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Hope College

nchor

Holland, Michigan

A student-run nonprofit publication

February I 999 Let's g e t r e a d y t o r u m b l e

S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r I 12 y e a r s

check C h a p e l series discusses love a n d s e x u a l i t y it out. D A N A LAMERS religion e d i t o r

Students cautioned against tresspassing Campusbeat, p a g e 2.

Rcccnl religious tension on campus has again began lo builcl up, mainly as Ihe campus prepares for the visil of Mario Bergner who will speak from experience of his "healed" homosexuality. Bergner will visil campus as pari of a Campus Ministries series on human sexualily which began Sunday, Feb. 21 and will c o n l i n u e through Sunday, March 17.

"The series is aboul understanding the order, foundation, and structure God laid when he made us," Dean of Chapel Ben Patterson said during last Sunday's Gathering message. Some are a bit apprehensive of what effect Bergner's message will have on the campus. "I fear that students who haven't formed their own opinions may be affected negatively," said A m a n d a Schneider ('99). "I want to get all the i n f o r m a t i o n out there, so they can make wise choices. I don't want this

to be a step back for communication on campus." Some students have been suprised at the Chapel's stance on the issue. Miriam Khadija ('01) doesn't attend T h e G a t h e r i n g s e r v i c e s o f t e n , but opted lo attend last Sunday night. "I guess I didn't realize thai this side of the stale is so conservative. T h e chaplain staff seems big on pushing controversial issues. I felt uncomfortable being there; it fell so strict, so closeminded," she said. "It's not something I'm exiciled lo go to again. Ev-

ery lime I've gone it makes me miss my church back home, at home I fell so much love. At the chapel I feel like if I don't do something they way they want, they're not going lo accept me." As sides may appear to be drawn, ihere has been a large emphasis on listening to and respecting each other. "I think that the reason this is such an intense issue is that it is so intensely personal. We all come to discussions on human sexualily with our own experiences," said Krislen Gray, Assism o r e SERIES on 3

Help wanted •

Student Develpment left with vacancies as Goebel and Bazuin announce plans to leave.

RITA SPIRES. SARA E LAMERS staff r e p o r t e r , c a m p u s b e a t e d i t o r

SAC geared for annual

Siblings' Weekend Campusbeat, p a g e 2.

Concerto competition to take place Intermission, p a g e 6.

Lenten season presents a time for reflection Spotlight, p a g e 8.

Julie G o e b e l , Director of Residential Life, announced that this would be her last semester at Hope as she prepares lo leave in June. "I think il is a good time for me to move on," Goebel said of her reason lo leave Hope. "I have really enjoyed working with the resident directors. They are a very dedicated group." Dean of Students Richard Frost is currently conducting a national search for replacements of both Goebel and Doug Bazuin, Resident Director of Kollen H a l t Bazuin will leave Hope on March 10, and Frost plans to have the positions filled by July I. He has already received applications for Goebel's position, after sending oul letters to several colleges and graduate schools nation-wide asking them lo nominate potential candidates. Bazuin has accepted a Residential Director posi, lion at Kcnyon College in Ohio, which he will begin on March 15. "I wish Doug and Julie ihe very best as they look loward new opportunities and thank them for their c o n t r i b u t i o n s to H o p e , " Frosl said. "I would like lo express my appreciation for their fine work." J. G o e b e l Bazuin feels like he is ready for this challenge and thinks he will fit in well with ihe college. "Kenyon College is afitfor me, and I amfitfor the college." he said. "Sometimes you just know when something is right." Jackie Williams ('00), Assistant Resident Director of Kollen, will accept some of the community responsibililies left by Bazuin. Nancy Shrode, Resident more RESIDENTIAL on 9

Anchor

LOVE Y O U R

M O T H E R

EARTH:

p\-\oXo

by J o h n a t h a n M u e n k

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. spoke on

our environmental destiny on Thursday, Feb 18 in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Kennedy was part of Student Congress9Annual Speaker Series. Please see story on page 2.

Discussion b o a r d proposed ERIN H U B B A R D staff r e p o r t e r

Willi the ink still wet on R.I.S.E.'s constitution, founding member Amanda Schneider ('99) has returned to the Campus Life Board with a new proposal. Her idea is for a bulletin board where inslead of tacking up adverlisements and want-ads, students could post their ideas, thoughts and opinions on current issues. ' T h i s is a way lo keep campus dialogue going," Schneider said. "Students will have the opportunity lo sit down and think oul what they are going to say." Schneider look the idea before the Campus Life Board, who supported il and turned il over lo Student Congress.

"We fell il would be a good way for students to voice (heir opinions," said Campus Life Board member David O'Brien. "We felt il would fall under Student Congress as far as funding goes." Schneider hopes that students can find an oullel for their mind, one that would welcome diversity. She feels the board should be open lo all students and placed in a public place, such as the DeWill Center. This will give everyone the opportunity to read and respond lo the comments posted. She also sees it as a continuation of the letters lo the editor printed in the Anchor. In order to avoid needless slurs, students would be required to include their name and number on these bulletins. This would also encourage friendships to develop between people wilh similar and perhaps differing ideas. m o r e DISCUSSION on 5

W e e k celebrates women's achievements SARA E LAMERS campusbeat editor

M e n s and Womens basketball prepare for Ml A A tournament Sports, page 12.

Women's contributions will be highlighted at ihe 15th Annual Women's Week, which began on Monday. Feb. 22 and will run through Friday, March 5. "The purpose of Women's Week is to a c k n o w l e d g e w o m e n , c e l e b r a t e their contributions and successes, and also lo reflect and look at the variety of d i f f e r e n t i s s u e s that s u r r o u n d w o m e n . " said event coordinator

Christa Collins Director of Special Events. "We hope lo give everyone a greater understanding of women." F o r i h e first l i m e the w e e k was headed by a | special planning I committee composed of faculty and students who organized the events and established the theme, "Reflections and

Images of Women." "This event is aboul our collective history and e v e r y o n e should care about ihis," said Jane Dickie, professor of Psychology and committee member. "Everyone who has a m o t h e r , sister, or relationship wilh another female can somehow partici-

pate." A film on eating disorders tilled "The Perfect Body" will be presented by W o m e n ' s Issues O r g a n i z a t i o n , ihe Counseling Center, ihe Dance Department, and the Health Department. This event is held in honor of National Ealing Disorders Awareness Week and will lake place in the Maas Conference Room at 8 p.m tonight. The film will feature women who have struggled wilh eating disorders and explore how the pressures of socim o r e W O M E N on 9


C a m p u s Beat

the

Anchor

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

A n n u a l series h o s t s K e n n e d y W h i l e e c o n o m i c growth is an cal myths that come about with this important aspect of the destiny of issue. I liked how he supported both the U.S, it should not be done at the the economy and environment." Kennedy, whose father Robert F. e x p e n s e of the e n v i r o n m e n t , according to Robert F. Kennedy Jr, K e n n e d y a n d u n c l e J o h n F. speaker for the Student Congress's Kennedy, were both prominent political figures, brought the prestige Annual Speaker Series. Kennedy spoke about preserving of his name with him to Hope. " T h e main reason I c a m e was the sacred nature of the environb e c a u s e he ment and need was a for political inK e n n e d y , " v o l v e m e n t to said Ryan p r o t e c t it f o r Grayburn future generaThe ('02) tions on Thurse n v i r o n m e n t a l Student day. Feb. 18. Congress The speech m o v e m e n t is felt the was interesting about the event exto m a n y s t u ceeded their dents who r e i n s t a t i n g of a e x pec tacame for a vaf r e e m a r k e t a n d a tions ber i e t y of r e a c a u s e of sons. democracy. 44 h i g h It w a s r e — R o b e r t F. K e n n e d y Jr. attendence. freshing to attorney "We've hear s o m e o n e gotten posiwho considers tive feedhimself an environmentalist talk about an impor- back and I felt Kennedy was an elotant issue like community for once quent speaker," said Student Conand not just why I ought to return gress President D a n a Marolt. "I cans that don't have a deposit/* said think this sets an example of what James Hull ('02) who hopes to en- we want this series to be.". ter the field of applied environmenKennedy, who is the Chief Prostal sociology. Beth Wezeman ( ' 9 9 ) . President ecutor for the Hudson Riverkeeper of Environmental Issues Organiza- and Senior Attorney for the Natution was impressed with Kennedy's ral Resources Defense Council, acpassion and dedication to the issue. cused corporations of using politi4, I personally loved the speech cal clout to suppress pro-environand my general impression was that mental laws to protect their o w n many of our group m e m b e r s en- interests. Kennedy feared that many joyed it as well," she said. " H e ar- of the pro-environment laws may gued against many of the stereotypi- be overturned by the current Con-

gress and the environment suffers. "We get the shaft," he said, of the politics of the environment Kennedy warned against the exp l o i t i n g of the e n v i r o n m e n t for money, and stressed the fact that the environment and economic success are linked. "The environmental movement is about the reinstating of the f r e e market and democracy," he said. K e n n e d y p o i n t e d to n a t i o n s which had no environmental laws and are now wastelands, and recalled the environmental hazards before Earth Day. He worries the lack of political protection of the environment may lead to something similar in the United States. "I believe in growth, I believe in developments, but I don't think it should be at the e x p e n s e of our landscapes," he said. Kennedy e m p h a s i z e d not only the importance of the global environment but also the environment in our neighborhoods. " T h e most important thing you can do is join an e n v i r o n m e n t a l group," he said. ' T o me, that's what the issue is all about, community." Kennedy often remarked on not saving the environment for its sake alone, but also for its influence on the American psyche and for future generations. "We don't inherent this land from our ancestors, we borrow it f r o m our children," he said, quoting a proverb. Kennedy concluded with a question and a n s w e r session, d u r i n g which many local issues, such as the Great Lakes, were addressed.

SAC gears for Siblings' Weekend WHADANEK staff r e p o r t e r

The Student Activities Committee designed t-shirts, pulled out their Twister boards and finalized their favorites ice-cream sundae toppings as they prepare for Siblings' Weekend on Feb. 26 and 27. Sarah Smith ('02), S A C ' s Traditional Events Assistant Chair said that Siblings Weekend benefits both Hope students and their families. "1 think our activities this year are g r e a t and will g i v e s t u d e n t s a c h a n c e to h a n g o u t w i t h t h e i r

younger siblings whom they might not otherwise see very often and have a good time." she said. Cassie Krause ('02) is planning on inviting her younger brother to Siblings Weekend. " I ' m looking forward to having him on c a m p u s . " Krause said. "I miss him a lot and I think this will be a great way for us to spend some time together and for him to see what my life is like now." New to the schedule of events this year are the Boehmer Family Jugglers who will be preforming on Saturday at the Knickerbocker The-

c a m p u s brief Jackson t o s p e a k t o Business s t u d e n t s The Executive-in-Residence program will feature Ralph Jackson ('64). Executive Vice President of Operations f o r C o o p e r Industries. He will speak to Business and E c o n o m i c s c l a s s e s d u r i n g his c a m p u s visit f r o m F e b . 28 to March 3. "Jackson will speak to students about his experiences in the field of business." said Dana Andrews ('00) of the Baker Scholars Prog r a m who is c o s p o n s o r i n g the event. "This is meant to be an educational experience that one cannot get from a textbook or a professor." Cooper Industries. J a c k s o n ' s e m p l o y e r , is a H o u s t o n - b a s e d c o m p a n y m a n u f a c t u r i n g tools.

hardware, and electrical and automotive products. Tony Muiderman. Professor of Business Administration, h o p e s that Jackson will provide insight and advice into the j o b market. "The program is very valuable to students because they can have personal conversation and interaction with those who have struggled in their careers and become successful." he said. •Talking to people about what they believe and value in business makes learning come alive in new ways." The series began last fall with Don Miller ('53). Chairman and C E O of Ederer Inc. who shared his e x p e r i e n c e s with i n t e r n a t i o n a l business in China.

atre. "We decided they'd be a good act for our siblings weekend because they were so entertaining and we booked them as soon as possible." said Traditional E v e n t s Chair Temple Lovelace ('00). " D o w Night" will begin Friday at 8 pm. It will be open for swimming. basketball and other athletic activities f o r s t u d e n t s and th e ir families. "We hope this will add some balance and will further allow all siblings — both boys and girls, to participate." Lovelace said. Lovelace hopes the activities they have planned will help students and their siblings feel more comfortable on campus. "I think our schedule of activities will take the weight off Hope students by providing a variety of things to do and transportation for them and their siblings." she said. ' T h o s e without transportation are often limited and it's hard to know what to do with your younger brothers and sisters sometimes." "Really Rosie" will be preformed at the Dewitt Studio Theater on Saturday at 11 a.m. Tickets are $2 and can be purchased at the door. The performance was held during the last week of January and the first week of February and was decided to be done again especially for the event. The play tells the story of a group of kids in Brooklyn who decide to make a movie to amuse themselves. m o r e S I B L I N G S on 9

yAnc/7or p h o t o by J o n a t h a n M u e n k

D I G G I N G i Archaeologist Rodolfo Fattovich spoke on his experiences while on a dig in Ethiopia on Monday, Feb. 22. The event was co-sponsored by the History Department and the History Honors Society.

