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V O L . 122 N O . 16

HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

"SPERA IN DEO'

M A R C H 4 . 2 0 0 9 • SINCE 1887

P H O T O BY D A V I D M O O R E

T W I C E A S N I C E - (Left) Jenny Cowen ('10) c u t s d o w n t h e net f o l l o w i n g Hope's v i c t o r y over Saint M a r y ' s College. (Above) The m e n ' s t e a m c e l e b r a t e s t h e ir victory over Calvin College; b o t h v i c t o r i e s were for t h e MIAA Tournament C h a m p i o n s h i p .

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Women

Men Defeated Calvin

Defeated St. Mary's

6 9 - 5 9

7 7 - 4 7

P H O T O BY K E V I N S O U B L Y

WELCOME TO THE BIG SHOW Men's and women's basketball teams set to begin NCAA Tournament following conference victories

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PUMPED UP(Left) Z a c h Osburn ( ' 0 9 ) s c r a m b l e s for a ball In Hope's victory a g a i n s t Calvin College. The senior c a p t a i n cont r i b u t e d 1 2 points, six rebounds and a b l o c k in t h e w i n . (Right) M i k e McAui l f f e ('10) cheers w i t h t h e rest of t h e Dew Crew at t h e MIAA Champions h i p g a m e at Van Noord Arena.

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P H O T O BY D A V I D M O O R E

P H O T O BY D A V I D M O O R E

Women

Road to the top

Men

Round 1

H o p e (25-1) C

W h e a t o n (24-3) Hosted by W h e a t o n 8 p.m. (C.T.) M a r c h 6

f

F o n t b o n n e (18-8)

m

Hosted by H o p e 7:30 p.m. M a r c h 6

Wash. & Jeff. (24-4)

Game 2 7 p.m. M a r c h 7

Game 2 7 p.m. (C.T.) M a r c h 7

Baldwin-Wallace (21-7)

UW-Piatteville {22-S)Hmm Hosted by W h e a t o n 6 p.m. (C.T.) M a r c h 6

A

H o p e (21-7)

Food Fair— Students experience multicul-

W H A T ' S INSIDE NATIONAL

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VOICES

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ARTS

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SPORTS

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Hosted by H o p e 5:15 p.m. M a r c h 6 Pitt-Greensburg (24-2) G R A P H I C BY K A T M O J Z A K

Career Spotlight— Job tips in a struggling "economy.

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Got a story idea? Let us Know at anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

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CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday March 4 Women of Color Celebration Dinner 5 - 7 p.m. M a a s A u d i t o r i u m . Hope seniors S a r a h Grower, Letlcia Parker. Barbra Rublo a n d C a r m e n R u f f l n o will be s p e a k i n g .

Thursday March 5 Model UN Conference 3 p . m . - 1 2 a . m . Friday, M a r c h 6 . Various l o c a t i o n s on c a m p u s . Hope w i l l host high s c h o o l s t u d e n t s f r o m t h r o u g h o u t t h e Midwest.

Friday Dance Marathon

March 6

7 p . m . u n t i l Saturday at 7 p . m . The D o w Center.

Saturday March 7 Anderson in concert with Travis Kingma and Call Me Anadarko 8 : 3 0 p . m . L e m o n j e l l o s . Part of t h e Hope College Concert Series.

Sunday March 8 "The Printed Image'* 1 p.m. D e p r e e A r t Center. Free A r t Exhibit t h r o u g h M a r c h 13.

Monday March 9 DeVos Musical Showcase 8 p . m . DeVos Hall, Grand R a p i d s . Various Hope m u s i c a l e n s e m b l e s a n d soloists will p e r f o r m .

Tuesday March 10 Pre-Sem Society Meeting 5 : 3 0 p.m. The J o h n s o n h o m e , 7 9 W. 1 3 t h St.

IN BRIEF ANCHOR STAFF AWARDED

Food Fair exhibits international tastes Rob Gulmond ASSISTANT A R T S EDITOR

The Holland c o m m u n i t y a n d H o p e College s t u d e n t s , faculty, and staff converged o n t h e M a a s C e n t e r last Saturday to s a m p l e tastes and learn a b o u t cultures f r o m a r o u n d t h e world at t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Food Fair. This year's food fair displayed myriad traditional recipes. S t u d e n t s p r e p a r e d dishes f r o m c u l t u r e s as far away as n o r t h e r n India a n d as close t o h o m e as A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n soul food. A p e r s o n could try dishes as familiar s o u n d i n g as Singapore's " y u m m y chicken wings" or as exotic s o u n d i n g as Kenya's chapatti. "It's going extremely well," said Kukua H i n s o n ('11), an international student from G h a n a . "1 w a s 4 5 m i n u t e s late and t h e s o u p w a s g o n e w h e n 1 got here." The p e a n u t soup, a traditional G h a n a i a n dish made from p e a n u t butter sold out quickly. T h e r e w e r e similar situations at other booths. G e r m a n potato p a n c a k e s and Japanese yakisoba experienced t h e s a m e fate. T h e food was available in exchange for tickets t h a t cost $1 each. A small plate of f o o d would cost o n e t o t h r e e tickets. "It's a c h e a p way t o get a meal," A f t a n Snyder (Ml) said. Students spent anywhere

DANCE MARATHON Hope College's Dance Marathon will take place in the Dow Center starting Friday, March 6 at 7 p.m. This is the 10th consecutive year for Dance Marathon. The 24-hour event raises money for Helen DeVos Children's Hospital and raises awareness of the hospital's work. The marathon will include testimonies of families served by the hospital, performances by local and student groups and a lipsync contest. The total amount of money raised will be announced at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, March 7.

f r o m 30 m i n u t e s t o Japan Club's six h o u r s p r e p a r i n g each dish. Japan Club m a d e onigiri, a traditional Japanese dish consisting of rice and m e a t . The rice is balled by hand, w h i c h typically m a k e s t h e m a k i n g of onigiri a lengthy process. Jessica Noriega and Sara Ochoa, international students f r o m Q u e r ^ t a r o , Mexico and C h i h u a h u a , Mexico respectively, served e n c h i l a d a s verdes. They said their dish is traditionally m a d e by g r o u p s of people, so t h e t w o of t h e m p r e p a r i n g it alone took s o m e time. They also said t h a t tortillas f r o m Mexico a r e better than the store-bought tortillas they w e r e serving. Ttub boki and kinchi pancakes, w h i c h had a c o m b i n e d p r e p a r a t i o n of a b o u t t w o h o u r s , w e r e offered at t h e Korea b o o t h . E u n j e e C h o i ( 1 0 ) a n d A n n i e Jang (Ml) said t h a t kinchi p a n c a k e s are a typical K o r e a n food, as typical as f r e n c h fries a r e in t h e U n i t e d States. The C h i n a b o o t h b o u g h t m o s t of their i n g r e d i e n t s at t h e V i e t n a m e s e m a r k e t in Holland. The other booths purchased their i n g r e d i e n t s mostly f r o m Meijer. But a s H a b e e b Awad, t h e International s t u d e n t advisor, explained, "The food fair is n o t just for p e o p l e t o eat, but for international i r a m e r s i o n "

Displays and s t u d e n t s knowledgeable about their culture were present at each b o o t h in case people had questions. Some students w e r e wearing attire native t o t h e c u l t u r e as they served and explained t h e food they made. "I think it's a great c o n c e p t for p e o p l e to share w h o they are," said G r a c e D e n n y (M0), a Hope student who studied in northern had never s t u d i e d abroad. India. She P H O T O BY K E V I N S O U B L Y made Tibetan O N I G I R I ANYONE?—Kanako Matsumoto mo-mo. ( ' 0 9 ) serves o n i g i r i , an a u t h e n t i c Japanese A n y o n e cuisine, at t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Food Fair. can get involved with The I n t e r n a t i o n a l Food Fair t h e event. Awad explained has been held for m o r e t h a a 2 5 that i n t e r n a t i o n a l s t u d e n t s a r e years. This year it w a s s p o n s o r e d e n c o u r a g e d t o take o t h e r s into by I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations Club, t h e kitchen and teach t h e m h o w Black S t u d e n t Union, H o p e to cook their native cuisines. T h e r e w e r e several s t u d e n t s Asian Perspective Association and t h e college's international offering food at t h e fair w h o w e r e f r o m t h e United States and students.

Event examines Orthodox Christianity Amy Soukup C A M P U S N E W S EOITO

Over the weekend of Feb. 2022, members of The Anchor staff attended the Associated Collegiate Press Best of the Midwest Conference in Minneapolis. Four of the Anchor staff won individual awards in recognition of their work for The Anchor. Competing against college journalists from across the Midwest, Karie Luidens ( ' 0 9 ) won an award for her coverage of the Hope shuttlebus changeover news story, Karen Patterson ( M l ) and Chris O'Brien (M2) were awarded for their joint sports news work on the Title IX Education Act Amendments, and Kevin Soubly ( M l ) was awarded for his news photo of Hope's recent ''No Zebras, N o Excuses" show.

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

Hope College's O r t h o d o x Christian Fellowship and Religious Life C o m m i t t e e p a r t n e r e d t o bring t h e event " E n c o u n t e r i n g Eastern O r t h o d o x y : A n I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e Faith and Life of t h e Eastern O r t h o d o x C h u r c h " to Hope's c a m p u s Feb. 23-24. T h e first of its kind, t h e event was c r e a t e d to explore and examine the Orthodox Christian faith as a way of life. The event consisted of t h r e e lectures given by Rev. T h o m a s H o p k o , t h e dean e m e r i t u s of St. Vladimir's O r t h o d o x Theological S e m i n a r y in C r e s t w o o d , N.Y. a n d M o t h e r M a c r i n a of Holy D o r m i t i o n O r t h o d o x M o n a s t e r y in Rives

Junction. The t w o - d a y event also included a discussion panel and O r t h o d o x services. Jack Mulder, professor of philosophy and director of Hope's Religious Life C o m m i t t e e said this event f o r m e d b e c a u s e t h e RLC had t h e idea "to highlight certain u n d e r r e p r e s e n t e d asp e c t s of t h e perspectives of our c a m p u s o n t h e wider Christian faith." M u l d e r said RLC talked with OCF, and they were excited a b o u t t h e idea. Erin F o r t n e r ('09), o n e of t h e O C F m e m b e r s i n s t r u m e n t a l in p l a n n i n g t h e event, h o p e d that s t u d e n t s c a m e away f r o m t h e event with a better u n d e r s t a n d ing of their c o m m o n Eastern Christian heritage.

