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F e b r u a r y 2003

Water N o o d l e

Hope College •

H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n • A s t u d e n t - r u n nonprojfit p u b l i c a t i o n •

S e r v i n g t h e Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 116 y e a r s

Dean of Chapel plans departure Tim Brown will return to full-time duty at Western Theological Seminary campus Kurt Koehler C A M P U S B E A T EDITOR

Just t w o years ago, in early 2001, Tim B r o w n w a s named to succeed Ben Patterson as H i n g a - B o e r s m a Dean of Chapel. He received a joint a p p o i n t m e n t w h e r e he w a s at the same time the D e a n of C h a p e l at Hope College and the Henry Bast professor of Preaching at Western Theological Seminary. Now Brown is moving on. On July 1, he will return full-time to his position at the seminary. " M y fundamental calling is as professor of preaching at Western Seminary, w h i c h 1 really love d o i n g , " Brown said. "I became increasingly aware that w e really need a full time dean of the chapel doing this impor-

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tant work and 1 really need to be fully at the task of teaching preaching at Western Seminary." President James Bultman is disappointed by, but understands Brown's

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decision. "Its not unexpected, because T i m was doing t w o jobs and doing them well, but it's not something one can continue to do long term," Bultman said. "We could cry about it, but I ' d rather be grateful f o r what will be the next three months and then to look very c a r e f u l l y with a search committee at w h o might bring the most to the table f o r H o p e ' s future." Despite B r o w n ' s departure there will be no further changes in remaining chapel staff. "We h a v e some very good people remaining, and w e ' r e excited about that, but T i m will be missed. T h e r e is no doubt about that," B u l t m a n

T h e graduating class of 2 0 0 3 voted f o r c o m m e n c e m e n t speaker last week. Five Hope professors were candidates: Charles Green, professor of psychology; John Yelding, secondary education; Rhoda Janzen, English; Fred Johnson, history; and Donald Luidens, sociology.

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Scholar will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls

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Dean of Chapel Tim Brown preaches to the Hope Community during a recent chapel service.

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T h e Dead Sea Scrolls will be the focus of this y e a r ' s Danforth Lecture at H o p e College. Dr. Gabriele Boccaccini of the University of Michigan will present "Leaders or Outcasts: Did the Essenes D o the D e a d Sea Scrolls?" at 3:30 p.m.on F e b . 2 0 in M a a s Auditorium.

Hope community is divided on Iraq Students both contest and condone military invasion by the U.S. Anjey Dykhuis C A M P U S B E A T EDITOR

For the past several months, almost all Americans have had o n e question on their minds: W h e n will we attack Iraq? Since several presentations to the w o r l d c o m m u n i t y by P r e s i d e n t B u s h , S e c r e t a r y of S t a t e C o l i n Powell, and U N inspectors Hans Blix and M o h a m m e d E l B a r a d e i , war has loomed closer and closer

to American society. For college students, w h o have seen very little of war, save the Persian Gulf and U.S. action in the Balkans, the possibility of war is a n e w experience. O n e H o p e stud e n t , G a b r i e l W i s e , has already been called a w a y f r o m c a m p u s to serve with his h o m e t o w n Reserves. T h e Security C o u n c i l ' s Resolution 1441 specified that Iraq must give an accounting of all w e a p o n s of mass destruction in its possession. U s e of force is not mentioned as a specific consequence, but the administration feels it has made this

clear f r o m the start. While Great Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair is a s t a u n c h s u p p o r t e r of a preemptive strike on Iraq, many countries, led by France and Germany, contest force as a solution. This past Saturday, millions a r o u n d the world publicly aired their unhappiness with the possible w a r on Iraq in rallies and p e a c e marches. Even here in Holland, many, especially H o p e students, joined in a rally in Centennial Park and a march d o w n Eigth Street to show discontent with the prospect of war. A l t h o u g h some students

Economy is down, school funding is down; most colleges are planning hikes Danielle Koski BUSINESS MANAGER

Money for everyone this year seems to be in short supply, and f o r Hope College, it is no different. Next year tuition, r o o m and board will be 5.8 percent higher. T h e n e w value will top out at $25,340. According to Hope College President James Bultman, the increase w a s not w h a t the administration wanted to do, but it w a s what it needed to

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do. ' T h e tuition increase is bigger then w e ' d like it to be," Bultman said.

