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Petrovich selected President's interpreter

MARCH 3, 1978

VOLUME NO. 90 ~ ISSUE 17

Communities fight nukes by Harvey Wassennan In the midst of the water crisis, as the Public Service Co. (PSC) was announcing its rate hike, and as the lobsters were dying in the harbor, t h e Clamshell Alliance proclaimed J u n e 24 as the date for its fourth occupation at the Seabrook site. The Alliance is a loose coalition of s o m e 50 a n t i - n u c l e a r g r o u o s f r o m a r o u n d New E n g l a n d . On Aug. 1,1976, when it was made up of just 15 groups, 18 Clamshellers marched onto tne newly bulldozed site and sat down. Three weeks later t h e r e were 180, and on Apr. 30, 1977, more than 2,000 people did it azain, with 1,414 arrested. Strictly committed to Gandhian non-violence, the Clamshell has required t h a t all Seabrook occupiers join "affinity groups" of eight to 20 people and undergo special training in the tactics oi peaceful resistance. The affinity groups, which i n c l u d e s u p p o r t e r s who camp out near the protest site but don't "occupy" it, are designed to function as a network of extended f a m i l i e s . Decision m a k i n g is by concensus, through lengthy group discussions r a t h e r than majorityrule voting. T h e C l a m s h a l l o r g a n i z a t i o n is s i m i l a r l y d e c e n t r a l i z e d . Local groups send representatives to a biweekly coordinating committee apportioned by region. The committee discusses major decisions and sends them back to the local groups, waiting for concensus to develop. The decision to reoccupy, f o r e x a m p l e , was m a d e at a Congress involving 300 people and requiring unanimity on all major decisions. The Alliance structure is designed to eliminate alienation; everyone has a say, and though t h e p r o c e s s is slow, m i n o r i t y rights a r e preserved. T h i s e m p h a s i s on c o m m u n i t y organizing prevails among the m o r e t h a n t h r e e dozen d i r e c t action alliances that have sprung up a c r o s s t h e c o u n t r y to f i g h t reactors, uranium mining, atomic waste storage and global weaponry. The anti-nuclear movement's f u t u r e a s a coalition t h a t can mature and survive to deal with other issues hinges on this popular participation. Mega-issues inevitably become local ones, translating into taxes and rate hikes, drained water and dead lobsters. One place the right and left have converged in this country is on the issue of community control, and the desire to make decisions in which individuals actually count f o r s o m e t h i n g . I n d e e d , if t h e movement is to survive both victories and defeats, it has to be built on that kind of scale, a network firmly rooted on grassroots needs as well as familiarity and trust. In t h a t l i g h t , o r g a n i z i n g t h e folks next door may be the most meaningful political act going. The atom can't hold a candle to the p o w e r of c o m m u n i t y a c t i o n . Nothing infuriates t h e conservative, working-class Seabrookers more than t h e fact t h a t their town voted against t h e plant twice - and it's still being built. With seven neighboring towns in agreement,

the New Hampshire seacoast has become friendly territory for the kind of m a s s civil d i s o b e d i e n c e that in anti-war days might have provoked a shower of brickbats. "No Nukes!" has become virtually synonymous with the demand for solar power, and beyond that, community control of a decentralized energy system. At its bottom line, one could paint the transition as purely mechanical. The numbers are there, and breakthroughs in the solar field occur a l m o s t m o n t h l y . Some experts argue that nuclear economics have already made the shift inevitable, and desperate corporate efforts to monopolize the new technology underscore that suspicion. In contrast to nuclear, the solar scenario promises no waste and accelerated growth, focusing on h u m a n n e e d s and l o n g - r a n g e survival, rather than short-term capital investment. Solar collectors, wind mills and small hydro plants can open the door to energy self-sufficiency. Cheap materials, elementary engineering and maint e n a n c e and a u n i v e r s a l fuel supply mean solar equipment can be owned and operated by towns, neighborhoods, tenants and even individual households. The barriers to this program are political, not technological. It is public powe r t h a t t e r r i f i e s t h e corporations, and gives the solar side its grassroots appeal. But none of it can really happen until the nukes are stopped. The r e s e a r c h , d e v e l o p m e n t and construction capital has to be freed, and t h e margin of demand preserved, before solar can really roll. And it will happen, as some key alliances are made -- the first one with organized labor. The AFL-CIO, and particularly the construction trades' councils, have been the nuclear industry's k e y s u p p o r t e r s o u t s i d e Wall Street. As a movement with clear middle-class roots, environmentalists have been remarkably uncons c i o u s of w o r k i n g - c l a s s n e e d s . Factory workers are, after all, the first to suffer from air-borne pollution. But ecologists rarely notice the problem until it surfaces downriver or downwind. Then factory workers again suffer as the plants are shut and jobs lost because of t h e d i f f u s i o n of c h e m i c a l s t h e y work with in concentrated form every day. Management has been more

Hope history professor Michael Petrovich has been selected to be President Carter's interpreter during the upcoming (March 5-9) state visit ot Yugoslavian President Marshal Tito. A native of Yugoslavia and a former escort interpreter for the U.S. Department oi State, Petrovich was selected a f t e r undergoing an evaluation in Washington, D.C. last week. None of t h e state department's present roster of escort interpret e r s "seemed up to this important task," according to Nora Lejins, chief of t h e l a n g u a g e s e r v i c e s division at t h e state department. " T h e n a m e of D r . Michael Petrovich was recalled as being a superlative escort interpreter b e t w e e n 1961-66, b e f o r e ne engaged in academic pursuits," said Ms. Lejins. "Dr. Petrovich clearly emerged as the best, both in interpreting ability and command of English and S e r b o - C r o a t i a n , " said Ms. Lejins following the evaluation in Washington. D r . P e t r o v i s h will l e a v e for Washington, D.C. this Sunday for a week's briefing prior to Tito's visit. "I am very honored to have been s e l e c t e d , " said P e t r o v i c h . " T h e Presidency embodies what America is all about and I am privileged to be able to do my part." Since being selected, Petrovich says he has spent a lot of time reading about President Carter and studying his use of words and speaking style. "An interpreter doesn't interpret words as much as he does the man; I guess you can say an interp r e t e r is the speaker's alter ego," said Petrovich. "An interpreter needs more than a knowledge of the language; it is important that he be aware of current social and political issues." Petrovich describes President Carter as a concise talker who is

than happy to lay the unemployment problem on environmentalists. But ecological problems-- and s o l u t i o n s - c a n n o t be s e p a r a t e d from worker control of industry. A s h i f t t o solar would d i r e c t a capital-intensive economy toward one built on labor. Few industries create as paltry jobs-per-dollar as nuclear power; t h e money goes for heavy e q u i p m e n t and exotic materials rather than human work and wages. S o l a r e n e r g y , r e c y c l i n g and c o n s e r v a t i o n c r e a t e , by many estimates, two to six times the jobs-per-dollar as either nuclear or oil. The jobs are safer, cleaner, closer to h o m e and f a r m o r e accessible to the basic skills of the general population. Moving from heavy, centralized energy to light, scattered sources would make a significant step on the road to full employment. The solar industry might not, U however, produce the high-paying, specializea jobs that make union organizing and dues collecting con" T h i n k i n g of H o l l a n d , " public v e n i e n t . Nor do t h e p o s i t i o n s television station WGVC's monthexist now, as they do at nuclear ly look at news of interest to West facilities. That's a problem that Michigan's Dutch community takes won't be overcome until t h e money a special look at the roots and starts to flow the other way. traditions of its people in A TALE Despite this, a solar f u t u r e has OF TWO CITIES, to be shown become increasingly attractive to Sunday, March 5, a t 1:00 p.m. labor's progressive wing. Miners, p - P r o d u c e d by t h e E v a n g e l i c a l farm workers, auto workers, Broadcasting Corporation (E.O.) of machinists and sheet metal work- l t h e N e t h e r l a n d s in c o o p e r a t i o n e r s h a v e all t a k e n s t r o n g anti- with the Dutch Immigrant Society n u c l e a r , or p r o - s o l a r , p o s i t i o n s ; to honor the American Bicentenand t h e last t h r e e h a v e skills nial, the program examines the quickly transferable to a growing cultural and ethnic ties binding solar industry. Holland, Michigan and Pella, Iowa In t h e 1950's, f o r m e r U n i t e d to their common homeland. Auto Workers president Walter The first half of the one-hour Reuther engineered the first anti- s p e c i a l f o c u s e s on t h e small nuclear legal intervention (against farming community of Pella, Iowa, Fermi I, at Monroe, Mich.) and described by early settlers as a was a strong advocate of cutting "high ridge between two rivers." back w e a p o n s e x p e n d i t u r e s t o Some 80 per cent of the city's 7,000 create employment. But only one- inhabitants are of Dutch ancestry fourth of this country's 96 million a n d t h e i r i n f l u e n c e is a p p a r e n t workers are now unionized, and e v e r y w h e r e as t h e camera pans the revitalization of labor, one of f r o m c o m m o n D u t c h s u r n a m e s A m e r i c a ' s m o s t i m p o r t a n t pro- carved in weathered tombstones gressive movements, is key to any t o t h e well p r e s e r v e d , old g e n e r a l m o v e m e n t f o r social f a s h i o n e d s t o r e a n d g r i s t mill. c h a n g e - i n c l u d i n g t h e p u s h for Pella is also the home of Central solar power. C o l l e g e , which p l a y e d a u n i q u e As primarily a rural campaign, r o l e in t h e e d u c a t i o n of e a r l y the anti-nuclear movement must Dutch immigrants. It was founded make inroads in the cities. The by a group of Iowa Baptists at the reactors serve urban consumers, request of the Dutch settlers, who but a r e kept out of their sight. desired a "religious influence" in On t h e other hand, nearly every