"The c o m m o n Eastern herit a g e all C h r i s t i a n s share is m o r e t h a n a heritage c o n c e r n i n g t h e birth, history and d o c t r i n a l dev e l o p m e n t of Christianity in t h e E a s t e r n c u l t u r e it o c c u r r e d in," said Fortner, p a r a p h r a s i n g f r o m " C o m m o n G r o u n d " by Jordan Bajis. "In fact, an 'Eastern' perspective d o e s not refer t o a particular geographic region o r culture, as m u c h as it d o e s t o t h e o u t l o o k w h i c h characterized t h e region d u r i n g t h e t i m e of C h r i s t w h i c h t r a n s c e n d s b o t h t i m e and place." H o p k o e m p h a s i z e d aspects of O r t h o d o x Christianity in his lectures t h a t apply t o all Christians. In his s e c o n d lecture t h e night of Feb. 23, "The Practice

of Eastern Orthodoxy," H o p k o talked of t h e m e a n i n g of righteousness. He said t h a t in H e brew, "righteouness" translates to "the way things are." He explained t h a t r i g h t e o u n e s s m e a n s a p e r s o n sees t h e t r u t h and sees things as they really are, t h e way G o d m e a n t for t h e m t o be. " W h e n you c o m e t o see yourself as you truly are, you have p e r f o r m e d a miracle greater t h a n raising t h e dead," said H o p k o . Fortner and t h e o t h e r m e m b e r s of O C F h o p e t o c o n t i n u e t h e tradition of t h e event in f u ture years with different topics and speakers. O C F m e e t s T h u r s day evenings in t h e b a s e m e n t of D i m n e n t a n d w e l c o m e s all.

Facebook privacy comes into question Karle Luidens SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

"Facebook gives p e o p l e t h e power t o share and m a k e s t h e world m o r e o p e n and c o n n e c t ed," t h e c o m p a n y ' s website p r o claims. But as h a s been so o f t e n discussed of late, Facebook also gives people t h e p o w e r t o ruin t h e i r o w n r e p u t a t i o n s by revealing private, less-than-flattering information. P h o t o s and c o m m e n t s posted for public c o n s u m p t i o n c a n even lead t o criminal investigation a n d legal c o n s e q u e n c e s .

Will i n f o r m a t i o n published o n your profile get you in t r o u b l e with c a m p u s authorities, o r h u r t your job p r o s p e c t s as you e n t e r t h e professional world? M o s t r e c e n t l y in t h e n e w s , Calvin College expelled a s o p h o m o r e as a result of a sexual c o m m e n t a b o u t a fellow stud e n t t h a t w a s p u b l i s h e d o n his profile. Tony Harris, 19, of Southfield refused t o write a retraction as part of his p r o b a t i o n requirem e n t s , saying that h e had not written anything inappropriate but r a t h e r t h a t t h e c o m m e n t ap-

p e a r e d online last fall after h e gave out his a c c o u n t password. John Witte, t h e d e a n of resid e n c e life at Calvin, c o m m e n t e d t h a t m a n y s t u d e n t s don't c o n sider the risk of posting c e r t a i n i n f o r m a t i o n online. "These sites are public, and there should be n o expectation of privacy," W i t t e said. For Hope's 5,379 Facebook users, t h e c o n c e r n s for their o w n privacy are real. H o p e College Assistant D e a n of S t u d e n t s and Director of Residential Life John Jobson concurred that information posted

o n Facebook is n o t private and can c o m e into play in Hope's judicial processes. "The college d o e s not actively m o n i t o r postings o n social n e t w o r k i n g sites," Jobson said. "However, in t h a t i n f o r m a t i o n p o s t e d o n sites such as Facebook is public, if a m e m b e r of t h e college c o m m u n i t y feels that a posting depicts behavior that is inconsistent with college policies, a c o m p l a i n t could be filed and t h e judicial process would be initiated." According t o Jobson, stuSEE FACEBOOK. PAGE 1 0


NATIONAL Stimulus package generates praise, criticism THE ANCHOR

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

Cory Lakatos GUEST W R I T E R

Much has been said recently about the $787 billion economic recovery plan, dubbed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which the Democratic controlled Congress passed two weeks ago at the urging of President Barack Obama. Democrats praise it as a much needed stimulus package for the ailing U.S. economy while Republicans criticize it as a pork-laden bill that will not assist the U.S. economy out of the current recession. N The Obama administration has set up Recovery.gov, a website dedicated to educating the public about the ARRA and to ensuring transparency as the bill's provisions are carried out. According to the site, the largest portion of the money, some $288 billion, is going towards tax relief. Other big-ticket items include state and local fiscal relief ($144 billion) and infrastructure and science ($111 billion). The bill also includes money for education and training, energy, health care, and "protecting the vulnerable." The full bill is available to the public at recovery.gov. One of the more obvious effects of the bill will be tax cuts. According to the Tax Policy Center, a nonpartisan research group, approximately 97 percent of Americans will receive some kind of tax break from the plan. On average this will amount to $1,179 saved annually but savings will vary widely with the income and marital status of the tax filer. Various state governors of both major parties have had a lot to say on the subject of the stimulus. The Republican executives of Idaho, Alaska, Texas, South Carolina and Louisiana have stated their intentions to turn away a portion of the federal money, though they do support some federal action in light of the recession. These governors contest a part of the ARRA that helps the states expand unemployment insurance, but stipulates that the states must increase the number of people receiving these benefits in order to receive the money. "Hie $100 million we turned down was

temporary federal dollars that would require us to change our unemployment laws," said Gov. Bobby |indal of Louisiana, a leader among the dissenting governors who recently gave the Republican response to Obamas State of the Union address. "That would have actually raised taxes on Louisiana businesses. We as a state would have been responsible for paying for those benefits after the federal money disappeared." Gov. Jennifer Granholm (D-Mich.). had strong words for the Republicans in a recent interview. "Well take it. South Carolina. I'll take your money. Louisiana, we'll take it. We got plenty of work here, plenty of jobs that we would like to create here," Granholm said. Testifying to the divisiveness of the stimulus package, the Republican Party is not united on this issue. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger of California has said that he will accept all of the federal money on behalf of his state. Chris Russ, a Hope College freshman, expressed his concerns about the spirit of some of the administration's recovery efforts. "I don't feel that the government throwing money at failing companies will help anything," Russ said. "There are still companies doing well in the current economy and the government is hurting them by helping their competition. It's like the government is punishing them for doing well." Jeffrey Polet, an associate professor of political science at Hope, reflected on the large cost of the package and the effects that this might have. "I think you're likely to see a middle-class tax increase, and not just in the income tax. This money has to come from somewhere. If the health-care plan passes I think you will see a lot of small businesses closing up shop, (creating) additional problems in unemployment payments," Polet stated. "Expect the state to look at increasing the take from every possible revenue stream, including sin taxes. Leaving bars open later is one way to do that." Polet said.

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P ERSPECTIVES

After 122 inches of snow, Hope students readily await spring m o n t h s , we can make it down to around 0 degrees in the eveWe are starting to approach ning, especially with wind chill. the end of winter, which means And it's not just the cold; we the start of spring. For anyone all know firsthand that it never who can remember how hot seems to stop snowing between November it was during the and March. first few weeks of So n o w that school back in late we're almost August and early We will likely see d o n e with the September, you the average temperabrutal cold know that we have ture warm up by 10 for another been feeling the degrees or so in the year, let's polar opposite of take a look at that over the last month of March. why exactly it few m o n t h s or so, _ —WEATHER.COM gets so cold and 1 think we are all eagerly await5 9 around here, and even why ing some w a r m e r it snows so weather around much. here. The biggest factor in MichiThe Midwest, particularly Michigan, is definitely known gan climate is our geographic for its harsh temperature swings location, and even though this throughout each year - dur- comes across as common sense, ing the hot s u m m e r m o n t h s we we need to remember what inwill typically make it well into fluence this has on us. First, bethe 80s and sometimes into the cause we're so far north on the planet (in relation to Florida, 90s. While during the winter Benjamin O'Dell GUEST W R I T E R

for example), t h e sun's rays hit at such a low angle that a significant a m o u n t of heat simply b o u n c e s off o u r planet, compared to during summer m o n t h s w h e n the sun's rays hit at a m u c h m o r e direct angle. Second, because we are only a few miles inland f r o m Lake Michigan, w e feel the effects of this almost every day, pred o m i n a n t l y d u r i n g the winter m o n t h s w h e n we get lake-effect snow. For this reason, the average snowfall of Holland is right a r o u n d 100 inches annually, c o m p a r e d to Chicago, where the average snowfall is less than 40 inches p e r year, mainly because it's on the other side of the lake. This year, we are already u p to 122 inches. As we get closer a n d closer to official start of spring, M a r c h 20, w h a t kind of w e a t h er should we expect, is the w e a t h e r going to be "normal"? W e will likely see the average

average. However, even though t e m p e r a t u r e w a r m up by about 10 degrees or so during the the temperature went that high, m o n t h of March, (which prob- in Grand Rapids, the m o n t h of ably can't c o m e fast enough for January was actually about 5 most of us), as well as a nice degrees below normal (noaa. gov). increase in the For those a m o u n t of dayof you who light time we have 6 6 are counting (weather.com). It's such a tease. down the days However, we all Why can't it be until spring, know that there is spring already? 1 which is probalmost no chance ably just about don't like the back that the weather everyone, you will perfectly fit and forth. can feel rest asa "normal" desured because scription, as we - M A R C TOM ( ' 1 2 ) it won't be will typically see a long until the great deal of tem95 weather begins perature swings as to warm up the seasons begin for good. Afto change. "It's such a tease. W h y can't ter all, we have definitely gotten it be spring already? I don't like through the worst of it, and it the back and forth," said Marc should be much easier from now Tori, a Hope freshman. In Feb- on. ruary, we saw the temperature get well into the 50s and it even approached 60 degrees, a time of year when even 40 is above


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NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K IN N E W S

"That's Al Qaeda's d r e a m . It's our nightmare. That's why Pakistan is O b a m a ' s potential Vietnam." - W a s h i n g t o n Post s e n i o r Pentagon correspondent Thomas Ricks o n t h e p o s s i b l e e f f e c t s o n w h a t w o u l d h a p p e n if Al Q a e d a g a i n e d c o n t r o l of P a k i s t a n a n d t h e country's nuclear weapons.