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'Going Dutch'art Arts, page 4

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Men's Basketball Sports, page 8

T h e main reasons for the tuition increase were because of increased need for financial aid for students and increased expenditure to pay for faculty health insurance. " W e ' v e tried to cut back on things that w e could, w e ' v e d o n e some of that already, but obviously, some of the increases w e have to pass on," Bultman said. Students supply the college with 6 9 percent of its revenue with 31 percent coming f r o m other sources. According to Bultman, the students pay a significantly lower percentage of the revenue than at other colleges. T h e other 31 percent of revenues, however, have not done as well this year. " O u r e n d o w m e n t is under attack because

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Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

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Hope College Speed Dating is a fundraiser for Dance Marathon sponsored by I.VE League. It will take place at 9 and 10:30 tonight for $5 in Maas Auditorium. Sign up tonight during dinner at Phelps. T h e Professional W o m e n ' s Networking Reception is f r o m 5:15 to 6:30 p.m. on F e b . 2 6 in the Etheridge Ballroom of the Haworth Center.

Fall '03 tuition increase is 5.8%

Three Hope teams won conference championships last weekend. Hockey, women's swimming and women's basketball dominate.

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support the possible military intervention in Iraq, many also dispute the administration's zeal for action. " I ' m definitely against war. I feel like the entire goal of this is to have b e t t e r r e l a t i o n s with the M i d d l e East and all these other countries and w e ' r e j u s t m a k i n g e n e m i e s wherever w e go. I think the U.S. is going about this in a completely wrong way and s o m e h o w linking it to terrorism," said Andrea Cleary ('05). And there is more. Cleary's reas o n i n g is o n l y p a r t of a w h o l e

I.VE league women's group to hold events

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Student pets Spotlight, page 6

Wind Symphony Arts, page 6


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CAMPUS BEAT

F e b r u a r y 19, 2 0 0 3

Progress continues on Hope fieldhouse Tyler Danek GUEST WRITER

Kurt Koehler C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

A pile of rubble is all that remains of a vacated foundry recently purchased by Hope College. The rund o w n foundry, located near the soccer field on the c o m e r of Fairbanks and Business 31, is being demolished and trucked away to provide space for Hope's new DeVos Fieldhouse. T h e fieldhouse, which developers expect to cost $ 2 0 million dollars, will provide an entrance to the east side of H o p e ' s campus. Further m o n e y will c o m e out of the c o l l e g e ' s e n d o w m e n t to maintain the b u i l d i n g . T h e m u l t i p u r p o s e building will host a new kinesiology lab, four basketball courts, a weight r o o m and will have enough seating to play host to H o p e ' s volleyball team, as well as m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s basketball. T h e arena will also support local high school basketball games, Hope college graduation ceremonies, and Tulip Time events. T h e n e w building will allow Hope to host N C A A tournament games, which, because of its dimensions, the Civic Center could not. The current demolition work m a r k s the first p h a s e of the fieldhouse project, which is scheduled to conclude in the s u m m e r of 2004. T h e next step in the DeVos project will be removing final debris left f r o m the site. Progress being made on the b u i l d i n g is e x c i t i n g f o r m a n y people at Hope. Brian Morehouse, w h o is active on the team of local leaders plan-

ning the project said, "It's nice to have the eye sore eliminated and a n e w o p p o r t u n i t y to e x p a n d o u r campus and community." Morehouse also is the director of the Dow Center and w o m e n ' s bask e t b a l l c o a c h and a d d e d , " T h e DeVos will be used by almost all of o u r students. T h e building is a m o d e r n - d a y f i e l d h o u s e that has many capabilities." Indeed, DeVos Fieldhouse will be a h u b of local activities. For example, the building will be able to host concerts for not only Hope, but the entire city of Holland. It is still undetermined whether I.M. events will be played on the four, full-size basketball courts at the fieldhouse but the g y m space will not go unnoticed. With both basketball teams practicing at the new building, D o w courts will be more available. Additional availability at the D o w will lead to more convenient I.M. game times as well as more indoor practice time for H o p e ' s baseball and Softball teams. M o v a b l e bleachers will provide 3 6 0 degrees of stadium seating f o r m a j o r e v e n t s . M o r e h o u s e said, "Right n o w the DeVos' plans are being used as a recruiting tool to entice athletes to c o m e to H o p e . " T h e bleachers will be more comf o r t a b l e than s t a n d a r d b l e a c h e r s and a c c o m m o d a t e m a n y m o r e f a n s for Hope games and events. T h e fieldhouse also will serve as the n e w location f o r the Kinesiology department, w h i c h will make use of several c l a s s r o o m s and a high-tech c o m p u t e r lab e q u i p p e d with current technology, a n d directly linked with the n e w training room. Classes that would normally