c a r e f u l in s t r u c t u r i n g his sentences. Dr. Petrovich, 44, came to the U.S. at the age of 21. In 1965, while working as a s t a t e d e p a r t m e n t i n t e r p r e t e r he v i s i t e d Holland, Michigan with a Y u g o s l a v i a n official who had come to Hope to visit Dr. Paul Fried, director of i n t e r n a t i o n a l e d u c a t i o n at t h e college. Former Hope President Calvin A. VanderWerf subsequently invited Petrovich to join the Hope history faculty. He joined the Hope faculty in 1966 and holds t n e r a n k of associate professor of history. From 1974 to 1976, he was with the International Studies Institute at Grand Valley State Colleges as associate professor of history and international relations. In the last 11 y e a r s , he has b e e n a c t i v e l y involved in international studies as a teacher in, and administrator of, an American summer program in Yugoslavia. He holds a B.A. d e g r e e in political science f r o m S h e p h e r d College, and a masters degree in international relations and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago. Last fall he was appointed by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) to a review panel to evaluate proposals submitted to the U. S. Office of Education for group projects a b r o a d and f o r e i g n c u r r i c u l u m c o n s u l t a n t s in m o d e r n f o r e i g n language training and area studies. He e v a l u a t e d p r o p o s a l s relative to East European studies. In t h e p a s t s e v e r a l y e a r s , Petrovich served on five federal panels of scholars, including the prestigious Fulbright-Hays Doct o r a l D i s s e r t a t i o n and F a c u l t y R e s e a r c h A b r o a d p r o g r a m s in 1974 and 1975, and the National Defense Education Act Programs (NDFL) Title VI in 1976 and 1977.

Tale of Two Cities "to air

(continued

educating their young but were u n a b l e t o e s t a b l i s h t h e i r own school. The second half of the program j o u r n e y s to H o l l a n d , Michigan where water was also an import a n t factor in determining its early settlement. A f t e r first considering W i s c o n s i n , a g r o u p of D u t c h immigrants in the early 1800's led by Rev. Albertus C. Van Raalte founded a community near Black L a k e in W e s t Michigan which eventually b e c a m e Holland. Though earlier settlers by-passed t h e a r e a t h i n k i n g it " w o r t h l e s s swampland," Van Raalte's group drew upon the experience passed down from generations of Dutch farmers to reclaim t h e land. Like t h e i r c o u n t e r p a r t s in P e l l a , t h e residents of Holland also wished a religious influence in higher education and founded Hope College in 1851. The Dutch cameras show the fruits of their labors as they exist today. A T A L E OF T W O C I T I E S explores the sense of "community" s h a r e d by all A m e r i c a n s , no m a t t e r w h a t t h e i r c o u n t r y of origin. S e r i e s h o s t for " T h i n k i n g of Holland" is Case Deventer. Produc e r / D i r e c t o r is A l e x a n d e r J . Plewes III of the WGVC-TV staff.

on page 4)

French critic to speak Dr. Germaine Bree, noted critic of French literature, will speak at H o p e S u n d a y , March 5 on t h e subject of the literary genre of a u t o b i o g r a p h y . T h e t a l k , sponsored by the department of foreign l a n g u a g e s and l i t e r a t u r e , t h e English d e p a r t m e n t , and t h e cultural affairs committee of Hope, will be held in the Van Zoeren Library conference room at 8 p.m. The public is welcome. Dr. Bree, a specialist on 20th Century French literature, has been a professor at Bryn Mawr University and at Washington Square College (where she chaired

the D e p a r t m e n t of Foreign Lang u a g e s and w a s h e a d of t h e g r a d u a t e p r o g r a m in A r t s and Sciences). She was the Vilas Professor in French at t h e Institute for Humanities Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is p r e s e n t l y t h e K e n a n Professor at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. Dr. Bree's many publications i n c l u d e such s t u d i e s a s C a m u s , C a m u s and S a r t r e : C r i s i s and Commitment, Marcel P r o u s t and the Deliverance from Time, and Women Writers in France.

Congressman Stockman (R - Michigan) to address Model U.N. c i Friday, March 10 at 10:00 A.M.


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IFC vetoes choice If t h e r e is one e m o t i o n p e r v a d i n g t h e U n i t e d States in these late seventies e q u a l in r a n g e to the a p a t h y t h a t everyone talks a b o u t b u t is too a p a t h e t i c to react to, it is f e a r : fear of c h a n g e , f e a r of t h e u n f a m i l i a r . Recently this f e a r has seemed to most o f t e n h a n d i c a p w o m e n .

W h a t do A m e r i c a n citizens of b o t h sexes fear losing t h r o u g h the passage of t h e ERA? Men will lose n o n e of their positive status; w o m e n will lose n o n e of theirs. T h e only t h i n g t h a t will be assured with the ERA is t h a t m e n a n d w o m e n will be assured in the letter of the law the right to choice. A n d choice seems to be the first victim of the irrational f e a r seen in A m e r i c a today. W o m e n lose the choice to pursue unconventional occupations without ostracism. W o m e n lose t h e right to d e t e r m i n e for themselves when the fetus they carry is a separate life. W o m e n lose t h e right

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to j o i n whatever social g r o u p s they please a n d feel c o m f o r t a b l e in, regardless of the sex of the m a j o r i t y of t h e m e m b e r s . It is not only w o m e n who lose when w o m e n are d i s c r i m i n a t e d against. Men a r e forced into a position in which they c a n n o t be themselves: they are forced to assume the role of the aloof, the uncaring. T h e y are forced to limit their friendships with women to a superficial level, to do away with honesty in m a n y of their relationships because they need to be m u c h c o n c e r n e d with m a i n t a i n i n g an i m a g e . F u r t h e r m o r e , m e n deny themselves valuable interaction with fully half of the h u m a n race. Now to t h e case in point: O n e c a n n o t help but be d i s a p p o i n t e d in the IPC's actions regarding the Centurian fraternity u p o n a w o m a n ' s pledging. W e a r e at Hope for the purpose of liberal education; one would h o p e t h a t those of us who believe in the intrinsic value of liberal education would also believe that we have a vital role in the s h a p i n g of society for the succeeding g e n e r a t i o n , a n d in m a k i n g a society which will s u p p o r t us t h r o u g h our lifetime. W e need to feel a responsibility to o p e n m i n d e d n e s s , a n d an afinity for healthy c h a n g e .

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Rotary awards offered T o H o p e Presidential Scholars a n d O t h e r Well-Qualified F r e s h m e n : W o u l d you be interested in s p e n d i n g your J u n i o r year a b r o a d on an all -expense scholarship covering r o u n d trip transportation, educational and living expenses for o n e a c a d e m i c year?

