however, is m o r e for protection of t h e stained g l a s s windows than a s a n energy-efficient move. S t o r m windows do not result in g r e a t savings, with a 10-year pay-back. Insulation o f f e r s another a l t e r n a t i v e for more efficient heating, a s planned for D u r f e e a n d Van Zoeren. Anderson noted that insulation h a s been used in past

renovation ventures, such as the r e m o d e l i n g of Van Vleck, Voorhees and Winants Auditorium. The i n n e r s t o r m s h u t t e r s used in Winants w e r e a n o t h e r energy-conscious m o v e , a n d eventually the college would like t o r e p l a c e all of the windows in G r a v e s . Another possible addition is the acquisition of a c o m p u t e r which would be c a p a b l e of designing a c e n t r a l e n e r g y m a n a g e m e n t s y s t e m . This would e n a b l e a u t o m a t i c control of s y s t e m s which m u s t c u r r e n t l y be shut off m a n u a l l y or by timeclock. Although the college is only in the process of a t t a i n i n g t h e c o m p u t e r , with a four-year pay-back, it is likely that the college will seriously c n s i d e r acquiring t h e s y s t e m . T h e bids, however, will probably be s o m e t i m e in the next t h r e e years. Included within the plan of i n c r e a s e d efficiency is the i m p r o v e m e n t of the boiler. T h e college would like to rework the 20 year-old boiler, which houses four boiler units, since it is too e x p e n s i v e to rebuild. Also, the p r o p o s e d e a r t h - s h e l t e r s t r u c t u r e to be built on the existing site of C a r n e g i e G y m n a s i u m is designed to be an energy-saving and efficient building.

How students perceive energy by Mark Stevens I perceive t h e e n e r g y c r i s i s a s a problem g e n e r a t e d by g o v e r n m e n t intervention. In specific, t h e E n e r g y Department has emphasized certain " a l t e r n a t i v e s " over a n d a b o v e others. F o r e x a m p l e , s o l a r energy w a s viewed a s the a n s w e r to our energy p r o b l e m s by t h e C a r t e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . So, t h e p r o g r a m w a s subsidized. Now w e realize the c o s t s involved in benefitting f r o m s o l a r e n e r g y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; i t ' s not economically feasible. Private industry, which makes decisions on the m a r g i n , would h a v e realized t h e " t r u e " cost of t h e p r o j e c t d u r i n g the decision-making process.. Subsidies dilute " t r u e " cost figures, a n d in turn, disillusion decision m a k e r s . As individuals, w e can support t h e p r e s e n t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n b e c a u s e of t h e

incentives it o f f e r s to p r i v a t e industry. Also, a s individuals w e can cut energy consumption and be a w a r e a s f a r a s alternatives a r e concerned.

by F r e d Ward In the i m m e d i a t e f u t u r e w e need to r e d u c e our dependency upon foriegn oil, i n c r e a s e our d o m e s t i c output a n d d e c r e a s e the r a t e of d o m e s t i c consumption. Concerning long-range e n e r g y plans it is a necessity that w e develop other s o u r c e s of e n e r g y . As I s e e it, at this t i m e t h e r e is a need to develop nuclear power. I realize that this is a s o r e spot with a lot of people, but a t this point there is no other c h e a p a l t e r n a t i v e energy source a v a i l a b l e to e a s e our d e p e n d e n c e upon oil.

Some ideas from the participants Keynote s p e a k e r Wolff s h a r e s his thinking on s u b s i d i e s in a f o r t h c o m i n g a r t i c l e , co-authored by W . J . B a u m o l of P r i n c e t o n U n i v e r s i t y , to be published in the J o u r n a l of P o l i t i c a l E c o n o m y ; the a r t i c l e is entitled " S u b s i d i e s to New E n e r g y Sources: Do They Add t o E n e r g y Stocks?" H e r e is the a b s t r a c t , or s u m m a r y , of the article. E n e r g y - p r o d u c t i o n subsidies a r e , p a r a d o x i c a l l y , shown likely to i n c r e a s e U.S. d e p e n d e n c e on i m p o r t e d oil. S t a n d a r d studies of net e n e r g y yields a r e shown seriously b i a s e d u p w a r d f o r two reasons. F i r s t , m a n y omit indirect e n e r g y i n p u t s w h i c h , our input calculation shows, p r o b a b l y c a u s e s l a r g e e r r o r s . Second, those s t u d i e s all omit t h e e n e r g y opportunity costs of non-energy inputs (e.g., the fuel substituted e l s e w h e r e for the labor used to p r o d u c e e n e r g y ) . We p r o v e that, a b s e n t externalities, any fuel-output s u b s i d y which c a u s e s a n o t h e r w i s e u n p r o f i t a b l e e x p a n s i o n m a y yield a n i n c r e m e n t a l fuel output s m a l l e r that the i n c r e m e n t in e n e r g y input plus t h e e n e r g y opportunity costs of other inputs. M a r c Ross, r e p r e s e n t i n g the antin u c l e a r position in our d e b a t e , h a s recently published a book, " O u r E n e r g y : R e g a i n i n g Control" (McGraw-Hill, 1981). Following a r e e x c e r p t s f r o m that book: " A m e r i c a n society c a n r e g a i n control of its e n e r g y s y s t e m , but f u n d a m e n t a l c h a n g e s in e n e r g y policy a r e n e e d e d to b r e a k t h e p r e s e n t i m p a s s e . Our p r e s e n t policy, which is p r e o c c u p i e d with e n e r g y supplies, does not t a k e into account the fact that supply e x p a n s i o n is only one way, a n d an i n c r e a s i n g l y ineffective w a y , of m e e t i n g e n e r g y n e e d s . Wes Michael h a s p r o b a b l y w r i t t e n t h e most in t h e m a n n e r of r e s p o n s e . He l e a d s c o n c u r r e n t session D on t h e Christian response. Here is s o m e of his thinking a s reflected in a recent " S o j o u r n e r s " a r ticle: "If s u n b e a m s w e r e w e a p o n s of w a r , w e would h a v e h a d solar e n e r g y d e c a d e $ ago." E a c h y e a r a n a t o m i c p o w e r plant o p e r a t e s , it p r o d u c e s enough plutonium to c r e a t e dozens of n u c l e a r b o m b s .

More about the speakers Session A Session A is hosted by a v e r y distinquished guest, f o r m e r U.S. S e n a t o r Gale McGee. His focus will b e on t h e - " G e o - P o l i t i c s of E n e r g y . " He is well qualified for this s u b j e c t , s e r v i n g a s h e does a s the c u r r e n t A m b a s s a d o r to the Organization of A m e r i c a n S t a t e s . His session will be in Wichers Auditorium.

Session B Session B, a t 3:15 p . m . in Winants, will be led by S a r a h P i l l s b u r y H a r k n e s s ; this a r c h i t e c t h a s a list of a w a r d s , publications, c o m m i t t e e s a n d j u r i e s m o r e t h a n a page long. She is vice p r e s i d e n t and p r i n c i p a l at t h e A r c h i t e c t s Collaborative, Inc. of C a m b r i d g e . H e r topic is " P a s s i v e Solar Design and Ar-

chitecture." Harkness has an honorary degree from Bates College, where she has designed their solar dining hall and other campus buildings. She holds a Master of Architecture degree from the Smith College Graduate School of Architecture.

Session C T h e third mini-session of the a f t e r n o o n will be held in P S C 219, 220, w h e r e Smith will discuss t h e " L e g a l and Political R a m i f i c a t i o n s of the E n e r g y C r i s i s . " Smith will h a v e s t a r t e d t h e day f o r us on the panel on a l t e r n a t i v e sources. This D.O.E. representative may have something to s a y about t h e talked-about d i s m a n t l i n g of t h e D.O.E.

Session D Many of the Hope community already know Wes Michaelson, the leader of session D. He will help us focus upon "The Christian/Ethical Response." Recently he was managing editor of Sojourners magazine and much of his thinking is evident in that Journal. His interest in energy, ethics, the environment, and

their interaction b e g a n s e v e r a l y e a r s a g o when he worked a s a n a d m i n i s t r a t i v e a s s i s t a n t to S e n a t o r M a r k H a t f i e l d ; he is presently continuing h i s writing e m phasis. M i c h a e l s o n ' s session will be held in the DeWitt T h e a t r e .

Session E Mini-session E will f e a t u r e Roes, t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l panelist w h o will h a v e helped us begin o u r d a y . H e will help u s close our d a y a s he d i s c u s s e s t h e " E n e r g y Links Between C a n a d a a n d the United S t a t e s . " T h i s session will b e held in PSC 50; s o m e notes provided by Ross a r e included below.

This special pull-out section has been compiled by Beth Dodd, Don Williams and Janet Lootens. im

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draws up constitution Hope's Student Congress has recently r e v i s e d their c o n s t i t u t i o n . It is b e i n g » published h e r e in o r d e r to c l a r i f y t h e m e a n s by which s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i o n is achieved. Purpose T h e p u r p o s e of t h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s is to p r o v i d e a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e body of s t u d e n t s , within t h e c a m p u s g o v e r n a n c e s t r u c t u r e , w h o s e f u n c t i o n is to s e e k , evaluate and act as deemed appropriate upon a r e a s of s t u d e n t c o n c e r n . Membership 1. T h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s will consist of a p r e s i d e n t , two vice p r e s i d e n t s , a n d elected representatives. 2. T h e t h r e e o f f i c e r s will be d e s i g n a t e d a s the c a b i n e t . 3. T h e c a b i n e t m e m b e r s , in addition to the seven student representative m e m b e r s of the A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s B o a r d , the A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s B o a r d , a n d the C a m p u s Life B o a r d (the c a m p u s g o v e r n a n c e b o a r d s ) , s h a l l be d e s i g n a t e d a s the e x e c u t i v e b o a r d . 4 The cabinet, and the e l e c t e d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s , will c o m p r i s e the voting m e m b e r s h i p of t h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s . The P r e s i d e n t 1. T h e p r e s i d e n t will be t h e chief r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of t h e s t u d e n t body. 2. H e / s h e m a y initiate policy which e x p r e s s e s a r e a s of s t u d e n t c o n c e r n , f o r m u l a t e policy, a n d r e f e r to such a s the task force committee, or c a m p u s governance board for further examination. 3. The p r e s i d e n t will h a v e the a u t h o r i t y to initiate and a p p o i n t t a s k f o r c e s a n d designate chairmen as he/she deems necessary. 4. H e / s h e will h a v e the power to call, with proper notification, meetings whenever necessary. 5. T h e p r e s i d e n t is in c h a r g e of all b u d g e t a r y c o n c e r n s of the S t u d e n t Congress proper. The first vice p r e s i d e n t 1. T h e first v i c e p r e s i d e n t will be r e s p o n s i b l e for all c a m p u s elections a n d polls. 2. H e / s h e will be r e s p o n s i b l e for all publicity n e c e s s a r y f o r the S t u d e n t Congress. 3. T h e first v i c e p r e s i d e n t will be t h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s c o o r d i n a t o r of c a m p u s s p e a k e r p r o g r a m s a f f i l i a t e d with the Student C o n g r e s s . The s e c o n d v i c e p r e s i d e n t 1. T h e second v i c e p r e s i d e n t will s e r v e a s c h a i r p e r s o n of the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s Appropriations Committee. 2. H e / s h e will o v e r s e e t h e writing a n d d i s t r i b u t i o n of t h e m i n u t e s of the c a b i n e t , e x e c u t i v e b o a r d a n d the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s meetings. 3. H e / s h e will be r e s p o n s i b l e for t a b u l a t i n g the r e s u l t s of all S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s votes a n d k e e p i n g r e c o r d s of such. The secretary 1. A s e c r e t a r y will b e a p p o i n t e d by the c a b i n e t to p e r f o r m all n e c e s s a r y c l e r i c a l f u n c t i o n s a n d t a k e a n d d i s t r i b u t e all minutes and necessary materials. 2. H e / s h e is not a m e m b e r of S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s but is p a i d by t h e C o n g r e s s on a hourly b a s i s . , The Congress 1. T h e Student C o n g r e s s will b e comp r i s e d of m e m b e r s e l e c t e d in a p r o c e d u r e e s t a b l i s h e d by t h e c a b i n e t . 2. T h e C o n g r e s s will be r e s p o n s i b l e f o r r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e s t u d e n t body on all m a t t e r s of s t u d e n t c o n c e r n . 3. T h e y will a p p r o v e by a m a j o r i t y v o t e t h e m e m b e r s of t h e g o v e r n a n c e b o a r d and standing committees. 4. T h e y will a p p r o v e t h e r e p r e s e n tatives, other than the cabinet m e m b e r s , t o the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s b y a m a j o r i t y vote. 5. T h e y will b e r e s p o n s i b l e f o r a p proving by two-thirds vote the allocation of the s t u d e n t a c t i v i t i e s a s r e c o m m e n d e d by t h e S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Committee 6. T h e y will, by a m a j o r i t y vote, m a k e a l l o c a t i o n o v e r $500 f r o m t h e s t u d e n t activities fee i see Student Appropriations