A/JCHOFt PHOTO BY R O B O N D R A The site of the future DeVos fieldhouse and former foundry is a bit of a mess these days but someday will be the home of many Hope College events. be held in the D o w will move to DeVos Fieldhouse. M o r e h o u s e said, "A project like this allows us to upgrade not just our athletics, but our c o l l e g e and c o m m u n i t y as a whole." O n e thing the building will not have is an indoor track. " W e ' d like to do it (an indoor track), but its just not f e a s i b l e without m a k i n g the building substantially larger," said Hope College President James Bultman. With the wide variety of things that the building is capable of, it is surprising how little is known of the development by Hope students. Aaron Larson, a sophomore m a n a g e m e n t major at Hope, said, "I had no idea what was going on," said Aaron Larson ('05). "I think people would be surprised if you told them of the plans. I can't wait to w a t c h H o p e w i n in the n e w arena."

M o r e h o u s e agrees with Larson. Morehouse said, " A s soon as the actual building's construction gets underway and the foundation is set, I expect Hope students to start asking more questions. Right n o w final decisions are being made, anticipation is beginning to grow. I think all students will not only enjoy, but be very surprised with what this building will provide." Another purpose of the DeVos F i e l d h o u s e will be to p r o v i d e a more beautiful eastern gateway to Holland and H o p e ' s C a m p u s . Currently H o p e ' s c a m p u s has no clear eastern boundary line. T h e fieldhouse will be passed by m a n y people. A n y o n e wishing to come into H o p e ' s C a m p u s f r o m the east will pass by it. As they do so a large sign, that has been stylishly d e s i g n e d , will m a r k the e a s t e r n boundry of the campus. H o p e ' s c a m p u s is c o n t i n u a l l y

growing, the fieldhouse is one of three major construction projects n o w in progress, and this will be another new addition to help attract students. C o n s t r u c t i o n is tentatively planned for August or September 2003. However, according to Bultman, it will not begin until all f u n d i n g f o r the project is secured. T h e college is presently five m i l l i o n d o l l a r s s h o r t of t h e fieldhouse's twenty million dollar price tag. T h e fate of present home of the m e n ' s basketball program, the Holland Civic Center will rest with the city of Holland. T h e Civic Center is o w n e d by the city and will likly be renovated f o r various purposes. T h e fieldhouse is not the first attempt to find a new indoor sports facility. A proposed 28 million dollar primarily publicly financed Area Center proposal w a s d e f e a t e d by Holland T o w n s h i p voters in 1999.

DEPARTURE from 1

i Tim Brown will return to teaching full-time as a professor of preaching at Western Theological Seminary (shown above)

as dean of chapel and feels he has continued what Ben Patterson began. ' T h e thing for which I ' m grateful is being able to j o i n with and encourage this great chapel team and just be a part of what is obviously a work of God on C a m p u s , " B r o w n said. "The snowball was rolling d o w n the hill. I just j u m p e d on it." T h e search f o r B r o w n ' s replacement will be nationwide and is beginning immediately. Bultman will chair a search c o m m i t t e e that will include Trustee David Bast; Administrative C o u n s e l m e m b e r Barry W e r k m a n ; chaplain staff m e m b e r Paul Boersma; religion professor Jeffery Tyler; faculty m e m bers Karla Wolters; Jonathan Peterson; Mansoon Han Kim; and Stephen Hemenway; staff m e m b e r Kathleen Arnold; and students A m y Zwart and Eric Deboer. Bultman hopes to have a replacement in place before Brown leaves in July.

According to Bultman. the new chaplain should be able to give spiritual oversight to the c a m p u s , preach well, engage students, have good academic credentials, write and speak well, and be a team player. "You want s o m e o n e with the credentials to give spiritual oversight to the c a m p u s , " Bultman said. Qualified candidates will also be members of the Reformed Church of America. " T h e r e are probably only two positions where you would say the person should be already or would be willing to join the Ref o r m e d Church and that would be the President and the Dean of the C h a p e l , " Bultman said. "Because of H o p e ' s ties with the Ref o r m e d Church of America that is probably where w e ' d look very carefully for someone." Though Brown will not formally take part in the selection of his successor, he believes