T h e Holland R o t a r y C l u b is looking for applications from outstanding young m e n a n d w o m e n who c a n qualify for Rotary F o u n d a t i o n awards for I n t e r n a t i o n a l Und e r s t a n d i n g for t h e year 1979-80. Underg r a d u a t e scholarships are available to students who will have c o m p l e t e d two years of college prior to August, 1979. Awards may be m a d e for any field of study a n d to any of the 150 countries in which there are R o t a r y Clubs. Preference will be given to applications f r o m those who wish to study in a country where the native language is different from their own, who can d e m o n s t r a t e r e a d i n g .

writing a n d speaking ability in that l a n g u a g e at the time of application, or d e m o n s t r a t e t h a t they will have achieved this prior to the b e g i n n i n g of their study abroad. A c a n d i d a t e f o r a Rotary F o u n d a t i o n educational award should be an outstanding student as well as a potential "ambassador of good will." Undergraduate scholarships are restricted to single students between the ages of 18 and 24 who are not d e p e n d e n t s or blood relatives of a R o t a r y Club member. H o p e students who expect to r e t u r n to the College following their year of training a b r o a d may be selected by the local club even if they are not local residents. Applications m u s t be m a d e no later t h a n M a r c h 15, 1978 for the 1979-80 a w a r d . W i n n e r s will be a n n o u n c e d in S e p t e m b e r 1978. Any student seriously interested in this p r o g r a m should o b t a i n an application f o r m in the President's O f f i c e in V a n R a a l t e Hall or in the Intern a t i o n a l Office (Voorhees 21, ext. 2170.) G o r d o n J . V a n Wylen, C h a i r m a n Rotary I n t e r n a t i o n a l C o m m i t t e e

_ _

To read or not to read T o the Editor, T h e Shakespeare M a r a t h o n begins tod a y at n o o n . T h i s fifty h o u r d r a m a t i c r e a d i n g is the b e g i n n i n g of a f u n d raising drive to enrich the DeWitt Cultural Center, to m a k e it more of a center for c u l t u r e . O n e of the ways we h o p e to achieve this goal is to commission a m a j o r piece of s c u l p t u r e for the c e n t e r . M o r t a r Board, the sponsors of the M a r a t h o n and the subsequent drive, would like to t h a n k all students, faculty, a n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r s w h o will be p a r t i c i p a t i n g , both as readers a n d audience. T h e project would not be possible without this supp o r t . W e would also like to t h a n k t h e Greek m e m b e r s w h o will be acting as o u r fund-collectors f r o m t h e s t u d e n t body d u r i n g t h e c o m i n g week.

present at the r e a d i n g t h r o u g h o u t the weekend, a n d t h a t each m e m b e r of the Hope community will make a contribution to the drive in the c o m i n g week. W h e t h e r you decide to r e a d or not to read, this can be a n e n r i c h i n g a n d enjoyable event for all.

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Dear Editor, In response to last week s letter conc e r n i n g the A r c a d i a n T a l e n t show, we acknowledge the criticism of J a n e t Swanson, a n d apologize to any of you w h o were offended. T h e A r c a d i a n Fraternity

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Published during the college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price: $8 per year. Printed by the Hi-Lites Shoppers Guide, Printing Department, Fremont, Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press, United States Student Press Association. Office located on ground floor of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 4600. The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty or administration of Hope College.

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Dear Senator, States mans hip in my opinion urgently requires that the vote on the new C a n a l T r e a t y be Yes! U n d e r present world aspects giving a little now certainly is wiser t h a n risking to lose everything later o n . T h e explanations given by President C a r t e r a n d his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n show t h a t we lose practically n o t h i n g at the C a n a l . O n the contrary, we'll g a i n the respect a n d trust of the rest of the world with such a treaty. We'll a c c u m u l a t e positive good will which we sorely need if we are to r e t a i n any m e a s u r a b l e influence in o t h e r i n t e r n a t i o n a l problems, m a n y of which are m u c h weightier t h a n the P a n a m a Canal a n d with which we have to deal as one of the world's two super powers. Viet N a m should have t a u g h t us t h a t "super power" does n o longer m e a n t h a t we c a n push everybody a r o u n d just as we please. It is distressing t h a t a large p a r t of our nation, maybe a majority, do not seem to have learned any lessons f r o m o u r recent history.

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THOUGHT

T h e H o n o r a b l e R o b e r t Griffin U.S. Senator

Do we w a n t a n o t h e r j u n g l e guerilla war right at o u r back d o o r , a n d do we w a n t to go on alienating Latin-American countries which in t h e f u t u r e will increasingly b e c o m e m o r e i m p o r t a n t for t h e political a n d e c o n o m i c well-being of o u r n a t i o n t h a n any other p a r t of the world? I wonder how m a n y of o u r U.S.-jingoists of today would b e willing to s h o u l d e r t h e rifle t o m o r r o w a n d sweat it out in t h a t P a n a m a n i a n s t e a m i n g tropical c a u l d r o n . W e c a n also b e sure t h a t those intern a t i o n a l powers w h i c h are now delivering the m e a n s a n d e q u i p m e n t f o r stirring u p all t h e present t r o u b l e in various p a r t s of A f r i c a will gleefully h e l p lighting a verit a b l e hell of t r o u b l e right at Uncle S a m ' s b a c k door. If o u r n a t i o n rejects the C a n a l T r e a t y , we t h e n also b e t t e r stop trying to m a k e c a p i t a l out of t h e h u m a n rights issue with which at present we t h i n k we c a n m a k e Russia s q u i r m . All we'll get f r o m the international c o m m u n i t y on h u m a n rights d e m a r c h e s will be a derisive l a u g h t e r . T h i s is also not jus t "Carter's T r e a t y " . T h e r e m u s t have b e e n c o m p e l l i n g reasons f o r Presidents J o h n s o n a n d N i x o n , too, to consider an a d a p t a t i o n of the Canal situation to present d a y world realities as i m p e r a t i v e in t h e interest of l o n g - r a n g e U.S. i n t e r n a t i o n a l goals. Politicians roll with s h o r t - r a n g e political p u n c h e s . S t a t e s m e n should b e above inflexible emotional outbursts of the voting masses which a r e c o n d i t i o n e d on now obsolete a n d n a r r o w sentiments of t h e glorious past. I h o p e t h a t you a r e a s t a t e s m a n a n d t h a t you vote -- YES! Respectfully, G e r h a r d F. Megow

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Dear Editor: Will you please p r i n t my letter to Senator Griffen on t h e P a n a m a C a n a l treaty? My last teaching stint at H o p e was t h e fall semester. Sincerely, G e r h a r d Megow, P h . D .

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March 3,1978

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Adni presents concert W i t h an a l r e a d y s u b s t a n t i a l career throughout Europe, Israel and the F a r East, twenty-seven e a r old D a n i e l A d n i , w h o h a s be en praised as "a pianist with an almost transcendental technique and a fine sense of lyricism," shall be appearing in a piano recital this e v e n i n g in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel at eight o'clock. Mr. Adni, who performs extensively abroad has appeared with virtually all the major orchestras in E n g l a n d including: t h e BBC orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic and the Liverpool Philharmonic. In addition to his England tours, Mr. Adni has given numerous concerts and recitals in the Netherlands, Germany (with the Berlin Radio Orchestra), S w i t z e r l a n d and Africa.

Highlights of Mr. Adni's 1977-78 U . S . t o u r s h a v e included t h e U n i v e r s i t y of C h i c a g o and t h e U n i v e r s i t y of California at Riverside. Mr. Adni's Holland appearance is p r o v i d e d by a Hope Music D e p a r t m e n t subscription to the Young Concert Artists Series which is s i m i l a r to t h e G r e a t P e r f o r m a n c e S e r i e s in t h a t t h e college pays a firm to bring young artists to the campus. M r . Adni, w h o h a s r e l e a s e d sixteen classical recordings thus far in his c a r e e r , shall be performing four works this evening. T h e f i r s t s e l e c t i o n is t h e second of the two sonatas of Opus 27 p o p u l a r l y k n o w n as t h e Moonlight Sonata in C - s h a r p Minor by Ludwig van Beethoven.