Tresspassers w a r n e d t o excercise c a u t i o n MIKE Z U I D E M A editor-in-chief

H o p e College Public Safety is hoping that it will not have to deal with the arrests of 4 0 to 50 students this year. That's the approximate number of Hope students that were arrested for trespassing in Allegan County last year. Public Safety is working with the Allegan County Sheriff's Department to warn students of possible infractions. " W h a t has been happening the past several years is Hope students have been arrested, primarily for trespassing." said Duane Terpstra. Director of Public Safety. "It happens primarily this time of year, and w e ' v e associated it directly with pledging." The area that has been most freq u e n t l y v i s i t e d by s t u d e n t s is Gilligan's Lake, otherwise known as " T h e Bowl." The area is private property owned by the Am way Corporation. and is located off 66th Street. Greek pledging runs from Feb. 26 through March 13. It is this time period that Terpstra has noticed the most arrests. T h e beach is popular among college students, and the trespassing violations have primarily occurred in this area. A c c o r d i n g to I n t r a f r a t e r n i t y Council President Adam Hudson, fraternities must list specifically what the organizations will be doing during an event and where they will be doing it. T h e organizations must list everything specifically, and then receive the college's approval before the event. "If they go out there without consent they are on their own." Hudson said. ' T h e college says ' w e didn't

now about it, they didn't tell us. yep they trespassed." According to H u d s o n . Terpstra and the Allegan County Police have not specifically contacted Greek Life about the infractions. But Terpstra and Allegan County Police hope that word the word will spread, and students will exercise caution. " M a y b e it appears to be public, but it's private. A lot of signs get torn down and we have to put them back up." said Allegan County Deputy Cory Hunt. "We don't want that confusion that it's public. It's not. it's private." W h i l e H u d s o n has not warned Greek organizations about the area, he feels that most students know the are is off limits. " S o m e o r g a n i z a t i o n s have adjusted and if they haven't, they are probably going to get in trouble." Hudson said. Students have also been caught at Laketown Beach Park. The beach is public, but restricted to use after 10 p.m. The areas have become cluttered with litter and the late night flow of traffic has upset local residents. S t u d e n t s w h o a r e c a u g h t are charged initially with trespassing, but further charges of minors in possession can be added.. " M y u n d e r s t a n d i n g is that the kids have been going probably for quite a while. No one cared in the past." Terpstra said. "The past three years w e ' v e been educating people that it's private." Public Safety has most frequendy caught Greek organizations at the b e a c h e s . S t u d e n t s o f t e n park in nearby Castle Park or load a truck with students to be dropped off. "Our goal is to stop this from happening." Hunt said. "It's a $ 100 fine a n d a m i s d e m e a n o r on t h e i r record."


F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

the Anchor

Religion

Campus Ministries Human sexuality series sparks campus controversy SERIES from I -lanl dean of Health and counsel- pus; many are interested in providing. "So. when we lalk about some- ing more dialogue, rather than a thing as difficult to understand as one-sided conversation. "I hope we are able to give the sexual orientation it can be particucampus community a fair represenlarly dilTitult to listen to a different tation of all the different perspecp e r s p e c t i v e . A n d 1 think w e ' r e tives of Christianity and homosexucalled to listen to each other, not to ality," said Deirdre Johnston, of the judge, not to convince, not to prove, Communications Department. "My but to listen," Gray said. concern is that the information stuS u n d a y ' s m e s s a g e opened the series, called "Setting Love in Or- dents will be given is too biased on der" which is a title of the book one side of the issue. Bergner diswritten by Bergner. The series will misses m u c h , o f the scientific refocus on understanding G o d ' s gra- search on homosexuality." S o m e of the supporters of the cious plan and purpose for sexuality. It will cover such topics as dat- "representation of d i f f e r e n t pering and courtship, marriage, sex, spectives" plan to distribute Rainfamily, homosexuality, and chastity. bow Pride ribbons to quietly show "We think there needs to be dis- s u p p o r t of the gay c o m m u n i t y . cussion at Hope to solve people's Plans are also being made for a sex problems, which includes just prayer vigil for the Thursday before Bergner speaks, and small-group about everybody." Patterson said. A letter addressed to the members discussion time in conjunction with of the Hope College c o m m u n i t y the chaplain's staff after Bergner's regarding the series has been posted presentation. Schneider describes the prayer on K n o w H o p e and sent through vigil as "one big hug for the gay campus mail to all students. community and their The letter states friends before this all that campus minhappens. To members istries is offering I don't w a n t of H o p e ' s gay comthe messages "out p e o p l e t o close munity this feels like of love for the stuan attack, it was said their minds to dents of Hope Colin a chapel report that lege, and r e v e r t h e chaplains. I they think G.L.O.B.E. ence for the God d o n ' t w a n t it t o should be disbanded; who gave us this it hurls because that is g e t messy. great gift of sexutheir only formal supality." It goes on to —^JenniferYoh ( ' 0 2 ) port on c a m p u s . We say that "our culwant to gO in with inture is marked by a great deal of bad news about sex. telligent questions." Some are uncomfortable with the None of us has been left untouched c o n s e q u e n c e s of in sonic way by sexual brpkenness." c m o t i p n a l B e r g n e r ' s visit to c a m p u s , espeAccording to the'chaplains' letter, Bergner will speak of "sexual cially concerning gay and lesbian brokenness in general, and the heal- students. "If I was a homosexual at Hope ing of homosexuality in particular. College I would feel very targeted. He will give a personal testimony 1 would feel like there is a big bullsof his years as a practicing homoeye on my forehead, " Johnston s e x u a l , and w h a t he c a l l s ' a n aplogetic to show Christians can said. A member of the gay community treat this subject with sensitivity, has begun to speak out. love, and kindness." "I believe Ben Patterson has gone " M a r i o is v e r y a r t i c u l a t e , thoughtful, very bright, and sensi- loo far. It's okay if he believes what tive." Patterson said. "I have a tre- he believes, but I was raised to bem e n d o u s a m o u n t of respect for lieve that God loves me and I'm what he has done in life and his gay, but Ben believes I'm going to Hell," said Jason Sanicki ('99). ability to speak eloquently." But others say that the risk of ofMembers ot RISE, G.L.O.B.E. (Gay. Lesbian, or Bisexual Equal- fending people is not reason to hold ity), a chapel intern, and other con- back the messages. "If we limit the discussion bec e r n e d m e m b e r s of the c o l l e g e c o m m u n i t y h a v e met to discuss cause we run the risk of offending anybody, then as an academic inways to avoid a division on cam-

stitution we couldn't talk about any- sexual issues must face the gender thing important," said Marc Baer, c o n f u s i o n preventing him or her from realizing true idenity in Jesus." Professor of History. Bergner also makes references to Baer sees the view the chapel is presenting as a side that is not of- psychological and medical studies ten presented on campus, especially in which homosexuality is reported to be changeable and treatable. This in the classroom. "This is an opportunity to hear the scientific evidence Bergner uses to other side that may not be presented make claims is also under fire by a n y w h e r e else on c a m p u s that I some. "There is growing medical eviknow of," Baer said. Students represent a variety of dence for (homosexuality) being biologically based, and as a Chrisreactions to the series. S t u d e n t J e n n i f e r Yob ( ' 0 2 ) is tian community we need to address worried about people tuning out that," said Johnston. She also pointed out that this past voices before they have heard them December, The American Psychipresent their opinions. "I hope people are rational and atric Association released a report w o n ' t j u m p to c o n c l u s i o n s that that c l a i m e d trying to c h a n g e a people, especially the chapel staff, person's sexual orientation is deare judging people when they're structive, of great risk, and overall not," Yoh said. "I don't want people harmful. But there are also those who are to close their minds to the chaplains. concerned about losing sight of BibI don't want it to get messy. Everyone has to take time to listen K) ev- lical truth. "I would hope to hear some truth eryone else and keep level heads." Some feel that is an issue that in G o d ' s expectations of how we should live together as sexual becannot and should not be avoided. "It's an issue that needs to be ad- ings. I believe that the Bible tells dressed. 1 admire Ben Patterson for us that sex is reserved for marital being so bold," said Kelly Martin r e l a t i o n s , " s a i d S a n d e r d e H a a n , ( ' 9 9 ) . "I hope it opens dialogue chairperson'of modern and classirather than prompting people to cal languages. "All of us are bompoint f i n g e r s . I k n o w that Ben barded by the permissive society we Patterson handles everything out of live in. It's beneficial to hear Biblitact and love. I look forward to ev- cal .truth, scriptural truth." .Some students look forward to erything he has to say." Still there are those who are un- hearing the messages. "I think it's a great series, the comfortable with Bergner's claim to have the knowledge of the truth topic is very relevant to this age," said Jen Harvey ('99). "I think that of homosexuality f»s a sin. as d liberal arts col"My main l e g e we s h o u l d problem, with look at all sides of Bergner is that he If I w e r e a an issue, and reis a man who is an h o m o s e x u a l a t H o p e cently a speaker, a expert.on his own I w o u l d feel v e r y bishop, has come to experience, but he generalizes from t a r g e t e d . I w o u l d feel H o p e and p r e sented a very open that to make truth like t h e r e was a big view of homosexuclaims using bulls-eye on m y ality. It's important weak evidence to to h e a r s p e a k e r s f o r e h e a d . s u p p o r t it," said J a n e Dickie, di- D e i r d r e J o h n s t o n , from both perspectives, it's good for rector of women's Professor of the college to hear studies. " H e disCommunications both sides." credits those who Both sides are also nervous about disagree with him. He calls those people sons of Satan, and that's a division occuring on campus. "In my 27 years here at Hope where I have the problem." Bergner has written a chapter in there has always been a close relationship between faculty and stuthe Christian Educator's Handbook on Family Life Education . In it he dents. It's been the bedrock of the speaks of homosexuality as change- college, and even though the facable and redeemable, saying that the ulty has typically been more liberal "Christian struggling with homo- than the students it has never got in

the way of seeing each other as Christians," Dickie said. While the chapel staff will be doing the bulk of the speaking, other speakers include a Hope staff member who will speak of her experience as a rape victim (whose name will not be released until the day she speaks). Gene McConnell, 1 the vice president of victim assistance for the National Coalition of Protection of Children and Families, and Tim Brown, a professor of preaching at Western Seminary. Bergner will share his testimony in chapel on March 12, speak to pastors that afternoon, and to the w h o l e c o m m u n i t y on Saturday, March 13, at 10 a.m. at the Haworth Center. A queston and answer period will follow the Saturday morning address. Mario will end his stay on c a m p u s by s p e a k i n g at T h e Gathering on Sunday, March 14, with a lime of prayer lo follow. Atlil

w

to come in:

Setting Lord in Order" Campus Ministries Series o n

H u m a n Sexuality • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Chapel Feb. 22-26: God's Plan Sunday, Feb. 28; The Gathering, "A Look at Sexual Broken: ness' Chapel Themes March 1-5Rape: one w o m a n ' s story, pornography (Gene McConnell). emotional dependency. Sunday, March 7: The Gathering, "Faith, Love,' and Chas^ tity" Chapel Themes March 8-12: Forgivenes, h o w to help the b r o k e n . O n Friday, Mario Bergner will present his testimony in chapel Saturday, March 13; Bergner will address the community at 10 a.m. in Haworth Center. Sunday, March 14: The Gathe r i n g , M a r i o Bergner w i l l speak of the healing and restoration of all broken sexuality, not just homosexuality Time for prayer will follow. Chapel Themes March 15-17; Is everyone welcome?: A Call to the Christian, Community

R C A i n Season o f D i s c o v e r y a n d D i s c e r n m e n t Hope College is affiliated with the Reformed Church in America (RCA). The RCA is presently in a "season of discovery and discernment guided by study, prayer, listening. and discussion aimed at living a more faithful response to homosexual persons." "They're saying lei's listen, lei's pray, let s think, not judge," said Deirdre J o h n s t o n , p r o f e s s o r of Communications. Among this church, like many others in society, questions dealing with Christianity and homosexuality. arc not easily answered. In 1994 a Task Force on Homosexuality to the C o m m i s s i o n on Theology for the RCA released a report concerning the denomination's stance on the is-

sue. The introduction to the reporl r e a d s , " D e t e r m i n i n g ' w h a t the Bible says' on any one issue is never as easy as quoting a verse from here and a passage from there. This has become ever more obvious lo the members of the task force as we have interacted with faithful members of the RCA who interpret the Bible quite differently on this iss u e . " The reporl made the recommedalion in hopes that "this season of discovery and discernment would be a time in which individual congregations and clusters of congregations would participate in moral discernment with the assistance of resources provided by the RCA. . . . " What follows is an excerpt of the report by the lack force.

Areas of Consensus/Agreement • Any process of moral discernment by C h r i s t i a n s m u s t t a k e t h e Bible seriously, since it serves as the rule for faith and practice. • The church is called lo set the standard for Christian faithfulness, and must not allow society lo dictate those standards lo us. • When we work at deciding how we ought to live faithfully, before God. it is of central importance thai we honor Christ above all. Whatever moral position we begin with, we acknowledge that we are subject ultimately to the authority of Christ, whom we love and serve. • As members of the body of Christ, we treat each other with deep re-

spect as we struggle together to gain a better understanding of what faithfulness lo Jesus looks like. Humility ought lo form a basis for openness to positions and people wilh whom we disagree. • Persons of homosexual orientation are part of the world God loves and for which Jesus died. • Church membership is open lo persons of homosexual orientation on the same basis as anyone else. • Sin, which distorts the lives of us all. is not evidenced in a greater degree in the lives of those wilh a same gender sexual orientation. • The church needs lo repent of its failure to minister lo people who are

h o m o s e x u a l and the pain it has s o m e t i m e s inflicted upon ihem. This includes a commitment to refrain f r o m l a n g u a g e w h i c h demeans, dehumanizes, and in other ways erodes a person's sense of their creation in ihe image of God. • The church should be a safe place for homosexuals to share struggles, tell stories, and seek G o d ' s design. • T h e r e is much not yet known aboul the causes of homosexuality and the ability of persons wilh a homsexual orientation lo change that orienlalion. • Moral positions that are not accompanied by lived practice are incomplete.


//^Anchor

O p i n i o n

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

your voice.

o u r voice.

Student

T h e intimate debate So the chaplain's staff will

questions

reasons behind

To the Editor:

be h a v i n g a f o r m e r

h o m o s e x u a l v i s i t i n g c a m p u s a n d s p e a k i n g . It s e e m s a s though the c h a p l a i n ' s staff e n j o y s critique. T h e c h a p l a i n ' s staff had to k n o w that by inviting a f o r m e r h o m o s e x u a l to c a m p u s , that a few e y e b r o w s w o u l d r i s e . A n d in a s m a l l w a y , t h e c h a p l a i n ' s s t a f f s h o u l d b e c o m m e n d e d f o r t h i s . In a s m a l l w a y , t h e y a r e t a k i n g a sensitive issue and f o r c i n g the college c o m m u n i t y to c o n t i n u e d i s c u s s i n g it. Religious issues have a w a y of flaring up and fizzling o u t at H o p e C o l l e g e . I s s u e s w i l l b e r a i s e d , d i s c u s s e d a n d s e t a s i d e in a m a t t e r o f w e e k s . I s s u e s s e e m h e a t e d , b u t f i n d a w a y t o t h e b a c k b u r n e r . A n d h o m o s e x u a l i t y is a p r i m e e x a m p l e of this.