S e c t i o n ) , upon r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s of Student Congress Appropriations Committee. 7. T h e y h a v e t h e p o w e r to initiate ad hoc c o m m i t t e e s or task f o r c e s . 8. They will set up r u l e s for the cond u c t i n g of their m e e t i n g s . T h e G o v e r n a n c e B o a r d s and S t a n d i n g Committees 1. T h e p r e s i d e n t shall a p p o i n t t h e cabinet m e m b e r s to the following Campus Governance Boards: the p r e s i d e n t to C a m p u s Life, the f i r s t vice p r e s i d e n t to the A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s B o a r d , a n d s e c o n d vice p r e s i d e n t to the A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s unless a c h a n g e in t h e s e a p p o i n t m e n t s is a p p r o v e d by t h e cabinet. 2. The C o n g r e s s a s a whole will elect one s t u d e n t m e m b e r to e a c h c a m p u s governance board. 3. T h e p r e s i d e n t will then, with the c o n s u l t a t i o n of the c a b i n e t , r e c o m m e n d to S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s the r e m a i n i n g s t u d e n t of the c a m p u s g o v e r n a n c e boards. 4. The c a b i n e t will appoint, with a m a j o r i t y vote of the Student C o n g r e s s , the m e m b e r s of the S t a n d i n g C o m m i t t e e s f r o m the e l e c t e d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . 5. Board a n d c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s shall r e m a i n in their positions until the next Student Congress is i n s t a l l e d the following y e a r . T h e B o a r d of T r u s t e e s 1. The s t u d e n t liaison m e m b e r s to the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s ' c o m m i t t e e will consist of the c a b i n e t a n d selected m e m b e r s of the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s . 2. Position openings shall be d e t e r m i n e d by t h e s e c r e t a r y of the B o a r d of Trustees. 3. With m a j o r i t y a p p r o v a l of the Congress, t h e c a b i n e t will appoint the s t u d e n t liaison m e m b e r s of the B o a r d of Trustees. 4. T h e s t u d e n t m e m b e r s on the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s C o m m i t t e e shall be s e l e c t e d giving r e s p e c t to the c o r r e s p o n d e n c e b e t w e e n a given c a m p u s g o v e r n a n c e b o a r d and its B o a r d of T r u s t e e s ' counterparts. T h e J u d i c i a l Board 1. The e x e c u t i v e b o a r d will appoint the s e v e n m e m b e r s of the J u d i c i a l B o a r d f r o m the s t u d e n t body, with a two-thirds a p p r o v a l of the C o n g r e s s . 2. E a c h m e m b e r shall b e c o n s i d e r e d for reappointment. A p p o i n t m e n t s and Elections 1. E a c h b o a r d will h a v e r e p r e s e n t a t i o n - f r o m both sexes, w h e t h e r it is a n appointed or e l e c t e d m e m b e r . 2. T h e c a b i n e t m e m b e r s will be e l e c t e d by a l l - c a m p u s ballot in t h e s p r i n g of e a c h year. 3. District elections will t a k e p l a c e in m i d - S e p t e m b e r . T h e r e will be s e p a r a t e d i s t r i c t ballots for e a c h a r e a . 4. C a m p u s r e p r e s e n t a t i o n will follow a p p r o x i m a t e l y the d i s t r i c t i n g a s outlined in t h e b y l a w s ( s e e section I - b y l a w s ) , e x c e p t a d j u s t m e n t s m a y be m a d e by the c a b i n e t d u e to a l t e r a t i o n s in the campus^ composure. Accountability 1. T h e e x e c u t i v e b o a r d will h a v e t h e p o w e r to r e c o m m e n d the r e p l a c e m e n t of a n y r e p r e s e n t a t i v e in Student C o n g r e s s . Sufficient c a u s e m a y be t h r o u g h t h r e e unexcused absences at Student Congress m e e t i n g s , lack of responsibility with r e g a r d to b o a r d o r c o m m i t t e e app o i n t m e n t s , or s i m i l a r a c t s of negligence. Removal f r o m Congress must be app r o v e d by a m a j o r i t y of t h e e n t i r e m e m b e r s h i p o f t h e Student Congress. 2. Any m e m b e r of the C o n g r e s s m a y r e c o m m e n d the r e p l a c e m e n t of a n y m e m b e r of a b o a r d o r c o m m i t t e e . T h e C o n g r e s s will t h e n h a v e t h e p o w e r to r e a p p o i n t t h a t position by a two-thirds v o t e of the total m e m b e r s h i p . 3. T h e C o n g r e s s will h a v e t h e p o w e r to r e m o v e the c a b i n e t m e m b e r s by a t h r e e f o u r t h vote of the total m e m b e r s h i p . In t h a t event, election will b e held in two weeks. 4. T h e s t u d e n t body, by petition, s u b m i t t e d to C a m p u s L i f e B o a r d a n d . a

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CO m a j o r i t y vote, m a y call f o r a new s h a l l r e c e i v e their r e s p e c t i v e a l l o c a t i o n s C o n g r e s s . E l e c t i o n s will be held within f r o m the B u s i n e s s Office. All o r g a n i z a t i o n s r e c e i v i n g f u n d s f r o m t h r e e w e e k s a n d a new C o n g r e s s will be the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s m u s t include in installed upon election. t h e i r a d v e r t i s i n g of all c a m p u s e v e n t s Student Congress Budget I. T h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s b u d g e t will be a n d a c t i v i t i e s the inscription " F u n d i n g f o r this a c t i v i t y is p r o v i d e d by t h e S t u d e n t p r e p a r e d by the c a b i n e t . 2. T h e C o n g r e s s s h a l l a p p r o v e the A c t i v i t y F e e t h r o u g h t h e S t u d e n t r e c o m m e n d e d b u d g e t by a two-thirds C o n g r e s s A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e . " vote. Amendment Procedure ^ 3. T h e a p p r o v e d b u d g e t shall t h e n be I. Any m e m b e r of S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s , g f o r w a r d e d to the S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n s with a s e c o n d m a y p r o p o s e a n a m e n d - y, C o m m i t t e e to be r e v i e w e d . The Student Congress Appropriations m e n t to this constitution a n d its b y l a w s , g Committee — 2. T h e a m e n d m e n t will then b e tabled, £ The Student Appropriations Committee in w r i t t e n f o r m , f o r a m i n i m u m of one is a s u b c o m m i t t e e of t h e S t u d e n t w e e k b e f o r e voting on r a t i f i c a t i o n . Congress. M e m b e r s h i p s h a l l be c o m 3. R a t i f i c a t i o n is a c c o m p l i s h e d by a posed of five Student Congress t w o - t h i r d s vote of t h e e n t i r e m e m b e r s h i p representatives appointed by the of the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s . A s i m p l e executive board, the second vice m a j o r i t y of the e n t i r e m e m b e r s h i p is p r e s i d e n t , a n d one m e m b e r of the adn e c e s s a r y in o r d e r to a m e n d the bylaws, ministration. Funtions Bylaws 1. It will r e c o m m e n d allocations u n d e r I. C a m p u s r e p r e s e n t a t i o n : a c c e p t e d p r o c e d u r e ( s e e below) of the I. T h e following is a b r e a k d o w n of t h e Student Activities F u n d to s t u d e n t c a m p u s into districts. It is s u b j e c t to organizations. r e a p p o r t i o n m e n t by the c a b i n e t with 2. It will e x a m i n e t h e f i n a n c i a l r e c o r d s s u b s e q u e n t m a j o r i t y a p p r o v a l by t h e of a n y o r g a n i z a t i o n f i n a n c e d by the C o n g r e s s with c o n s i d e r a t i o n given to Student Appropriations Committee, population of living a r e a . In the event t h a t provided t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n is notified at the C o n g r e s s d o e s not yet exist, t h e least one week in advance of cabinet decision alone will s t a n d . examination. Brumler/Columbia Apts. — 1 3. It will r e s e r v e a portion of the s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e ; C o t t a g e s — 2; D u r f e e — activities f e e in a c o n t i n g e n c y f u n d . T h i s 1; D u r f e e / G i l m o r e — 1; D y k s t r a — 4; m o n e y is to b e used for a n y i n n o v a t i v e or F r a t e r n i t y Complex — 3; G i l m o r e — I ; i m m e d i a t e need s i t u a t i o n s that m a y a r i s e I n t e r n a t i o n a l R elations Club — 1; Kollen d u r i n g the school y e a r . Allocation — 4; L i c h t y / V a n Vleck — 1; P a r k v i e w decisions u n d e r $500 m a y be m a d e by the Apts. — 1; P h e l p s — 2 ; Voorhees — 2 ; OffAppropriations Committee. These c a m p u s S t u d e n t s — 5; At L a r g e — 3; allocations a r e to be r e p o r t e d to the (confinued on p . 14) C o n g r e s s a t their next m e e t i n g , and m a y be o v e r r u l e d by a two-thirds m a j o r i t y of the C o n g r e s s (excluding A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s ) . F o r allocations over $500 the A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e THEATRE makes its r e c o m m e n d a t i o n to the 392-2653 Congress, which then a c t s a c c o r d i n g to a s i m p l e m a j o r i t y vote (including App r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s ) . No f u n d s m a y be d i s p e r s e d by the App r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e until the r e p o r t on the b u d g e t r e q u e s t h a s been s u b m i t t e d at the next S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s m e e t i n g . Procedure In the allocation of the Student Ac|JANE| tivities F e e , the following p r o c e d u r e s h a l l FONDA be u s e d : 1. E a r l y in the second s e m e s t e r e a c h individual o r g a n i z a t i o n is to s u b m i t a budget r e q u e s t a n d r a t i o n a l e for the following y e a r . 2. T h e S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Comm i t t e e will then r e v i e w all b u d g e t requests f r o m student organizations, following s t a t e d c r i t e r i a ( s e e b y l a w s ) , and p r e p a r e a r e c o m m e n d a t i o n . R e c o r d s a s to r a t i o n a l e for r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s s h a l l be k e p t by t h e c o m m i t t e e . 3. T h e S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e shall p r e s e n t its b u d g e t r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s to the S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s , acquainting the C o n g r e s s with its r a t i o n a l e f o r the r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s it makes. 4. All o r g a n i z a t i o n s s u b m i t t i n g b u d g e t r e q u e s t s , a n d t h e public, shall be notified THEATRE of t h e A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e 39*2653 r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s p r i o r to t h e S t u d e n t Congress Budget meeting. 5. Any o r g a n i z a t i o n or individual wishing to a p p e a l the b u d g e t r e c o m m e n d a t i o n of the A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Comm i t t e e m u s t s u b m i t t h a t a p p e a l , in writing, to t h e Student C o n g r e s s p r i o r to An American Dream the b u d g e t m e e t i n g . Becomes a Love Story. 6. At the b u d g e t m e e t i n g , o r g a n i z a t i o n s SISSY SPACKK or i n d i v i d u a l s will h a v e t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to TOMMY' IJ-E JONES p r e s e n t t h e i r a p p e a l to t h e C o n g r e s s . 7. A f t e r l e a v i n g all a p p e a l s r t h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s will vote on t h e b u d g e t r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s of t h e A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Committee. 8. T h e C a m p u s L i f e B o a r d - s h a l l a p p r o v e or v e t o the p r o p o s e d b u d g e t 4 allocations in toto. 9. T h e S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s s h a l l s u b m i t final b u d g e t authorizations to t h e Business Of f ice. O r g a n i z a t i o n s , in t u r n ,