T h e s o n a t a s of t h i s p e r i o d of Beethoven's life show a wide range of s t v l e s and f o r m s unlike t h e u s u a l Classical fast-slow-fast movement arrangement. The next work is also a sonata. By Franz Schubert, the Sonata in A Minor is t h e f i r s t of t h r e e s o n a t a s c o m p o s e d in 1825-26 acclaimed by Schumann as being " m a s t e r l y . " S c h u b e r t , in his sonatas, seems to have been influenced more by Haydn and Mozart t h a n by B e e t h o v e n . T h e i r form focuses exclusively on the stand a r d classical p a t t e r n s , b u t a r e more lyric than dramatic. Schubert also avails himself to expansive melodies and harmonic progressions. After a brief intermission, Mr. Adni shall perform three piano-

Tune up your reading skills About 85 per cent of the work you do as a c o l l e g e s t u d e n t involves reading. It is the single most important learning skill, and yet many s t u d e n t s are bogged down in poor reading habits that can make studying a chore. Reading is the visual ability to understand words and their relat i o n s h i p one to a n o t h e r . To improve reading skills you must increase your capacity to see and grasp the groupinc; of words, or ideas, at a speed that is comfortable for you. The key is to move your eyes at a r a t e that allows y o u r b r a i n to a b s o r b t h e main ideas printed on a page. R e m e m b e r , y o u r e y e s , like fingers for the piano or legs for jogging, must be trained to be skillful. If you would like to tune up your reading skills, these basic steps will help. S T E P 1 - E V A L U A T E YOUR READING HABITS DO YOU VOCALIZE WORDS IN YOUR MIND, OR MOVE YOUR LIPS AS YOU READ? You may be using the childhood habit of sounding out each word. This slows you down. DO STRANGE WORDS CONS T A N T L Y STOP YOUR PRO GRESS? Your vocabulary needs improving. DO YOU READ EVERY SINGLE WORD S E P A R A T E L Y ? Train your eyes to span phrases and to g r o u p t h o u g h t u n i t s tntrpthpr DO YOU HAVE TO BACK UP AND REREAD VERY OFTEN? You a r e not p a y i n g a t t e n t i o n . Force yourself to concentrate. DO YOU READ EVERYTHING AT THE SAME SPEED? Your speed should vary with the subject matter. ARE YOU READING FASTER NOW THAN WHEN YOU WERE IN HIGH SCHOOL? Skillful

r e a d i n g is an a r t continual practice.

and

needs

STEP 2 - PROVIDE THE RIGHT ATMOSPHERE To read effectively, you need to set the scene for concentration. Pick a quiet place where you can read with a minimum of interrupt i o n . H a v e a pencil r e a d y for taking notes. M o s t i n d i v i d u a l s find t h a t 15 inches away from their eyes is a c o m f o r t a b l e d i s t a n c e to hold a book. Make sure the lighting is good. Radio, television, and music, all pull your attention away from the words and ideas you are reading. S T E P 3 - U S E YOUR E Y E S EFFICIENTLY The eyes see printed words and transmit them to the brain. They are the key to how well you read. E Y E S P E R C E I V E WORDS ONLY W H E N THEY STOP MOVING OR MAKE WHAT IS CALLED A "FIXATION." During the pause, the brain registers what the eyes have seen. Depending on your eye span, you will perceive one, two or more w o r d s in each f i x a t i o n . The a v e r a g e college s t u d e n t , for example, has a span of 1.1 words and makes 4 fixations per second. By increasing the number of words your eyes include in each fixation, you increase your reading speed. TRAIN YOUR EYES TO TAKE IN MORE THAN ONE WORD AT

A TIME. You can make your eyes fix on related words, phrases, or short lines in one brief stop. This sentence, for example, should be read in five fixations; "The cost of oil/has risen/ because of/ limited natural resources/ and increased imports." VOCALIZING WORDS, EVEN IN YOUR MIND, SLOWS DOWN YOUR E Y E S . DON'T ALLOW YOUR E Y E S TO W A N D E R BACKWARD. Try not to reread sentences. You will find that you remember more if you can keep m o v i n g f o r w a r d . This does not mean, of course, that you cannot review what you have read. MANY PEOPLE NEED G L A S S E S TO R E A D WELL. Blurred words, constantly tired or itching eyes are signals for an eye examination. Don't put it off. T h i s a r t i c l e on r e a d i n g is appearing here in two installments and is one o f - a series of AFP STUDENT SERVICE articles developed by the college textbook p u b l i s h e r s to h e l p s t u d e n t s imrove their use of study time and earning materials. A complimentary booklet will be sent to you if you w r i t e to A A P S T U D E N T SERVICE, Association of American P u b l i s h e r s , Inc., One P a r k A v e n u e , New York, New York

E

10016.

(to be continued next week).

McCombs receives award Bruce McCombs, assistant prof e s s o r of a r t a t Hope College, recently had a print entitled "19071977" awarded the Ralph Fabri prize at the 153rd annual exhibition of the National Academy of Design in New York City. This

e x h i b i t i o n is t h e o l d e s t in t h e United States, established in 1825. McCombs also had prints exhibited in national print exhibitions at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and Trenton State College, Trenton, N.J.

f o r t e p i e c e s by A r n o l d Schoenberg, an Austrian composer of the twentieth century's post-Romanticism period. Though he began to learn t h e violin at age seven and at the s a m e time composed many violin duets, his family did not recognize his musical talent. Finally, with the death of his father, he had to earn his living by working in a bank. There he met t h r e e young men of his own age who helped begin his real musical and l i t e r a r y e d u c a t i o n . Soon Schoenberg was writing numerous compositions including opera, choral a n d o r c h e s t r a l w o r k s and pianoforte music. The three pieces Mr. Adni shall be playing, Massig - Sehr langsam - Bewegt, were written in 1908 for the pianoforte or in more popular terminology, the piano. The word

goes back to t h e early Italian piano builders who needed a name to differentiate between their instrum e n t and t h e m o r e c o m m o n l y known harpsichord. B e c a u s e t h e p i a n o could be played at various dynamic levels (as opposed to the harpsichord) they e:ave it an Italian name pianofc lianolorte - meaning soft and loud. T h e c o n c l u d i n g w o r d s of t h e evening are by Franz Liszt. Born in Hungary in 1811, the life of Liszt was one of the most brilliant of the Romantic era. Added to his fame as a p i a n i s t , c o n d u c t o r a n d c o m p o s e r w a s t h e g l a m o u r of many publicized love affairs with women of high regard and position and also many honors from cities and sovereigns across the Euro(continued on page 6)

Model United Nations on campus next week 400 Students from at least 35 d i f f e r e n t Michigan high schools will visit the campus on March 9th and 10th to participate in the Sixth Annual Hope Model United Nations. This year's Model United N a t i o n s , r u n by t h e Political Science Department, promises to be bigger and better than ever. The Model United Nations has invited Congressman David Stockm a n , R e p u b l i c a n of M i c h i g a n ' s F o u r t h D i s t r i c t , to d e l i v e r t h e keynote address. Congressman Stockman will speak to the high school delegates at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, March 10th -- all interested Hope s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y a r e encouraged to attend. The Congressman will speak in t h e Main T h e a t r e of D e W i t t there should be seats available in the balcony. In c o n n e c t i o n with t h e Hope Alumni in Residence Program, tne Model U.N. will also h a v e Mr. David Boerigter on campus for the entire week. Mr. Boerigter, who is a foreign service officer currently serving as Special Assistant to the California Secretary of State, will address U.N. delegates on March 9th a n d a v a r i e t y of political s c i e n c e and economics c l a s s e s throughout the week. When asked about the purpose

of the program, student director Rob T o r r e s e n e x p l a i n e d , " T h e Model U.N. g i v e s high school students the opportunity to take on the roles of professional diplom a t s and to work with o t n e r delegates in a simulated United Nations." He s t a t e d f u r t h e r , " I t is our hope and goal that each student come away f r o m t h i s o n e - d a y e x p e r i e n c e w i t h an i n c r e a s e d a w a r e n e s s of both t h e U n i t e d Nations and contemporary international issues." T h e d e l e g a t e s p a r t i c i p a t e in S e c u r i t y Councils, a Political C o m m i t t e e , a n d , of c o u r s e , t h e General Assembly (to be held in the Main Theater of DeWitt). The sixty students who participate in the Security Councils arrive on Thursday evening and spend the n i g h t in d o r m i t o r y r o o m s on campus. The issues for this year's Model U n i t e d N a t i o n s include i n t e r n a tional t e r r o r i s m , t r a n s f e r of resources, and crisis situations in South Africa. High school students a r e j u d g e d on t h e i r a b i l i t y to authentically r e p r e s e n t their countries and awards are presented on Friday afternoon. The entire day is always an exciting and educational experience for all involved.

Mascara causes infection Mascara and other eye makeups can cause infection and blindness, the FDA announced recently. After receiving several reports of c o r n e a l u l c e r a t i o n c a u s e d by bacteria introduced when the cornea was scratched, the FDA said it plans to require cosmetic manufacturers to include a preserv a t i v e in m a s c a r a and o t h e r cosmetics. T h e b a c t e r i a is one o f t e n p r e s e n t on t h e skin, and is

absorbed by the cosmetics through .the applicator wand. Without an adequate preservative system the micro-organism can survive and multiply inside the container. When the mascara is used again, if t h e m i c r o - o r g a n i s m s on t h e wand come into contact with a scratched or damaged cornea, the eye can become infected. If the infection isn't treated immediately, it can lead to partial or total blindness in the injured eye.