"We've b e e n in this cycle in which law enforcem e n t pushed h a r d e r and h a r d e r and harder, which drives the c o m m u n i t y f u r t h e r and f u r t h e r away." - David K e n n e d y , p r o f e s s o r at N e w York's J o h n Jay C o l l e g e of C r i m i n a l Justice, o n w h y n e w approaches to dealing with street c r i m e c o u l d be b e t t e r f o r t h e c o m m u n i t y as a w h o l e .

"I would like to c o n t i n u e the political talks in a way that does n o t c o n t r a dict Israel's international obligations." - B e n j a m i n N e t a n y a h u , Israel's p r i m e minister elect, on his plans t o c o n t i n u e t h e p e a c e talk t h a t w e r e b e g u n at A n n a p o l i s .

"The p r i m a r y n e a r - t e r m security c o n c e r n of the United States is t h e global e c o n o m i c crisis a n d its geopolitical implications.' 1 - D i r e c t o r of N a t i o n a l Intel ligence, D e n n i s Blair, o n t h e CIA's n e w e s t c o n c e r n a l o n g s i d e terrorism and stopping nuclear proliferation.

"I don't think t h e r e w a s anyone w h o had m o r e influence on A m e r i c a n p o p u l a r culture last year, and I think she s e c u r e d h e r place as the q u e e n of comedy." - Jeff Z u c k e r , N B C U n i v e r s a l C E O , o n T i n a Fey's e x t r e m e l y succ e s s f u l a n d i n t e r e s t i n g year.

"I felt like Sojourner Truth was pushing down on one shoulder and Harriet Tubman was pushing down on the other—saying, 'Sit down girl!' 1 was glued to my seat."

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

Oscars a break from endless winter Julie Kocsis STAFF W R I T E R

During these long, winter m o n t h s in Michigan, there is o n e thing a n d one thing only that gets m e t h r o u g h the cold, snow7 days: award shows. For m e — a n d I'm sure a few others— there is nothing m o r e enjoyable than lounging o n t h e couch in man-sized p a n t s watching Hollywood's shiniest and bestdressed parade d o w n t h e red c a r p e t and then, for some, o n t o the stage to receive that most coveted award. So far this year, we've seen t h e Golden Globes, the P e o p l e s Choice Awards and the G r a m mys. But on Feb. 22, the m o t h e r of all award s h o w s — t h e 81st Annual Academy Awards—was held at t h e Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. And for a few h o u r s (Ok, four hours), we joined our friends Brad and Angelina, Meryl a n d Mickey, Kate and Hugh for an evening of glitz, glamour a n d some never-ending acceptance speeches. Hugh Jackman, w h o hosted the m a r a t h o n event, o p e n e d the show with a tribute to s o m e of this year's n o m i n a t e d films. However, "due to cutbacks" Jackman decided to put together his own tribute in his garage. The set he c o n s t r u c t e d for the "Slumdog Millionaire" tribute included empty pizza boxes and a couple of lawn chairs. In the "Milk" tribute, Jackman ann o u n c e d his "Craigslist b a c k u p dancers." This "more economical" decision m a d e the opening number hilarious! This great introduction transitioned to the bulk of the show with the award presentations. For her role in t h e Woody Allen film "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," Penelope Cruz won the award for Best A c -

tress in a Supporting Role. This year, each of the four main awards (Best Actor/Actress, Best Supporting Actor/Actress) were presented by winners f r o m previous years. Presenting C r u z with her award was Tilda Swindon, w h o won in 2008 for her role in "Michael Clayton." This m a d e the m o m e n t m o r e than just winning an award, but an invitation to join an elite group of actors and actresses. Joining the r a n k s of previous winners for the title of Best Supporting Actor was Heath Ledger for his role as the Joker in "The Dark Night." This win d r e w m u c h e m o t i o n f r o m the audience in light of Ledger's unexpected passing nearly o n e year ago. His p a r e n t s and sister, however, were there to accept the award o n Ledger's behalf. About eight h o u r s into the s h o w (Ok, maybe it was more like two) Beyonce Knowles joined Hugh Jackman on stage for a salute to musicals. In this medley, Knowles a n d Jackm a n danced and sang songs f r o m "Grease", "Moulin Rouge" "Westside Story", "Chicago" a n d " M a m a Mia!" They were then joined by couples f r o m two recently successful musical s — Z a c Efron and Vanessa Hudgins f r o m "High

Oscar's Golden Winners M o t i o n P i c t u r e : " S l u m d o g Millionaire' A c t o r : Sean Peni Actress;Kate Winslet, "The Reader" Supporting Actor: Heath Ledger. "The Dark Knight" Supporting Actress: Penelope Cruz, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" D i r e c t o r : Danny Boyle, " S l u m d o g Millionaire

School Musical" and A m a n d a Seyfried and Dominic C o o p e r f r o m "Mama Mia!" "The musical is back!" shouted Jackman at the e n d of the salute. The slightly less exciting awards of the evening followed this fun, upbeat p e r f o r m a n c e . Maybe i t s just me, but finding out w h o won for Sound Mixing or Best D o c u m e n t a r y Short Film doesn't really get my pulse racing. (Note to the Academy: N o o n e cares w h o won Best Lighting—myself and Christian Bale included.) The award for Best Actor, presented by Michael Douglas, went to Sean Penn for his role as Harvey Milk. In his acceptance speech, Penn said, "I think it is a g o o d time for those w h o voted for the ban against gay marriage to sit

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- C l a u d e t t e C o l v i n , a 15 year old, w h o r e f u s e d t o give u p h e r seat o n a b u s in M o n t g o m e r y , Ala. n i n e m o n t h s b e f o r e Rosa P a r k s d i d in 1955.

"The current crisis will allow artists who do less material and more ephemeral, less manufactured and more nomadic kinds of art to emerge from the shadows."

• •

Bir Jft Brranrara

- M o n t r e a l conceptual artist J o c e l y n Fisel on h o w the global e c o n o m i c recession could benefit artists and artistic expression. G R A P H I C BY K A R I E L U I O E N S

and reflect, a n d to anticipate their great s h a m e and t h e s h a m e in their grandchildren's eyes if they continue that way of support. We've got to have equal rights for everyone." Finally, Kate Winslet won the award for her role in "The Reader," beating out t h e 15-time n o m i n e e Meryl Streep. "I'd be lying if I (said) I haven't m a d e a version of this speech before. I think I was probably eight years old and staring into the b a t h r o o m mirror. A n d this would have b e e n the s h a m p o o bottle," Winslet said, holding u p her award. But the big winner of the evening, the "underdog" some may say, was "Slumdog Millionaire." The film took h o m e eight wins, including the awards for Best Director (Danny Boyle), Cine m a t o g r a p h y a n d Best Picture. And while after four h o u r s (five, for those of you w h o watched the Barbara Walters Special) the Hollywood elite headed off to Elton John's after party, 1, like most of you little people out there, headed back to reality and off to bed.


MARCH 4 . 2 0 0 9

ARTS

THE ANCHOR

Music to our ears, locally and abroad Hope student bands to play Lemonjello's with international group on March 7 Paul Rice GUEST WRITER

M a t t h e w Scott, the man b e h i n d Lemonjello's and its counter, is very intentional a b o u t t h e selection of musicians that c o m e to play in his cleared-out c o r n e r of Holland's local hipster hub. He appreciates variety, bringing in artists of different genres and generations, with shows oriented t o w a r d s college c r o w d s as well as older or younger frequenters. Scott is deliberate in using t h e v e n u e s following to help local musicians —including H o p e students - - g e t experience a n d attention. But Scott also h a s t o make sure P H O T O COURTESY A N D E R S O N the music A C O U S T I C E L E C T R O N I C A - Anderson Is an P H O T O COURTESY C A L L M E A N A D A R K O that he's Indle-pop duo f r o m t h e Netherlands, c o n s i s t i n g endorsing SIBLING DUO Adam of Bas van Nlenes a n d Jeroen van der Werken. is actually Nelson (*09) and Erica Nelson. g o o d . t h e end of t h e year. Hope's radio station is c o n t a c t i n g H e feels t h e s h o w o n M a r c h K i n g m a is a senior and plays t h e band to c o n d u c t an on-air 7, p u t o n by t h e Hope for Hope's w o r s h i p b a n d . His interview in t h e evening b e f o r e College Concert Series, t h e show. Listeners can expect b a n d m a t e s are m u s i c s t u d e n t s will certainly deliver. at W e s t e r n Michigan University. t o gather s o m e insight into t h e The headlining b a n d is a D u t c h Influenced by "just about band's c a r e e r and personality. e l e c t r o - p o p duo, A n d e r s o n . They everything but c o u n t r y " and There are two o p e n i n g acts, played Lemonjello's o n their last c o m i n g f r o m diverse musical each featuring a H o p e s t u d e n t . A m e r i c a n excursion, savoring backgrounds, th e ir style First, t h e Travis Kingma Band t h e h u m o r of playing consecutive t r a n s c e n d s b l a n k e t s t a t e m ents — a h o u s e h o l d n a m e h e r e o n shows in Holland, Mich, and of genre. The band is a long t erm their h o m e t o w n Holland. They're campus— has played at v e n u e s project, and they have r e c o r ded f r o m t h e Kletz to t h e Park far f r o m breaking t h r o u g h in any m a n y songs. M o s t of what Theater. Travis Kingma ('09) will c o m m e r c i a l sense in A m e r i c a , will b e played at t h e u p c o m i n g b e r e p r e s e n t i n g the band's m u s i c but their last j a u n t h e r e g e n e r a t e d Lemonjello's s h o w will be n e w as a solo act at this show. The a fervent following. material. A n e w single entitled Travis K i n g m a Band as a whole Expectations for this exotic, "Firefly" will be released o n their is set t o play at Lemonjello's n e a r little g r o u p are high. W T H S ,

ROCK THE COFFEEH O U S E — Travis K i n g m a Is set t o open as an acoustically solo a c t for Anderson at Lemonjello's this weekend.