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Voorhees Hall to be reopened S. Van EyI T h e r e will be a n open house in the n e w l y - r e n o v a t e d V o o r h e e s Hall on Sunday, April 5. All interested p a r t i e s a r e urged to attend. When the Hope A c a d e m y b e c a m e a college in 1866, it w a s essentially a m e n ' s school. The early y e a r s counted but few f e m a l e students, all of whom lived offc a m p u s . In 1904, M r . a n d Mrs. Ralph Voorhees presented Hope with a gift of $100,000, i n c l u d i n g $35,000 w h i c h Elizabeth Voorhees requested go towards a w o m e n ' s dormitory. Built in a predominantly F l e m i s h architectural style, it cost $40,183 — and included electricity. Completed in 1907, the dorm had a housing capacity of 110 but only 13 women comprised the total n u m b e r of residents during the first year. Because the number of residents did not increase substantially in subsequent years, the college decided to open the first floor of the dorm to unm a r r i e d faculty m e m b e r s .

Opening the new dorm also introduced the first l a r g e dining room, with the capacity to feed 180 people all at the s a m e time. In F e b r u a r y of 1969, a small electrical fire resulted in the fire m a r s h a l l declaring the building u n s a f e for student housing, thus ending its long c a r e e r as a w o m e n ' s d o r m . F r o m then on it was strictly an office building for the education , history, religion, and geology d e p a r t m e n t s , and the Office of International Education. The psychology d e p a r t m e n t had some of its offices and all of its lab s p a c e there while waiting for Peale Science Center to be finished. This S e p t e m b e r Voorhees will reopen a s ^ d o r m ; at a cost of 1.3 million dollars, the s t r u c t u r e h a s been completely renovated. E l e v a t o r s have been put in, fire a l a r m s installed, and new electrical and heating s y s t e m s put in. With the exception of the basement, which has been designated for conference rooms, all floors contain either single, double or triple rooms for a total of 110 occupants.

Critic to lecture at Hope Lawrence DeVine, theater critic of the Detroit F r e e P r e s s , will be on c a m p u s next Thursday and F r i d a y . Nationally active, DeVine is immediate past c h a i r m a n of the American Theatre Critics Association and also associate director of the National Critics Institute of the E u g e n e O'Neill T h e a t e r Center in Waterford, CT. He w a s a Professional J o u r n a l i s m Fellow a t the University of Michigan on a grant f r o m the National Endowment for the Humanities. In 1977, DeVine was invited to the NEH pilot s e m i n a r for critics of the a r t s in Washington, D.C. A g r a d u a t e of Northwestern University's Medill School of J o u r n a l i s m , he was theater critic of The Miami Herald and e n t e r t a i n m e n t editor and critic at the The Los Angeles Herald-

E x a m i n e r before coming to Detroit. DeVine is a frequent critic-in-residence at American College T h e a t r e Festivals and in 1979 w a s a m e m b e r of the ACTF's national new d r a m a jury along with playwright William Gibson. He twice has been nominated by the F r e e P r e s s for a Pulitzer Prize in criticism. Following is a schedule of his lectures during his two d a y s at Hope: Thursday, 12-1:20 p.m. in DeWitt studio theatre — a talk on what the critic looks for in a p e r f o r m a n c e review. F r i d a y , 10-10:50 a . m . in DeWitt m a i n theatre — a talk on what a newspaper critic does. F r i d a y , 3:30-5 p.m. in the Alley (lower level DeWitt) — coffee and informal discussion.

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Suspicious persons: Voorhees Six nuisance calls Girl followed from Burger King to d o r m Larcenies: Cash and clothes taken f r o m Gilmore Cue stick taken f r o m F r a t e r n a l Cottage had six dollars a n d two s w e a t e r s taken Two c h a i r s taken Gas in Dow lot C a m e r a , lense and bag stolen f r o m open Kollen room Vandelisms: Door kicked in and lock broken off in Fraternal Car dented behind Shield's cottage F i r e equipment discharged at Kollen Hail Driving on the sidewalk Discharged fire extinguishers in Emersonian Broken thermostat in DeWitt Broken broom — j a m m e d door Broken window at Otte Conference Room Janitor closet had the lock broken off Violin s m a s h e d in Snow Auditorium Driving on lawn

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E a c h room will h a v e a slightly different shape and there will be about 35 residents per floor. The Residential Life C o m m i t t e e is deciding whether Voorhees will be a n allwomen or co-ed d o r m . The a i m is to m a k e Voorhees a special d o r m for m o r e serious-minded students. Ideas of having the d o r m ' s own guest lecturers, m a n y m o r e quiet hours than currently practiced, a receptionist in the lobby, an events committee, and a written c h a r t e r of goals and objectives have been discussed by the committee.

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T h e first residents of the remodeled facility will be the p a r e n t s of the classof 1981, during this y e a r ' s c o m m e n c e m e n t weekend. Over the s u m m e r , conferences will use the d o r m also.

Walter recital Organist Norene W a l t e r s will present a junior recital on T u e s d a y , M a r c h 10 at 4:30 p.m. in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel. Included in the p r o g r a m a r e J.S. B a c h ' s " T o c c a t a a n d F u g u e in D Minor," a " N o e l " by Louis Claude Daquin, Joseph J a n g e n ' s " C h a n t de M a i , " and C e s a r F r a n k ' s "Chorale in A Minor." The recital is open to the public.

. . . to provide a representative body . . . (continued

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Total m e m b e r s h i p — 35. 2. In the c a s e of a c h a n g e in district by a Student Congress m e m b e r during the school y e a r , that m e m b e r shall r e m a i n in Congress a s a delegate f r o m the district in which h e / s h e was elected. 3. In the c a s e of a resignation by or a dismissal of a Student Congress m e m b e r , the next leading vote-getter within the leaving m e m b e r ' s district shall r e p l a c e that person in Congress and in h i s / h e r c o m m i t t e e a s s i g n m e n t s . Should there be no r e m a i n i n g c a n d i d a t e s f r o m that district, a p p o i n t m e n t s will be m a d e by the E x e c u t i v e Board. If the vacancy involves a board position, another election within the Congress shall be held to fill the position. Attendance 1.Representatives must h a v e at least t h r e e days notification of meeting t i m e and place. 2. E a c h r e p r e s e n t a t i v e is allowed t h r e e unexcused absences. An excused a b s e n c e is: work, class, illness, etc. a s d e t e r m i n e d by the cabinet. 3. A r e p r e s e n t a t i v e must notify an officer prior to the meeting if h e / s h e will not be there, and why. 4. A q u o r u m consists of two-thirds of the total Student Congress m e m b e r s h i p . Appropriations C o m m i t t e e Evaluation Criteria The following criteria a r e to be used by the Student Appropriations Committee in its evaluation of student organization budget r e q u e s t s : 1. Are the activities or p r o g r a m s planned available to the e n t i r e c a m p u s ? 2. Will these p r o g r a m s bring a r a n g e of activities to c a m p u s to m e e t a variety of i n t e r e s t s within the student body? 3. Are these p r o g r a m s duplicating those planned by another organization? 4. What p e r c e n t a g e of the c a m p u s p a r t i c i p a t e d in this activity in the past? 5. H a s the organization proved itself reliable? ^ 6. Are students getting their money's worth? 7. Does the organization h a v e a faculty advisor?

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Washington semester is underway by Anne Brown E v e r y s p r i n g a select g r o u p of Hope s t u d e n t s d a r e s to p a r t i c i p a t e in a s a f a r i t h a t l e a d s t h e m t h r o u g h the b u r e a u c r a t i c j u n g l e of W a s h i n g t o n , D.C. T h i s exc u r s i o n is a l s o known a s the W a s h i n g t o n Honors P r o g r a m .

politica, p a r t i c i p a t e in g r o u p i n t e r v i e w s with C o n g r e s s m e n a n d legislative s t a f f , e x e c u t i v e s , lobbyists, political p a r t y officials, a n d j o u r n a l i s t s , a n d i n t e r n f o r two s e v e n - w e e k p e r i o d s in C o n g r e s s , t h e e x e c u t i v e b r a n c h , o r with political interest g r o u p s . The p a r t i c i p a n t s a r e a l s o r e s p o n s i b l e for p r e p a r i n g e x t e n s i v e research p a p e r s b a s e d upon their semester's work. T h e 1982 W a s h i n g t o n s e m e s t e r will be l e a d by p r o f e s s o r s J a c k H o l m e s a n d J a m e s Z o e t e w a y , w h o a r e now n the p r o c e s s of s i f t i n g t h r o u g h a p p l i c a t i o n s for