Orchestra presents concert The Hope Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Robert Ritsema conductor, will present a concert of contempor a r y and r o m a n t i c music on Tuesday, March 7 at 8:00 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Featured on the program will be t h e p e r f o r m a n c e of t w o u n p u b lished compositions, both recent winners of the composition contest sponsored by the National School Orchestra Association. Receiving its first official performance will be the winner of the 1977 contest, Madison Overture, composed by Lowell F r y e of the University of Southern Mississippi. Mr. F r y e describes the work as "being in arch form, using two major themes, the first very active and the second more lyrical. An a t t e m p t w a s m a d e to b a l a n c e dramatic and lyrical qualities, soli and tutti work, and the amount of participation amone the different sections of the orchestra." Second on the program will be Queensmere by S. T. Griebling of A k r o n , Ohio. Queensmere, the winner of the 1976 contest, was first heard in Holland at t h e concert concluding the NSOA summer conference of t h a t year. Concluding the first half of the program will be Chorale Fantasy by William Pressor, a piece built on the chorale melody "Christ lag

in Todesbanden." Following intermission the orchestra will perform the magnificent Symphony Number Two in D Major by Jean Sibelius. This major work replaces on the program the originally-scheduled Symphony Concertante by Jongen for organ and o r c h e s t r a , with organist Roger Davis. The music for the Jongen piece was ntpt available at this time, and has been rescheduled for performance in the fall of

1978. The Sibelius Symphony is one of the most popular of this famous c o m p o s e r ' s w o r k s . It is a t r u e example of late romantic writing, a n d while not b e i n g " p r o g r a m " music in the fullest sense of the word, the work does suggest certain ideas of the beauties of nature and the patriotic ideals of the composer's native Finland. The concert is open to the public free of charge.

\

Looking for signs of Spring The Hope Band wants to help c u r e y o u r w i n t e r d o l d r u m s . On Friday evening, March 10 at 8:00 p.m. in the Kletz, the Band will make a valiant a t t e m p t to top Prof. Wayne Boulton's performance of "God spell" which rocked the r a f t e r s at last year's concert. Guest conductors this year include D r . M e r e d i t h Blackwell of t h e Biology D e p a r t m e n t w h o will share t h e podium with Dr. Donald Williams in a production number by Spike Jones. The script for this tour de force was written by Kirk Hoopingarner and will include t h e appearance of Judi White, soprano and Michael Smit, baritone. The program will

also include t h e impromptu painting of an a b s t r a c t i o n by P r o f . Delbert Michel. His painting will be c o - o r d i n a t e d with a p e r f o r mance by the Band of Hale Smith's Expansions. The Hope Band's Kletz Concerts are part of a long-standing tradition involving t h e students' favorite professors in light-hearted and humour encounters with the Band. The Band will also perform "Pop" numbers, including "Mars" from the Planets of Gustan Hoist and a l i t t l e - k n o w n b a l l e t s u i t e of Sir A r t h u r Sullivan. Seating is inform a l a n d r e f r e s h m e n t s will b e available in t h e Kletz.

5. MINOTAUR IN JEOPARDY

SCULPTURE •

DRAWINGS •

PAINTINGS •

ETCHINGS

HOPE COLLEGE DE WITT CULTURAL CENTER GALLERY HOLLAND, MICHIGAN FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 23, 1978


Page 4

Hope College anchor

No Nukes (continued

from page 1)

city in the U.S. is vulnerable, in event of a nuclear accident, to a frantic a t t e m p t at evacuation. Detroit was on the brink in 1966, and Boston, New York, Philadelphia, P i t t s b u r g , Chicago and Los Aneeles a r e only a few of the cities within 50 miles of active plants. It's also in the cities tnat the energy economy must ultimately be balanced. Inefficient factories, wasteful skyscrapers and inadeq u a t e public t r a n s p o r t a t i o n are a s s a u l t s a g a i n s t n a t u r e . Any effective campaign to change that must combine tne need for jobs with a revitalized neighborhood e n v i r o n m e n t and a localized energy supply. It's an image that seems fartetched but urban use of solar and wind power is already being pioneered at the East 11th S t r e e t project in Manhattan, and elsewhere. Power t h a t is corporate, expensive and rural-generated can only prolong this country's innercity agony. A sane urban energy scene-and a movement based t h e r e to achieve it- is as essential to stopping nukes as it is to humanizing city life. The nuclear industry has also displayed an amazing knack for sitting reactors on Native American burial grounds. J n d i a n lands contain a high percentage of this country's uranium reserves (from ten to 90 percent depending on sources), and a significant number of N a t i v e A m e r i c a n s mine t h e stuff, and get cancer from it. The u n y i e l d i n g r e p r e s s i o n of N a t i v e American activism stems at least in part from the politics of coal and nuclear fuel; so does the current c a m p a i g n of f o r c e d s t e r i l i z a t i o n ( a f f e c t i n g 24 p e r c e n t of N a t i v e American women, according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs) and the almost nonexistent food and health p r o g r a m s on t h e r e s e r v a t i o n s .

N a t i v e A m e r i c a n s h a v e long played an active role in the antinuclear campaign, and the issue is i n s e p a r a b l e f r o m t h e h i s t o r y of Government attacks on them. Nor can it be seen apart from t h e r e v e r b e r a t i o n s in S o u t h Africa, where 20 percent of the West's uranium reserves reside, and in the third world, where the acquisition of reactors significantly ups the odds on a nuclear holocaust. 1978 is opening onto one of those s p e c i a l e r a s w h e n social c r i s e s b r i n g a d r a m a t i c u p s u r g e in h u m a n e n e r g y a i m e d at b r o a d social change. For all the obvious reasons, the anti-nuclear campaign is currently in the vanguard. Major a t t e m p s to stop reactor construction, snut down existing plants and force a showdown over nuclear weapons and waste storage can be expected at a score of atomic sites tnroughout the U.S. by this summer. The industry is down, but far from out. Even a m o r a t o r i u m on new p l a n t s will leave several hundred reactors operating here and abroad, and a giant weapons industry sucking up r e s o u r c e s , c h u r n i n g out w a s t e s a n d t h r e a t e n i n g i n s t a n t annihilation. A n u c l e a r e c o n o m y is a w a r economy, and atomic reactors, instruments of corporate terror. As long as they operate, there will be a negative tension in human life that makes all other moves toward social harmony that much more difficult.

pressure point-the rate-hike issue -can only transpire in a nonviolent atmosphere. Overall, nonviolent d i r e c t a c t i o n is a t a c t i c w h o s e p o w e r w e ' r e j u s t b e g i n n i n g to explore. It is wrapped up in a way of life t h a t is bound to have growing appeal in a choking, conflictridden world. Indeed, peaceful resistance may well be to traditional politics what s o l a r p o w e r is to e n e r g y ; t h e reality is not yet fully tangible, but the potential is infinite. Together they seem our best hope-maybe our only hope-for a human future. Ask a neighbor about it.

"Is he serious? The way to find out is to have a baby," says Dr. Marijean Suelzle about the rise in teenage pregnancies. Dr. Suelzle, an assistant professor, at Northwestern University, said t h a t the dramatic increase in teenage pregnancy is caused by teens wanting to become adults and test the relationship. A John Hopkins University study released in t h e beginning of F e b r u a r y s h o w e d a 33 p e r c e n t increase nation-wide in teen pregnancies between 1971 and 1976. "Why else, when young people know about birth control, would t h e y k e e p h a v i n g b a b i e s ? " Dr. Suelzle asked. Dr. Suelzle believes, "It's a rea f f i r m a t i o n of f e m i n i n i t y and a testing of the relationship with the male. "But the big thing is affirmation of adult status. You want desperately to be grown up so you say, 'Look, I've got this child so you have to t r e a t me as an adult.' "One result has been that the teen keeps the child instead of