Here we go again. Only this lime, in my opinion, our personal freedom of choice is at slake. Never in my life did I ever think I'd live lo see the day where Ben Patlerson would end up gelling an "ex-gay" ill his chapel lo Iry and "convert" ihc homosexuals on ihis campus. Al a Christian college this is nol a very Christian thing lo be doing. Now you can say what you wanl lo regarding the upcoming campus visil of a certain " f o r m e r homos e x u a l " by ihe n a m e of M a r i o

Chapel

intern

urges community

To Ihe Editor:

Almost a year ago, the chaplain's staff was being c r i t i c i z e d f o r its s t a n c e o n h o m o s e x u a l i t y a n d o t h e r i s s u e s . R e l i g i o u s i s s u e s w e r e r a i s e d in v i r t u a l l y e v e r y a s p e c t a n d t h e e f f e c t f o r c e d H o p e t o e x a m i n e w h e r e it stood as a Christian-affiliated institution. T h e m a j o r i t y o f s o c i e t y is s o w r a p p e d u p in s i l e n c e a n d s t e r e o t y p e s t h a t a n y r e a l h e a d w a y is s l o w a n d h e a v y footed: W h a t the c h a p l a i n ' s staff s e e m s to be attempting is

continuing

the

discussion

and

debate

on

h o m o s e x u a l i t y . O n e d o e s not need to b e a fan of the chapel to see this as a positive. The

chapel

offers

a

specific

viewpoint

on

h o m o s e x u a l i t y , a n d it i s d e f i n i t e l y o n e t h a t n o t e v e r y o n e s e e s e y e t o e y e o n . In f a c t , in m a n y w a y s t h e c h a p e l ' s view on h o m o s e x u a l i t y could be seen as n a r r o w and closeminded. W h a t t h e " S e t t i n g L o v e in O r d e r " s e r i e s is d o i n g is c r e a t i n g an outlet for the c o n t i n u a t i o n of this discussion. S t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y n e e d t o t a k e it u p o n t h e m s e l v e s t o keep this discussion going. Talking can b e c o m e heated and frustrating, but for p r o g r e s s to c o n t i n u e this action m u s t be taken. W h a t is c o m m e n d a b l e is t h a t t h e c h a p e l is a t t e m p t i n g t o c o n t i n u e t h i s d e b a t e . H o m o s e x u a l i t y is a n i s s u e that i s f a r f r o m b e i n g r e s o l v e d o r a g r e e d u p o n in a n y w a y . B u t is a l s o a n i s s u e t h a t s h o u l d n o t b e d r o p p e d b e c a u s e it i s u n c o m f o r t a b l e o r i r r i t a t i n g . T h e f a c t t h a t t h e d e b a t e c o n t i n u e s in a n y w a y s h o u l d be uplifting.

My name is Matt, and I am one of ihe inlerns who serves under the college's chaplain staff. My wife. Julie and I have lived here for nearly a year now, and have had .he privilege of k n o w i n g many gracious people among Hope's students, staff and faculty. We are indebted lo the chaplain staff for their kindness, experience, and laughter. In similar ways, we have been embraced and challenged through our relationships with R.I.S.E. Members, and we are grateful for the warmth and wisdom that ihey loo have extended to us. If nothing else, I hope this letter will be taken by all our friends as a token of our sincere appreciation for their investment in our lives. What has prompted me to write this letter is hearing from various voices on campus which suppose that the chaplains' series on sexuality will be explosive or divisive. I agree lhal the series will be addressing difficult issues, but the reactions lo those addresses, before they are even spoken, do not seem fair. What troubles me most is that ihe lone of such voices is often pessimistic and

Physical

editor-in-chief Michael production editor

Zuidema

Amanda

Black

campusbeat editor

Sara

E. Lamers

sports e d i t o r

Paul

Loodeen

intermission editor spotlight e d i t o r s in foe us e d i t o r photo editor copy e d i t o r business m g r . / a d r e p ad designer distribution mgr. p r o d u c t i o n assistant faculty advisor

Kate Folkert Carrie

Arnold

Julie Green Dana Lamers Johnathan

Muenk

Jennifer Schwieger Stacey Slad Dan McCue Doug Sweetser Christine

Trinh

Tim Boudreau

staff p h o t o g r a p h e r s April Greer • Chandler

Pohl

staff r e p o r t e r s

This letter is in response lo the Feb. 10, 1999 "Our View" Anchor a r t i c l e c o n c e r n i n g r e c y c l i n g at Hope C o l l e g e . In the a c a d e m i c buildings on campus, an effective recycling program has bten going on for several years. Most offices have recycling procedures in place for o f f i c e paper. C a r d b o a r d , s t y r o f o a m . and p a c k a g i n g "peanuts" are also recycled. Most-recently. the college has started a recycling program for all fluorescent light bulbs on campus. There are currently seven recycling d u m p s l e r s on c a m p u s for o f f i c e paper and one 30-yard dumpsler for other forms of recyclable materials. Cans, mostly pop cans, have been recycled in many ways on campus for some lime. Several years ago, a professor had several boxes made

Mcnulilh Care • Whitney Hadanck • Lisa Hoekslra • Erin Hubbard • Andrew KU'czck • Tiffany Ripper • Rciko Sagioka • Rita Spires • Adam Taylor

Tlic \iiiliiij /> a i>nk1ini of sluilcnt unci ts fnnittil lliron^h the Hope College Siiiilcnl \pi>n>i>riiHiiiiis Coninniu-i' Ij Uci s io ihc cdilor arc eiicoiiniycil ihoii^h due lo sium; liinirnilons the Anehor resenes the rii;hl to edit The opinions nddiessed in the ediiorinf n'ie *olel\ those of the editor-in-ehief. Stories fmm the Hope College Nfiis Service tire-n prudneh of the I'lihln-Rehitiom Office. Pije-jeur suhscriptions to the Anehor ate nvitlldhle foi S / J M'e lesen e'the ri^ht to oeeept oriejeet uny (id\'ertisinii Vol. 1 I 2, Issue 19

^ A n c h o r

guest speaker

sexuality even an issue? Why does it excite such feelings of hatred iti other people when their lives will never be touched by it? Why is a p e r s o n ' s sexuality a n y o n e e l s e ' s business; and who are we to judge other people ? "He who is without sin among you, let him be the first lo throw a stone." John 8:7.

J a s o n J o n Sanicki ('98)

to discussion

perhaps condescending. In truth, most of the diverse students I talk lo are hungry for a series on sexuality that frankly addresses their struggles and questions. Even those students who take issue with some of the R C A ' s orthodox positions have been receptive to the idea of hearing what ihose positions are. Despite this need. I continue to hear voices which, to be honest, belittle t h e ' c h a p l a i n s ' e f f o r t lo present orthodox teaching on sexuality with compassion and integrity. In response, I can only say that the series on sexuality strikes me as a time to listen, not fight. I say this as someone who has worked hard to make the series an appropriate Christian response to ihe immense complexities of sexuality and the people most affected by it (which I believe include all of us). I also say this as someone who believes that there is a time for everything, including protests. The series on sexuality simply does not strike me as one of those limes. The chaplains are serious about their pastoral effort to handle the series with the inlegrity of grace, and I hope our community gives them that opportunity.

Plant staff explains

To the Editor:

m e e t t h e press.

Chapel

Bergner, bul lo me this sounds like a veiled allempl al sexual harassment. I am not mad al the f a d that this is occurring, that is why ihere is Freedom of Speech, bul al the same lime I am nol rejoicing either. I feel very upset and hurl at ihe fact that the chaplains would sloop so low as lo do a thing like this. Throughout the Bible, what does J e s u s say about h o m o s e x u a l i t y ? Nothing. Why do the chaplains feel lhal what they are doing is "saving" us from eternal damnation? We don't need to be "cured." Why is homo-

current

My question to those who think antagonistic reactions more appropriate than listening is a simple one: why? For others who find themselves caught in the middle of the controversy, I appeal to you lo stop speculating. Instead, come listen, interact, and respond to the series itself, for yourself and o u r c o m m u nily. I am confident that you will be pleasantly surprised by what you hear. For those of you most receptive lo the series. I appeal to you to take seriously the concerns raised by those who are nol, lo listen lo them, and to give them as much grace (not debate) as you yourself hope lo receive. People on all sides of our campus musl not fear the voices insisting lhal a series on sexuality can only be divisive. I, for one, choose lo believe that people of different convictions can listen to one another, and I invite the Hope College community to join me in that conviction.

M a l t Canlis

recycling

for pop can recycling. These boxes were then used as fund raisers by several groups on campus and are still in use today. Several years ago. President John Jacobson called on the college community to dramatically reduce paper usage. Recycling in the dormitories has been a harder program to initiate because the college does not have ihe staff to lake on this responsibility. If the students do not lake some o w n e r s h i p in the p r o g r a m , it is doomed lo failure. Also, there are n u m e r o u s difficulties associated with dorm recycling. If the proper articles are not placed in the correct containers, the entire operation might be compromised. Also, if the material is not properly cleaned or not taken out at appropriate intervals, the risk of disease or insects increases dramatically. It is admirable that Kalamazoo

series

program

College has an entire division for recycling. The cost of this, however, cannot be ignored. The total cost difference lo a student attending Hope or Kalamazoo is substantial. Some of this difference may well be attributable lo the recycling division. If Hope were lo initiate such a division, costs to the student might also rise. Some members of the Physical Plant staff would like lo join a group of s t u d e n t s visiting K a l a m a z o o College lo assess their recycling program. The college would welcome the opportunity to gain helpful incite. We all need lo do our part in recycling and agree that this is an extremely important issue. The enlire Hope community needs to reduce the waste that is generated and recycle all that can be recycled. Physical P l a n t M a n a g e m e n t

The Squirrel sees the letters. The Squirrel likes the letters. The Squirrel wants more letters. (DjO i j j o u h a v e AorndLhimf

i o A a i f ?

The Anchttt Is waiting for those letters and e-mails.

wichoA@Jwpsjxlu9 ajichD\@Jic!piLcdu • anchsjM&hcpBsduanchoA @Mi}fx.edu •ansJtoA@}wptodn


^Anchor

F e b r u a r y 24. I 999

Intermission

Student soloists to perform with orchestra p a r t m e n t s . He e x p l a i n s that since they c o m e f r o m similar situations, they understand what to look for. It's also a c h a n c e

K A T E FOLKERT" intermission editor

Sludcnls laking l e s s o n s f r o m the m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t were eligible to c o m p e t e on Jan. 22 for the c h a n c e to p e r f o r m as a soloist with the orchestra. On Friday, F e b . 26, the six winners will g i v e their p e r f o r m a n c e s .

for the H o p e m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t to get s o m e e x p o s u r e . " T h e j u d g e s that c o m e in are a l w a y s a m a z e d by the level of talent here at H o p e , " R i t s e m a said. " T h a t ' s very rewarding."

" T h e c o m p e t i t i o n is o p e n to a n y o n e w h o is taking less o n s f r o m a n y o n e in the d e p a r t m e n t , " said

Violinist W a l v o o r d is p e r f o r m i n g the 5th m o v e m e n t of " S y m p h o n i c E s p a g n o l e " by E d w a r d Lalo. "I entered the c o m p e t i t i o n b e c a u s e my teachers thought i t ' d be g o o d for m e , " W a l v o o r d said. "I also had a piece ready."

T h e o r c h e s t r a will o p e n t h e p r o g r a m with the

S h e had the c h a n c e to d o a similar p e r f o r m a n c e as a high school senior, so this is n o t h i n g n e w for W a l v o o r d .

" O v e r t u r e to N a b u c c o . " Six soloists will follow. S t u d e n t s w h o are p e r f o r m i n g are J e n n i f e r

" I ' m l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to it," s h e said. " I ' m excited to be up there p l a y i n g . "

Robert Ritsema, d i r e c t o r of the orchestra.

Walvoord ('02), Paul Jacobs ( ' 0 1 ) , Lauren

T h i s annual e v e n t has been g o i n g on for a l m o s t 30 years

"There aren't any divisions. E v e r y o n e c o m -

K r u s e ( ' 0 2 ) . Jill B e n n i n k ( ' 0 0 ) , A s u k a

a c c o r d i n g to R i t s e m a . T h e c o m p e t i t i o n w a s started to g i v e students the o p p o r t u n i t y to p e r f o r m with the orchestra.

petes against all the other p a r t i c i p a n t s . " With s uc h an o p e n field, the w i n n e r s are

M i y a s o . and G w e n Veldhof ( ' 9 9 ) .

d e t e r m i n e d by w h o p l a y s the best at the actual

F o r Veldhof, this will be her second time p e r f o r m i n g at this

"It's a u n i q u e e x p e r i e n c e . As a p r o f e s s i o n a l musician m y self I k n o w it is o n e of the peak things to d o , " he said. "It

audition.

event. S h e w o n the c o m p e t i -

adds a n o t h e r facet to the s t u d e n t ' s e x p e r i e n c e at H o p e . "

s

" T h e r e m a y be s o m e o n e w h o is overall the better performer, but s o m e b o d y else m a y be h a v i n g a great night and

tion t w o years a g o as a sophom o r e . S h e will b e p l a y i n g " P i a n o

will play better than t h e m , " R i t s e m a said. "It just d e p e n d s on w h o p e r f o r m s the best in the particular s i t u a t i o n . " R i t s e m a p i c k s the j u d g e s f r o m o t h e r s c h o o l s ' m u s i c de-

C o n c e r t o N o . 2 in G m i n o r " by S a i n t - S a e n s . " I ' m excited a b o u t the p e r f o r m a n c e , " she said. " B u t I ' m still a little n e r v o u s b e c a u s e it's a n e w p i e c e . "

finds unity in cultural

T h e p e r f o r m a n c e b e g i n s at 8 p . m . in D i m n e n t C h a p e l . A d m i s s i o n is free.

DISCUSSION

It's a small world after all Annual "Images"program

T h e p r e p a r a t i o n for the p e r f o r m a n c e d o e s not fall solely on the soloists. T h e orchestra m u s t learn all the pieces in about three w e e k s .

from

p e r h a p s d i f f e r e n t ideas.

already fostered m u c h thinking.