Thursday Big Love

March 5

8 p.m., D e w i l t Center m a i n t h e a t r e

Friday March 6 Jackie l i c e performs 7 : 3 0 p.m.. W l c h e r s A u d i t o r i u m

Dance 3 5 8 p.m.. Knickerbocker Theatre

March 7

2 p.m. a n d 4 p.m.. Wichers Aud.

IN BRIEF PROFESSOR WRITES 2 0 0 8 BEST MYSTERY BOOK

PHOTO

COURTESY T R A V I S K I N G M A

Myspace page shortly. The second o p e n i n g act for A n d e r s o n , Call M e A n a d a r k o , will be playing their Lemonjello's d e b u t . This b r o t h e r and sister d u o consists of A d a m Nelson another Hope worship t e a m m e m b e r — o n guitar and vocals, and Erica Nelson o n p i a n o a n d vocals. T h e two play original music • that they have b e e n writing together and a p a r t for two years now. Nelson's influences c o m e mostly f r o m t h e p o p / p u n k side of t h e s p e c t r u m , t e m p e r e d by his experience in t h e w o r s h i p b a n d . His sister's music c o m e s f r o m a m o r e subtle "indie" vein. As a s o p h o m o r e , A d a m anticipates m a n y m o r e Call Me Anadarko performances o n Hope's c a m p u s . Lemonjello's hosts p e r f o r m e r s every w e e k e n d . The v e n u e offers an o p p o r t u n i t y t o t a p into t h e flourishingcreative communities of H o p e College and Holland. Tickets are $ 3 for t h e general public. H o p e s t u d e n t s will get in free with ID.

The highly sought after Francine Prose to read and speak on her recent works Andrew Gehl STAFF W R I T E R

I N T E R N A T I O N A L L Y R E C O G N I Z E D T A L E N T - Prose next t o her l a t e s t b e s t s e l l i n g book, "Goldengrove" (2008).

back together without all of its pieces, Nico slips into a dangero u s relationship with her dead sister's ex-boyfriend. The story addresses t h e u n t h i n k a b l e suf-

T H I S W E E K IN A R T

Saturday Senior Recitals

Bestselling author set to visit campus Award. Prose has b e e n p u b lished in over a d o z e n m a g a z i n e s Prolific, a w a r d - w i n n i n g a u t h o r and collections. Francine Prose will be visiting Prose h a s received praise for H o p e College as part of t h e Jack h e r work f r o m m a n y critics. Ridl Visiting W r i t e r s Series o n USA Today c o m m e n t s , Wednesday, M a r c h 11. "Francine Prose h a s a knack Prose's work h a s b e e n in p u b for getting t o t h e lication for over h e a r t of h u m a n 30 years and cov- 66 nature." ers a broad range Francine Prose has a Her stories of subjects. Her deal with very writing includes knack for getting to specific situa15 novels, a few the heart of tions and c o n collections of human nature. flicts, but never short stories, a —USA TODAY fail to c o n n e c t t o h a n d f u l of chilt h e "big picture" dren's books, 55 of existence. several nonficHer latest novel, "Goldengrove," tion b o o k s o n art and travel, a is a h a u n t i n g tale of death a n d couple of controversial articles, adolescence. Thirteen-year-old and a meditation o n o n e of t h e Nico loses her sister in a tragic seven deadly sins—"Gluttony." d r o w n i n g , and t h e rest of t h e Her 2006 book of helpful tips, "Reading Like A Writer," was a s u m m e r l o o m s ahead of her and her family as they a t t e m p t t o N e w York T i m e s bestseller, a n d c o p e with t h e loss. As the f a m her 2000 novel "Blue Angel" was ily tries to learn h o w to put itself a finalist for t h e National Book

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fering of a child's death, the pain of growing u p and t h e ways in which h u m a n s rely—or fail to rely—on each o t h e r in o r d e r to SEE V W S .

PAGE 1 0

"Library Journal" h a s n a m e d "The Blood of Caesar: A Seco n d C a s e f r o m t h e N o t e b o o k s of Pliny t h e Younger" by Dr. Albert Bell of t h e H o p e College history faculty o n e of the five best mysteries published in 2008. "Library Journal" is read by m o r e t h a n 100,000 library directors, a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and staff in public, a c a d e m i c and special libraries, and is in its 132nd year of publication. Its review sections evaluate nearly 7,000 b o o k s annually. T h e 2008 "Best Books" list, released in D e c e m b e r , included "Best G e n r e Fiction" in five categories: mystery, science fiction and fantasy, r o m a n c e . Christian fiction and thrillers. In its review of "The Blood of Caesar" in June 2008, t h e "Lib r a r y Journal" called t h e book "outstandingly researched and laden with suspense," n o t i n g t h a t "this j o u r n e y into ancient R o m e by history professor Bell could be o n e of t h e m a s t e r p i e c e s of t h e historical mystery genre." Bell's first mystery featuring Pliny t h e Younger, w h o was a real-life historical figure, as a protagonist was "All Roads Lead t o Murder," w h i c h was set in April of A.D. 8 3 and followed his sleuth as he solved a m u r d e r in t h e provincial city of Smyrna. "The Blood of Caesar," published this past s u m m e r , takes place a few m o n t h s later in t h e city of Rome itself. "The Blood of C a e s a r " d r a w s o n Bell's professional interest in ancient history. His scholarly work includes t h e book "Exploring t h e N e w T e s t a m e n t World," which reviews t h e social, political and cultural b a c k g r o u n d against w h i c h t h e N e w Testam e n t was written, and a n u m b e r of articles o n topics including Pliny the Younger. A professor of history. Bell h a s been a m e m b e r of t h e H o p e faculty since 1978. H e holds a bachelor's degree f r o m C a r s o n N e w m a n College, a master's f r o m Duke University, a Master of Divinity d e g r e e f r o m Southe a s t e r n S e m i n a r y and a doctorate f r o m t h e University of N o r t h Carolina. "The Blood of Caesar: A Second Case f r o m the N o t e b o o k s of Pliny t h e Younger" is available for $15.95 at t h e H o p e - G e n e v a Bookstore, or at any b o o k s t o r e or online book dealer.


6

TUN ANCHOR

ARTS

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

Jackie Tice

Native roots: Tice to perform

P H O T O BY K E V I N S O U B L Y

H I S T O R I C A L E T C H I N G S — (Foreground) "The P r e s e n t a t i o n of t h e Chinea t o Pope C l e m e n t XIII w i t h a Tree Canopy F l a n k e d by Gatehouses," 1 7 5 9 by I t a l i a n engraver, Giuseppe Vasl, designer Giuseppe Palazzl and a r c h i t e c t of set-piece Paolo Posl.

Art students turn professional DePree Gallery's latest exhibition gives art students a chance at curation Karie Luidens ASSISTANT GRAPHICS EDITOR

f r o m Italy, France, Belgium and A m a t e u r s c u r a t e d t h e latest b e y o n d . Different regions t e n d s h o w to go o n display in t h e De ed to p r o d u c e different styles, for Pree Gallery, b u t you would n o t example, p o r t r a i t u r e in France, k n o w it f r o m t h e professional a n d highly detailed l a n d s c a p e s quality of their w o r k . or v e d u t e in Italy. Eight H o p e College s t u d e n t s "The class certainly gave m e w h o took last fall's A r t 361— s o m e good experience research"Renaissance and Early M o d ing o b s c u r e artists and subjects," ern Prints"—researched and H a w k i n s said. "It t a u g h t m e p e r designed t h e exhibition "The severance a n d (gave me) a small P r i n t e d Image," w h i c h consists idea of what it would b e like to of a b o u t 30 small etchings a n d c u r a t e a similar exhibition in a engravings f r o m across W e s t e r n museum." Europe. Beyond exploring t h e history Dr. A n n e Heath, assistant p r o and signififessor of art c a n c e of their history and o w n selected gallery di- 66 The class gave me good images, t h e r e c t o r at De student cuPree, guided experience researching rators also t h e process, obscure artists and subjects. had t h e chalb u t t h e ma—ALLISON HAWKINS ( ' 0 9 ) lenge of dejority of t h e signing and work was I implementconducted ing a unified exhibition. by t h e s t u d e n t s . "I appreciate t h e class for h o w " W e had a few i n t r o d u c t o r y I l e a r n e d m u c h a b o u t eighteenth lectures o n p r i n t m a k i n g basics, c e n t u r y prints, but also h o w t o but after t h a t it was entirely inc o n n e c t such a c q u i r e d a r t w o r k s d e p e n d e n t so t h a t we could acinto a m o d e r n context, t h a t is, complish t h e m a s s of research that we h a d — a n d it was a lot," t h e D e Pree Gallery," Van G r o n ingen said. "The p r i n t s have been Jaci Van G r o n i n g e n ('10) said. given n e w life in their m a t s and "I have never checked so m a n y b o o k s o u t f r o m the library at frames." The prints were collected by o n e time!" art historian Dr. Richard W u n Each s t u d e n t selected several der, w h o h a s a long relationship p r i n t s t o research in greater d e p t h in o r d e r t o p r o d u c e a final w o r k i n g with Hope. They w e r e t h e n m a d e available t o t h e colthesis paper. For example. Van lege by M a u r i c e Kawashima, Groningen's images all depictw h o w o r k s in fashion design. ed architecture, while Allison Both Kawashima and W u n d e r Hawkins' ('09) focused o n selfreceived h o n o r a r y degrees f r o m portraits. H o p e in 1999 in gratitude for The w o r k s were c r e a t e d by a their ongoing efforts to enrich variety of different artists, s o m e t h e arts at H o p e . familiar and o t h e r s less k n o w n .