A f t e r t h e ' g r o u p ' r e i g n e d supreme musically in t h e Sixties, we came into this decade waiting for a musical messiah to dominate the era the way that the Beatles once did. It n e v e r h a p p e n e d and contemporary music diversified as a result, destroying rock-rhethoric and absorbing influences of jazz, c o u n t r y and classical into t h a t t h r o w a w a y g e n r e k n o w n as Rock-n-Roll. M o r e r e c e n t l y t h e solo a r t i s t has b e c o m e p o p u l a r again, whether your tastes are for Frank Zappa or Linda Ronstadt. Singer songwriters too are enjdying a bit of a comeback. Three artists with roots stretching back to t h e S i x t i e s h a v e recently released new albums to mixed reviews: Leonard Cohen; But if t h e nukes are the war J o n i Mitchell; a n d R a n d y Newbrought home, then the movement m a n . All t h r e e h a v e d i s t i n c t i v e to stop them must be one of peace. styles, but are united by commitThe major breakthroughs in anti- ment to t h e material they perform. nuclear politics have come through E a c h h a s had t h e i r s n a r e of an ability to communicate with a p o p u l a r and c r i t i c a l s u c c e s s e s , diverse citizenry on a person-to- either by themselves or through person basis. The Clamshell is now i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of t h e i r s o n g s . asking that future occupiers do Cohen/Mitchell/Newman songs ofneighborhood canvassing before ten contain lyrics t h a t can stand on they sit down at the site; and the their own, away from the melodies a t t a c k on t h e i n d u s t r y ' s p r i m e of the song, yet are sometimes over-shadowed by the tune. The respective albums they produce a r e all s e p a r a t e e n t i t i e s . T h e y don't have formulas for the giving it up for a d o p t i o n . The c o n t e n t of t h e i r a l b u m s , a s is quality of the child's upbringing common of the hard-sell commersuffers. cialism in music t o d a y . They "Then the child ends up a proc h a l l e n g e t h e i r a u d i e n c e s and blem in child care, because the themselves -- experimenting and teenager eventually finds out she sometimes failing. can't handle it and the child is Randy Newman has gotten a lot placed for adoption at a later time. of publicity lately for a song of his "Many of the biggest problems entitled "Short People," which has in child care come from a teenage, received more attention than it single-parent background. Some deserves for its attack of bigotry teens make good parents, but not misunderstood as a slur against many are qualified." the non-tall. It is a selection from The John Hopkins study noted Newman's fifth studio album Little that about 93 percent of babies Criminals, and is an attempt to cut born to teenagers out of wedlock in on the A.M. market. So far it are kept by the mother. has w o r k e d . U n f o r t u n a t e l y his It also stated that only one in songs seem a bit weaker this time every seven teenagers interaround. It also appears t h a t the viewed used contraceptives. r e c o r d h a s been f l a w l e s s l y proDr. C. H. Moss, president of the duced in order to compensate. The Voluntary Sterilization Associa- orchestration is as lush as ever, tion of Indiana, said contraceptives emphasizing the effect of a sound are shunned because planning for track for Newman's little tales of sex is seen as sinful. Americana. The strings especially " W e ' v e r u n into s i t u a t i o n s are used more effectively than where a young person won't use ever before. The Eagles are an contraceptives because she consi- interesting addition as back up to d e r s she is s i n f u l for t h i n k i n g Newman's somewhat slurred and about sex. The assumption is if she somnambulent lead vocals. Esped o e s n ' t t a k e t h e pill she isn't cially on "Rider In The Rain," an sinful. absurd little ditty about a foppish "But she's pregnant." c o w b o y , s t r a i g h t out of Andy Warhol's movie "Lonesome Cowboys." Contrasted with this is the beautiful simplicity of a song like "I'll Be Home" which was once recorded by Harry Nillson. Newman's adaptation of a personae is well used in a number of songs, among them "Texas Girl At Her F a t h e r ' s Funeral" and "Sigmund Freud's Impersonation of Albert Einstein In America," t h e latter dealing with our country's subliminal machismo. As always, there is t h e a m b i v a l e n c e of N e w m a n ' s approach to his material which is both ironic and poignant to the listener. There a r e flaws in the package of course, but a f t e r three y e a r s of a s e l f - d e s c r i b e d " d r y spell" it is good to hear music of thought again. Leonard Cohen's songs in the past have expressed a repressed sensuality mounting in climactic

Hope lost its nineteenth annual battle with Calvin. (See story page 6)

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" S h a k e s p e a r e L i v e s ... P u t Culture in Your Center" will be t h e t h e m e of a 50-hour long reading marathon of the works of S h a k e s p e a r e by a p p r o x i m a t e l y 100 H o p e s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y a n d staff members, beginning today. The marathon, sponsored by the Hope Chapter of Mortar Board, will be the kickoff event for a fundraising effort to finance the commissioning of a sculpture for t h e College's student and cultural center.

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Studies concur.... Pregnancy tests relationships by Signey Jay Lazarus Campus Digest News Service

Culture to fill center

DELS GUITARSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;BANJOS MANDOLINS AND FIDDLES STRING INSTRUMENT CONSTRUCTION/REPAIRS 23 E. 8th St., Holland

The sculpture will have a theme which focuses on f u r t h e r i n g the position of women in society. It is noped t h a t a woman sculptor will be commissioned to undertake the project. T h e p a r t i c i p a n t s will m o u n t ladders in the College's DeWitt Student and Cultural Center at noon F r i d a y , f o r t h e n o n - s t o p r e a d i n g . It is e x p e c t e d t h a t between 15 to 20 of Shakespeare's works will be read.

solo artists regain prominence

b a t t l e s b e t w e e n its male and f e m a l e p r o t a g o n i s t s or b e t w e e n t h e male and female in oneself. M o s t f a m o u s f o r his s o n g "Suz a n n e , " Cohen himself u s u a l l y comes across as vulnerable and sensitive in these mock epics with simple light melodies. " D e a t h Of A L a d i e s M a n , " Cohen's latest album, exchanges i t ' s t h e m e of s e n s u a l i t y for sexuality and possibly a touch of misogyny added for good measure. T h e p a i r i n g of t h i s i n t r o v e r t e d balladeer with the flamboyant Phil Spector produces a most unusual partnership that exaggerates both gentlemen's weak points. The music, for the most part written by S p e c t o r ( i n f a m o u s for t h e echo-chamber, wall of sound effect, of such tunes as the original "Da Do Ron Ron"), is loud, layered and a t r i f l e dull a l m o s t o b s c u r i n g Cohen's lyrics and vocals. As for t h e l y r i c s t h e m s e l v e s , they are much darker and graphic this time around. There can be nothing said to be subtle in a song e n t i t l e d " D o n ' t Go H o m e W i t h Your Hard-On." The album is a bit hard to listen to due to it's sordid and depressing nature, although a f r i e n d of mind who had b e e n h a v i n g a d i f f i c u l t t i m e in his romantic relationships was sympathetic of Cohen. The title tune is a near ten minute cut detailing a psychic confrontation between two members of the opposite sex, and the man's ultimate fall from grace. The earthiness of his songs has turned to mud. The reason could very well be t h a t Spector, without c o n s i d e r a t i o n of a n y o n e else associated with the album, decided to r e l e a s e t h e m a t e r i a l on t h e record from the demo tapes that he c o n f i s c a t e d a n d s o l i t a r i l y mixed. If novelty is your bag, you may enjoy Cohen's trip through his personalized hell. Otherwise check out t h e r e s t of L e o n a r d Cohen's catalog of records, which if not b e a u t i f u l , a r e at l e a s t intelligent. Joni Mitchell recently released her double album entitled "Don Juan's Reckless Daughter" which is her most divergent album to date. There is only one song on the s e t t h a t is r e m i n i s c e n t of her earlier folk posturings, with the majority of material even more

heavily jazz influenced than her last few albums. The musicians are about the same as on her "Hejira" album of a year ago. Most of them a r e from Weather Report. Their influence is quite strong, as bass and percussion are more noticea b l e , e s p e c i a l l y on " T h e T e n t h World" Mitchell's first instrumental collaboration with Airto and Chaka Khan among others letting loose. Also included in the package is a 16 minute side called "Paprika Plains" with Mitchell's r e t u r n to the piano in an improvisation with o r c h e s t r a t i o n d u b b e d in. T h e majority of the lyrics presented on the sleeve are not sung and meant to be read silently to oneself. The n a m e s a k e of t h e a l b u m h a s Mitchell describing the separation of mind and body which is mostly Castenada, Little Byron. Two of the songs on t h e album have been previewed before: " J e r i c h o , " which o r i g i n a l l y appeared on Mitchell's live album " M i l e s of A i s l e s " ; and " D r e a m land" which was written while on the Rolling Thunder Review and later recorded by fellow compat r i o t R o g e r McGuin. M c G u i n ' s version of "Dreamland" strangely enough sounds more Mitchellish t h a n J o n i ' s own r e n d i t i o n . T h i s s h o w s t h a t Michell will not fit herself into a mold and imitate her p a s t w o r k s . T h e s o n g on t h e record that has gotten the most criticism/acclaim is a track titled "Talk To Me," which has Mitchell t r y i n g to m a k e c o n t a c t w i t h a silent lover, through small talk, a n y t h i n g , to t r y and gain a response from him. It is c u r i o u s why Mitchell decided to release a two record set which contains barely six minutes more material than her previous album. True, it is a bit self-indulgent, something Mitchell has been accused of ofttimes. It seems more a transitional piece than anything else, with its random mixture of personal (painfully so) and quazipolitical s o n g s . T h e r e is no d i s c e r n a b l e c o n c e p t h e r e as on " H e j i r a ' s " t h e m e of e s c a p e and flight. Still, it is vital music. It makes one wonder where Mitchell will go next. She will undoubtedly lose a few l i s t e n e r s w i t h t h i s project, but she will gain some too. "It's just in dreams we fly."