1982. B e c a u s e the s e m e s t e r is a n h o n o r s p r o g r a m , a high G . P . A . is one of t h e c r i t e r i a f o r a c c e p t a n c e . At least t h r e e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f r o m Hope f a c u l t y m e m b e r s a r e a l s o r e q u i r e d , a n d to c r e a t e a d i v e r s i f i e d g r o u p , H o l m e s and Z o e t e w a y t a k e t i m e to choose a v a r i e t y of majors. The honors semester enables students T h e a d v i s o r s ' second t a s k is f i n d i n g or f r o m all d i s c i p l i n e s to s t u d y in d e s i g n i n g i n t e r n s h i p s for the s t u d e n t s . W a s h i n g t o n , a n d to a p p l y k n o w l e d g e of A c c o r d i n g to H o l m e s , " T h e f i r s t c r i t e r i o n their a r e a a s it r e l a t e s to g o v e r n m e n t a n d is to find out w h a t the s t u d e n t s a r e inpolitics. J u n i o r and s e n i o r s t u d e n t s take a terested in." Evidently, great pains are s e m i n a r on A m e r i c a n g o v e r n m e n t and t a k e n to p l a c e s t u d e n t s . O n e s e m e s t e r , t h e r e w a s a two-week s e a r c h for a n i n t e r n s h i p for a s t u d e n t who w a n t e d to w o r k with t h e b u r e a u c r a c y that dealt with hospital c a r e . D u r i n g this t i m e H o l m e s e v e n w e n t t h r o u g h the White House personnel. Finally, Holmes c a m e a c r o s s a. b u r e a u c r a t w h o s e son w e n t to Hope and p r o v i d e d the connection that was needed. In a n o t h e r c a s e a s t u d e n t w a s placed in is d r a s t i c a l l y wrong. C e r t a i n that s h e h a s by T i m o t h y S h a f f e r the i n t e r n s h i p he w a n t e d b e c a u s e a scoop, F o n d a s t r i k e s u p a f r i e n d s h i p "NUCLEAR ACCIDENT/' screams H o l m e s ' m o t h e r had w o r k e d for one of the with L e m m o n and with D o u g l a s ' help the c o v e r of T i m e m a g a z i n e . April 9,1979. m e n in the d e p a r t m e n t . "A lot of the tries to c o n v i n c e h i m to t a k e a s t a n d "NUCLEAR N I G H T M A R E , " echoes p l a c e m e n t s a r e m a d e by just knowing a g a i n s t the plant. L e m m o n is s u s c e p t i b l e Newsweek the s a m e day. The stage: w h o m to c o n t a c t , " s a i d H o l m e s , " b u t the to their p l e a d i n g s , f o r he feels t h a t t h e T h r e e Mile Island, j u s t outside of s t u d e n t s still h a v e to p r o d u c e . ' ' controlling p o w e r s a t the plant a r e H a r r i s b u r g , PA. T h e c a s t : P e n n s y l v a n i a T h e Hope p r o f e s s o r s ' p r i m a r y j o b while pushing f o r an e x t r e m e l y d a n g e r o u s governor Richard Thornburgh, the in D.C. will be m a k i n g s u r e the s t u d e n t s r e o p e n i n g of the p l a n t . Nuclear Regulatory Commission, h a v e a good e x p e r i e n c e . T h e y will be T h e d i s c o v e r y of f a l s i f i e d c o n s t r u c t i o n t h o u s a n d s of p a n i c k i n g P e n n s y l v a n i a n s o r g a n i z i n g s e m i n a r s , m e e t i n g s , and and a c o u n t r y on t h e e d g e of n u c l e a r d o c u m e n t s s e a l s L e m m o n ' s conviction o r i e n t a t i o n a n d e v e n helping f r u s t r a t e d a n d he t a k e s o v e r t h e p l a n t by f o r c e , h y s t e r i a . T h e chilling f o r e s h a d o w i n g of s t u d e n t s with housing p r o b l e m s . T h e i r while F o n d a and D o u g l a s s c r a m b l e the e n t i r e c r i s i s : " T h e China S y n d r o m e , " d a y will be c o n s u m e d with setting u p the d e s p e r a t e l y a g a i n s t t i m e a n d the p l a n t s t a r r i n g J a c k L e m m o n , J a n e F o n d a , and i n t e r n s h i p s , m a k i n g c o n t a c t s , w o r k i n g on officials to put L e m m o n on TV a n d e x p o s e Michael Douglas, the blockbuster movie r e s e a r c h t h a t m a y h a v e b e e n put on the the wfiole c o r r u p t h i e r a r c h y of the r e l e a s e d just two w e e k s p r i o r to the inb a c k b u r n e r d u r i n g t h e fall, and e v e n nuclear industry. cident at T M I , m a k i n g the r e a l n u c l e a r cooking a n occasional m e a l f o r t h e inJack Lemmon grows better as he grows b r e a k d o w n a f r i g h t e n i n g e x a m p l e of life terns. older. His p e r f o r m a n c e a s the lonely coming uncomfortably close to T w o of the 1980 W a s h i n g t o n i n t e r n s engineer who discovers that the dials and mimicking art. w e r e N a n c y D i r k s e and R e x Mowat. g a d g e t s that h a v e g i v e n m e a n i n g to his F o n d a s t a r s a s a politically n a i v e Dirkse's two i n t e r n s h i p s involved life a r e c r u m b l i n g b e h i n d a wall of deceit n e w s c a s t e r who, p r i o r to her e x p o s u r e to is a r e f i n e m e n t of the t y p e of c h a r a c t e r he the liberal activist i n f l u e n c e s of won a n A c a d e m y A w a r d for in " S a v e T h e c a m e r a m a n Michael D o u g l a s , c o n c e r n s T i g e r . " T h e final m o m e n t s of the f i l m , herself only with a d v a n c i n g h e r c a r e e r , w h e n L e m m o n is in control of the n u c l e a r s m i l i n g at the right people a n d t h e right plant r a n d t h e s c r e e n , a r e a b s o l u t e l y p l a c e s a n d c a r e f u l not to s t e p on a n y toes r i v e t i n g . J a n e F o n d a , m e a n w h i l e , conin h e r e f f o r t to get to the top. She and t r i b u t e s one of the f i n e r p e r f o r m a n c e s of D o u g l a s , while on a r o u t i n e tour of a her c a r e e r in her p o r t r a y a l of the hollow California n u c l e a r p l a n t , feel s t r a n g e life of a w o m a n w h o knows s h e ' s b e e n v i b r a t i o n s a n d w i t n e s s f r e n e t i c a c t i v i t y in hired m o r e for her looks t h a n h e r ability. the control r o o m , w h e r e ^ J a c k L e m m o n T h e real s l e e p e r of the film, however, is works as plants manager." M i c h a e l Douglas, w h o g i v e s a v i b r a n t D o u g l a s s e c r e t l y f i l m s the a c t i v i t y and p e r f o r m a n c e in a role that m a n y feel shows it to a n e x p e r t on n u c l e a r p o w e r should m a k e him a s t a r in his own right. s t a t i o n s , who a s s u r e s him that s o m e t h i n g H o p e ' s S t u d e n t Activities C o m m i t t e e 1 will p r e s e n t this p r o v o c a t i v e and t i m e l y film F r i d a y and S a t u r d a y at 7:30 a n d 10 p . m . in W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m in G r a v e s P i a n i s t fcdna H o l l a n d e r T e r Molen will Hall. Admission is a dollar f o r s t u d e n t s p r e s e n t a guest r e c i t a l F r i d a y , M a r c h 6 at with a Hope College ID. 8 p . m . in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C h a p e l . T h e recital is s p o n s o r e d by the m u s i c department. T h e p r o g r a m will consist of B r a h m s ' S o n a t a in F Minor; M o z a r t ' s Rondo, K. 511; a n d L i s z t ' s Venezia e Napoli. T e r Molen is a 1960 H o p e g r a d u a t e ; s h e m a j o r e d in m u s i c a n d w a s a p i a n o s t u d e n t of Anthony Kooiker. T e r Molen taught p i a n o at H o p e b e f o r e m o v i n g to D a l l a s , w h e r e s h e s t u d i e d with R u d o l p h F i r k u n s y DIAL at S o u t h e r n Methodist U n i v e r s i t y . She 396-5840 c o m p l e t e d h e r m a s t e r ' s at N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y , w h e r e s h e is p r e s e n t l y w o r k i n g a s a pianist f o r s t r i n g e n s e m b l e s . She a l s o t e a c h e s p r i v a t e l y in E v a n s t o n ,

The China Syndrome Impending disaster

w o r k i n g f o r S e n a t o r M a r k Hatfield a n d doing r e s e a r c h for the labor law d e p a r t - • m e n t of t h e C h a m b e r of C o m m e r c e . While s h e w a s n ' t on t h e job, D i r k s e , a political s c i e n c e a n d b u s i n e s s m a j o r , a t t e n d e d c l a s s two nights a w e e k , worked on h e r two r e q u i r e d p a p e r s , a n d "did a s m u c h in the city a s p o s s i b l e . " When a s k e d w h a t a d v i c e s h e would give o t h e r s t u d e n t s p l a n n i n g to a t t e n d t h e Washington semester, she replied. " E x p o s e yourself to a s m u c h a s W a s h i n g t o n a s you c a n . " Dirkse also gave this advice: " E v e r y o n e goes to Washington with t h e idea of doing s o m e t h i n g g r e a t , but don't be too d i s a p p o i n t e d if you end u p in a routine office j o b . " She said s h e would definitely do it a g a i n if s h e h a d t h e c h a n c e , s t a t i n g " I e n j o y e d being a p a r t of the w o r k i n g a t m o s p h e r e i n s t e a d of reading about it." But p r e - l a w s t u d e n t s and political s c i e n c e m a j o r s a r e not the only people who p a r t i c i p a t e in the honors s e m e s t e r . Rex M o w a t , a c h e m i s t r y m a j o r , worked for C o n g r e s s m a n D a v i d S t o c k m a n , now R e a g a n ' s b u d g e t d i r e c t o r , for two d a y s a week and did research in t h e b i o c h e m i s t r y b r a n c h of the Food and Drug Administration for three. In f a c t , M o w a t will h a v e a r e s e a r c h p a p e r published in t h r e e m o n t h s on s t r u c t u r a l s t u d i e s of b a c t e r i a l polysacc h a r i d e s . H e s t a y e d in D.C. a n e x t r a m o n t h to w o r k on his r e s e a r c h , which took 10-12 h o u r s a d a y . Mowat s a i d t h a t his c h e m i s t r y b a c k g r o u n d a t Hope w a s fine p r e p a r a t i o n f o r his i n t e r n s h i p , and c r e d i t s the Washington s e m e s t e r with " o p e n i n g m y eyes to viewpoints other t h a n those of Hope C o l l e g e . " F u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n on the Washington semester p r o g r a m can be obtained from Zoetewey or Holmes.