TUITION from 1 our investments are not doing as well and some of our auxiliary services, like the Haworth Center, are down because people are not traveling as much. Our rental properties are not generating as m u c h because people do not have the money to rent," Bultman said. A c c o r d i n g to Bultman, our tuition is still less then other private s c h o o l s , e s p e c i a l l y those in the Great L a k e s Colleges Association. Usually the college redistributing t u i t i o n d o l l a r s f r o m r i c h e r to

needier s t u d e n t s via gift aid. A s stated in the letter sent out to parents and students, Hope College is working to increase aid programs and tax allowances through Hope and its affiliates. Currently, though, the college can do nothing about the fact that there are several scholarships and grants that are being reduced or cut f r o m the stale and federal budgets. A c c o r d i n g to B u l t m a n , the tuition increase is partly d u e to the fact that more financially needy stu-

dents are at Hope. At the same lime, the increased tuition creates m o r e pressure for these students and forces those students w h o can afford to pay to assist those that cannot. That is something that all colleges deal with, according to Bultman. "Students under unusual circumstances can have the financial aid office look at their situation. T h e y are very willing to do t h a t , " Bultman said.

that person should be a clear and forceful articulator of the Christian faith, have a genuine a n d p e r s o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p with J e s u s Christ, and love college students, college faculty and the college life. Despite his departure. Brown will not become a stranger to the chapel program. " I ' m not anticipating a formal relationship, but I ' m open to anything," Brown said. " I ' l l come to Chapel f r o m time to lime. I will pray f o r and cheer on the chapel team and the work that next person will begin to do when he or she gets chosen to do it." T h e Dean of Chapel oversees the Chapel program, the chaplain staff, student bible studies, spring break mission projects, some counseling, retreats for m e n and w o me n , and the general spiritual health of the college's students, f a c u l t y a n d s t a f f . T h e p o s i t i o n of H i n g a - B o e r s m a D e a n of C h a p e l w a s c r e a t e d in 1 9 9 4 .

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All American Food

$1.50 OFF ANY COMBO All Day Every Sunday (Until 3/30/03) With Hope College ID South River Shell M i n i - M a r t / A & W C o m e r of River and 16th Street


C A M P U S

F e b r u a r y 19/ 2 0 0 3

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New Member Education begins for Greek organizations Fraternities and sororities educate the future of their groups Glenn Lester STAFF REPORTER

With New M e m b e r Education in full swing, Hope fraternities and sororities are adding to their numbers. The purpose of New M e m b e r Education is "to educate new m e m b e r s on what a fraternity or sorority is," said n e w Phi Sigma Kappa m e m b e r Greg Elizando ('06). " N M E tells you the basic stuff you need to know." N M E is also designed to activate pledges into H o p e ' s Greek system, according to Interfraternity Council President and Fraternal Society m e m b e r Eric Terpstra ( ' 0 3 ) . Terpstra said that N M E will continue for about the next 16 days. "It's a time w h e n both active and n e w m e m b e r s get to k n o w each other through learning about the history and traditions associated with S i g m a S i g m a , " said Carly Jugenitz ('03), President of the S i g m a Sigmas. This spring's pledge class consists of " 2 0 0 new members, roughly," according to Terpstra. Sororities h a v e more pledges than fraternities. Just 3 6 of the 200

pledges joined fraternities. These numbers do not include Phi Sigma Kappa which added over twenty new members. With publicized Rush events over, N M E education is kept secret with most fraternities and sororities. T h i s confidentiality leaves some students uneasy. "1 think that people are often inquisitive about something they do not understand. Rush and N M E are intimidating for people on the outside because they have never experienced them," said Promethean president Matt Boes ('03). " T h o s e with the courage to go through Rush and N M E are the type of people w e want anyway." Elizando agreed. " A lot of students don't like what pledges have to go through. E v e n though it's not hazing, it's not for everyone. I d o n ' t dislike it." Terpstra attributed the disapproving view of N M E to media scrutiny of fraternities and sororities at Hope and nationally. He said that the good things Greeks do are not publicized, while the bad things are. " N M E must be sanctioned by the school. W e ' r e not doing anything illegal," Terpstra said. Elizando said that if the events of N M E were made public, Greek life w o u l d lose something. T h e

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Prometheans (left to right) Mike Polk (*05), Chris Sterling ('04), Steve Adair (404), and Joe Tolton (405) gathered in the basement of their cottage Tuesday night for Great Movie Night. New member education for all greek organizations runs until March 1. secrecy of N M E " m a k e s it a little special," he said. Terpstra agreed. " D o you think your family secrets should be publicized?" He said that N M E must educate new m e m b e r s and "the way we implement these policies is what makes us

different." Promethean N M E is not kept secret, according to Boes. " W e publish our N M E schedule on our website [http://www.cs.hope.edu/ ~akp/nme.html], and all events are officially open to anyone w h o wants to attend, not just n e w

m e m b e r s . It hasn't harmed us to publish it." Boes still saw merit in N M E secrecy. ' T h e r e ' s a certain amount of value to having inside secrets between close friends or siblings, which is something fraternity m e m b e r s are."