P/1NOPOULOS S/1LONS HOLMND IQ. 701 Washington Ave Holland, Michigan 49423 (616) 392-8543

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Writers: You can win $100; $50; or $25 in cash and book prizes for best short story, humorous essay, or other short pieces between 250 and 1000 words - with free copy of w i n n i n g C O L L E G E CONTEMPORARIES Magazine for all - if you enter the Collegiate Creative Writing Contest whose deadline is APRIL 25. For rules and official entry form, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: International Publications, 4747 Fountain Ave., Dept. C-3, Los Angeles, CA 90029.

Friends of animals hold contest W A N T E D FOR RESEARCH: Information pertaining to the Bush and Lane Piano Company, located in Holland between 1901 and 1930. Any data or literature, especially pertaining to player piano production would be useful. Please contact Bill Burkhardt, 1145 Lakeside Dr. SE, Grand Rapids, Ml 49506.

Smokers ....beware!!! by S. Jayu Lazarus Campus Digest News Service His breathing started to return to normal; she was still panting a little. He reached over to the night table, groped around till he found the pack of cigarettes. He shook one out of the pack, put it in his mouth, and lit up. Smoke curled off the burning tip of the cigarette as it glowed in the dark. He inhaled, felt the smoke move gently into his lungs, then exhaled through his nose and mouth, the smoke looking like a big, gray, amorphous cloud. The gray cloud of smoke from a cigarette is a complex mixture of approximately 1,000 different substances and trillions of separate particles, all of them mixing and merging, breaking down and rec o m b i n i n g to form new compounds. Over the years, scientists have been able to analyze these subs t a n c e s and i d e n t i f y t h o s e subs t a n c e s t h a t c a u s e p r o b l e m s to smokers and nonsmokers. In a journal published by the American Cancer Society, a Utah internist summarized what scientists have learned to date about cigarettes, their smoke, and its effect on the lungs. As the smoker draws on the cigarette, the tip of the cigarette can reach temperatures of 1600 degrees fahrenheit, yet even at this t e m p e r a t u r e t h e tobacco b u r n s incompletely, producing the smoke that is drawn into the lungs. As the smoke travels into the mouth, some of its components are filtered out by the unburnt tobacco. These components will turn to s m o k e when t h e e m b e r s r e a c h

them; doctors say this is why the smaller a cigarette gets, the more concentrated the smoke gets. If the cigarette is smoked to the end, it will produce about one-fifth an ounce ol smoke. Scientists say 85 percent of the smoke, by weight, consists of relatively harmless nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide gases. About half of the remainder is a mixture of fine particles, and the rest is water and toxic gases. The tens of trillions (a million billion or so) of fine particles are made up of nicotine and tar, a general name for the compound t h a t c o n t a i n s s e v e r a l cancercausing agents. Nicotine is, among other things, a nerve stimulant which increases blood pressure and heart rate, and stimulates the adrenal glands to p u t out m o r e " f i g h t or f l i g h t " hormones. All this activity increases the heart's need for oxygen. In a normal individual, t h i s extra oxygen is easily supplied. But, if the arteries that supply the heart with oxygen-rich blood have become narrowed by fatty deposits, they may not be able to meet this demand. The r e s u l t could be mild or e x t e n s i v e d a m a g e to t h e h e a r t muscle. In combination with nicotine, which i n c r e a s e s t h e h e a r t ' s demand for o x y g e n , carbon monoxide, by decreasing the available o x y g e n , may c o n t r i b u t e to t h e development of heart disease. Cigarette smoke also contains acrolein, nitrogen dioxide, formald y h y d e , h y d r o g e n sulfide and a m m o n i a , all which i r r i t a t e t h e lungs. Acrolein and phenol, in combination with other gases can produce

FOR SALE: 1967 Mercedes Call Grand Rapids, 949-2829.

Benz.

C L O T H I N G repaired, remodeled, made to order. Call 396-4887. F R E E L A N C E ARTIST and Private art instructor: Call Gary at 392-3843 for creative services.

cancer because they are cocarinogens. The same gas used to execute prisoners in gas chambers, hydrogen cyanide, is present in cigarette smoke. All of these gases and particles go into a smoker's mouth, nose and throat after every puff. One reason for a high rate of mouth cancer among smokers is because some of the particles and gases are absorbed by the mouth tissue. The rest go into the lungs where they can stick to the bronchial t u b e s , or be a b s o r b e d into t h e b l o o d s t r e a m . Because of t h a t , smokers have: --A 30 times greater chance of lung cancer than nonsmokers. --Ten times greater chance of chronic b r o n c h i t i s and emphysema. --Double t h e risk of h e a r t disease. --One and a half times the risk of a stroke. -Double the death rate of any age over nonsmokers. Notes Dr. John Holbrook, assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah, "An a v e r a g e 30-year-old male who smokes 15 cigarettes a day may expect to lose five and a half years of life." He puffed on the cigarette for several minutes, blowing little smoke rings and pretending he was a dragon and blowing smoke out of his nose. Lying at his side, she smelled the smoke and wrinkled her nose. He laughed and went on smoking. He lit a second cigarette but fell asleep while smoking it. Their house burnt down.

THE FURTHER UP FURTHER INN now open! 336 College.

$3,500 - $2,500 - $2,000 - to be awarded to the three top essayists by Friends of Animals, Inc. The Regina Bauer Frankenberg S c h o l a r s h i p c o n t e s t is aimed at fostering interest in changing the relationship between humans and other life forms. Awards will be given to students who present the t h r e e best e s s a y s i n c o r p o r a t i n g animal rights principles in support of a Federal legislative campaign. The subject of the essay is, "Why should Congress, on behalf of the people, t h e animals and t h e e n v i r o n m e n t , ban t h e leg-hold trap?" For f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n and entry form, please write: Friends of Animals, Scholarship Committee, 11 West 60th Street, New York. NY 10023.

Book swindler afoot A p e r s o n using t h e name of David Rule, r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e American Text Book Company, is going from one campus to another offering to buy sample and used books. Instead of paying cash for t h e books, he l e a v e s a r e c e i p t stating that he will check the value and return with cash. He states that the faculty member can have the books back if he does not agree with the value. THE PROBLEM

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IS T H A T HE DOES NOT RETURN. Hillsdale College lost 51 books valued at $500.00 by this person and Calvin College has also been visited. If you are approached by this person, please ca the Department of Public Safety, le is described as a white male, in his late 40's, 6'2", silver or graying hair, neat conservative dresser.

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Mickey Mouse loses in Finland (CPS) - W h a t could be m o r e i n n o c e n t t h a n Donald Duck? Authorities in Helsinki think they have the answer. T h e w a t e r - l o g g e d w o n d e r of Disney films is being banned in Helsinki libraries because officials say that his lifestyle is too racy and sets a bad example. T h e c a r e f r e e duck w i t h t h e sailor hat has been "going steady with the same woman for 50 years without result and this is hardly a model f o r t h e y o u n g , " M a t t i Holopainen, chairman of Helsinki's youth committee, told a recent city council meeting. Donald's lifestyle clearly raised some official h a s s l e s . N o t e v e n Uncle Scrooge and nephews Huey,

D e w e y and Looey escaped scrutiny. The Donald Duck stories feature "not a single normal family, just aunts and uncles and nephews," Holopainen complained. D o n a l d , known in Finnish as "Aku Ankka," enjoys a circulation of almost 300,000 in Finland. This is not the first time Donald Duck has come under attack. Leftoriented groups complained about t h e ' b o u r g e o i s ' view of life presented in Disney features while other critics taking a more nationalistic tack, urged Finnish artists to produce a domestic series of comic book heroes. A c h i l d r e n ' s h o m e in t h e C o m m u n i s t P a r t y -- d o m i n a t e d

city of Kemi cancelled its Donald Duck subscription two years ago. B u t while Donald is g e t t i n g ducked in Finland, all is well with Mickey Mouse, known as "Mikki Hiiri" who appears to pass the censors in Finland.

AVON can help you pay tuition bills. Sell in your spare time. Men and women are invited to call Mrs. Janet Kemp, Avon Managef, 392-6238

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Hope College anchor

Page 6

19th straight time Dutch lose to Calvin F o r the 19th consecutive time H o p e h a s lost t o C a l v i n in basketball. The traditional rivalry, begun in 1917, shows t h e Knights to have a 45-44 edge. T h e 75-69 decision dropped the Dutch to 4-7 in the MIAA and fifth place. Calvin jumped out to a 24-19 lead and upped t h a t to 39-33 in the first half. T n e standing room only crowd saw Mark Hospers score five points and J i m Holwerda two points to close t h e gap to one at nalftime, 41-40. Cold s h o o t i n g p l a g u e d t h e

Your Horoscope...