HOPE PR - Folk artist Jackie Tice will be perf o r m i n g o n M a r c h 6 at 7:30 p.m. in W i c h e r s A u d i t o r i u m . Tice is a mixed C h i c k a m a u g a C h e r o k e e and East E u r o p e a n songwriter, artist, educator, international Peace advocate and m o t h e r of t w o teenagers. Tice f u s e s her diverse roots, exposing t h e delicate and essential relationship of n a t u r e and h u m a n nature. F r o m being raised in a steel-mill t o w n d u r i n g Pennsylvania's industrial b o o m t o her s u b s e q u e n t travels exploring m o u n t a i n s and canyon lands across N o r t h America, Tice's original a w a r d - w i n n i n g songs and m o v i n g Native Flute c o m positions have been critically praised, h o n o r e d , and featured in radio, film a n d p e r f o r m a n c e v e n u e s f r o m Los Angeles t o t h e United Nations. U p c o m i n g t o u r s in Africa and t h e M i d d l e East a r e being planned. W i n n e r of t h e 2006 Indian S u m m e r Music Award for best p o p song, "Second Skin," and t h e National Kerrville Award for Emerging Songwriters, Tice is a u n i q u e voice a m o n g acoustic performing artists. Her 2005 CD, "Second Skin," was p r o d u c e d by t w o - t i m e Native A m e r i c a n G r a m m y winner. Bill Miller, w h o writes, "Hers is a voice that n e e d s t o b e h e a r d - her s o n g s are as poetic as they are powerful." Tice's r e c e n t release, " M o r n ingSky D r u m Song," places her fully into Native A m e r i c a n m u sic g e n r e with native flute and guitar-based c o m p o s i t i o n s .

P H O T O BY K E V I N SOUBLY

B E A U T Y & R O M A N T I C R U I N S - "Vedute dl Roma, no. 6 8 2 , " ca. 1 7 4 6 by I t a l i a n engraver. Giovanni B a t t i s t a Plranesl. "It feels g o o d t o have t h e show open—although the weight hasn't been quite lifted off my shoulders. There's still presenting and publishing t o w o r r y about!" Hawkins said. The s t u d e n t s will p r e s e n t their research o n Friday, M a r c h 6, f r o m 9 a.m. t o 1 p.m. at De Pree. Dr. T i m o t h y Smith of Birm i n g h a m S o u t h e r n College and

Dr. H o p e Saska of the D e t r o i t Institute of A r t s will also give keynote addresses as p a r t of t h e presentation. An o p e n i n g rec e p t i o n will follow that evening f r o m 5 t o 7 p.m. in t h e gallery. The Printed Image r u n s f r o m Feb 23 to M a r c h 13. The De Pree Gallery is o p e n M o n d a y t h r o u g h Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

e m o n je M o s 61 n 9tl! s l ' e p j linilairj. mi lemoniellQ$.com


FEATURES Discover job search strategies at Career Services THE ANCHOR

MARCH 4 . 2 0 0 9

Emily West CAMPUS NEWS CO-EDITOR

T

he end of the academic year is near. For seniors, it is time for some major decisions to be made. One of these major decisions revolves around employment: what is the job, where will one live, for whom one will work and how much money can be made. While the task of job searching may seem intimidating given the economic climate, there are multiple options and resources worth considering. The process of choosing a location is a complex one. There are several aspects of a location outside of job opportunities. According to Dale Austin, director of Career Services at Hope College, there are several factors worth considering when choosing a location: quality of life, cost of living and living surroundings. "There are certain parts of the country where there are solid opportunities and high quality of life dimensions—climate,

cultural, educational, recreational opportunities—and a reasonable cost of living," Austin said. Austin also addressed the relational side of the decision: Do you have family, friends, relatives, peers and/or other acquaintances in the area? Although there are some fields of wotk that show promising opportunities in Michigan, many graduates have found success in searching out-of-state. Austin emphasized the importance of networking. According to him, over 60 percent of employed professionals find their work through contacts. Students can network with Hope alum contacts by scheduling a networking appointment at the Career Services office. On the Career Services website, there are two online resources available to aid students in their search. First, there is a link to Spotlight on Careers, a site with job and internship listings as well as other resources for various liberal arts career fields. CareerSearch is a database

of over 4 million organizations that can be searched by location or type of organization. Another helpful online site is Riley Guide (www.rileyguide.com). Austin highlighted the regions of the nation that have shown recent growth. The Southeast, specifically North Carolina and Georgia;, the Southwest, specifically Texas and Arizona; and the mountain states, mainly Colorado and Utah, have overall economic growth. Other regions may have growth in a particular field and* Chicago remains a favored opportunity for Hope graduates. Another option for seniors is federal government work. According to Austin, over 40 percent of federal employees will be eligible for retirement between 2003 and 2010. This means over 1.7 million nationwide opportunities with solid pay, benefits and job stability. "The key is to keep in mind that we cannot control the opportunties in the job market, but we do have control over the energy, initiative and actions that we

7

take to find work," Austin said. He has these final points of advice for finding work: 1. Have a focus on the type or types of work that you are seeking; it is difficult to look for work that you have not defined. O u r staff can assist with helping you clarify your direction. 2. Get your support materials set, like a resume, cover letter, references and other supporting documents (portfolio, etc.). 3. Learn how to interview effectively; what goes on in the interview plays a big role in your success, and should not be overlooked or taken lightly. 4. Develop a plan for finding work. W h a t are your resources,, contacts, timetables for finding work? W h a t is your back up plan; your contingency plan? W h a t are your plans for finding short-term work until you gain meaningful longer-term work?

G R A P H I C BY G W E N M A C I V E R , K A T M O J Z A K A N D T I F F A N Y P H A N

Q&A

with Joe Zupancic

('98), Engineer

W h a t is it t h a t you do? W h a t are t h e d u t i e s a n d responsibilities of your p a r t i c u l a r job? W h a t is a typical a n d atypical day/week? I design and validate microprocessors before they are fabricated, basically computer engineering. My responsibilities include any and more of the following: • Develop testplans strategies

and

testing

• Write software tools

for Hewlett-Packard,

Denver,

Colorado

product cycle. A typical product will take three to four years from start to finish. H o w c a n s t u d e n t s best p r e p a r e t h e m s e l v e s in college t o work in your field? Having a passion for understanding 'how things work' was my motivation. Without that, anyone would quickly lose interest in technical obscurities we deal with everyday. After that, strong computer skills in computer engineering (electrical engineering and computer science) will land a student in my field.

• Run simulations • Debug failures • Due to the technical nature of my work, I constantly need to communicate with others Doing all of the above would describe a typical day for myself. An atypical day would be at a quarterly event or celebration where we go out as a team for lunch then blow off some steam at gokarts, a movie or other fun activity. W h a t was your first position, a n d w h a t other p o s i t i o n s have you held b e f o r e your c u r r e n t one? I've basically been in the same line of work doing very similar tasks but on different products. This is my fourth

W h a t d o e s your o r g a n i z a t i o n look for in an entry-level c a n d i d a t e ? W h a t s h o u l d o n e expect as an entry-level worker? Because we get an overwhelming number of applicants, a candidates resume is the first and likely only way to catch our attention. A high GPA and appropriate course work are a must. When a resume is pulled, a phone screen will be conducted where we ask a few technical questions trying to gauge if they have good communication and their interest in the job. Offers are not made until an on-site interview is conducted. If hired, a recent college graduate will be mentored to help ease the transition. The mentor will help facilitate training and guidance in performing the job at

hand. The learning curve can be steep but new hires usually become productive in a month or two. How d o people find entry-level work in t h i s field? W h e n recruiting occurs, the large universities are usually visited by many tech companies during career fairs. However, all individuals have an opportunity by applying for positions and submitting their resumes online. Is g r a d u a t e school necessary for your position, e i t h e r right a f t e r school or a f t e r work experience? W h a t k i n d of entry-level position would you r e c o m m e n d f o r s o m e o n e interested in t h i s field b e f o r e a t t e n d i n g g r a d u a t e school? Graduate school would certainly help in my field, especially coming from Hope. Hope gives you a great toolset to be a well-rounded person, but it lacked many of the technical engineering courses necessary for a resume to make it through the screening process. How has your liberal a r t s e d u c a t i o n h e l p e d you or h i n d e r e d you in your position? A liberal arts background in a technical field as mine makes me different. While I work with many very brilliant people.

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so many are missing different pieces of the puzzle. Many of the off courses' I took at Hope don't necessarily give me an advantage at work, they do make me feel more complete as a person. Life is much more than work. Did you c h o o s e to live in your area b e c a u s e of t h e e m p l o y m e n t o p p o r t u n i t i e s or f o r o t h e r reasons? If you have o t h e r reasons, what are they? W h a t are s o m e of the positives a n d negatives of living in t h a t location? I chose Fort Collins, Colo., because of my original employer, Hewlett Packard. But now, I have difficulty imagining myself going through another Michigan winter and being happy. We get 300+ days of sunshine a year and my mother calls me saying they broke the record this month for the most cloudy days. However, 1 love Michigan and will always cherish its many advantages: trees, water, beaches, etc. The worst thing about living 1,200 miles away f r o m h o m e is missing our families. W h a t advice would you like to .offer s t u d e n t s c o n s i d e r i n g a career similar to y o u r s ? Never stop learning and never be afraid to learn new technologies. If you stop in this business, you will quickly fall behind and become obsolete.