T h e c o n c e p t is b o r r o w e d f r o m

diversity

Oberlin C o l l e g e , w h i c h S c h n e i d e r recently visited. S h e c o n s i d e r e d establishing a w e b site b u t w a s hesi-

d i f f e r e n t c u l t u r e s w h o are s t u d y i n g at H o p e a c h a n c e to s h o w m a n y of

d e n t s b o n d , " she said. " T h e y really h a v e a blast." I m a g e s is also an e v e n t that stu-

A c h a n c e to see the d i v e r s e cul-

their f r i e n d s and n e i g h b o r s the b a c k g r o u n d s that they c o m e f r o m .

d e n t s w h o m a y travel abroad or

T h e i d e a has b e e n a s s i g n e d to Student Congress's Constituency

tures represented on H o p e ' s c a m -

" I t ' s a w a y to m a k e p e o p l e a w a r e

study overseas would be interested

Task F o r c e , w h o h a n d l e s all student

pus will be p r e s e n t e d to s t u d e n t s on M a r c h 6.

of c u l t u r e s on H o p e ' s c a m p u s and

in.

s o m e of the things these p e o p l e do in their c u l t u r e s , " M o t o n said.

" A lot of s t u d e n t s f r o m H o p e travel and study abroad and this

r e c o m h i e n d a t i o n s , s u g g e s t i o n s and c o m p l a i n t s . If a p p r o v e d . S t u d e n t

KATTE F O L K E R T intermission editor

T h e annual I m a g e s p r o g r a m , a

I

tant b e c a u s e of possible censorship.

C o n g r e s s w o u l d d e c i d e the p r o p e r

Eric G o o d m a n ( ' 9 9 ) , President of R.I.S.E., s u p p o r t s the idea. "I think that it would help to encourage challenging dialogue, which would make Hope a more a c a d e m i c a l l y and spiritually rigorous c o l l e g e , " he said. M a t t C a n l i s , a C h a p l a i n Intern e c h o e d t h e s e thoughts. "In as m u c h as it is s o m e t h i n g that b r i n g s p e o p l e f a c e to f a c e I

celebration of diversity a n d cul-

Otis agrees.

can g i v e them s p e c i f i c things to

c h a n n e l s to f o l l o w and w h e r e t o get

think that it will g e n e r a t e relation-

ture, will begin with an interna-

"It g i v e s s t u d e n t s a c h a n c e to let

look for and see in other cultures,"

the f u n d i n g . F u n d i n g in this case,

s h i p s , " he said. "In as m u c h as it

tional and ethnic m e n u in P h e l p s cafeteria. F o l l o w i n g that, an inter-

their p e e r s see t h e m in the c o n t e x t

M o t o n said. It is also a c h a n c e for students

would only involve the c o s t of the board and installation so this is not

s e r v e s as a p l a t f o r m for p e o p l e to publish opinions it will be divisive,"

w h o h a v e been on o f f - c a m p u s

likely to be a s t u m b l i n g block.

he said. " A n d I a p p l a u d A m a n d a ' s efforts."

national b a z a a r will be held at the

of w h o they really a r e , " she said. T h e p r o g r a m is also a b o u t bring-

K n i c k e r b o c k e r , w h i c h will s h o w -

ing s t u d e n t s f r o m d i f f e r e n t b a c k -

case different cultures. The e v e n i n g will c u l m i n a t e in the tra-

g r o u n d s together. T h e different cul-

t h e y ' v e seen.

tural g r o u p s on c a m p u s ,

" A lot of s t u d e n t s w h o study in foreign

like Black

c o u n t r i e s g e l involved in I m a g e s to

ditional program d i s p l a y i n g songs, d a n c e s a n d readings f r o m d i f f e r ent cultures.

study p r o g r a m s to s h a r e what

T h e event has b e c o m e an impor-

Coalition and H o p e ' s

tant program at H o p e C o l l e g e o v e r

Asian Per-

the years.

spective A s -

B e i n g in H o l l a n d ,

"It a l l o w s s t u d e n t s to see d i f -

sociation,

Otis thinks that the

share what they've l e a r n e d , " Otis said.

ferent c u l t u r e s than their o w n that

all c o n t r i b -

Images program is es-

they d o n ' t usually s e e , " said A n thony M o t o n ( ' 0 1 ) , one of the plan-

ute.

pecially i m p o r t a n t .

ners of the e v e n t .

dents from

Tliis y e a r ' s t h e m e is f o c u s i n g on unity and m a i n t a i n i n g identity in a s h r i n k i n g world.

" I t ' s stumultiple b a c k -

Im^cs 1999

grounds

H

FLORIDA m WRING BREAK F R O M $159 PER W E E K

"I strongly b e l i e v e diversity is important in West M i c h i g a n , in Holland,

and

at

c o m i n g together to a p p r e c i a t e e a c h

H o p e , " she said. " I t ' s a f f i r m i n g p e o p l e ' s identities."

Otis, special p r o g r a m s c o o r d i n a t o r

o t h e r ' s c u l t u r e s , " said D. Wesley Poythress, director of multi-cultural

f o o d b u f f e t will be s e r v e d f r o m

and o f f i c e m a n a g e r f o r I n t e r n a -

life.

4 : 3 0 to 6 : 0 0 p.m., and the bazaar

" T h e w o r l d is g e t t i n g s m a l l e r and c o m i n g t o g e t h e r , " said A m y

T h e issue is still p e n d i n g but has

The international and ethnic

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O t i s also said that the s t u d e n t s

will f o l l o w at 6 : 3 0 p.m. D o o r s for

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want to portray individuals and individual c u l t u r e s . "

w h o get i n v o k e d h a v e a lot of fun w o r k i n g together.

the program will open at 7 : 3 0 p.m. with the s h o w b e g i n n i n g at 8 : 0 0

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T h e p r o g r a m g i v e s s t u d e n t s of

" I t ' s a lot of f u n to s e e the stu-

p.m..

1-800-488-8828 17403 FRONT

BEACH

ROAD

• PANAMA

CITY

BEACH,

• 2 p.m. • T h e Winter's • 7/9:30/12 - SAC movie • " A dutfe

• & p.m. • "The Winter's Tale

Ufe* • Winants Auditorium

Tale" • DeWitt main t h e a t r e • 7/9:50/12 • S A C movie • WA

• 6> p.m. • T h e Winter© Tale" •

Life" • Winants Auditorium

• & p.m. •"The Winter's Tale" • DeWitt main t h e a t r e following PeWitt main t h e a t r e J o i n t Archives exhibit • "Sears F. Rlepema: An Ecumenical Immigrant" • throu^Ii March 2 6 "Powers of 10" exhibit • DePree A r t Gallery • through March 2 6

• 3 / 7 p.m. • SAC movie • "A B u ^ ' s Life • W i n a n t s Auditorium

DevAtt main t h e a t r e • discussion

Call One Time Short-term Regular Basis

K a t e MacDonlels

ARC Boys & Girls Club Communities in Schools

• 7 / 9 p.m. • "The 3\q One" • Winter film s e r i e s • Knickerbocker t h e a t r e

Apply

Todsyl

f L Ji413


(toAnchor

Intermission

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

Kincaid entertains H o p e O N ATANGENT Kate Folkert

REIKO S A G I O K A staff w r i t e r

A f t e r h e r r e a d i n g T u e s d a y night, J a m a i c a Kincaid w a s a s k e d a b o u l her interest in gardening. S h e r e s p o n d e d by talking about the variety of plants in her garden

T h e Fabric of O u r Lives

and h o w she likes lo put things tog e t h e r and find out w h e r e t h i n g s

Kincaid w a s a s k e d a b o u l w h a t

written. O v e r t i m e , the individual

come from. Kincaid takes this s a m e approach

c l c m c n i s w e r e i m p o r l a n l lo h e r

e v e n t s and p e o p l e c o m e

lo her writing.

s h o r l stories. Her s i m p l e reply:

together to f o r m a single plot.

"I d o n ' l k n o w . " "\ like the traditional short

E a c h m o m e n t in o u r lives b e c o m e s c o n n e c t e d to the next

s h e said. Kincaid b e g a n h e r visit lo H o p e

story, but I c o u l d n e v e r w r i t e it,"

and a f t e r a w h i l e it is i m p o s s i b l e

with an i n f o r m a l q u e s t i o n and an-

she e x p l a i n e d . "It has a b e g i n -

l o s e p a r a t e them.

s w e r s e s s i o n , w h i c h w a s held at

On T u e s d a y nighi, J a m a i c a

ning, m i d d l e , and an e n d . I j u s t

But d o we really h a v e lo?

"I h a v e a garden full of w o r d s , "

Maas Center Tuesday afternoon. S h e a n s w e r e d q u e s t i o n s f r o m stu-

have no interest in it." C o m m e n t s like that m i g h t

I m e a n , w h y c a n ' t we allow the stories of o u r lives l o w e a v e

m a k e any g o o d E n g l i s h teacher

t h e m s e l v e s like the tapestries of

d e n t s in p e r s o n . Kincaid w a s a s k e d a b o u l

cringe, but a f t e r h e a r i n g K i n c a i d

w o r d s Kincaid uses? F r o m the m o s t p r o f o u n d

she writes slories w h i c h are related to her o w n life. S h e also t a l k e d

m i l e s t o n e to the m u n d a n e

aboul the i m p o r t a n c e of n a m e s and

t h r o u g h a tapestry w h e r e w o r d s weave together separate

c h o r e s of daily e x i s t e n c e , it's o u r stories that are m o s t

h o w she r e g a r d s the m e a n i n g s and

S m i l s , w h o had the opportunity,

B o t t o m of T h e R i v e r " ( 1 9 8 4 ) w a s

along with other s t u d e n t s and fac-

n o m i n a t e d for the P E N / F a u l k n e r

t h o u g h t s and e v e n t s and

i m p o r t a n t , not the order we tell

origins of them. K i n c a i d read pari o f h e r w o r k ,

ulty, lo eat dinner with Kincaid, w a s

Award and went on lo win the

i m p r e s s e d with h o w the writer d o e s

M o r t o n D e u w e n Zebel Award of the

follow if you tried to listen to

t h e m in. It d o e s n ' t really m a t t e r if w e

" M y M o t h e r " f r o m h e r collection, " A t T h e B o t t o m of T h e R i v e r " ,

not hesitate lo s h a r e her v i e w s .

A m e r i c a n A c a d e m y and Institute of

her like you m i g h t the nightly

can r e m e m b e r individual details

which she insisted thai nobody liked

" S h e ' s very h o n e s t a b o u l w h a t

Arts and Letters. " A n n i e J o h n "

n e w s , but I think her s o m e t i m e s

or s p e c i f i c timelines. W h a t we

w h e n she first wrole it for T h e N e w

she d o e s , " S m i l s s a i d . " S h e s t a n d s

(1986), "A Small Place" (1989),

c o n f u s i n g style is far m o r e true

h a v e lo u n d e r s t a n d is that

Yorker. It w a s nol p u b l i s h e d then.

behind her own work."

and " L u c y " ( 1 9 9 1 ) h a v e f o l l o w e d .

lo life than any s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d

everything we experience

S h e also read selections f r o m " M y

"The

article or e s s a y c o u l d e v e r be.

a f f e c t s w h o w e are a n d w h o we

Brother." A f t e r the r e a d i n g , she a n s w e r e d

Kincaid w a s part of the W o m e n ' s Week and Black History M o n t h cel-

read, this is o b v i o u s l y true f o r her. Her w o r k s take the r e a d e r

feelings. M a y b e not easy l o

W e are all w r i t i n g o u r o w n stories, e v e n if w e a r e n ' t

are b e c o m i n g . M a y b e K i n c a i d ' s w a y of

authors. E a c h day w e add n e w

telling stories s h o u l d be h o w we

p a r a g r a p h s and c h a p t e r s . D o they honestly all m a k e

all s h a r e the e v e n t s of our o w n

Anchor

how

photo

by J o h n a t h a n Muenk

C u 11 i n e: T/iis is an example of a outline that I have no idea what to say because this picture doesn V really lend itself to anything profound.

Autobiography

of

My

M o t h e r " w a s published in January 1996 and it has b e e n national best

a f e w q u e s t i o n s that s t u d e n t s had

ebrations on campus. B o r n in 1949, K i n c a i d w a s e d u -

written d o w n before the reading b e g a n . S h e talked aboul h e r favor-

cated in Si. J o h n ' s , A n t i g u a , in the

B r o t h e r " has b e e n n o m i n a t e d for

seller. H e r m o s t recent work, " M y

lives. M a y b e we d o n ' t need a

ite books, w h i c h are mainly British

West Indies. S h e w a s raised by her only parent, h e r mother. S h e lives

the National B o o k Award. T h i s r e a d i n g w a s f u n d e d by T h e

literature and include " J a n e E y r e "

in V e r m o n t with h e r h u s b a n d and

O f f i c e of Multi-Cultural Life. Black

the w a y o u r lives u n f o l d ? I liked K i n c a i d ' s d i s c u s s i o n of

beginning, middle and end. M a y b e all of life is a p r o c e s s

and w o r k s by J a n e A u s t e n . S h e e n d e d the r e a d i n g with ad-

children now. In 1973 h e r first article w a s p u b l i s h e d . H e r s l o r i e s

History Monlh Celebration; W o m e n ' s Week, T h e M e y e r Lecture

h e r a u t o b i o g r a p h y w h e n she

that d o e s n ' t a l w a y s fit s o neatly

vice on h o w l o prepare for a c a r e e r

have appeared in The New

S e r i e s f o u n d e d by P a m e l a W h i t e

e x p l a i n e d that e v e r y t h i n g she wrote actually h a p p e n e d , just

on a printed p a g e S o lei's s h a r e our stories, as

in writing. "Betray, betray, betray," she said.