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by William K. Anderson ami Gordon J . Van Wylen, In these d a y s of J i i g h inflation, establishing the budget and c h a r g e s for tuition, room and board is of concern to all — to students and their p a r e n t s , f a c u l t y , a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , and the Board of Trustees. In view of this, a two-part article h a s been p r e p a r e d dealing with these issues. This first article outlines s o m e of the o v e r a l l p a r a m e t e r s ami issues that a r e involved in developing a budget and establishing these c h a r g e s , a n d p r e s e n t s s o m e c o m p a r i s o n s with other colleges. The next article will outline s o m e suggestions on how we can a d d r e s s these issues a n d work together to k e e p costs down and provide a d e q u a t e financial aid and work opportunities, while maintaining our c o m m i t m e n t to excellence. At Hope we s t r i v e to k e e p two objectives before us in r e g a r d to budgets and charges: 1. To a c h i e v e excellence in all we do — the a c a d e m i c , residential and ext r a c u r r i c u l a r life of the college. This requires that the n e c e s s a r y Resources be available. 2. To maintain c h a r g e s to students and the financial aid p r o g r a m at such levels that a Hope education is available to every qualified student. At Hope, c h a r g e s for tuition, room and board cover 76 percent of the operating budget. T h e b a l a n c e comes f r o m gifts to the Annual Fund (budgeted at $1,200,00 this y e a r ) and income f r o m such sources a s the E n d o w m e n t Fund, t e m p o r a r y i n v e s t m e n t s , and rental of c a m p u s facilities for conferences during the s u m m e r months. It should also be noted that of the 76

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percent that is covered by c h a r g e s for tuition, board and room, about one-fourth is covered by F e d e r a l and state financial aid a n d three-fourths by students, p a r e n t s , and Hope g r a n t s . This y e a r Hope has budgeted $840,000 for financial aid g r a n t s , and, in addition, a very substantial amount for work and work study. Last y e a r the college spent $626,000 for financial aid g r a n t s ; the p r o j e c t e d figure for 1081-1982 is $1,030,000. One way of looking at these f i g u r e s is that of the $1,200,000 the college r e c e i v e s in gifts for the Annual Fund, $840,000 is used for g r a n t s f o q financiat" aid. It follows that c h a r g e s fiiMuftion, room a n d board, even if paid in full by a student, do not cover the actual cost of the education he receives at Hope. Also, a student who pays all costs is not subsidizing those who receive financial aid. It would be acc u r a t e , however, to say that a student paying all the costs himself receives less a s s i s t a n c e f r o m gifts the college r e c e i v e s than those who r e c e i v e financial aid. Some questions of concern a r e how costs of Hope c o m p a r e with other colleges, and how costs at Hope have increased in recent y e a r s c o m p a r e d to these colleges. P e r h a p s the best c o m p a r i s o n for Hope is with colleges in the Great Lakes Colleges Association. Over the y e a r s , c h a r g e s at Hope h a v e been about $1,000 less p e r y e a r than the a v e r a g e of all the colleges i n . t h e GLCA Specifically, for this a c a d e m i c y e a r , c h a r g e s at GLCA colleges r a n g e d f r o m a high of $8,035 to a low of $5,775 at Hope. The a v e r a g e for all GLCA colleges w a s $6,908. As r e g a r d s i n c r e a s e s over the v e a r s , the increase at Hope over the past seven y e a r s w a s $3,290, and the a v e r a g e at aU GLCA schools w a s $3,738.

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Over the past five w a r s , a n u m b e r of e l e m e n t s in the budget h a v e increased d r a m a t i c a l l y . These a r e a s follows: Category Student S a l a r i e s Utilities Financial Aid Payroll T a x e s Insurance on Facilities Five-Year I n c r e a s e 123% 99 101

137 145 Average Annual IiKroase 25% 19.8 20 2

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The next a r t i c l e will deal u.ith these matters.

Deciding your occupation by Nan Hussey We, a s college students, spend four or five y e a r s pushing toward graduation, a r e released into the insecurity of the job m a r k e t , struggle through t h e first y e a r s to direct ourselves into our p r e f e r r e d occupations, and do all this following a pattern based largely on a s s u m p t i o n s . We aim unconsciously either to m a t c h or exceed our p a r e n t s ' lifestyles, income level and prestige, and p u r s u e our livelihoods without ever realizing our privileged position of choice. It is true. We who a r e blessed with education, no lack of material necessities, and the f r e e d o m and opportunities of this country needn't w a d e bhndly through life. We, of all people in the world, have the opportunity to choose our lifestyles and environment; T h e r e f o r e , before we plunge madly down the f r e e w a y in pursuit of the middle-class ideal, I urge that we all e v a l u a t e our a i m s and goals and estabiis-h firm ideas of the persons we wish to become a n d the things we wish to accomplish. The individuals I really a d m i r e a r e those who've used their lives to some end beyond mere daily support and t o m o r r o w ' s pleasure. I r e m e m b e r two outstanding doctors: One I met at a hunger c o n f e r e n c e where he s h a r e d with those attending how he and his wife had re-evaluated an existence they found tense and lonely. This was d u e mostly to his hectic work^scheduie a n d their concentration on things and the social whirl. They established a sum they e s t i m a t e d would m e e t their t r u e needs c o m f o r t a b l y and discovered it w a s what he couid m a k e in Iwo regular workdays. So he t r i m m e d back his list of patients and began to see them just two days a week, donating his time the r e m a i n i n g three to w e l f a r e patients, for which service he r e f u s e d compensation. Their family began to pull back together, having more i m p e t u s now

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In addition, t h e r e have been substantially i n c r e a s e d costs for health and hospitalization insurance, travel, w o m e n ' s intercollegiate athletics, and a variety of other b u d g e t s r e l a t i n g directly to our a c a d e m i c quality and ext r a c u r r i c u l a r activities. Of g r e a t e r c o n c e r n , however, than such information is the question of "What can w e do about all of this at H o p e 9 " In essence, t h e r e a r e t h r e e w a y s in which these c o n c e r n s can be a d d r e s s e d These are: 1 D e c r e a s e the cost of oi)erating the college. 1 I n c r e a s e the gilt a n d other norv tuition income of tl>e college. 3. Insure that w e have an a d e q u a t e financial aid budget and work opportunities for students.

that he no longer worked o v e r t i m e or on call, and he himself telt a wonderful sense of fulfillment in c a r i n g for his new patients. The second r e m a r k a b l e doctor I met at a P r e s b y t e r i a n c h u r c h . Clothed in the white m e n ' s g a r b of India, he'd just r e t u r n e d f r o m completing his two-year medical internship at a mission (here r a t h e r than in an A m e r i c a n hospital. Having once leaned toward mission work, he'd seized this p r o g r a m a s his opportunity to discover if he would really c a r e to devote his life and work to the world's poor. Two m o n t h s a f t e r I h e a r d him speak he r e t u r n e d to India with his tull M.D credentials. T h e r e a r e m a n y e x a m p l e s of ordinary people in this society who direct their lives toward s o m e end. Simply becoming f a m i l i a r with some of the professors on the Hope c a m p u s will provide interesting s u r p r i s e s in this respect. Investigate other role models to learn what motivates their lifestyles and it these p u r p l e s w e r e conscious decisions or unquestioned assumptions. Especially in light of this w e e k ' s world hunger e m p h a s i s , we who h a v e the choice of opportunities and e x p e n d i t u r e s m a y wish to begin taking slock of our motivation. An u p p e r middle-class s a l a r y does not d i c t a t e u p p e r middle-class purchases. Our money should be directed to where we would h a v e it go — where, I suggest, it would do most good or at least lead to more than m e r e i n c r e a s e of an a l r e a d y substantial existence. As I see it, all lifestyles f r o m the upper lower class through the very wealthy in this country provide sufficient necessities for a life without physical lack. Which one is right for you? Does too m u c h money bring selfish, greedy d e s i r e s ? Does m o r e money allow support of worthy institutions 9 Does the hustle-bustle of big city life n e g a t e any benefits of higher w a g e s ? Must there be a p u r p o s e beyond m e r e l y continuing to live and obtaining wished-for items? " Y e s " to any of these questions or to m a n y s i m i l a r ones m e a n s one has a l r e a d y begun to e v a l u a t e the direction one's life will take a n d has taken the first s t e p to conscious and conscientious lifestyle selection. Any a r e a of the country is open, n e a r l y any type of dwelling, m a n y income levels and an a s s o r t m e n t of different jobs. Do not be limited by f a m i l y b a c k g r o u n d or preconceived ideas. We need to be a w a r e of our m a n y options a n d , above all, of our exceptionally f o r t u n a t e position of being able to choose which option to exercise.

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Heading off to college - again b> Carole J e a n King "Hoy. I ' m anxious today. No. I'm t e a r f u l , b e c a u s e I know w h a t ' s bothering me. T o m o r r o w , a f t e r 17 y e a r s . I a m going back to school. I'm going to c o m p e t e with s t u d e n t s my own child's a g e in what will be for m e a new world . . . college, the world of higher learning . . where one is once a g a i n judged by letters, five of t h e m ; A, B.C.I), and F And. like before. F does not stand for a 'fine' job done! The evaluation of one's work in this newlearning situation m a k e s it sound as if it's high school but it's not. " N o longer a r e students spoon-fed. if they m a k e it. they m a k e it on their own. And t h a t ' s bad enough, but for m e those m a g i c letters a r e going to be handed out by 'kids.' oh. I m e a n professors. I went to e l e m e n t a r y school with m a n y y e a r s ago Anxious and f e a r f u l , yes. all of those, but m a y b e I ought to clarify myself. 1 think I ' m anxious and fearful b e c a u s e I have physiological s y m p t o m s of anxiety, fright and emotional tensions: perspiration, rapidly b e a t i n g h e a r t , muscle tension and insomnia. " I can accept m y s e l f ; a f t e r all. I'm not infallible, and I knew all along I w asn't an Einstein, but can I m a k e a passing g r a d e 0 Will the kids accept m e or will they s t a r e at me a s if I'm hideously m a r k e d like s o m e sort of alien being when I meet them in the halls? Will they giggle gleefully when 1 ask a question in c l a s s such a s 'what does eclectic m e a n ? ' M a y b e I'd feel b e t t e r if I explain to myself what might happen if my biggest f e a r , the f e a r of failure, w e r e to materialize. " 'Self, you a r e going to blow your first test; it is going to happen the very first t i m e y o u t a k e a test.' "Wow, 1 feel less anxious a l r e a d y . T h a t ' s it. all I have to do is a d m i t I might not be p e r f e c t . " T h a t ' s right. Self, but then you knew that all along, didn't you?' " O h yes, I know I'm not perfect, and I know all those students who s e e m so bright w e r e also a c a d e m i c a l l y i m m a t u r e as f r e s h m e n , just a s I a m . And I also know that if I try. 1 can be a c a d e m i c a l l y m a t u r e too. " There, that's the way to think . . . positive. You can do it. Self; I know you c a n do it.'