8

VOICES

THF ANCHOR

MARCH 4 . 2 0 0 9

Growing in the soil

Change for tradition's sake A privileged life

Ashley DeVecht

Whether we like it or not, as Hope College students we are a group of privilege. No matter what your circumstances — if you're working your way through school, getting a free ride because of scholarships, or if your parents are paying the bill — you are entering into a group of privileged people by earning a college degree. Because of this, we as Hope College students can often become blinded to the effects of the economy. We hear about the recession on the news, are lectured about it in our classes, but the emotional nature of the issue is often shrugged off. We lived in a bubble of Phelps food and campus jobs, of cottages and dormitories. Perhaps we may struggle finding a job after graduation, but it is rare that the issues of homelessness or starvation affect us personally. But I might argue that, in fact, the effects of the economic downturn are beginning to show up subtly on and around our campus. During poor economic times, people get desperate, and that desperation can be seen in recent happenings. It seems that desperate times call for desperate measures. On Monday, Feb. 23, a student reported to Campus Safety that her windshield wipers were stolen off of her car. Later that week Campus Safety responded to an incident at a Hope College cottage. A middle-aged man had walked up to the house and was asking for money because "he ran out of gas." Later that same day the Student Activities Committee reported that some of their sound equipment was missing. Some may argue that these incidents would happen here no matter what the state of the economy is. But I would argue that the economy has a direct impact on our safety and general good will. In recent history, crime rate has been correlated with the state of the economy; when times get tough, crime goes up. In Chicago, property crimes have risen 3 percent since the beginning of the recession, and robberies have risen 9 percent, according to the Chicago Tribune. Nationwide, crime has increased during every recession since the 1950s, said Richard Rosenfeld, a criminology professor from the University of Missouri-St. Louis. So what can be done to help the situation? It's not like we have control over the nation's economy, right? Well, maybe not, but we can help out in our local community during these tough times. •Holland Rescue Mission: Donate gently used clothes to cloth those who can't afford to buy pricey clothing. Contact: (616) 355-6221 •Habitat for Humanity: Help build a house with a family that doesn't have suitable housing. Contact: habitat@hope.edu or Shannon Morton at (616) 393-8001 ex.103 •Total Trek Quest: Mentor and train third through fifth grade boys in an after school running program. The program ends with a 5K run. Contact: LeighMoerdyke at (616) 396-2301 ext. 127 This is just a sampling of the endless possibilities for reaching out to our community. Visit www.hope.edu/student/organizations/activilies/volunteer/opportunities. htm for more opportunities. We have been blessed to bless others and with privilege comes a responsibility; we must care for and protect others. Don't stand unaffected in the face of others' misfortune. What if you were the one to become mis fortunate one day? Ashley is enjoying the lack of snow and the abundant sunshine riencing lately. She hopes this means the ground hog was wrong.

Aftan Snyder

Leaving our rooms behind

Co Editor-in-Chief

Columnist

Ah yes, the half semester mark has come and gone, and some of us are gleefully dropping a class while simple as, "Hey, I really care about my others dutifully take one up. Whatever your situation, I have one general neighbors and the community in which I live. Maybe in some free time I'll be a piece of advice: get out of your room! This needs some explaining. For CASA tutor." Take a chance. Embrace those of you who don't know, 1 am one the risk. You never know how God will of those students who agonizes over ev- use you to help someone, or how He will ery comma within a paper, who reads use someone else to help you. There are so many ways to do things every paragraph within a text, and who you love here at has an almost physical inability Hope, but the to skip class. Basically, I am a thing is, you may really annoying perfectionist. I not know you tend to shut myself away in or...you C A N make love something der to more completely devote new friends even until you try it. myself to my studies. if y o u ' v e already You who have I know there are some of us, established a basic a heart for your shall we say "more fun people," neighbors, get who could probably do with friend base... involved with some shutting-in to study, but Hope For the this article is written for those Nations. They who identify more with me. This article is for those of you who take organize a prayer walk twice a month, every assignment too seriously, who pri- knocking on doors and asking for prayer oritize studying above living. Take it requests. Not a broad enough scope for from me, get out of your rooms! 'There you? They also support an orphanage is a time for everything under heaven," in Ethiopia, sell bracelets for women in including cramming for that biology India, and dialogue with a Cambodian exam, but there is also a time for cutting church. Get out of your rooms. Get involved back and letting go. I hate to employ a rather tired man- with something new. Discover who you tra, but here it is: College is about dis- are. Please don't come away from this covering who we really are. How, 1 ask, can we discover ourselves in a cramped thinking I just authorized you to dump room surrounded by nothing but thick all your homework out the nearest wintextbooks and fly-away papers? Col- dow. "Sorry Professor, I'm discovering lege is the perfect opportunity to get myself." Like I said earlier, there is a involved, to meet new people (yes, you time to be a student. But don't let that CAN make new friends even if you've job consume you. There is also time to already established a basic friend base), live. to divert yourself with fun activities, to Aftan is discovering thejoys of living, find out what really inspires you. These don't have to be mind-blow- specifically with dark chocolate chip ing, life-changing revelations that come cookies and banana pancakes. from being a basketball star or student body president. Maybe it's something as

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Wondering what March to Support is all about?

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Residential Life staff of TEAM KoIIen is leading a collection drive to support troops in Iraq. Students, faculty and staff can turn in items to the SUD desk in DeWitt, including: C a n n e d fruit (pears, peaches, pineapple, oranges, NOT cocktail): C a n n e d s o u p s / c h i l i / t i c e (pull-top and ready to eat): b e e f j e r k y (various flavors): Jolly R a n c h e r s (miscellaneous hard candies): c h a p s t i c k ; and b u g spray. For a complete list

4t-ch 2 - ^ ^ O o S ^ V l o p e

on items, check KnowHope.

Take advantage of this opportunity for Hope College to give back to our troops serving overseas. THE

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VOICES

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

THE ANCHOR

From the inside out

Myths, tricks and trainwrecks

Sam Ogles

Erika English Columnist

Managing Editor

Lent yourself

Hitting the jackpot Loving s o m e o n e is easy. It's finding s o m e o n e w h o will love you back equally that's difficult. N o w that's hitting the jackpot. That's the m o m e n t w h e n eve r y t h i n g is right, and t h e opinions of t h e world don't even matter. But d o e s anyone really get there? Is it t o o m u c h of a g a m b l e t o wait for t h e p e r s o n w h o could win your h e a r t away? Is it even conceivable, or is love just a rigged g a m e in which s o m e o n e always loses? W h e n you think about love, it's s u p posed t o be selfless. The Biblical account of love goes into great d e p t h to describe it as keeping n o record of w r o n g s . I m m e diately a "Yeah, but..." c o m e s to m i n d . Bec a u s e if love keeps n o record of wrongs, or doesn't s e e o n e p e r s o n as h u r t i n g o r giving m o r e t h a n t h e other, is love really just blind? Is love s u p p o s e d to b e ignorant? H o w d o you even begin t o m e a s u r e love, t h e risks and benefits, and, for t h a t matter, w r o n g s or selfless giving? If w e were to go against t h e Biblical idea of love and keep a tally, h o w would o n e even start to f a c t o r in all t h e parts of love? Before m a k i n g t h e gamble, would you weigh w h a t benefits t h e r e might be to you against your luck f r o m t h e past? Should dating just be keeping score cards? But t h e n again, we all love differently and h o w two p e o p l e c o m e t o g e t h e r in a relationship s e e m s t o be m o r e t h a n s o m e c o r r e c t checklist or online dating profile m a t c h u p . So what t h e n ? Is love really just luck? It s e e m s t h a t s o m e p e o p l e are just lucky in g e n e r a l â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t h e kind of p e o p l e you w a n t to t a k e with you t o Vegas. But is t h a t luck or skill? Perhaps d e e p d o w n t h e r e is s o m e kind of skill w e m u s t have to win at love, as well. W h e n you hit t h e jackpot, you've taken t h a t chance, b u t t h e r e was s o m e t h i n g else going o n as well, s o m e t h i n g m o r e . It's unexplainable, that " s o m e t h i n g else," but it's w h a t m a k e s t w o

Erika English would like to admit that she has a mild obsession with PostIt notes, and that the inspiration for this piece came from a close friend finding a note with this title on it and asking her what it meant. Thanks, dearfriend, for the encouragement.

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Lent. Finally, I'm n o authority. It could be t h a t a m o r e m a t u r e Christian reads this and c o r r e c t s me. But c o m p a r e these w o r d s with those f o u n d in your church, in Scripture a n d don't b e afraid t o observe Lent for t h e p u r p o s e of slavery to G o d ' s will. It's a process of purification and we are all of u s suitable candidates. Out of all of the proposed titles for Blagojevich letproff Hair; Swiss Cheese Morals. "