Dutch (39 percent for t h e game), and t h e K n i g h t s slowly built a 70-61 lead with 3:37 left. A basket by Holwerda, two free t h r o w s and a basket by Chris P e t e r s o n gave the Dutch fans hope with only 1:05 remaining. But it was not to be as t w o f r e e t h r o w s by M a r t y G r a s m e y e r put t h e game out of reach. Holwerda was the leading scorer of the game with 18 points while P e t e r s o n t h r e w in 16. Mark Hospers and Scott P e t e r s o n added 12 apiece.

Grapplers claim fifth Hope's women's varsity basketball took third place in the MIAA Division III t o u r n a m e n t held at Alma this past w e e k e n d . Hope defeated Olivet by the score of 76 to 73. High scorer for Hope was Connie Reitberg with 16 points. Barb Geeting had 12 points. Pat Henry led the rebounding with 16. Hope lost the first game of the t o u r n a m e n t to t h e h o s t t e a m . Alma, 67 to 53. High scorer in the g a m e was Sue Gebhart with 16. P a t H e n r y p u l l e d d o w n 11 rebounds. Earlier last week Hope hosted Kalamazoo and Alma at the

Armory. Against Kazoo, Hope lost 51 to 41. They w e r e down by 4 w i t h 41 s e c o n d s t o go, b u t committed some costly fouls. Top s c o r e r and r e b o u n d i n g in t h a t game went to Mary Aufderheide, with 11 and 10 respectively. On Thursday of t h a t week t h e y played A l m a , l o s i n g 64 to 55. B a r b Geeting was high for t h a t g,jame with 16 points. Again P a t H( lenry led the rebounding with 1 This weekend Hop(e travels to Adrian to play in tn e SMAIAW s t a t e tournament.

ARIES: (March 21 to April 19A l s o A r i e s A8cendant)-A " l o v e a t f i r s t s i g h t " k i n d of r o m a n c e could happen to you now. You a r e popular, dynamic, and your socialemotional life is a dramatic whirl. Creative juices run high. Carefully c h e c k o u t all t i p s or s e c r e t information. TAURUS: (April 20 to May 20Also Taurus Ascendant-Enjoy your happiness mood. Cultivate y o u r h o b b y t a l e n t s . A t r i p is ossible. Study courses are a v o r e d t h a t p r e p a r e you f o r f u t u r e e x p e r t i s e . U s e self-discipline and p e r s e v e r . Don't mix emotions witn business matters. GEMINI: (May 21 to June 21Also Gemini Ascendant)-You could be very nervous, t e n s e and highs t r u n g while waiting to see how a m a j o r m a t t e r will t u r n out. Avoid s t i m u l a n t s or anything that adds to your nervousness. Guard your tongue and t e m p e r . You are about to s t a r t a whole new life. CANCER: (June 22 to July 21Also Cancer Ascendant-Investm e n t opportunities may be around you now and previous ones could b e p a y i n g o f f . All s t u d y and schooling e f f o r t s bring positive results. Take t h e time to get out socially when invited. Enjoy yourself without guilt. LEO: (July 22 to Aug. 21-A180 Leo A8cendant)-Get out in nature

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Women Cagers place third The Hope W r e s t l i n g Squad ended a disappointing season last weekend by placing fifth in the MIAA out of six teams. C a p t a i n B a r t Rizzo a n d Mike Sutton, Hope's two best wrestlers this season, w e r e seeded first in their respective weight classes. B o t h , h o w e v e r , lost o p e n i n g m a t c h e s to t o u g h u n s e e d e d opponents and failed to place. D i r k D o o r e n b o s and P a u l Garmirian wrestled well enough to t a k e third places at 126 and 150 respectively. Cliff Nicholson, out all season due to injury, came back to upset t h e number one seed at 190 and place second. Nicholson was up 5-3 with a minute remaining in the match, but ran out of ?as and ended up losing t h e match. Coach G e o r g e K r a f t w a s disappointed in the results but looks

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and the open air to satisfy your restless spring fever feelings. T a k e a t r i p if o f f e r e d . C u r b a r r o g a n t a t t i t u d e s if you a r e c r i t i c i z e d . Be c o o p e r a t i v e , n o t dominating, in family m a t t e r s . Be unselfish. VIRGO: (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22Also Virgo Ascendant)-You could b e t o u c h y n o w , so k e e p a low pr6file, if you feel misunderstood, unable to communicate, get off by yourself for a bit of pampering. Use your sensitivity to enjoy t h e a r t s , music, and c r e a t u r e comforts. LIBRA: (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22-A180 Libra A8cendant)-Use your w a r m e s t , most charming personality to i m p r e s s bosses and VIPs. Maintain leadership and powercontrol with the light touch. Be alert for tips or advice about your career performance. Don't listen to gossip. SCORPIO: (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21A l s o Scorpio A s c e n d a n t M f you use p e r s u a s i v e n e s s and charm, you can put over a long-cherished dream. Meet c u r r e n t and past obligations happily. Get financial accounts in order and d e t e r m i n e not to overspend. Oversocializing could prove hectic. SAGITARIUS: (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21-Also S a g i t a r i u s A s c e n d a n t ) A t t e n t to detail m a t t e r s such as correspondence, bills, budget, etc. Be a charming influence on m a t e

or p a r t n e r . Be p r o m p t for appointm e n t s and don't woolgather while driving. Don't act impulsivelysituations change. CAPRICORN: (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19-Also Capricorn A8cendant)-A s h o r t t r i p t o v i s i t r e l a t i v e s is possible. Maintain harmony within the family. In c a r e e r m a t t e r s , use y o u r o w n j u d g m e n t in m a k i n g decisions. Curb t e m p e r a m e n t a l o u t b u r s t s . Try t o be m o r e calm. AQUARIUS: (Jan. 20 to Feb. IS-Also A q u a r i u s A s c e n d a n t Channel your high energy and g e t on the ball to clear up work. T r u s t your intuitive hunches-make new s t a r t s . Finances improve and career m a t t e r s prosper through some unexpected or s t r a n g e way. Consult e x p e r t s before investing. P I S C E S : ( F e b 19 t o March 20-A18O Pisces A8cendant)-Expand your horizons. S t a r t a new hobby or join a new group. Keep appointm e n t s promptly and m e e t deadlines-then get out socially. Be a l e r t for a b u s i n e s s o p p o r t u n i t y and when a t work, k e e p your mind on your work.

SAC Activities Calendar MARCH 3 Film: Lady Sings the Blues, 6:30, 9:00, & 11:30, Winants. Hope students $1.00, guests $1.30. MARCH 4 Casino DeWitt nightclub.

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forward to the returning grapplers and t h e recruits for next year. The Dutchmen w e r e 0-4 in the MIAA and 2-11 overall.

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pean continent. The opening Liszt piece is the well known Mephisto Waltz - the first one, followed by the eleventh and twelfth Hungarian Rhapsodies (Incidentally, t h e r e are nineteen). These are pieces of gypsy music as opposed to native Hungarian folk tunes which Liszt and o t h e r nineteenth century composers thought they were. Daniel Adni's performance tonight is a presentation of t h e Hope Music D e p a r t m e n t and is f r e e of charge to t h e public.

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George F. Baker Scholarship offered The George F. Baker Scholarship P r o g r a m has been established at Hope to aid promising students intent on a career in business. This s c h o l a r s h i p is not r e s t r i c t e d , however, to m a j o r s in Economics and Business. Majors from other disciplines who are interested in pursuing a career in business are welcome to apply. Baker Scholars a r e selected for t h e i r l e a d e r s h i p q u a l i t i e s , character, and academic record. Any S o p h o m o r e w h o is in good s t a n d i n g with Hope may apply for t h i s a w a r d . In s p e c i a l c a s e s a J u n i o r may be considered. Each scholarship will continue

for a maximum of two successive undergraduate years, provided t h e recipient maintains the personal and academic s t a n d a r d s expected of scholarship holders. During the undergraduate period. Baker Scholarship holders attend weekly seminars with individuals who have distinguished themselves in t h e field of business. These seminars may include visits to businesses and factories. T h e deadline for applying for a B a k e r S c h o l a r s h i p is M a r c h 10. Applications a r e available at t h e P r o v o s t ' s Office. Van Raalte Hall.

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03-03-1978  

03-03-1978