• But, I'm still nervous; m a y b e it would help if I r e r e a d "How To Get What You Want Out of L i f e , " by J o y c e Brothers. Or. m a y b e it would help if I talked with my minister. Or. m a y b e it would help if I jogged, or took on s o m e diversiona! activity. such a s t r a n s c e n d e n t a l meditation. I have to do s o m e t h i n g ; I have only 12 m o r e hours until my first class. "I really should try s o m e conversing techniques, how about clarifying . . . " 'Do you m e a n . Self, you a r e anxious about t e s t s 0 M a y b e a r e s t a t e m e n t would work better. As I u n d e r s t a n d it. Self, your plan is to panic, right? Oh yes, I c a n see your s t r a t e g y clearly now / tomorrowmorning at 9 a . m . your professor will ask your n a m e , and you a r e going to choke up and breathlessly m u m b l e . . . "Ca Ca . . . Kin . . . I mean my n a m e is Carol K i n g . " Boy. t h a t ' s going to be cute. Self "Now let's back up and put bur m e n t a l g e a r s into neutral, so we can s t a r t over again and get this "stinkin-thinkin" out of your head. Yes. yes. I know (we) a r e over 30 y e a r s old. So w h a t 0 T h e r e is no such thing a s being too old to learn. Look at G r a n d m a Moses; she didn't s t a r t painting until she w a s 72. And what about people like Erik E r i c k s o n 0 We just r e a d that he was also a late bloomer. Are you listening, Self 0 Silence . . . "Oh well. 1 needed a c h a n c e t a s l o w up my c o n v e r s i o n a n y w a y . M a y b e you'll feel better if I r e m i n d you of s o m e f a c t s you a l r e a d y know and what is likely to h a p p e n thai first d a y . T h e buildings, even though they look powerful and overwhelming. a r e not ; they will not fall in on you. T h e c l a s s r o o m s do not shut their doors p e r m a n e n t l y behind you; the r o o m s a r e only meeting places w h e r e people a r e taught and e x c h a n g e ideas. T h e administration welcomes all students. The s t u d e n t s a r e learning just like you a r e going to. The p r o f e s s o r s a r e too; they s o m e t i m e s learn f r o m the students. And the first test you fail won't hurt your pride forever. F a i l u r e h u r t s only a s long a s you let it hurt. Now c o m e on. a r e n ' t you feeling better a l r e a d y ? " Y e s . it does help to c o n v e r s e with myself. And I do feel much better than before this talk with myself. And 1 sure hope no one s e t s up any blocks to this therapeutic c o m m u n i c a t i o n I h a v e with myself, such a s requesting an explanation. b e c a u s e I'm not r e a d y y e t . "

Dawn Tuttle and David Blauw s t a r in Hope's t h e a t r e production of " T h e C r u c i b l e , " opening at DeWitt Main T h e a t r e this F r i d a y , (photo courtesy of the t h e a t r e department)

Hope theatre department presents The Crucible' " I wished for a way to write a play . . . which would show that the sin of public t e r r o r is that it divests m a n of conscience, of h i m s e l f . " T h e play A r t h u r Miller had in mind w a s " T h e Crucible," first produced in 1953. " T h e Crucible," directed by George Ralph, w ill open this weekend at the Hope T h e a t r e . It will be p r e s e n t e d March 6. 7, and 10-14 at 8 p.m. A double focus in the play keeps b e f o r e us Miller's twain concerns. One focal point is the c o m m u n i t y which e r u p t s in an orgy of accusation and c o n d e m n a t i o n , a r i s i n g f r o m r e p r e s s e d guilts, f e a r s , petty vengeance, a f r a n t i c desire to be on the "right'* side politically and theologically, and calculated greed. T h e other focal point is the individual, J o h n P r o c t o r , struggling with his own s e n s e of guilt while a t t e m p t i n g to s t a n d a g a i n s t the collective insanity. Though the play is set in S a l e m , M a s s a c h u s e t t s , in 1692, Miller w r o t e

concerning the m a s s political hysteria of the 1950s. " T h e C r u c i b l e ' s " f r e q u e n t revival in college, high school and c o m m u n i t y t h e a t e r s s u g g e s t s that society needs to be r e m i n d e d that such m a d n e s s is a l w a y s a possibility, and that the t r u e h e r o is the individual who recognizes his own fallibility and still m a i n t a i n s the personal integrity which distinguishes humanity. T h e r e will be a discussion following the opening night p e r f o r m a n c e a s a p a r t of an a u d i e n c e education p r o g r a m . J a m e s I. Cook, Mrs. P a t r i c k Donnelly, and Daniel VanderArk will lead the discussion. F o r f u r t h e r information and ticket reservations, interested individuals can contact the ticket office at the DeWitt Center. Hope students m a y see a n y t h e a t e r production f r e e if they wish to u s h e r . Sign-up sheets for ushering a r e on the back of the double doors next to the ticket office.

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Rick Avra & Lance Tillstra. and Bob S t e a r n s & Cheryl N o r m a n a r e the final cont e n d e r s for the first and last annual " S p r i n g Turns Men's H e a r t s To " contest. You decide, (photos by Lora Hector)


8

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by Tim Taylor After 13 y e a r s (1967) it h a s h a p p e n e d again. After skipping the d e c a d e of the 70s, Hope tied for the MIAA m e n ' s basketball championship with Albion a n d Calvin by beating the first and losing to the second last week. At a rowdy Knollcrest Fieldhouse, Calvin looked like they w e r e going to rout the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n just a s it had e a r l i e r at the Civic Center a s they took a quick 9-2 lead. T h e lead, however, s t a y e d at about that m a r g i n for the entire half, a s a combination of good defense, sloppy offense, and atrocious officiating kept the g a m e low-scoring, with Calvin a h e a d 3327 at the interim period. Hope c a m e out fast in the second half a s baskets by Matt Neil and Jeff Heerdt g a v e the O r a n g e and Blue their l a r g e s t and only lead of the b a l l g a m e . T h e m o m e n t u m quickly c h a n g e d a s Matt Neil picked up his fourth foul and Calvin s t a r t e d dominating the b o a r d s with their twin towers, M a r k G r a s m e y e r and P a u l Ten Brink, both 6 , 8". To show the effect of less a g g r e s s i v e play by Neil necessitated by the fourth whistle, one only needs to look at Calvin's 40-27 rebounding e d g e while considering that normally Hope is the best rebounding t e a m in the league. This board edge m a t c h e d with a v e r y hot Ten Brink and m o r e f r e e throw opportunities g a v e Calvin the g a m e , 67-57. In explanation, Ten Brink hit five field goals, t h r e e f r o m at least 20 feet, and w a s 8 for 9 f r o m the line, while the whole Calvin t e a m was 25 of 28 f r o m the charity stripe in c o m p a r i s o n to Hope's 15 of 21. This loss, coupled with a n Albion victory over Olivet, m a d e it necessary for Hope to beat Albion on S a t u r d a y for a piece of the league crown. Both of the s q u a d s w e r e obviously very emotional, a s they t r a d e d b a s k e t s a s they contest began. Slowly, however, the Britons began pulling a w a y a s they went

••••• •

inside to their big m a n , J i m Clegg, who threw in, literally, a left-handed hook every t i m e he touched the ball, so that the s c o r e r e a d Albion 35, Hope 26 with 8:42 before the half. Clegg's c o u n t e r p a r t , Jeff Heerdt, then went to work a s his 19 points in the half led to a 46-46 score at the b r e a k . The second half was wilder than the first a s the t e a m s s e e m e d to flip-flop hot s t r e a k s ; coach Glenn Van Wieren w a s to s a y later, "One t e a m would b e c o m e hot a n d the other would invariably cool down. It hurt us at t i m e s . " Hope w a s the first s q u a d to benefit f r o m a hot s t r e a k a s with only t h r e e m i n u t e s gone, they found themselves up by eight, 58-50. That euphoria w a s too good to last, however, a s five minutes later (with 12:30 left) Albion had turned the tide, leading 68-65. Hope once a g a i n surged, this t i m e on a couple of b a s k e t s and then a s s i s t s by Scott Benson, and they took the lead b a c k 72-68. Then things got really wild. Albion, led by P e t e McKnight a n d Glenn K i r k h a m , scored 10 points in a row to give the Britons a c o m m a n d i n g 82-74 lead with just six m i n u t e s left in the contest. Benson a n d Rick Reece then went wild, however, a s the two would h a v e m a d e Houston M c T e a r proud of their r u n n i n g ability. T h e two, along with Heerdt, Neil and Brian B e c k m a n , scored 17 points in a row and g a v e Hope the lead 91-82 with 1:35 and the Dutch in possession of the ball. Albion drew within four, 92-88, but seven clutch f r e e throws by J o h n Sutton and B e c k m a n put Hope out of r e a c h , a n d provided the winning m a r g i n , 99-92. This victory g a v e the Flying D u t c h m e n the opportunity to p a r t i c i p a t e in the twog a m e playoff that took place Monday a n d T u e s d a y evenings. The winner of this playoff will a d v a n c e to the NCAA Division III G r e a t Lakes Regional t o u r n a m e n t tomorrow and S a t u r d a y .

Hope's swim season ends by E v a Dean It's over and done with. With the exception of nationals, Hope's s w i m m e r s a r e finished with their regulation season. It's been a long one, but coach J o h n P a t n o t t is very pleased with the input and output received f r o m both t e a m s . Champions again, the w o m e n have r e c a p t u r e d their MIAA league title. Going into the league meet a s defending c h a m p i o n s , the Flying Dutch took off with a slow s t a r t on F r i d a y but finally s o a r e d to their winning heights on S a t u r d a y . With combined e f f o r t s in both the 400and 800-yard f r e e s t y l e r e l a y , the w o m e n s w a m their way into first place. In the 400 f r e e , consisting of Nancy Scholten, Kirsten Newhof, Anne Stone and Deb Wettack, the first-place t i m e w a s m a r k e d at 3:54.78. Though this w a s not recorded a s a school record, t h e w o m e n still s w a m well. T h e 800 f r e e proved to be much m o r e eventful, a s Scholten, Stone, Nancy Sivertson and Leslie B e t h a r d s kicked u p a school record and e a r n e d the right to p a r t i c i p a t e in the nationals along with t h e other relay t e a m . The s w i m m e r s posted a 8:21.23 and left the r e m a i n i n g t e a m s trailing by about 16 seconds, or, in l a y m a n ' s t e r m s , about 20 y a r d s behind. Individual efforts w e r e all s t a t e d to be "solid p e r f o r m a n c e s " by P a t n o t t and it is h a r d to single out a n y w o m a n a s s t a r since so m a n y shined through, he s a i d . Newhof r e m a i n e d consistent and won both the 50 f r e e , r e c o r d i n g a school record at 25.79, and the 100 f r e e , posting 56.04 and missing the nationals by one-tenth of a second. B e t h a r d s kicked up a s t o r m in the 200-yard individual m e d l e y a n d had h e r g r e a t e s t swim of the s e a s o n , a c c o r d i n g to P a t n o t t . She m a r k e d a 2:21.04 and placed second, losing by only six-tenths of a second. Nancy Scholten also s w a m well and placed first in the 200 f r e e by setting her personal best of 2:04.67. Sivertson, Kathy Breyfogle and Susan Zobl, too, added to the depth of the 13-member team. In diving, t h e o n e - m e t e r b o a r d showed the entire league H o p e ' s exceptional divers by putting all t h r e e of Hope's divers in the first t h r e e positions. S a r a h Souter took first, showing off a 349.05 score, both a school a n d a league r e c o r d . Lynn B u ^ reported in at second a n d M a r y DeVries c a p t u r e d third. T h e next s t e p will be for eight m e m b e r s of the w o m e n ' s t e a m to travel to the nationals on M a r c h 12. T h e m e n s w a m v e r y well, played

second fiddle to Kazoo only, and took second place in the league meet. This w a s definite i m p r o v e m e n t over placing third last y e a r , a n d P a t n o t t said he w a s very pleased with the m e n ' s p e r f o r m a n c e s , especially their response to the competition at a league m e e t . Although Hope did not win any r a c e s , only Kazoo m a n a g e d wins over all the t e a m s , a n d the m e n still showed their potential. Both the 400 medley relay (Beck Greene, Mike S c h m u k e r , D a v e Groeneveld and P a t Nelis) and the 400 f r e e s t y l e relay (Nelis, P e t e D > k e m a , Tim J a s p e r s e and D a v e Moored) placed second and recorded school r e c o r d s . T h e 400 f r e e pulled out an upset and beat Calvin with a 3:19.92 m a r k . Individual e f f o r t s f e a t u r e d the alwaysconsistent Craig Anderson and Pat Nelis. Nelis took second in t h r e e of his events, the 200, the 500 and the 1650 free. Anderson, on the other hand, placed third in his t h r e e events, the 500 and 1650 f r e e , behind Nelis. and the 200-yard butterfly. Tim J a s p e r s e gave a fine p e r f o r m a n c e in the 50 f r e e p r e l i m s with a 22.3 school record, but failed to s w i m a s well in the finals, only placing sixth. If J a s p e r s e had s w a m a s well in the finals a s in the p r e l i m s he would have taken second. The m e n a r e entirely finished now a n d can only await the a r r i v a l of next y e a r ' s season, except for Nelis and J a s p e r s e , both of whom will be g r a d u a t e d .