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Despite all of my experiences, h o p e s and especially pride, J m u s t a d m i t t h a t I a m n o t at all qualified t o give advice o n spiritual matters. But in p r e p a r i n g for Lent over a week ago, I was surprised by h o w m a n y n o n - C a t h o l i c s follow Lent, or at least o n e of its biggest parts - self-denial. A n d I began to w o n d e r if t h e p u r p o s e of Lent is overlooked by soirte Christians. Giving up s o m e t h i n g for Lent is noble. It really is. Self-denial serves a noble and spiritual p u r p o s e and it can be d o n e t h r o u g h abstaining and fasting. But my c o n c e r n is that Lenten self-denial for any o t h e r p u r p o s e t h a n G o d is just self-denial. S o m e p e o p l e d o away with d o u g h n u t s for Lent. Pop isn't u n c o m m o n . Coffee is also a p o p u l a r choice. But we should be careful. W e can b e d o ing self-denial for t h e sake of physical health, of psychological health, of social health, but if it d o e s n o t lead us t o G o d , point t o w a r d s G o d , r e m i n d us of G o d , d r a w us t o G o d , t h e n it is simply a self-focused exercise. I joined t h e Catholic C h u r c h a c o u p l e of years ago and t h e advice t h a t was given m e I'll repeat here. Do n o t give up s o m e t h i n g for Lent just b e c a u s e it's physically u n h e a l t h y for you. Lent is not a b o u t losing weight and lowering cholesterol. Also don't give u p things for financial reasons such as going o u t to eat so t h a t you can save s o m e money. O n e can abstain f r o m things for t h e right reason, but in deciding what t o give u p for Lent, m a k e s u r e you can answer H o w d o e s this d r a w m e t o G o d ? Do, however, give u p things t h a t t e m p t you to follow a way o t h e r t h a n God's. Give up that addiction t o going o u t (or staying in) if it's h u r t i n g your relationships. Give up t h a t late-night T V show if you should be using t h e t i m e for prayer. Give u p a r g u m e n t and debate if it always requires you to judge o t h e r s (especially if you prefer to a r g u e in editorials). Do c h a n g e your habits. Let these habits be a sign and r e m i n d e r t o you of t h e inward c h a n g e for w h i c h you're striving. W a s h y o u r h a n d s in cold water to r e m i n d you t o pray t h r o u g h o u t t h e day. W e a r an u n c o m f o r t a b l e necklace or bracelet you have to adjust in o r d e r t o r e m i n d you of t h e suffering and sacrifice of Christ. Find s o m e t h i n g that w o r k s for you. Lastly, and p e r h a p s m o s t difficultly, k e e p it t o yourself. It's O K to tell p e o p l e w h a t you're giving up for Lent, b u t let t h a t be t h e e n d of it. M e m e n t o m o r i - R e m e m b e r death. We a r e to die t o ourselves, to give ourselves u p t o Christ. A n d we c a n n o t d o this if we are m a k i n g a show of o u r sacrifices, if we are c o m plaining or if we forget t h a t pride in earthly things eventually passes away. A n d even t h o u g h Lent h a s already begun, it's never t o o late t o start a good habit. Think it over and see if there's s o m e t h i n g you'd like t o s t a r t / s t o p doing to benefit y o u r s u b m i s s i o n to G o d . R e m e m b e r that Lent is a Christian tradition. N o n - C a t h o l i c s shouldn't feel t h a t t h e y can't observe Lent. Catholics, in t u r n , shouldn't be possessive of

people last. It's what clears the score card b e t w e e n taking chances. T h e r e is a skill in finding the perfect timing. But could skill be taught? If there is s o m e s o r t of m e t h o d to t h e madness, can s o m e o n e actually teach t h e rules to t h e g a m e of love? It s e e m s t h a t n o m a t t e r w h a t we do, love is still a gamble. W h e t h e r it's a s u r e t h i n g that gets us t h e "big money," or it's a winner-takes-all g a m e w h e r e you lose eve r y t h i n g , love h a s t h e potential for high pay-off or m a k i n g us pull o u t our checkb o o k s . A n d since there's n o surefire way t o win every time, or g u a r a n t e e that fate favors t h e fearless, t h e h e a r t of t h e g a m e is in what we bring t o t h e table. If w e tip t h e scales with kindness, what h a r m d o e s t h a t do? If we forget to keep a record of wrongs, d o we miss o u t o n anything? Relationships aren't m e a n t to b e o n e - s i d e d , but t h a t doesn't m e a n keeping a tally. O u r score c a r d s and p r e d i c t i o n s will never tell u s t h e t r u t h t h a t lies in t h e gamble. The R o m e o s and Hitches of o u r t i m e s can never deliver t h e simple s h o r t c u t s t o t h e h e a r t and soul of t h e game. The t r u t h , h e a r t and soul tell us that in o r d e r to hit t h e jackpot and find that p e r s o n w h o balances o u r h e a r t s , with n o g u a r a n t e e s , we'll just have t o t a k e a chance. A n d it's in t h a t selfless c h a n c e that we might really get lucky.

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Facebook affects students' future • JUMP, f r o m page 2 dents have come forward with complaints in the past, but only very rarely, perhaps once per school year. Such incidents have generally been related to inappropriate alcohol use. "Thankfully, we have not had a situation of the same nature as the recent events at Calvin," Jobson said. "If it were to happen, however, the college's processes—the judicial process, the sexual harassment policy, or the discriminatory behavior policy—would be used. O u r guidelines for responding are the same when dealing with social networking sites as any other form of information." Students should be aware of their online activities not just t o stay on the good side of Hope's policies, but t o plan for their professional futures. According to Sara DeVries of Hope's Career Services, employers regularly scan applicants' Facebook profiles as part of the hiring process. Though privacy settings are supposed to protect your page f r o m unauthorized eyes, there's no guaranteeing that potential hirers won't have ways t o see everything you upload. "Employers say that they're routinely able t o see profiles," DeVries said. "If you're a student rely-

ing on your privacy settings to protect your page, you're relying on something you can't control." In general, a little common sense is all it takes to keep your online profile out of trouble. "Be careful with photos. Look at photos thinking, Tf I was hiring someone, how would I interpret this picture?" DeVries said. She also recommended avoiding any depiction of intimate relationships, using foul language or using public posts to express fits of passion. "Avoid extreme emotional language. If you go off on a rant, either negatively or positively, that gives a picture of your maturity level." O n the other hand, armed with the knowledge that future employers may be scouting your Facebook page, you could polish the image you convey to your advantage. "The site is for f u n and should be a place for you t o show the real you," DeVries said. "A Facebook page doesn't have t o be professional—but it shouldn't be inappropriate."

racism

ageism

• VWS, from page 5 as community members are invited to c o m e and listen. The reading begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 11; jazz will begin a half hour earlier. A Q&A session will also take place in the Herrick Room of the DeWitt building at 3 p.m. for those interested in having a m o r e intimate encounter with the widely respected author.

k /

DO YOU

Presented by Linda Elliot Sponsored By Hope College Student Congress

homophobia

Visiting Writer to visit Hope College rely—on each other in order t o make it through tragedy. "Marshaling magnetic characters, hidden history, suspense, and acute insight into the transmutation of anguish into compassion. Prose plunges through the scrim of melodrama to reach the realm of myth," proclaims Booklist's Donna Seaman. Prose will be reading at the Knickerbocker Theatre. Admission is free, and Hope students as well

The Anatomy of Prejudice

sexism

i

ethnocentrism

March llth, 2009 at 8:00pm Dimnent Memorial Chapel Event is open to the public and free for all

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THE ANCHOR

11

A T H L E T E PROFILE

Fourth NCAA appearance icing on the cake for Reest Delo's swimming career at Hope to t h e all-MlAA t e a m t h r e e t i m e s and was t h e MIAA's m o s t STAFF WRITER valuable s w i m m e r in 2008 To say Brittaney Reest She has qualified for Delo ('09) h a s had a successful the NCAA Division III s w i m m i n g career at H o p e would n o t do justice to all she h a s < C h a m p i o n s h i p s in t h e 100-yard b a c k s t r o k e every year and so accomplished. far h a s finished in t h e t o p eight T h r o u g h o u t h e r four years twice. Her best finish c a m e in as a m e m b e r of t h e s w i m team, 2206 w h e n she finished fifth; in Reest Delo has b e e n selected Bethany Strlpp

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P H O T O BY A L E X W O T A L

N A T I O N ' S E L I T E - Brittaney Reest Delo ( 09) has been leading Hope swimming since her freshman year. She will be competing In the 100 backstroke at the NCAA Championships.

addition s h e placed eighth last season and 14th in 2007. O n t o p of t h e M I A A h o n o r s , Reest Delo was an All-American for t h e 100-yard backstroke in 2006 and 2008. A week and a half ago, she tied t h e M I A A record in t h e 100 backstroke, set t h e M I A A record in t h e 200 backstroke and s w a m o n t h e 400 freestyle relay t e a m that set b o t h an M I A A a n d a H o p e College record. Her t i m e of :57.82 in t h e 100-yard backstroke was good e n o u g h t o qualify her for t h e 2009 N C A A Division III C h a m p i o n s h i p s , w h i c h will take place f r o m M a r c h 18-21 in Minneapolis. Reest Delo also conditionally qualified in the 200-yard backstroke b u t will have t o wait until Saturday to find o u t if her t i m e was good e n o u g h to send her t o t h e national m e e t . "I'm really excited (to s w i m in t h e 100-yard backstroke at t h e c h a m p i o n s h i p meet)," Reest Delo said. "I h o p e to i m p r o v e my time. I've i m p r o v e d it every year by a tiny bit and I would like to c o n t i n u e t o do that." Despite t h e pressure s o m e might feel at a big m e e t like t h e

national c h a m p i o n s h i p s , Reest Delo is doing what s h e can to stay calm. "I just try to stay relaxed," she said. "I want t o m a k e it as f u n as

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I've learned to enjoy the things I do and do everything with all the passion I have. —BRITTANEY REEST DELO

99

possible. I feel like I d o better w h e n I'm just goofing a r o u n d with my t e a m m a t e s right u p until it's t i m e to focus o n t h e race. I don't do as well w h e n I get stressed and n e r v o u s before." However, with all the excitement c o m e s s o m e sadness. Reest Delo has been s w i m m i n g since she w a s 8 years old. After the c h a m p i o n s h i p meet, her s w i m m i n g career will be over. "It's really sad, b e c a u s e not only is it t h e end at H o p e , b u t it's t h e end," she said. "I really have mixed e m o t i o n s , b e c a u s e it'll be a relief to b e d o n e and have n o m o r e m o r n i n g practices, b u t I'm

a lot m o r e sad than relieved. It s e e m s like I've b e e n doing this my whole life." As far as her f u t u r e in t h e s p o r t is c o n c e r n e d , Reest Delo isn't exactly sure what she'll do. "I'm definitely going to take s o m e t i m e off," s h e said. "I probably won't d o any m o r e competitive s w i m m i n g — j u s t for f u n or to work out." Even though the c o m m u n i c a t i o n s major f r o m Holland h a s experienced m u c h success in her s w i m m i n g career, she said w i t h o u t hesitation t h a t t h e highlight of her s w i m m i n g career at H o p e has been t h e p e o p l e she h a s m e t b e c a u s e of it. "The p e o p l e that I've m e t t h r o u g h s w i m m i n g are m y best friends," Reest Delo said. "I can't imagine my life w i t h o u t these people. I couldn't have d o n e any of it w i t h o u t my team." As Reest Delo concludes J)^r career, s h e will have learned^ s o m e i m p o r t a n t lessons a b o u t life f r o m s w i m m i n g . "I've learned to enjoy t h e things I do and d o e v e r y t n i n g with all t h e passion I have," she said. "It's easy to want t o give up, but I've learned t h a t you have to completely c o m m i t yourself to s o m e t h i n g you're doing."