Rolling

c o n f u s i n g or hard to f o l l o w a s

Sally S m i l s , editor of O p u s , w a s

s e n s e ? Is ihere any real o r d e r to

not necessarily in the order she presented t h e m . 1 think (his s p e a k s to the w a y

they m a y be.

the stories of o u r lives are

u n d e r s t a n d ourselves/

I t ' s the only w a y w e ' l l ever

H a d a s ; W o m e n ' s Issues O r g a n i z a -

view. K i n c a i d ' s first b o o k , " A l T h e

tion; and T h e Cultural A f f a i r s C o m -

zation is j u d g e d . " M y vision of H o p e is that stu-

is not s o m e h o w a replacement lo the

d e n t s w h o h a v e an interest in any-

B e a u x Arts ball. "It w a s n e v e r an e i t h e r / o r situa-

thing we d o e v e r y t h i n g we can to

plan to repeal the e v e n t a g a i n this year. T h i s d e c i s i o n s t e m s m o s t l y

tion," she said. " T h i s is a o n e - l i m e

n u m b e r s , " he said. "If there are only

c o l l e g e s p o n s o r e d e v e n t , b u t we

three p e o p l e w h o want an organi-

f r o m the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s d e s i r e to

hope O p u s will be a b l e lo s p o n s o r

zation w e need to see h o w we can

f o c u s on student writing. "It w a s mostly my idea b e c a u s e I

it next y e a r a n d h o p e f u l l y it will

w o r k together lo support any inter-

b e c o m e an annual p r o g r a m . " O p u s h a s b e e n m a k i n g an effort

est." R e s p o n s e lo the w o r k O p u s has

to o p e n up m o r e to the c a m p u s a s a

d o n e this year has b e e n a f f i r m i n g .

w h o l e , and S m i l s has b e e n pleased with the p r o g r e s s m a d e this year.

"We've gotten,positive comments aboul what w e ' v e already

"I t h i n k w e ' v e b e c o m e m o r e

d o n e , " S m i l s s a i d . "I think n o w

o p e n this y e a r . " s h e said. " O v e r 2 0

people are j u s t w a i t i n g to see w h a t

atre g r o u p s d e c i d i n g to no l o n g e r

writers w e r e published in the fall

happens."

produce plays."

edition. I ' m excited to see h o w e v e n

T h i s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n w a s agreed upon by the w h o l e o r g a n i z a t i o n .

the staff has g r o w n and p e o p l e h a v e

" W e fell o u r t i m e a n d e n e r g y

help." D e s p i t e the fact that s o m e m a y

D e s p i t e the s u c c e s s of the B e a u x Arts ball last year. O p u s d o e s nol

felt the o r g a n i z a t i o n n e e d e d to focus on writing for the w h o l e c a m p u s . " said J a c k R i d l . a d v i s o r t o O p u s . "I felt it set a d a n g e r o u s precedent for us b e c o m i n g a social organization. Ii w o u l d be like a the-

w o u l d be b e t t e r spent p u b l i s h i n g

a p p r o a c h e d m e aboul h o w they c a n

student w o r k . " said Sally Smils ( ' 0 1 ) . editor o f O p u s .

see the d e c i s i o n s O p u s has m a d e

Ridl thinks that the f o c u s on stu-

r e a c h e d by the o r g a n i z a t i o n , Smils s e e s m o r e s t u d e n t s b e i n g contacted

d e n t w r i t i n g is i m p o r t a n t , b u t d o e s n ' t w a n t t o be seen a s a n t i B e a u x Arts. " W e can h a v e a B e a u x A r t s Ball

by their e f f o r t s this year. "I think the o r g a n i z a t i o n has be-

ary things," he said. " A s a p r o f e s sor I see lots of quality w o r k and I

use. O p u s s p o n s o r s a c o m m u n i t y . It's nol a c l i q u e . " Ridl is q u i c k to point out, h o w ever, that n u m b e r s s h o u l d not be h o w the i m p o r t a n c e of an organi-

iber the good days at Hope.

SPRING BREAK 'ill 5V57 CanCUn J a w i a i c a ^ a w a s

Let J

•« rxay-

mm ' laa-

*

f i / s •

c o m e m o r e a part of the c a m p u s , " S m i l s said. " W e ' r e c o n n e c t i n g with m o r e of c a m p u s in the v e n u e s we

f

s u p p o r t . It s h o u l d n ' t be based on

recently as a w a y to n a r r o w those

every w e e k e n d , but w e ' r e a literary organization so let's d o m o r e liter-

wani it to get r e c o g n i z e d , t o h a v e the opportunity for it t o be s e e n . " O n e big e v e n t O p u s is s p o n s o r -

You're 80. Trying to

s h o p on M a r c h 13. S m i l s said this

intermission editor

mittee.

of honesty as in her w o r k , " she said.

Opus focuses on writing ing this s e m e s t e r is a writers' w o r k -

and The Paris

pleased with the reading. "In person she has the s a m e level " S h e is r e f r e s h i n g and g e n u i n e . "

K A T E FOLKERT"

Yorker, Re-

Stone

CAMPUS REPS - SIGN UP ONUNE I

1-800 234-7007

www.ondloss5ummertours.com

-

m


F e b r u a r y 2 4 , 1999

the

Anchor

Spotlight

H o p e g r a d finds fun, f u l f i l l m e n t in radio He lists meeting the p e o p l e as the

"1 did television in high school. I JULIE G R E E N

t h o u g h t radio w a s kind of s t u p i d , "

spotlight e d i t o r

An a n m a j o r w a s ihc original plan for Eric Hultgrcn ( ' 9 6 ) . bul an illfalcd a s s i g n m c n l resulted in E r i c O ' B i r a n . \VVT196.1 F M radio hosl. "1 gol kicked out of ihe arl dep a r i m e n i . I w o u l d nol d r a w flow-

H u l t g r e n said. N o n e t h e l e s s , first s e m e s t e r his f r e s h m e n year, Hullgren had a rad i o s h o w at W T H S . T h e noon to 3 pm s h o w w a s alternative style, entitled ' N o o n T i m e J a m s . ' "Can you believe that?" Hultgren

ers," Hultgren said. Hullgren saw c o m i c s a s ihe essence of arl, nol f l o w e r s , and ihe arl

said, fond of h o w stupid he thought

d e p a r i m e n l saw o i h e r w i s e . H e and ihe arl d e p a r i m e n l d e c i d e d lhal il

the o b v i o u s c h o i c e for H u l t g r e n . 4 T m stupid and I ' m u g l y - [ r a d i o ]

would be beller if he f o u n d a n e w

is w h e r e w e all g o , " h e said.

area of expertise. Today, h e is the hosl of an after-

best pari. "I h a v e p h o n e lines busy all day long. I g o to G r i f f i n g a m e s ,

out taking your c l o t h e s o f f . "

and use them on ihe air," he said.

Hullgren d e c i d e d to get up on a box and take his c h a n c e at il. Sur-

T h o u g h this m e a n s a lot of last m i n u t e preparation, there is a bit of

he said. O n e of H u l l g r c n ' s favorite people is a lady he d o e s n ' t k n o w , but s e e s

prising t o h i m , he w o n the event.

reason behind ihe m a d n e s s .

But he w a s u n a b l e to take the cash prize or go o n t o the c h a m p i o n s h i p

" T h e r e a s o n of the s h o w is to identify wilh p e o p l e on a m o r e per-

o f t e n at public r a d i o a p p e a r a n c e s . Hullgren said he can a l w a y s r e c o g -

r o u n d of box d a n c i n g b e c a u s e he

sonal level," he said, Hultgren w o r k e d a s a radio pro-

In the e n d , radio turned o u t to be

n o o n s h o w wilh a m u s i c intensive Top 4 0 f o r m a l . Bul there is a lot of history that

rich-quick scheme I expected." O t h e r than this, H u l l g r e n e n j o y s

c a m e b e f o r e the glory days.

the j o b .

" M u c h like S e i n f i e l d , I lake things lhal h a p p e n in e v e r y d a y life

bars, do appearances. We'll just h a n g r>ut at a place to d o a s h o w , "

his first title was. A f t e r his tria| run in art, radio w a s

the perfect career. Bul, said Hultgren, "It's certainly nol the get-

a c o m p e t i t i o n of b o x d a n c i n g . B o x d a n c i n g is basically stripping with-

nize her b e c a u s e her shirt is c o v ered in a m u l t i t u d e of pins displaying all the area radio station's logos. Every W e d n e s d a y night, 96.1 has a p u b l i c a p p e a r a n c e at G r o t t o , a night

club

in G r a n d

Rapids.

Hultgren had one of his o d d e s t exp e r i e n c e s here. " O n e time when I was working on the m o r n i n g show, I w a s at the G r o t t o [where] w e were s p o n s o r i n g

Pianist gains early success

w a s a sponsor. Along with ordinary people, H u l t g r e n has had the c h a n c e to talk with w e l l - k n o w n o n e s . H e h a s interviewed Semisonic, Third Eye Blind, M a t c h b o x 20, Gov. John Engler, and G e o f f e r y Fieger. 44

spotlight e d i t o r

for Eric S c h r o t e n b o e r ( ' 0 1 ) . "I w e n t to the p h o n e b o o k and

Hultgren said, but nol a great

said. " I ' m fully a w a r e lhal this isn't a

a m o u n t into the p r e p a r a t i o n for his show. H u l l g r e n likes t o take it as h e

real j o b , bul 1 d o n ' t plan to get one s o o n . B u r g e r K i n g ' s a l w a y s look-

goes.

ing for fry c o o k s , " h e said.

I p u t a lot of h o u r s i n t o i l , "

A T T E N T I O N HOPE S T U D E N T S :

T H U R S D A Y 18 COLLEGE NIGHT

T H U R S D A Y IS COLLEGE NIGHT!!

l o o k e d for a [ r e c o r d i n g ] s t u d i o , " S c h r o t e n b o e r said. Wilh a lot of motivation and a few

FREE BURGER AMD P O T A T O BAR. 5 P M -BPM

calls, S c h r o t e n b o e r lined up his first recording session and in D e c e m b e r of 1996 r e l e a s e d h i s first a l b u m .

a

DJ AND DANCING B T A R T 8 AT AT 6 0 0 P M

i

T h e a l b u m is s o l o and

f r o n t stage. " B u s i n e s s is always changing. I'll go wilh it as long a s I can," Hultgren

AT CALYPSO S ENTERTAINMENT COMPLEX IN THE HOLIDAY INN OF HOLLAND 6 5 0 EAST 2 4 T H S T R E E T G1G-396-0707

It all started wilh the yellow pages

Forever Faithful.

P r e f e r r i n g to be on air than behind the scenes, Hultgren h o p e s to slay

in B I W F I T

JULIE GREEN

piano. A pianist

ducer, but later c h a n g e d to hosting.

GREAT SHOT SPECIALS

musician,

S c h r o t e n b o e r has released t w o al-

64jD0

szoo

b u m s and is l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to re-

240Z DRAFTS

cording two more. Last fall, S c h r o t e n b o e r released

BEAT THl RUSH amd a n Hoik

M U S T BE 21 TO ENTER

fAHL Y

his s e c o n d a l b u m . Bethlehem, an a r r a n g e m e n t of p i a n o and strings. This

album

was

recorded

in SOLO PIANO

Wichcr's Auditorium with help from a H o p e string quartet. For Schrotenboer, a childhood

Anchor

M A J O R

illustration courtesy Eric Schrotenboer

M U S I C : Eric Schrotenboer's

second album.

hobby has created a f u t u r e p r o f e s -

Belli l e h e m , features

sion. "I started p l a y i n g the p i a n o w h e n

w h e r e , but b o o k s t o r e s in M i c h i g a n

T w o m o r e a l b u m s are h o p e f u l l y

are c a r r y i n g the C D ' s . " I t ' s b e e n d o i n g g o o d in t h e

on the w a y for Schrotenboer. " I ' m w o r k i n g on a c o u p l e m o r e

s t o r e s in W e s t e r n M i c h i g a n , "

projects, a h y m n and a c o m p o s i t i o n

on lessons. A lot of dedication w e n t

Schrotenboer said. T h e Christian

of my o w n , " he said

into his years of p l a y i n g , but il usu-

bookstores have been especially

He h o p e s that his o w n c o m p o s i -

ally w o r k e d out for Schrotenboer.

tion will be r e c o r d e d and put out

I w a s five years old. I loved to just p u n k around on il," he said. His p a r e n t s d e c i d e d to start him

original

piano

"I w a s able to find a really g o o d

supportive. As a triplet, S c h r o t e n b o e r is the

balance. Il takes a lot of w o r k , but

only o n e to lake up m u s i c ; his t w o

il pays o f f in the e n d , " h e said. Today, S c h r o t e n b o e r is a m u s i c

sisters play volleyball. "Right now, I ' m taking guitar les-

m a j o r l o o k i n g into religion. " I ' d love to gel into m u s i c m i n i s -

s o n s , bul j u s t for f u n , " h e said. T h o u g h he has taken guitar les-

compositions.

my life." S c h r o t e n b o e r said. S c h r o t e n b o e r has several reasons for such dedication. "First of all, it's

DURING HAPPY HOURS

what I love to do. Bul my walk with

MQNOAY-SATURDAY

try. 1 want to write m u s i c and pos-

s o n s for about a year and a h a l f , he

sibly p e r f o r m , " he said. His C D ' s a r e n ' t s e l l i n g e v e r y -

d o e s n ' t c o n s i d e r p l a y i n g il seri-

T h a t ' s w h a t keeps m e going; it j u s t c o m e s when 1 sit d o w n and play."

I n s t r u c t o r b e c o m e s r a d i o host JULIE GREEN spotlight e d i t o r

many C D ' s . " Even t hough it's called free f o r m ,

f o r m radio station in the state. T h a i I n v o l v e m e n t wilh radio began in a similar a t m o s p h e r e for Erskine.

Free f o r m is the f o r m a l of J o h n Erskine's 10 a.m. W e d n e s d a y m o r n ing radio s h o w at W T H S . As an in-

I try to get into. Last week, it w a s

" I ' v e been doing r a d i o since I ' v e

black history m o n t h , this w e e k is

structor at H o p e . E r s k i n e has decided to g o past the c l a s s r o o m .

w o m e n ' s w e e k . " he said. While having a theme, Ersksine

been in c o l l e g e , " he s a i d . "I w a s involved in ihe creation of m u s i c .

'"I h a v e a lot of personal interest in radio and m u s i c , " Erskine said. In the c l a s s r o o m , he t e a c h e s re-

p l a y s n o certain type of m u s i c . "I probably lean more towards an

cording techniques and applications. O u t s i d e , he hosts a radio program he describes a s " a resurrection of free f o r m . I bring in a b u n c h of things in from my collection o f too

7 - 9 : 3 0 AM MONDAY-FRIDAY 9:30

PM-MIDNITE

really p e a k e d my interest."

Erskine's shows do have a theme. "I usually have s o m e sort of topic

international flavor. Well, no, it's just all o v e r the p l a c e , " he said. Childhood influenced Erskine's

V I P 5195速

next fall. ' ' M u s i c has a l w a y s been a part of

C h r i s t is w h e r e the inspiration is.

ously.