Raffle delayed by G e o r g e Caravella The d r a w i n g for the winner of (he L a c r o s s e Club-sponsored r a f f l e of a trip to the B a h a m a s h a s been postponed. The original d r a w i n g date, Monday, M a r c h 2, h a s been c h a n g e d to S a t u r d a y , M a r c h 7. The d r a w i n g will be held at 5:30 p.m. S a t u r d a y in P h e l p s Dining Hall. All ticket b e a r e r s a r e u r g e d to a t t e n d . In c a s e of a b s e n c e the winner will be notified by phone. The winning ticket is worth a round-trip flight for two to F r e e p o r t in the B a h a m a s . Hotel a c c o m o d a t i o n s h a v e also been paid for. The eight day a n d seven night vacation falls on Hope's spring b r e a k , M a r c h 21-28. Tickets will be on s a l e T h u r s d a y a n d F r i d a y in P h e l p s Dining Hall d u r i n g dinner hours and prior to the d r a w i n g on Saturday.

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ATTENTION

Dick Donohue and D. Kenrick for a landslide

commodations. Open 24 hrs. a day--phone

victory w i t h the following:

6677. Ask for

GIRLS!!

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The Nights' of Earl' - Wildman

and Pole or Froggie and Stinky. UNTIL RECENTLY, Tommy L.'s parents thought

CYNTHIA--I'm

he was a kumquat. In an attempt to avoid a

belated birthday!- Love, NeeCee.

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complex, Tommy held a contest in the local

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paper in which local residents would write a

COSMOS-'l m sorry that what started as a joke

small biography of Tommy. One entry was

has caused such bad feelings. I hope things

submitted. It lost. Tommy is now campaigning

areO.K.now.

to be the 1982 poster child for Birth Control. GLENN BULTHUIS -Watch for him. Coming to Hope April 25! Albums available- SAC office "MY

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Senior wrestler Byron Prielipp receives a medal for his third-place finish in the recent conference tournament, (photo by Randy Warren)

centric layers of nacre as abnormal growths

HEY FIRST FLOOR -When it's all over, can we

within the shells of some mollusks and used

celebrate? Love, The Tipsy Trio

as gems. They're beautiful! I love y o u ! - " Y o u r little girl, Rainbob." engogement. DEAR

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HEY T!, Dr. T. would be proud, wherever he is, love J.

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Heading off to college - again b> ( a r o l e J e a n King "Hoy. I'm anxious today. No, I'm t e a r f u l , b e c a u s e I knou w h a t ' s bothering m e T o m o r n m . a f t e r 17 y e a r s . 1 a m going back to school I'm going to c o m p e t e with s t u d e n t s my own child's a g e in what will be for m e a new world . . . college, the world of higher learning . . where one is once a g a i n judged by letters, five of t h e m : A. B.C.I), and F And. like before. F does not stand for a 'fine' job done! The evaluation of one's work in this new learning situation m a k e s it sound as if it's high school hut it's not. "No longer art 1 s t u d e n t s spoon-fed. if they m a k e it. they m a k e it on their own. And t h a t ' s bad enough, but for m e those m a g i c letters a r e going to be handed out by 'kids.' oh. I m e a n professors. I went to e l e m e n t a r y school with m a n y y e a r s ago Anxious and f e a r f u l , yes. all of those, but m a y b e I ought to clarify myself. I think I ' m anxious and f e a r f u l because I have physiological s y m p t o m s of anxiety, fright and emotional tensions: perspiration, rapidly b e a t i n g heart, muscle tension and insomnia.

V

"I can accept myself; a f t e r all. I ' m not infallible, and I knew all along I wasn't an Einstein, but can I m a k e a passing g r a d e 0 Will the kids accept m e or will they s t a r e at me a s if I'm hideously m a r k e d like s o m e sort of alien being when I meet them in the halls 0 Will they giggle gleefully when I ask a question in c l a s s such as 'what does eclectic m e a n 0 ' Maybe I'd feel b e t t e r if I explain to myself what might happen it my biggest f e a r , the f e a r of failure, w e r e to materialize. " 'Self, you a r e going to blow your first test; it is going to happen the very first t i m e y o u t a k e a test.' "Wow, I feel less anxious a l r e a d y . T h a t ' s it. all I have to do is admit I might not be perfect. " T h a t ' s right. Self, but then you knew that all along, didn't y o u ? ' "Oh yes. I know I'm not perfect, and I know all those students who s e e m so bright w e r e also a c a d e m i c a l l y i m m a t u r e a s f r e s h m e n , just a s I a m . And I also know that if I try. I can be a c a d e m i c a l l y m a t u r e too. " 'There, that's the way to think . . . positive. You can do it. Self; I know you can do it.'

"But, I ' m still nervous; m a y b e it would help if I r e r e a d "How To Get What You Want Out of Life." by J o y c e Brothers. Or, m a y b e it would help if I talked with my minister. Or. m a y b e it would help if I jogged, or took on s o m e diversional activity. such as t r a n s c e n d e n t a l meditation. I have to do something; I have only 12 m o r e hours until my first class. "I really should try s o m e conversing techniques, how about c l a r i f y i n g . . . " 'Do you m e a n . Self, you a r e anxious about t e s t s 0 Maybe a r e s t a t e m e n t would work better. As I u n d e r s t a n d it. Self, your plan is to panic, right 0 Oh yes, I can see your s t r a t e g y clearly n o w / t o m o r r o w morning at 9 a . m . your professor will ask your n a m e , and you a r e going to choke up and breathlessly m u m b l e . . . "Ca Ca . . . Kin . . . I mean my n a m e is Carol King." Boy. t h a t ' s going to be cute. Self "Now let's back up and put bur m e n t a l g e a r s into neutral, so we can start over again and get this "stinkin-thinkin" out of your head. Yes. yes. I know ( w t i a r e over 30 y e a r s old. So w h a t 0 T h e r e is no such thing a s being too old to learn. Look at G r a n d m a Moses; she didn't start painting until she w a s 72. And what about people like Erik E r i c k s o n 0 We just r e a d that he w a s also a late bloomer. Are you listening. Self 0 Silence . . . "Oh well. I needed a c h a n c e t a s l o w up my c o n v e r s i o n a n y w a y . Maybe you'll feel better if I r e m i n d you of s o m e f a c t s you a l r e a d y know and what is likely to happen that first day. T h e buildings, even though they look powerful and overwhelming. a r e not ; they will not fall in on you. The classrooms do not shut their doors p e r m a n e n t l y behind you; the rooms a r e only meeting places w h e r e people a r e taught and e x c h a n g e ideas. The administration welcomes all students. The students a r e learning just like you a r e going to. The professors a r e too. they s o m e t i m e s learn f r o m the students. And the first test you fail won't hurt your pride forever. F a i l u r e hurts only as long as you let it h u r t . Now c o m e on. a r e n ' t you feeling better a l r e a d y 0 " Y e s . it does help to converse with myself. And I do feel m u c h better than before this talk with myself. And 1 sure hope no one s e t s up any blocks to this therapeutic c o m m u n i c a t i o n I have with myself, such a s requesting an explanation. because I'm not r e a d y y e t . "

v :

-v/:v> v /

...

Dawn Tuttle and David Blauw star in Hope's theatre production of "The Crucible," opening at DeWitt Main Theatre this Friday, (photo courtesy of the theatre department)

Hope theatre department presents The Crucible' "I wished for a way to write a play . . . which would show that the sin of public t e r r o r is that it divests m a n of conscience, of h i m s e l f . " The play A r t h u r Miller had in mind w a s " T h e Crucible." first produced in 1953. " T h e Crucible." directed by G e o r g e Ralph, will open this weekend at the Hope T h e a t r e . It will be presented March 6. 7, and 10-14 at 8 p.m. A double focus in the play keeps b e f o r e us Miller's twain concerns. One focal point is the c o m m u n i t y which e r u p t s in a n orgy of accusation and condemnation, arising f r o m r e p r e s s e d guilts, f e a r s , pettyvengeance, a f r a n t i c desire to be on the " r i g h t " side politically and theologically, and calculated greed. T h e other focal point is the individual. J o h n P r o c t o r , struggling with his own sense of guilt while a t t e m p t i n g to s t a n d against the collective insanity. Though the play is set in Salem. Massachusetts, in 1692, Miller w r o t e

concerning the m a s s political hysteria of the 1950s. " T h e C r u c i b l e ' s " frequent revival in college, high school and c o m m u n i t y t h e a t e r s suggests that society needs to be r e m i n d e d t h a t such m a d n e s s is a l w a y s a possibility, and that the true hero is the individual who recognizes his own fallibility and still maintains the personal integrity which distinguishes humanity. T h e r e will be a discussion following the opening night p e r f o r m a n c e a s a p a r t of an a u d i e n c e education p r o g r a m . J a m e s I. Cook. Mrs. P a t r i c k Donnelly, a n d Daniel VanderArk will lead the discussion. F o r f u r t h e r information and ticket reservations, interested individuals can contact the ticket office at the DeWitt Center. Hope s t u d e n t s m a y s e e any theater production f r e e if they wish to usher. Sign-up sheets for ushering a r e on the back of the double doors next to the ticket office.

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Rick Avra & Lance Tillstra. and Bob Stearns & Cheryl Norman are the final contenders for the first and last annual ^Spring Turns Men's Hearts To " contest. You decide. (photos by Lora Hector)


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a.