M E N ' S TENNIS

Experienced team gets into the swing of things Karen Patterson C o - S P O R T S EDITOR

III national t o u r n a m e n t and was n a m e d t h e m o s t valuable player in t h e M I A A last year. H e a d coach Steve G o r n o hopes that the level of experience will help t h e t e a m to be competitive in t h e M I A A . " W e w a n t t o capitalize o n t h e experience and m a t u r i t y of t h e seniors," G o r n o said. "Last year we w e r e very competitive with s o m e of t h e best t e a m s in t h e region and conference." The t e a m will have an o p p o r t u n i t y t o travel to s o u t h e r n California t o play s o m e of t h e best Division III t e a m s in t h e country.

Spring is definitely beginning to make an appearance: t e m p e r a t u r e s are warmer, t h e sun shines m o r e frequently and s p r i n g s p o r t s have officially begun their respective seasons after m o n t h s of o p e n gyms and off-season training. M e n ' s t e n n i s has already gotten off to a positive start, putting forth strong p e r f o r m a n c e s in t h e n o n - s c o r e d G r a n d Rapids City T o u r n a m e n t and defeating Wabash college 66 8-1 over the " T h e w e e k e n d despite We are the true defiquality of falling t o Luther tennis in and DePauw. nition of a team. California The 2009 —COACH STEVE GORNO is quite roster of 12 possibly t h e players includes 99 best in t h e nine returning c o u n t r y , " letter winners, G o r n o said. including co"We will have a huge challenge captains John Schlotz ('09) and in our dual m e e t s and at t h e Z a c h H u b e r ('09) w h o have Stag- H a n Invite." played o n the varsity since their Despite t h e challenge that f r e s h m e n years. awaits t h e team, G o r n o is Also leading t h e t e a m is coc o n f i d e n t that his players have captain John Pelton ('09) w h o what it takes t o c o m p e t e with c o m p e t e d in t h e N C A A Division

t h e best. "With a t e a m t h i s e x p e r i e n c e d , we w a n t e d to play the best in the c o u n t r y to give ourselves the best possible p r e p a r a t i o n for t h e M I A A season," G o r n o said. After spring break, t h e t e a m will have a h o m e m a t c h against G r a n d Valley State University b e f o r e beginning M I A A play against A q u i n a s College o n April 1. O n e thing that will give the Flying D u t c h m e n an edge this year is their overall experience. M o s t of t h e t e a m has been playing together for two or three seasons now, giving t h e t e a m a strong b o n d and good c h e m i s t r y b e t w e e n t h e players. However, s o m e of t h e u n d e r classmen are expected t o make c o n t r i b u t i o n s to t h e t e a m as well. Jon Lautz (11), Brad Boelkins ('11), Alex H u g h e s ('12) and Kyle McKey ( 1 2 ) will all be c o m p e t i n g for playing t i m e this spring. A

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up, which is cool to see," Schlotz said. "He's b e e n w o r k i n g really h a r d at practice and is really tough in t h e d o u b l e s matches." T h o u g h they did not finish a t o p t h e M I A A last season, the men's tennis t e a m is looking t o move t o t h e t o p and d o m i n a t e t h e M I A A this year. With strong leadership from r e t u r n i n g players a n d p r o m i s i n g talent in t h e younger classes, G o r n o is c o n f i d e n t in his team's ability t o c o m p e t e with t h e best in t h e region. Gorno has high expectations for his players but k n o w s that they can deliver.

"They're t h e h a r d e s t working, nicest g r o u p any coach could ask for," G o r n o said. "Each one shows great sportsmanship in the midst of intense competition, and with all the experience, we are a t r u e definition of a team."

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H u g h e s has m a d e an impression, e a r n i n g a spot in t h e starting lineup early in t h e season. " H u g h e s has really s t e p p e d

G R A P H I C BY K A R I E LUIDENS


1 2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOK

MARCH 4 , 2 0 0 9

BASKETBALL

Hope's Snikkers, Reimink named MVP Women's MVP Karen Patterson C o - SPORTS EDITOR

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P H O T O COURTESY H O P E P R

MIAA Most Valuable Player Carrie Snikkers ('11)

Carrie Snikkers ('11) has been n a m e d the M I A A women's basketball M o s t Valuable Player for the 2008-09 season a f t e r a remarkable b r e a k o u t season. Snikkers finished atop the M I A A in scoring average, with 13.7 p o i n t s a game. In addition to p o u r i n g in 360 p o i n t s over the course of 26 games, she led t h e M I A A in field goal percentage with a .526 average. After missing part of the 2007-08 season d u e to injury, the 6'4 center c a m e back to b e a d o m i n a t e force on b o t h offense and d e f e n s e for the Flying Dutch. She s h o w e d n o signs of lingering injuries t h r o u g h o u t the season, starting all 26 g a m e s for the Flying D u t c h this season. Snikkers finished the season with 39 steals and 49 blocks; with an average of 1.63 blocks per game, she finished second for the conference. En r o u t e to helping the Flying D u t c h claim an M I A A title and t o u r n a m e n t c h a m p i o n s h i p , Snikkers c o n t r i b u t e d 3 3 points in two games, gaining h e r sixth double- double of the season in the c h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e against Saint Mary's with 10 r e b o u n d s and 20 points. She was also o n e of five different H o p e players t o be n a m e d the M I A A Player of the Week, earning the h o n o r twice.

Men's MVP For the third time in as m a n y years, a Flying D u t c h m a n was n a m e d as the MIAA's M o s t Valuable Player. This year the h o n o r w e n t t o Jesse Reimink ('09) w h o led the M I A A in scoring this season with 21.1 points per g a m e . The three-year starter has b e e n a steadfast presence on the t e a m since his f r e s h m a n year, scoring 1,424 p o i n t s and grabbing 631 r e b o u n d s in his four seasons with the Flying D u t c h m e n - the m o s t of any H o p e basketball player ever. Reimink c o n t r i b u t e d 587 p o i n t s coupled with 201 r e b o u n d s in his final season at H o p e College. In addition to the s t a n d - o u t scoring and r e b o u n d i n g , h e finished the season ranked third in field goal percentage, second in f r e e - t h r o w percentage, tied for second in steals, a n d tied for fifth in 3 - p o i n t e r s per game. Reimink finished his M I A A career o n a high note, helping lead the D u t c h m e n to a 69-59 away victory against rival Calvin to claim the MIAA tournament championship. In the c o n f e r e n c e g a m e of his career, Reimink n e t t e d 25 points, including shooting 5-6 f r o m the 3point line. Coupled with notable p e r f o r m a n c e s in the victories over Alma and Albion, Reimink was n a m e d the final M I A A player of the week for the fifth time this season.

P H O T O BY D A V I D M O O R E

MIAA Most Valuable Player r Jesse Reimink ('09)

SOFTBALL

Indoor games get ball rolling before season begins Bethany Stripp STAFF WRITER

Hope College's women's Softball t e a m played their first g a m e o n Feb. 27. The fact that their season s t a r t e d so early is interesting e n o u g h , b u t what m a d e the event even m o r e interesting was its location: the Superior D o m e in M a r q u e t t e . For the second year in a row, the Flying D u t c h traveled to Michigan's U p p e r Peninsula to c o m p e t e in the two-day long Finlandia University Dome Tournament. The Superior D o m e is a 14story high enclosed playing field o n the c a m p u s of N o r t h e r n Michigan University. T h e D o m e is e q u i p p e d w i t h artificial t u r f c a r p e t ,

is m o r e like a carpet, no cleats w h i c h c r e a t e s a v e r y different are worn, and lights, rather t h a n e n v i r o n m e n t in w h i c h t o play the sun, could m a k e seeing a fly softball. "Turf is just so different t h a n ball difficult." Even with real grass," cothese big captain Deidra d i f f e r e n c e s, Enochs ('10) 66 there are said. "I'm a It helps us prepare for advantages to pitcher, and the outdoor season being able t o w h e n we're o u t by playing on a field play so early in o n a real field, I against a team. the year. c a n actually use " W e are used â&#x20AC;&#x201D;COACH KARLA WOLTERS the dirt in the to scrimmaging infield to my 59 against each advantage w h e n pitching. But o n the turf there is o t h e r and hitting off o u r own pitchers. This tournament nothing to really push off of." allows us to see different pitchers The differences stretch and hitters, " co-captain Kelli beyond just the turf, though. "It's different in several ways," D u i m s t r a ('09) said. "It gets us o u t of the g y m and Coach Karla Wolters said. "There's n o wind, the surface o n t o an actual field. It just lets

us see how our t e a m is looking and m a k e a d j u s t m e n t s we need t o b e f o r e we get outside. "It helps us p r e p a r e for the o u t d o o r season by playing on a full field against a t e a m other t h a n ourselves," Wolters said. " W e also b o n d as a team on o n e of o u r longer bus rides of the year." The t e a m had mixed results at the Finlandia T o u r n a m e n t this year, w i n n i n g o n e g a m e a n d losing o n e g a m e b o t h on Friday a n d Saturday. For the second year in a row, the Flying D u t c h fell t o the Titans f r o m the University of W i s c o n s i n â&#x20AC;&#x201D; O s h k o s h , 3-4. In their second g a m e o n Friday, Hope's softball team beat Concordia, Wise., 13-3.

During this game, four H o p e players hit h o m e r u n s , including a pair of h o m e r u n s f r o m designated hitter Kori N i e u w s m a ('11). O n Saturday, H o p e scored seven r u n s in the seventh inning to c o m e back f r o m a 7 - 4 deficit against Simpson College t o win the game, 11-7. Later that day, H o p e lost t o St. Scholastica, Minn., 7-1. T h e team put together a s t r o n g offensive effort over the course of the four games, finishing with 36 hits. The t e a m will take their 22 record into their next g a m e against G e n e v a College, Penn., o n March 14 in Kissimmee, Fla. d u r i n g t h e Rebel Spring games over Spring Break.

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