O N E W E E K

mssmm

M y r o o m m a t e s w e r e inlo il l o o . " F o r now, Erskine is content wilh a once a w e e k show, bul will perh a p s e x p a n d in the future. T h e s h o w has been r u n n i n g for

TANS F

^lidniu^

only t w o w e e k s , bul E r s k i n e has

4 Sun w i

style. "I g r e w up in Detroit in the late

had no bad feed back yet. " T h e few p r o f e s s o r s w h o listen

Cimse

sixties. W A B X w a s the first f r e e

to it like il," he said.


the Anchor

Spotlight

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

Season of Sacrifice STILL SMILIN*

Hope College Celebrates

Carrie Arnold

As d i v i s i o n s began lo f o r m in the CARRIE

ARNOLD

Christian c h u r c h , the different seels b e g a n lo o b s e r v e Lent in different ways.

spotlight e d i t o r

Breaking it O u t Sigh.

p l a n n i n g a lime w h e n we can

1 had finally gotten d o n e with five w e e k s of w o r k . It

h a v e a time j u s l to think. Jusl to

w a s m y lime o f f now. N o one

d o absolutely n o t h i n g at all. I find I need a b r e a k f r o m l i m e t o

else c o u l d h a v e it. W i n t e r

t i m e , to c o m e back to reality, to

break had finally a r r i v e d .

r e - a d j u s t to my rapidly c h a n g -

So. u n c e r e m o n i o u s l y , I arrived back h o m e . I p r o m p t l y Hopped out on

ing s u r r o u n d i n g s . S c h o o l w o r k keeps m e busy. T h e A n c h o r k e e p s m e busy. M y

the c o u c h w h e r e 1 r e m a i n e d ,

f r i e n d s k e e p m e busy. W h i l e I

s e m i - c o m a t o s e , f o r the next

e n j o y all of the activities 1 do,

three d a y s . I would h a v e been p e r f e c t l y

s o m e t i m e s I find m y s e l f o v e r w o r k e d (and of course,

c o n t e n t to r e m a in t h e r e into eternity. N o s c h o o l w o r k , no

u n d e r p a i d ) and slrelched out

j o b , no n o t h i n g . Just f r e e d o m .

burned oul, but thai d o e s n ' t

M y t w o largest c o n c e r n s

too thin. I try to a v o i d gelling always happen. I c o u l d n e v e r give u p any of

were e a t i n g and r e m e m b e r i n g to brush my teeth. T h e only

the things 1 do. T h e y h a v e

thing I w a s r e s p o n s i b l e for

c o m e to m e a n t o o m u c h to m e

w a s the r e m o t e c o n t r o l . N o t

already. B u t it d o e s m e a n that 1

loo bad, right? H e c k , if I kept this routine

need a break. W e all do.

up, I w o u l d c o m e b a c k to H o p e so well resled I w o u l d n ' t h a v e t o sleep for a w e e k . W h i l e I l o a f e d a r o u n d o n the

Yel part of Ihe i m p o r t a n c e of t a k i n g s o m e l i m e off is in not d o i n g it loo o f t e n . T h e m e a n i n g gels d i l u t e d if we m i n d l e s s l y w a s t e a w a y the

sofa, I a l s o had l i m e t o d o s o m e t h i n k i n g , w h a t with all

hours. T a k i n g a b r e a k should

of those c o m m e r c i a l b r e a k s .

less.

a l l o w us to d o m o r e in life, not

E v e n t s had b e e n h a p p e n i n g s o fast in my life that I n e e d e d lime to c a t c h up t o t h e m .

A n d so, j u s l a s u n c e r e m o n i o u s l y as I left, I arrived back at

T h e r e w a s n o w a y t o d o this at

Hope. I a s k e d m y s e l f lots of

s c h o o l - too m u c h to d o , too

q u e s t i o n s on my l i m e o f f .

little lime.

Questions about what I wanted

But a b r e a k . . . N o w that w a s

to m a j o r in, w h a t I w a n t e d to

a great idea. S o m e t i m e s , we just need to

d o in life, my role in the w o r l d ,

lake s o m e lime o f f . T h i s

w h a t I w a n t e d to m a k e for

doesn't imply going anywhere

dinner.

a n d e v e n m u n d a n e m a t t e r s like

or d o i n g a n y t h i n g e x p e n s i v e . It d o e s n ' t e v e n imply t a k i n g m o r e than a day o f f . B u t w h a t it m e a n s is gelling t i m e for us. Jusl o u r s e l v e s . A n d d o absolutely nothing. I d o n ' t m e a n the s i m p l e procrastination and v e g g i n g oul routine we d o d u r i n g ihe school year. O r e v e n b l o w i n g off an a f t e r n o o n of classes jusl for the heck of it. W h a t I m e a n is seriously

For every question I asked, I f o u n d t w o m o r e that I w a n t e d answered-such as what I w a n t e d for b r e a k f a s t and w h a t I w a n t e d for lunch. But gelling those a n s w e r s w a s n ' t as i m p o r t a n t a s sorting o u t e v e r y t h i n g that had h a p p e n e d since I got b a c k f r o m C h r i s t m a s Break. S o lhat's w h a t I did o v e r m y break. A lot of e v e r y t h i n g , and a lot of n o t h i n g at all.

een

Tm

giving up swearing. I

h a v e a pretty bad potty m o u t h . " — A n n e Houseworlh ('01)

&

" I ' m not giving up a n y t h i n g b e c a u s e we d i d n ' l practice | L e n l ] in m y c h u r c h g r o w i n g up."

c h u r c h . A n d I ' m not ungrateful or a n y t h i n g , but I g a v e it all a w a y . " Patterson also believed that Lent is a l i m e w h e n o n e can start d o i n g

Lent is a b o u t sacrifice. At least that's what Cathleen Robarl ('02)

Dr. Phil M u n o a ,

s o m e t h i n g , as op-

p r o f e s s o r of reli-

thinks. " J e s u s C h r i s t m a d e the ultimate

gion, c o m m e n t e d that no matter h o w

posed lo giving s o m e t h i n g up.

sacrifice, so I figure ihe least I can

the d i v i s i o n s af-

" Y o u can start visiting a n u r s i n g

d o is s a c r i f i c e s o m e t h i n g s m a l l , "

f e c t e d the c h u r c h .

R o b a r l said. T h i s year, R o b a r l d e c i d e d to g i v e

Lent remains "an ancient ritual ob-

h o m e or m e m o rize s o m e Scripture. Give up your

up sweets.

served

own

" C a n d y , c o o k i e s , ice c r e a m - basically j u s l d e s s e r l s , " R o b a r l said.

church." " I t ' s a sign of re-

" I ' v e been d o i n g it every year since

pentance,"

I b e c a m e a Christian my s o p h o m o r e year in high s c h o o l . M y first year, I gave up p o p for ihe sake of simplic-

Patterson, D e a n of ihe Chapel, said. " [ A s h e s are] a re-

ity in my life.

m i n d e r of our mortality. All of o u r

on h i g h e r things. T h a t is ihe heart

best e f f o r t s in life on our o w n will

of Lent. T h i s r e p e n t a n c e m a k e s you

T h e season of Lent has j u s l began, and s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y all

by

the

Ben

lime,"

Patterson

said.

"Instead watching

of 'rV,

read s o m e g r e a t b o o k s , ll m a k e s you more focused

e n d in d u s t without G o d . "

turn a w a y f r o m sin and t o w a r d s

over H o p e ' s c a m p u s are celebrat-

T h i s period of c o n f e s s i o n of sins,

God."

ing Ihis holiday in a variety of ways.

r e p e n t a n c e and s a c r i f i c e lasls f r o m

F o r the next 4 0 days, people all over

A s h W e d n e s d a y until G o o d Friday,

T h e H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y is cele b r a t i n g the s e a s o n of L e n t with

the world will be o b s e r v i n g the t i m e C h r i s l s p e n d in the w i l d e r n e s s , as

the d a y J e s u s w a s c r u c i f i e d . T h e

e c u m e n i c a l church s e r v i c e s

time period of 4 0 d a y s is s y m b o l i c

W e d n e s d a y afternoon f r o m 1 2 l O l o

well as the ultimate sacrifice that he

of ihe lime that C h r i s l spent fasting in the w i l d e r n e s s to b e t e m p l e d by

12:30 P.M.. T h e s e r v i c e s will be held al H o p e C h u r c h , with a o i f f e r -

the Devil. T h i s o c c u r r e d j u s l a f t e r

enl church s p o n s e r i n g e a c h service.

made. T h e w o r d L e n t c o m e s f r o m the A n g l o - S a x o n w o r d Lencten, w h i c h m e a n s lo m a k e longer. T h i s w o r d r e f e r s lo the l e n g t h e n i n g of d a y s as

However,

S p r i n g t i m e and Easter proach.

warns

means

The holiday on A s h Wednesday, 4 0 d a y s bef o r e Easier, not counting Sund a y s . On A s h

Sacrifice keeps m e o b e d i e n t and so, hopefully, I will be m o r e faithful in prayer.

ous y e a r ' s P a l m S u n d a y celebra-

('02)

holiday celebrated by ( ^ i ^ t i a i ^ u / o r l d u / i d e ii?

i t s e l f , "

order to re^e/i\bcr tt^e

Patterson said. " T h e r e is n o p a r t i c u l a r virsomething. T h e

—Cathleen Robart

15 39 a i ^ u a i

" S a c r i f i c e is n e v e r an e n d in

tue in giving up

fronds

f r o m the previ-

to an

end.

Wed nesday, palm

Patterson

against sacriflee as only a

ap-

of L e n t b e g i n s

very

his b a p t i s m and right b e f o r e J e s u s b e g a n his ministries.

value

is

in

w h a t ' s released

ti/i\e tt^at:^505 5pe9t ii} t[;e u;ilder9e53 to be tempted by tt)e Deuil. It b e ^ i i ^ o f ^ i j l i / e d i ^ -

when you say

tion are b u r n e d ,

no

a n d the a s h e s

thing lo say yes

to

some-

day ai^d e9d5 09 (jood

to something

priday, tt^e day Je5U5

better." A l t h o u g h R o b a r l has f o u n d her

u;a5 crucified, la^tii^ 40

Lenten sacrifices lo be infinitely rewarding, she has f o u n d her d i f f i c u l -

day3.

had b e c o m e c o m m o n . T h i s fast w a s used not only as a m e a n s of r e p e n -

ties in k e e p i n g h e r p r o m i s e s .

a5 a 3ea509 of repei)-

tance. but also as a w a y for n e w

n i e n c e of g o i n g out of m y w a y not

m e m b e r s lo prepare t h e m s e l v e s for

lo d o thai thing," Robart said "I j u s l

an E a s t e r b a p t i s m .

got a h u g e car e p a c k a g e f r o m m y

are used lo m a k e the s y m b o l of a c r o s s on a Christian's forehead. By the f o u r t h century, the traditional 4 0 - d a y o b s e r v a t i o n of Lent

eard

" I ' m giving up pizza, j u s l for stronger w i l l p o w e r . "

" T h e hardest part is the i n c o n v e -

l ^ t

a ^ o

5erue3

tai^e ii) preparation for tbe

Easter holiday.

What, if anything, are you giving up for Lent? Why?

" I ' m giving up pop.

It's a n

e v e r y d a y ihing. It's a g o o d w a y lo r e m e m b e r w h a t Christ d i d . "

— D e a n n a Lebar ('01) —Eric John Branch ('01)

—Michelle Haiduc ('99)

Lent

" I ' m not giving up a n y t h i n g . " —Robin Boh ('99)


the

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999 s t r i c t l y classified.

W O M E N from I

A C T N O W ! Last chancc lo reserve your spol for spring break! Group discounis f o r 6 + . Call Leisure Tours for Souih Padre, Cancun. Jamaica, and Florida. 1 - 8 0 0 - 8 3 8 - 8 2 0 3 / www.leisurelours.com

#1 P a n a m a Cily vacations! Free Parlies-no cover. Besi beachfronl hotels from $129. Free "Spring Break Uncensored" video! 1-8002 3 4 - 7 0 0 7 . Www.cndlcsssummcrlours.com

SPRING BREAK BEACHES Daylona, Panama Cily, Padre, Miami, C a n c u n , Jamaica. Bahamas, eic. Bcsi hotels, prices, parlies. Browse www.icpl.com. Reps earn cash, free irips. Call Inier-Campus 800-3276013

Applications for ihe Sludcnl Union Desk are available al Ihe S U D Feb. 25 and arc due March 19.

Whal arc you paying for your rechargeable phone card? 25 cenls, 30 ccnis. 45 cenls per min? You warn a s u r p r i s e c h e c k oul h u p : / / www.ibcom.nel/pmc/561057.him

Every self-respecling English maj o r has read "Of Mice and Men"

# I Spring Break '99 vacalions! Bcsl prices guaranlced!!!! Cancun and Jamaica $399, Bahamas $459, Panama Cily Beach $129. Book now and receive a f r e e " S p r i n g Break U nee n sored" video!!! 1 -8002 3 4 7 0 0 7 . WWW.endlesssummerlours.cdm

My dear Fieldmarshal (Mail Carrier?): Arc you hard lo gel lo know? I love finding oul. — Your Counselor .

M: Thanks for ihe shoulder. I promise lhai I will be normal again someday and ihen you will learn lo apprecialc my driving. Queen of Complexes: Sorry thai I haven't been around much lately. Someday life will be normal again. I love you to death and know that we will both make it through it all. Hang in there friend.

RESIDENTIAL from I of Kollen, will accept some of the community responsibilities left by Bazuin. N a n c y Shrode, Resident Director of Phelps Hall, will lake over many of Bazuin's administrative responsibilities for the rest of the semester. "I think Nancy and Jackie will work well together," Bazuin said. Bazuin also puts a lot of confidence in his RA staff who he feels will work well with Williams and Shrode. Goebel will also be available lo help with any problems thai may

Anchor

arise for the last six weeks of the semester. "With Jackie and Nancy's help I have every reason to be confident," Goebel said. "We're jusl going lo keep on keeping on." Amanda Pelers ('01) along with other RA's in Kollen, are disappointed that Bazuin will be leaving so soon. "I think it will be weird because we worked with him all year and working with another person for jusl six weeks will be strange," she said.

for several weeks and even reserved the jugglers last semester. "Things have been crazy the past few weeks, but it's nice lo know my efforts will give students a chance lo spend s o m e quality lime with their siblings and that there will be fun activities available," she said. 1999 Program

32nd Annual Program

Hope S

Middle East Training Session

Basic cross-cultural missionary training preparing participants for work and witness anywhere in the world.