Sports A long time waiting for recognition

o X o c o u O J

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by Tim Taylor After 13 y e a r s (1967) it h a s h a p p e n e d a g a i n . After skipping the d e c a d e of the 70s, Hope tied for the MIAA m e n ' s basketball c h a m p i o n s h i p with Albion and Calvin by b e a t i n g the first a n d losing to the second last w e e k . At a rowdy Knollcrest Fieldhouse, Calvin looked like they w e r e going to rout the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n just a s it had e a r l i e r at the Civic Center a s they took a quick 9-2 lead. The lead, however, s t a y e d a t about that m a r g i n for the e n t i r e half, a s a combination of good d e f e n s e , sloppy offense, and a t r o c i o u s officiating kept the g a m e low-scoring, with Calvin a h e a d 3327 at the interim period. Hope c a m e out f a s t in the second half a s b a s k e t s by Matt Neil a n d Jeff H e e r d t g a v e the O r a n g e a n d Blue their l a r g e s t and only lead of the b a l l g a m e . The m o m e n t u m quickly c h a n g e d a s Matt Neil picked up his f o u r t h foul and Calvin s t a r t e d d o m i n a t i n g the b o a r d s with their twin towers, M a r k G r a s m e y e r and P a u l Ten Brink, both 6'8". To show the e f f e c t of less a g g r e s s i v e play by Neil n e c e s s i t a t e d by the fourth whistle, one only n e e d s to look at Calvin's 40-27 r e b o u n d i n g edge while considering that n o r m a l l y H o p e is the best r e b o u n d i n g t e a m in the league. This board e d g e m a t c h e d with a veryhot Ten Brink and m o r e f r e e throw opportunities g a v e Calvin the g a m e , 67-57. In explanation, Ten Brink hit five field goals, three f r o m at least 20 feet, and w a s 8 for 9 f r o m the line, while the whole Calvin t e a m w a s 25 of 28 f r o m the c h a r i t y s t r i p e in c o m p a r i s o n to Hope's 15 of 21. This loss, coupled with a n Albion victory over Olivet, m a d e it n e c e s s a r y for Hope to beat Albion on S a t u r d a y for a piece of the l e a g u e crown. Both of the s q u a d s w e r e obviously very emotional, a s they t r a d e d b a s k e t s a s they contest began. Slowly, h o w e v e r , the Britons b e g a n pulling a w a y a s they went

inside to their big m a n , J i m Clegg, who t h r e w in, literally, a left-handed hook e v e r y t i m e he touched the ball, so that the s c o r e r e a d Albion 35, Hope 26 with 8:42 b e f o r e the half. C l e g g ' s c o u n t e r p a r t , J e f f H e e r d t , t h e n went to work a s his 19 points in the half led to a 46-46 s c o r e at the b r e a k . T h e second half w a s w i l d e r than the first a s the t e a m s s e e m e d to flip-flop hot s t r e a k s ; c o a c h Glenn Van Wieren w a s to s a y later, " O n e t e a m would b e c o m e hot a n d the o t h e r would i n v a r i a b l y cool down. It h u r t us at t i m e s . " Hope w a s the first s q u a d to benefit f r o m a hot s t r e a k a s with only t h r e e m i n u t e s gone, they found t h e m s e l v e s u p by eight, 58-50. That e u p h o r i a w a s too good to last, h o w e v e r , a s five m i n u t e s l a t e r (with 12:30 left) Albion had t u r n e d the tide, leading 68-65. Hope once a g a i n s u r g e d , this t i m e on a couple of b a s k e t s and then a s s i s t s by Scott Benson, and t h e y took t h e lead b a c k 72-68. T h e n things got r e a l l y wild. Albion, led by P e t e McKnight a n d Glenn K i r k h a m , s c o r e d 10 points in a row to give the Britons a c o m m a n d i n g 82-74 lead with just six m i n u t e s left in the contest. Benson and Rick R e e c e then went wild, h o w e v e r , a s the two would h a v e m a d e Houston M c T e a r p r o u d of (heir r u n n i n g ability. T h e two, along with H e e r d t , Neil a n d Brian B e c k m a n , scored 17 points in a row and g a v e Hope the lead 91-82 with 1:35 and the Dutch in possession of the ball. Albion d r e w within four, 92-88, but s e v e n clutch f r e e t h r o w s by J o h n Sutton a n d B e c k m a n put Hope out of r e a c h , and provided the winning m a r g i n , 99-92. This victory g a v e t h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n the opportunity to p a r t i c i p a t e in the twog a m e playoff that took p l a c e Monday a n d T u e s d a y e v e n i n g s . T h e w i n n e r of this playoff will a d v a n c e to the NCAA Division III G r e a t L a k e s Regional t o u r n a m e n t t o m o r r o w and S a t u r d a y .

Hope's swim season ends by Eva Dean It's over and done with. With the exception of n a t i o n a l s , Hope's s w i m m e r s a r e finished with their r e g u l a t i o n s e a s o n . It's been a long one, but c o a c h J o h n P a t n o t t is v e r y p l e a s e d with (he input a n d output r e c e i v e d f r o m both t e a m s . C h a m p i o n s a g a i n , the w o m e n h a v e r e c a p t u r e d (heir MIAA l e a g u e title. Going into the l e a g u e m e e t a s d e f e n d i n g c h a m p i o n s , the F l y i n g Dutch took off with a slow s t a r t on F r i d a y but finally s o a r e d to their winning h e i g h t s on S a t u r d a y . With c o m b i n e d e f f o r t s in both the 400a n d 800-yard f r e e s t y l e relay, the w o m e n s w a m their w a y into first place. In the 400 f r e e , c o n s i s t i n g of Nancy Scholten, Kirsten Newhof, Anne Stone a n d D e b W e t t a c k . the f i r s t - p l a c e t i m e w a s m a r k e d at 3.54.78. Though this w a s not r e c o r d e d a s a school r e c o r d , the w o m e n still s w a m well. T h e 800 f r e e p r o v e d to be m u c h m o r e e v e n t f u l , a s Scholten, Stone, N a n c y S i v e r t s o n a n d Leslie B e t h a r d s kicked u p a school r e c o r d and e a r n e d the right to p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e n a t i o n a l s a l o n g with t h e o t h e r relay t e a m . T h e s w i m m e r s posted a 8:21.23 and left the r e m a i n i n g t e a m s trailing by a b o u t 16 s e c o n d s , or, in l a y m a n ' s t e r m s , about 20 y a r d s behind. Individual e f f o r t s w e r e all s t a t e d to be "solid p e r f o r m a n c e s " by P a t n o t t and it is h a r d to single out a n y w o m a n a s s t a r since so m a n y shined t h r o u g h , he said. Newhof r e m a i n e d consistent a n d won both the 50 f r e e , r e c o r d i n g a school r e c o r d at 25.79, and the 100 f r e e , posting 56.04 and m i s s i n g the n a t i o n a l s by one-tenth of a second. B e t h a r d s k i c k e d up a s t o r m in the 200-yard individual m e d l e y a n d had her g r e a t e s t s w i m of (he s e a s o n , a c c o r d i n g (o P a t n o t t . She m a r k e d a 2:21.04 and p l a c e d second, losing by only six-tenths of a second. N a n c y Scholten a l s o s w a m well and placed first in the 200 f r e e by s e t t i n g her p e r s o n a l best of 2:04.67. Sivertson. K a t h y B r e y f o g l e a n d Susan Zobl, too, a d d e d to the d e p t h of the 13-member team. In diving, (he o n e - m e t e r b o a r d showed the e n t i r e l e a g u e Hope's exceptional d i v e r s by p u t t i n g all t h r e e of Hope's d i v e r s in the first t h r e e positions. S a r a h Souter took f i r s t , s h o w i n g off a 349.05 s c o r e , both a school a n d a l e a g u e r e c o r d . Lynn Bute r e p o r t e d in at s e c o n d and M a r y DeVries c a p t u r e d third. T h e next s t e p will be for eight m e m b e r s of the w o m e n ' s t e a m to t r a v e l to the n a t i o n a l s on M a r c h 12. T h e m e n s w a m v e r y well, p l a y e d

T h e winning ticket is worth a r o u n d - t r i p flight for two to F r e e p o r t in the B a h a m a s . Hotel a c c o m o d a t i o n s h a v e also been paid for. The eight day a n d s e v e n night v a c a t i o n falls on H o p e ' s s p r i n g b r e a k , M a r c h 21-28. T i c k e t s will be on s a l e T h u r s d a y a n d F r i d a y in P h e l p s Dining Hall d u r i n g d i n n e r h o u r s a n d prior to (he d r a w i n g on Saturday.

AND THE WINNER IS . . . . Congratulations to

ATTENTION

Dick Donohue and D. Kenrick for a landslide victory with the following:

commodations. Open 24 hrs. a day- phone

second fiddle to Kazoo only, a n d took second place in (he league m e e t . This w a s definite i m p r o v e m e n t over p l a c i n g third last y e a r , a n d P a t n o t t s a i d he w a s very pleased with the m e n ' s p e r f o r m a n c e s , especially their r e s p o n s e to (he compe(ition at a l e a g u e m e e t . Although Hope did not win a n y r a c e s , only Kazoo m a n a g e d w i n s over all (he ( c a m s , a n d (he m e n s(ill showed (heir po(ential. Both the 400 medley relay (Beck G r e e n e . Mike S c h m u k e r , D a v e G r o e n e v e l d and P a t Nelis) and (he 400 f r e e s t y l e r e l a y (Nelis, P e t e D y k e m a , T i m J a s p e r s e and D a v e M o o r e d ) placed second and r e c o r d e d school r e c o r d s . T h e 400 f r e e pulled out an upset and beat Calvin wi(h a 3:19.92 m a r k . Individual e f f o r t s f e a t u r e d the a l w a y s consistent C r a i g Anderson and P a t Nelis. Nelis took second in t h r e e ot his e v e n t s , the 200, the 500 a n d the 1650 f r e e . And e r s o n , on the o t h e r hand, placed third in his t h r e e e v e n t s , the 500 and 1650 f r e e , behind Nelis. and the 200-yard b u t t e r f l y . Tim J a s p e r s e g a v e a fine p e r f o r m a n c e in the 50 f r e e p r e l i m s with a 22.3 school r e c o r d , but failed to s w i m a s well in the f i n a l s , only p l a c i n g sixth. It J a s p e r s e had s w a m a s well in the f i n a l s a s in (he p r e l i m s he would h a v e t a k e n second. The m e n a r e e n t i r e l y finished now a n d can only a w a i t (he a r r i v a l of next y e a r ' s s e a s o n , except for Nelis and J a s p e r s e , both of whom will be g r a d u a t e d .

Raffle delayed by G e o r g e C a r a v e l l a T h e d r a w i n g for (he w i n n e r of the L a c r o s s e Club-sponsored r a f f l e of a trip to the B a h a m a s h a s been postponed. The original d r a w i n g date, M o n d a y . M a r c h 2, h a s been c h a n g e d to S a t u r d a y . M a r c h 7. The d r a w i n g will be held at 5:30 p . m . S a t u r d a y in P h e l p s Dining Hall. All ticket b e a r e r s a r e u r g e d to a t t e n d . In c a s e of a b s e n c e the w i n n e r will be notified by phone.

6677. Ask for

GIRLS!!

Dutch

treat

ac-

The Nights' of Earl '-'Wildman

and Pole or Froggie and Stinky. UNTIL RECENTLY, Tommy L.'s parents thought

CYNTHIA--I'm

he was a kumquat. In an attempt to avoid a

belated birthday!- Love, NeeCee.

so

glad

you

came.

Happy

complex. Tommy held a contest in the local paper in which local residents would w r i t e a

COSMOS'-l m sorry that what started as o ioke

small biography of Tommy. One entry was

has caused such bad feelings. I hope things are O.K. now.

submitted. It lost. Tommy is now campaigning to be the 1982 poster child for Birth Control.

GLENN BULTHUIS -Watch for him. Coming to "MY BABY." Dense variously

colored and

Hope April 25! Albums available- SAC office 6577.

usually lustrous concretions formed of concentric layers of nacre as abnormal growths

HEY FIRST FLOOR -When it's all over, can we

within the shells of some mollusks and used

celebrate? Love, The Tipsy Trio

as gems. They're beautiful! I love y o u ! - " Y o u r little girl, Rainbob." engagement.

Senior wrestler Byron Prielipp receives a medal for his third-place finish in the recent conference tournament, (photo by Randy Warren)

DEAR

P.S.

Happy

"GRATEFUL. STUDENT'-Thanks.

needed that! ! - F r o m your F.A.O,

Pre-

DEAREST

FROGGIE

AND

STINKY,

sounds

charming, anchor typist. we

HEY T!, Dr. T. would be proud, wherever he is, love J.

03-05-1981  
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