Academic and practical orientation to Muslim culture and to serve opportunities in the Muslim World. Lectures, travel, home stays combined with studies in the Bible and Islam.

Studies in Bible and missions, practical assignments. Intensive Spanish language study, home stays with national families. Open to college-aged students and other adults. STS is held in the Yucatan Peninsula.

For c o l l e g e - a g e d and older adults. METS 1999 is based in Istanbul. Turkey. J u n e 11 t o J u l y 23, 1999 COSTS:

June 24 t o A u g u s t 11,1999 COSTS:

S25 registration fee S925 program expense plus travel and supplies Request

STS application

from:

I.D.E.A. MINISTRIES Dr. Dick L. Van Halsema, President 4595 Broadmoor Avenue SE Suite 237 Grand Rapids. Ml 49512-5365 <ideamin@ideaministries.org> Telephone 616.698.8393 Fax 616.698.3080

$25 registration fee $995 program expense (subsidized) plus travel and supplies

Request

STS application

College

i

b

<ideamin@ideaministries.org> Telephone 616.698.8393 Fax 616.698.3080

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Many Special Treats! Surprises! Buffets! Cheapest Prices! 1 9 9 9 Siblings Phelps W e e k e n d D i n i n g Prices A o e s S ' l l

A g e s J 2

Breakfast

$ 1 . 5 0

$ 3 . SO

Lunch

$2.00 $2.50

$4.50 $5.50

from:

I.D.E.A. MINISTRIES Dr. Dick L. Van Halsema, President 4595 Broadmoor Avenue SE Suite 237 Grand Rapids, Ml 49512-5365

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, A/>'/'/

Mexico STS 1999 Summer Training Session

Hope alumnae who will share the successes and challenges of their lives and careers. T h e p a n e l will f e a t u r e B a r b Tacoma-DePree, Obstetrician/Gynecologist; Leanne Moss, Founder and Director of the Grand Rapids Opportunities for Women Organization; Peggy Helmink, International Business Consultant for the World Bank; and Lori Gcrligs, Registered Nurse. "We hope to provide women at Hope an example of women who can be e f f e c t i v e role m o d e l s , " Collins said. "They will reflect on these successes and whal or who contributed to this as well as ihe challenges along the way. " C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r Steven B o u m a - P r e d i g e r of the Religion Department agrees. "It just seems wrong that half the h u m a n r a c e is d i s c r i m i n a t e d against. I think it is easy lo think that this discrimination is an issue of the past, but it is still going on today," he said.

Women's Issues Organization, the Dance Department, and the Counseling Center will present "The Perfect Body," a film on eating disorders Wednesday, Feb. 2 4 - 8 p.m. in Maas Conference

SIBLINGS f r o m 2 Habitat for Humanity and S A C are cosponsoring van rides out lo The Edge Ice Arena for ice-skating from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Saturday. $5 will be needed lo cover the cost of rink time and ice skate rental. Smith said that S A C has been working on organizing this event

in Cook Auditorium in DcPree. Students will be able to participate in a contest at the photo exhibit held in the Maas Conference Room during March 2 through 5 from 9 a.m. lo 7 p.m. The display, titled "Women by Women. Women by Men," will depict several aspects of w o m e n ' s lives and students who correctly guess which photos were laken by men and which by women will receive prizes. " T h e photo display gels at the heart of the question of whether or not men and women create different art," Dickie said. "It will be interesting to see if the viewer can tell the difference." The Psychology Department will present the results of a survey on perceptions and attitudes of gender. The survey was given lo Hope students by Inlroduclion to Psychology students. The presentation will take place on Tuesday, March 2 al 11 a.m. in Phelps East Lounge. Another highlight of the event will be a panel discussion of female

city contribute lo the issues. "This is a time in our lives as college students when we are looking at our bodies and decide whal we feel is right and what is wrong," said Jill P i e r s o n ( ' 0 0 ) P r e s i d e n t of Women's Issues Organization. T h e C o u n s e l i n g C e n t e r and Health Department will be available to speak with students afterwards. Director of the Counseling Center Kristen Gray stressed that students are encouraged to seek help if uncomfortable with food. "The reason that we at the counseling center are interested in this is because it is a very big issue," she said. "This is very real and we see people struggling with these issues on a daily basis at Hope." Another film series, tilled "A Century of Women," will present a three part documentary which explores ideal beauty, w o m e n ' s sexuality. women's political rights. S h o w i n g s will l a k e p l a c e on Thursday, Feb. 25, Monday, March I and Wednesday, March 3 al 7 p.m.

pinner

Bring your sibling into t h e Kletz Snack Bar for lots of g r e a t specials


^Anchor

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

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the Anchor

F e b r u a r y 24, I 999

Sports

S w i m m e r s finish f i r s t and second in c h a m p i o n s h i p s /Men's swimmers take second in championships LISA MOEKSTR/X staff r e p o r t e r T h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n lost to K a l a m a z o o again at the M i c h i g a n Intercollegiate Athletic Association C h a m p i o n s h i p s w i m m e e t , last weekend. For the fourth c o n s e c u t i v e year,

S, r0n P"11 , 0 S i n ,h(e ^ r p l a c i n g first in lour out ol the live e v e n t s . Starling o u t ihe w e e k e n d Joshua Ficke ('01), David

Vruggink COO), Scolt V r o e g i n d e w a y ( ' 0 1 ) , and L i p p e r l finished ihe 2 0 0 F r e e Relay, wilh a condilional qualifying time for N C A A D i v i s i o n III C h a m p i o n -

Hope's swimming team finished second in the M I A A . K a l a m a z o o

T h e s a m e te^im also e n d e d the

finished wilh 619.5 points, and H o p e f o l l o w e d wilh 5 2 1 . 5 . Calvin

w e e k e n d j u s t as strong by w i n n i n g

369.5, A l m a 246, A l b i o n 226, and Olivet 25. Even wilh a second place finish, ihe Flying D u t c h m e n w e r e happy

ihe 4 0 0 Free R e l a y with a n o t h e r c o n d i t i o n a l q u a l i f y i n g t i m e for ihe N C A A Championships. T h e 4 0 0 and 2 0 0 M e d l e y Relay t e a m both c o n s i s t i n g o f D a t t e l s ,

wilh ihe way

Joshua

Boss

the meet pro-

('02),

Tom

gressed

B o u w e n s ('00), and

and

ended. "Kalamazoo had the depth to pull them through, we are a very good dual meet team hut we d o n ' t h a v e the s a m e depth that they have,"

said

I think that everyone swam well, t h e t e a m did as t h e y w e r e

tional q u a l i f y ing l i m e s , the M I A A record,

e x p e c t e d t o do and

and the pool r e c o r d ,

I w a s really pleased

3 : 2 4 . 5 2 in the

w i t h everyone's times.

head coach John Palnott, "I think e v e r y -

Lipperl finished with N a -

400

one s w a m well, the team did as they w e r e e x p e c t e d lo d o and I w a s really pleased wilh e v e r y o n e ' s

Women's swimmers LISA HOEKSXR/V

capture ""

staff r e p o r t e r

and

c o u r t e s y of Public Relations

eighth MIAA title at championship

meet

200 Medley Relays.

V a n A u k e n s w a m for personal best

T h e Flying Dutch finished with 5 3 3 points. C a l v i n e n d e d second at

l i m e s in b o t h t h e 5 0 a n d 1 0 0 Freestyle. In both e v e n t s she qualified for N a t i o n a l s a s well as creat-

The Hope College women's

4 1 0 , f o l l o w e d by K a l a m a z o o 385,

s w i m m i n g team finished the Michi-

A l m a 366, Albion 248, Saint

ing the n e w M I A A record and the

E v e n

gan Intercollegiate Athletic A s s o -

M a r y ' s 145, and Olivet 28.

though the regular season

ciation league meet, with their

W h i l e pleased with the final out-

pool record. D u r a n t e w a s c l o s e behind in the

eighth c o n s e c u t i v e first place vic-

c o m e , H o p e w a s c o n f i d e n t they had

50 f r e e , also a National q u a l i f y i n g

tory. In t h e past 19 y e a r s H o p e h a s

the talent to finish first, but d i d n ' t k n o w h o w c l o s e it would be.

t i m e of : 2 4 . 3 I . D u r a n t e finished the m e e t favor-

" I a m really p r o u d of o u r team

ably by d e f e n d i n g her title a s 100yard B u t t e r f l y c h a m p for the third

1:33.17 in the 200.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;John Patnott Head Swim Coach

Photo

R E C O R D S E X X I N G : Josh Boss ('02) in the front slowly builds a lead against Kalamazoo College in the first 50 meters of the 200 meter breaststroke at the MIAA Championships.

is n o w o v e r , six s w i m m e r s will c o n t i n u e c o m petition in the N C A A C h a m p i o n -

w o n the title 17 times. A f t e r the first day of c o m p e t i t i o n H o p e ' s Kari Jackson ('99), captured

b e c a u s e w e really pulled together, I thought it w a s g o i n g t o be a lot

the c h a m p i o n s h i p on the o n e - m e t e r

closer

N C A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s lo b e held

board and second on the three m e t e r

V a n A u k e n said.

M a r c h 18-20 in M i n n e a p o l i s .

" A f t e r the s e c o n d d a y w e k n e w

B o s s is the only f r e s h m a n of the

board. " K a r i d i d really well with d i v i n g

w e w e r e n ' t g o i n g lo win it all, s o

g r o u p to be h e a d e d to N a t i o n a l s .

we look all the w o r r i e s and pres-

times." K a l a m a z o o w a s c o m f o r t a b l e in first p l a c e a f t e r ihe s e c o n d d a y but

ships. Lipperl, Ficke, Dattels, Boss,

that d i d n ' l hurl the mentality of the Flying D u t c h m e n .

B o u w e n s , and V r o e g i n d e w e y q u a l i f i e d f o r i h e D i v i s i o n III

than

it

really

was,"

y e a r in a row with a t i m e of :58.58. D u r a n t e also finished ihe 2 0 0 Butterfly in first as did D o y l e did in the

" W e w e n t into the m e e t think-

200 Backstroke. Patnolt w a s pleased with the out-

this year, this has been a great se-

ing it w a s g o i n g to b e really c l o s e

c o m e of the w o m e n ' s team this year

B o s s u n o f f i c i a l l y b r o k e the Divi-

nior year for her," stated head coach

b e t w e e n us a n d C a l v i n , b u t w e

and not j u s t b e c a u s e of another first

sure off o u r s e l v e s . We s w a m for

sion III N C A A Record at the league

J o h n Palnott. Not only did H o p e do

w e r e n ' t going to let a n y t h i n g g o for

pride. As a t e a m we d e c i d e d to just

m e e t in t h e 2 0 0 B r e a s t s t r o k e ( 2 : 0 2 . 6 0 ) , a t i m e t h a t is a l s o a

f r e e , " she said. In addition t o s u c c e s s f u l diving

place. " O u r t e a m s g o a l s are not lo win,

have fun and s w i m fast for personal best l i m e s , " said Jared L i p p e r l

well in diving, they also finished on lop in 11 out of the 18 e v e n t s . For the w o m e n , relays w e r e an

and relays, H o p e c o n t i n u e d with

a r e a of e x p e r t i s e . T h e w o m e n started the m e e t out by w i n n i n g the

convincing limes in individual races

t e a m s h a v e . We c a n ' t set win-loss records as a goal. Individual athletes

as well. T h e l e a g u e ' s m o s t valuable

need individual g o a l s to learn and

first place w i n s in the 100 Freestyle and the 100 Butterfly. A l s o plac-

an N C A A C h a m p i o n s h i p m e e t . B o s s also is j u s t h u n d r e d t h s of sec-

200 Free Relay. Llena Durante ( ' 0 0 ) , J e n n a A n d e r s o n ( ' 0 2 ) , Eliza-

female swimmer, Betsy V a n d e n B e r g , c o m p l e t e d the m e e t

d e v e l o p , we w e n t into this m e e t lo s w i m o u r best l i m e s and not look

ing first f o r H o p e C o l l e g e w a s

o n d s a w a y f r o m reaching the

beth V a n d e r v e e n ( ' 0 2 ) , and Erinn

winning the 2 0 0 Individual Medley,

C h r i s D a t t e l s ( ' 0 1 ) a t w o - t i m e All M I A A s w i m m e r , w h o w o n the 2 0 0

O l y m p i c Trial t i m e . "I a m j u s t g o i n g t o t h i n k o f s w i m m i n g at N a t i o n a l s like I d o

V a n A u k e n ( ' 0 0 ) f i n i s h e d with a

the 100 B r e a s t s t r o k e and the 2 0 0

b a c k , " he said. Q u a l i f y i n g for the N C A A Divi-

lime of 1;37.07, the pool record, and

Breaststroke. T h i s is the 14,h c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r

sion III C h a m p i o n s h i p s are Jackson for diving, and the 2 0 0 Free and 2 0 0

that a H o p e f e m a l e s w i m m e r has

M e d l e y relay t e a m s . All will c o m -

been named M I A A MVP.

pete on M a r c h 11 to 13 in O x f o r d ,

COI). L i p p e r l finished wilh individual

M I A A and a pool record. H e w a s u n a b l e lo record the national r e c o r d b e c a u s e it w a s not in

h a v e the d e p t h to win first p l a c e in

g o i n g lo d o w h a t e v e r c o a c h tells

the M I A A record. Colleen Doyle ('00), Betsy VandenBerg ('01), Durante, and

e a c h event s w a m ; they did have the

m e lo d o , " Boss said.

V a n A u k e n also s w e p t the 4 0 0 and

Freestyle. Although Hope College didn't

a n y o t h e r r a c e . To p r e p a r e I a m

Durante agreed.

As

defending " champion.

we h a v e no control over w h a t other

Ohio.

T r a c k t e a m s c o m p e t e in p r e s e a s o n i n d o o r m e e t s A N D R E W KLECZEK staff r e p o r t e r

T h e H o p e m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s track t e a m s look to be c o m p e t i t i v e in what c o u l d be very close r a c e s for c o n f e r e n c e titles that Calvin has d o m i n a t e d recently. T h e last m e n ' s title c a m e in 1986, for the w o m e n it c a m e in 1988 but Calvin has w o n 10 of 11 in m e n ' s competition and 9 straight w o m e n ' s titles. " T h e league is really q u i l e bala n c e d . " said head c o a c h M a r k Northius. He also adds, " E a c h meet s h o u l d he w i t h i n 2 0 p o i n t s . " "I d o n ' t think a n y o n e is g o i n g t o w a l k a w a y with it." If a n y team has an e d g e it w o u l d p r o b a b l y be r e t u r n i n g c h a m p i o n Calvin. Northius said, that they are. very s e n i o r lead, as an a d v a n l a j i e .

f r o m last year, and we did pretty well t h e n , s o w e ' l l p r o b a b l y d o

S o m e o f the r u n n e r s a r e m o r e

d i s t a n c e t e a m will feature a d u o of

pete for the l e a g u e title.

optimistic. "It's hard l o tell if w e can beat

all c o n f e r e n c e c r o s s c o u n t r y runners. Veldman, and Wade. T h e team

"We lied for second last year, and I think w e ' l l h a v e a pretty g o o d

them, but we'll put up a good fight,"

should gain strong contributions

c h a n c e at s e c o n d if not first this

said m i d d l e distance r u n n e r L o u i s Williams ('01).

from sprinter Mark Youngs ( ' 9 9 )

y e a r " said captain Ashley Pries

Northius and many runners agree that C a l v i n will o n c e again be the

w h o w a s an a l l - c o n f e r e n c e runner

At this point in the y o u n g season

last year. T h e H o p e m e n finished s e c o n d in the G r a n d Valley Slate Univer-

COO). T h i s y e a r ' s t e a m will feature the

team lo beat this year. " T h e y ( C a l v i n ) return m o s t of

return of t w o - t i m e A l l - A m e r i c a n B e c k y T i m m e r ( ' 9 9 ) , w h o returns

iheir p e o p l e f r o m last y e a r ' s c o n -

sity I n d o o r Invitational b e h i n d

f r o m a y e a r in S p a i n , a n d E m i l y

N o r t h i u s said. " W e should d o well

league rival Adrian on F e b 13. Scor-

S o w e r s ( ' 0 1 ) w h o q u a l i f i e d for the

ing f o r H o p e w e r e W a d e in the 3 , 0 0 0 meter run, Kevin R i c h a r d s o n ( ' 0 1 ) in the high j u m p , and Ted

N C A A last year in discus. Even with these two obvious strengths, c o a c h N o r t h i u s f e e l s that

in dual m e e t s . " Despite s o m e early preseason s u c c e s s at the G r a n d Valley Stale

Coryell ('02). A f t e r f i n i s h i n g s e c o n d in t h e l e a g u e last year, and p o s t i n g a dual

the t e a m ' s overall b a l a n c e will be their greatest w e a p o n . " W e ' r e not heavily reliant on any

the t e a m ' s s t r e n g t h s look lo be centered in a f e w areas. " O u r j u m p s and o u r d i s t a n c e m i d d l e d i s t a n c e e v e n t s s e e m to be o u r b i g g e s t s t r e n g t h s right n o w , " N o r t h i u s said. Distance runner Dylan Wade ( ' 0 2 ) and Joe Veldman ( ' 0 1 ) agree that d i s t a n c e will be a strength. " F o r ihe distance r u n n e r s , I feel w e ' l l hold our e n d , " W a d e said.

pretty well this y e a r , " T i m m e r said.

ference championship

leam,"

University Indoor Meet and the Spring A r b o r Invitational. Northius w a r n s that it is not an accurate reflection of the t e a m ' s abilities. " W e only took 10 out of the 40

m e e t r e c o r d of 5 - 2 , the H o p e

one area to get ihe p o i n t s " Northius

" W e ' v e put in s o m e g o o d mileage this w i n t e r , " Veldman said.

w o m e n ' s track team looks lo o n c e a g a i n start the s e a s o n o f f on ihe

said. T h e team also points lo the fact

D i s t a n c e e v e n t s s h o u l d be the t e a m ' s greatest s t r e n g t h with ihe

right foot. E x p e c t a t i o n s are r u n n i n g high a s the t e a m f e e l s they have a c h a n c e

they d i d n ' t lose m a n y s e n i o r s to g r a d u a t i o n and iheir overall y o u t h

N o r t h i u s said. Bolh t e a m ' s c o m p e t e M a r c h 20lh at M o r e h o u s e University in Atlanta.

as team assets. " W e h a v e m o s t e v e r y o n e back

T h e i r first c o n f e r e n c e meet will be a g a i n s t Albion on M a r c h 31 si.

return of all c o n f e r e n c e runner Paul B c r k e ( ' 0 0 ) . A l o n g wilh B e r k e the

to d e f e a t Calvin and possibly c o m -

w o m e n , s o it's n o t fair to s a y , "


the Anchor

Sports

F e b r u a r y 24. I 999

D u t c h m e n capture fifth consecutive championship MIKE Z U I D E M A editor-i n-chief

g a m e s w o u l d be e a s i e r , " Van W i e r e n s a i d . " O u r g u y s felt they could be a pretty g o o d team and we

In (he end il will only look like H o p e C o l l e g e ' s l l f l h straight c o n l e r e n c e basketball m l e . Bui t h o s e i n v o l v e d with the Flying D u t c h m e n k n o w dilTerent. " T h i s is a pretty g o o d r e w a r d for the c o a c h e s and p l a y e r s to go

e n d e d up w i n n i n g s e v e n straight g a m e s and that has to d o with the heart of this t e a m . " T h e Flying D u t c h m e n j u m p e d on the Yellow J a c k e t s early Saturday, pulling out t o a 12-3 lead six m i n -

through all the peaks and valleys we

utes into the g a m e . D e f i a n c e c l o s e d the g a p to as close as f o u r points,

d i d , " said head c o a c h G l e n n Van Wieren. " W e ' v e now won five

but t h r e e p o i n t e r s by K y l e VandcrWall ( ' 0 1 ) and Pat S t e g e m a n

c h a m p i o n s h i p s in a row and t h a t ' s

( ' 9 9 ) near the e n d of the half g a v e

unbelievable." H o p e o v e r c a m e a 3 - 4 start in the

H o p e a 3 9 - 2 8 h a l f - t i m e lead. " D u r i n g the half I asked if any-

Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic

one felt they p l a y e d well, that they

Association to c l i n c h a tie for the c h a m p i o n s h i p with an 8 0 - 6 5 d e f e a t

p l a y e d a g o o d first h a l f , " Van Wieren said. " A n d to a m a n all said

of D e f i a n c e , S a t u r d a y . H o p e will

n o and the r e s p o n s e w a s i m m e d i -

share the title with rival C a l v i n . H o p e w a s a b le to s t r i n g t o g e t h e r

ate." During the second half, Hope

seven straight l e a g u e g a m e s to claim a s h a r e o f a title that w e e k s

built its lead to 27 points and limited D e f i a n c e to only four o f f e n s i v e

a g o s e e m e d out of reach.

r e b o u n d s , a f t e r g i v i n g u p 15 in the

H o p e had r e a c h e d a season low a f t e r falling to D e f i a n c e 8 6 - 8 2 on

first half. 4t I thought a key factor w a s w e

Jan. 30. T h e Flying D u t c h m e n had lost t w o straight and w e r e in d a n -

c o n t r o l l e d m o v i n g the t e m p o of the g a m e , " Van W i e r e n said. " W e w e r e

g e r of not finishing in the top half of the M I A A .

(Si*

Anchor

p\-\o\o by J o h n a t h a n Muenk

G O I N G U P S T R O M G : Hope ys Craig Veldman ('01) goes up for a lay up against two, defending, Calvin players on Feb. 10ys which helped Hope win a share of the MIAA title.

also a b l e to d o s o m e things o f f e n -

rebounds. S t e g e m a n has 9 8 9 points o v e r his

spectively. V e l d m a n w a s r e c o g n i z e d for his

the heart of this t e a m , it's the believing in t h e m s e l v e s . "

sively. It w a s a g a m e we d i c t a t e d . "

f o u r - y e a r career. He a l s o m o v e d

efforts as only the second H o p e

H o p e next faces A l m a in the first

M I A A Player of the Week. T h e title is Van W i e r e n ' s 13th in

r o u n d of the M I A A T o u r n a m e n t , Center. H o p e defeated the Scots 83-72 on

" T h i s is the kind of t h i n g you

L e a d i n g the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n

within one of Joel H o l s t e g e ' s ( ' 9 8 )

d r e a m a b o u t as a c o a c h . You win, you lose, you win, you lose, and

were graduating captains Stegeman and C h r i s Vander Slice ( ' 9 9 ) .

116 c a r e e r g a m e s p l a y e d r e c o r d . C r a i g V e l d m a n ( ' 0 1 ) a d d e d 15

then our g u y s m a d e s o m e d e f i n i t i v e

S t e g e m a n t a l l i e d 18 p o i n t s , a n d

points, and Ryan Klingler ( ' 0 1 ) and

22 s e a s o n s and H o p e ' s 30th M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p , both l eague records.

d e c i s i o n s to p r a c t i c e h a r d e r s o the

V a n d e r S l i c e had 10 points and 10

VanderWall scored 12 a n d nine re-

"It's the heart of these players, it's

t o n i g h t at 7 : 3 0 p.m. in the C i v i c

Jan. 20, and 8 8 - 6 9 F e b . 13.

H o p e w i n s in t h e f i r s t r o u n d o f M I A A t o u r n a m e n t PAUL. L O O D E E N sports editor

on T h u r s d a y , Feb. 2 5 at Knollcrest F i e l d h o u s e . T h i s will be the third m e e t i n g b e t w e e n the t w o t e a m s .

The Flying Dutch settled for

Calvin has w o n both previous c o n -

third in the M i c h i g a n Intercolligate Athletic A s s o c i a t i o n a f t e r a second

tests. " T w e n t y w i n s is o u r lucky n u m -

loss to C a l v i n o n F e b 13. H o p e e n d e d the M I A A season

ber," H o s f o r d said. "It's win or g o home."

with a 12-4 r e c o r d . It also p l a c e d the F l y i n g D u t c h a s the third seed

B e a t i n g Calvin will be no easy task for the D u t c h . T h e y will need

g o i n g into last n i g h t ' s t o u r n a m e n t

to d o things right to win.

g a m e against K a l a m a z o o . Finish-

" N e e d to r e b o u n d and play o u r

ing a h e a d of the Flying Dutch were

best g a m e to beat t h e m , " said head

Calvin and D e f i a n c e w h o shared

c o a c h Brian M o r e h o u s e .

the M I A A title.

H o p e needs to beat C a l v i n and

T h e m a t c h u p s s e n t the F l y i n g

then capture the M I A A T o u r n a m e n t

Dutch into last n i g h t ' s clash with

c h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e to earn an au-

Kalamazoo.

t o m a t i c berth in the N C A A Tour-

H o p e had p r e v i o u s l y beaten the Hornets t w i c e in M I A A a c t i o n by

nament. " T o win we need to take pride in

s c o r e s of 7 3 - 4 5 and 6 8 - 5 4 .

what

" W e k n e w they w e r e g o n n a play tougher and we k n e w we were

agressiveness and desire," Hoekstra

gonna have to play tougher to w i n . " said Lisa H o e k s t r a ( 01).

In its last g a m e a g a i n s t Calvin, H o p e and C a l v i n traded the lead

E a r l y in the g a m e , H o p e took

early b e f o r e C a l v i n put together a

control with a 9 - 0 run. F o r the rest of the half the Flying Dutch kept a

we

do,

and

play

with

said.

10-1 run, p a c i n g t h e m to a 32-21

six to nine point lead as e a c h t e a m

h a l f t i m e lead. A f t e r the half, C a l v i n built o n

traded baskets.

their lead with the h e l p of 21 H o p e

"We a l w a y s hit a dry spot during the g a m e and h a v e to pick it

t u r n o v e r s . T h e final score ended u p

up. said Tara H o s f o r d ( ' 9 9 ) .

a s 6 1 - 4 3 . Pacing the Flying Dutch w a s Kristin K o e n i g s k n e c h t ( ' 0 1 )

At the end of the first h a l f . H o p e had a 12 point lead with the s c o r e

with 13 points. T h e season finale against North

s t a n d i n g at 3 2 - 2 0 . T h r o u g h the first 10 m i n u t e s of (he s e c o n d half H o p e e x t e n d e d

Park College of C h i c a g o on Feb. 2 0

Anchor

Co

^0pe

"eS£1

. 99 e

nior

tnfor

Letja^

* c* .

a 2 -g z

5 S | | C vi X v uJ -

o f f e r e d a d i f f e r e n t result than the

t h e g a m e , the s c o r e w a s d e a d -

Picture gourself on,the

d o w n the s t r e t c h as the H o r n e t s

locked at 13-13. T h e n , the Flying

-s'

could gel no closer then 10 points.

Dutch m a d e a run, out s c o r i n g their

T h e final s c o r e w a s H o p e 6 6 . K a l a m a / o o 54. L e a d i n g the w a y

o p p o n e n t 27-11 to end the first half.

K a l a m a / o o 41 -26. Next up for H o p e will be Calvin

L

|

\

A f t e r that it w a s back a n d f o r t h

b o u n d s a s H o p e out r e b o u n d e d

College

. 99

g a m e against C a l v i n . M i d w a y t h r o u g h the first half o f

16 points. Kristin K o e n i g s h n e c h t ( 0 1 ) had a g a m e high of 13 re-

by J o h n a t h a n Muenk

D R I V I N G " T H R O U G H A C R O W D : Tara Hosford ('99) cuts through three Kalamazoo defenders as the Flying Dutch rode o f f with a win in the first of the MIAA tournament.

their lead to 14 p o i n t s at 4 5 - 3 1 .

for the Flying Dutch were Hoekstra with 2 0 points and H o s f o r d with

photo

•y s

-TO

w r . -

0 h o p e . e

A f t e r the late run in the first half, H o p e n e v e r looked back, w i n n i n g 89-60. T h e Flying D u t c h w e r e led by H o e k s t r a and Sara A n d e r s o n ( ' 0 2 ) with 17 points e a c h . H o s f o r d with 13 points, and K o e n i g s k n e c h t with 10 points.

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Office " i u i 1' £ on o


02-24-1999