IRAQ from 1 stream of arguments. "I really haven't made u p my mind. Currently I ' m leaning against war. T h e y only recently have c o m e u p with some evidence but until they c o m e u p with evidence of W M D we aren't justified going in there and killing them f o r what we have ourselves " said Ben F r e e b u m ('03). T h e European Union shares this feeling. In a statement issued this past week, they said, "We want to achieve this peacefully. It is clear that this is what the people of Europe want. War is not inevitable. Force should only be used as a last resort. It is for the Iraqi regime to end this crisis by complying with the d e m a n d s of the Security Council. We reiterate our full support f o r the ongoing work of U.N. inspectors, they must be given the time and resources that the U.N. Security Council believes they need." T h e United States is the leading force in the pro-war m o v e m e n t , with the entire administration united behind Bush. Also behind B u s h is Hope College President James Bultman. "I think that all of us hope w e can reach a diplomatic solution as opposed to going to war and I think war is viewed as a last resort. But if it is in the best interest of not only the U.S. but the world to pursue a military operation, then as an American citizen I would be supportive, but I hope it d o e s n ' t c o m e to that. T h e United States sacrificed a lot of blood on foreign soil to fight for f r e e d o m on foreign soil. Right n o w there are a lot of countries that have forgotten about that and that's really disappointing to me." Kelly W i e g h m i n k ( ' 0 6 ) agreed, "I think we should go to war with Iraq because I think that Saddam needs to be stopped. If w e didn't do it the risk is too great. What really convinced m e that w e should go to war are the satellite pictures that we got. To m e that looks very suspicious, along with the tapes they confiscated. T h e evidence looks really strong that he's up to something, so I think that he should be slopped."

Many in the nation hold views similar to B u l t m a n ' s . T h e y concur that war is terrible, but it m a y just be the solution f o r this new state of affairs. "War might be necessary in this situation, just to clear things for once - hopefully. We should probably go to war even though I d o n ' t want to. It's probably the best thing to do right now, even though it'll be horrible," said Adriana Canche ( ' 0 6 ) . A n e w tape that has surfaced that was aired on Al-Jazeera, the main news station of the Arab world, allegedly features O s a m a bin Laden exhorting citizens of Baghdad to retaliate against the so-called U.S. aggressors and "Iraqi hypocrites," or those Iraqis w h o have supported the U.S. T h i s links the war on Iraq to the war on terror, and coincided with the capture of an Al-Qaeda leader in Detroit that set the nation on high, or orange, alert f o r several days. It w a s later found that the report was invalid, and many citizens had rushed out for emergency supplies, duct tape, and plastic, to seal off their h o m e s f r o m possible chemical or biological attack. Recently, the administration has agreed to hold off on any crucial decisions for two weeks. This will accomplish three things: first, it gives the U.S. a chance to hear f r o m the opposition, second, it gives Turkey a chance to agree with letting the U.S. use air bases to attack Iraq f r o m the north, and third, it gives the U.S. a chance to further sway those opposed to the war. In the meantime, a second, more specific resolution is in the works that will specify the use of force as sanctioned by the U.N. Whether or not it is vetoed is insignificant to the U.S. because Bush and company stress the fact that Resolution 1441 is enough grounds for war against Iraq. But many, like Shelly Lunn ('06), believe that this is not good enough. "I don't think we should go because I don't think it's fully justified and I don't think that w e have evidence o r reason." said Lunn. Ben Falk ('04), a fifth year senior said, "I think it's f u n n y how we already call it a

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A/VCHOFf G R A P H I C war on Iraq w h e n there isn't actually a war in Iraq - I hate to see war coming out of a stagnant economy such as it is right now. I ' m a firm believer in the idea that violence only brings more violence. I don't like the idea of war one bit, especially w h e n it looks like w e ' r e the aggressors and we pretty m u c h are the imperialistic aggressors right now." War is on the horizon of the future, whether it actually happens of not. But even if political doves have little impact on the decision for an Iraqi invasion, their words will certainly be considered the next time war b e c o m e s a possibility. T h e administration hopes for a short period of fighting and National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice hopes for a short occupation of only 18 months. Regardless of these reassuring words f r o m the government, almost 57 percent of the country resists the proposed war. Currently, over 150,000 U.S. troops are stationed in the Persian Gulf, awaiting .

BY C H A D S A M P S O N

orders to m o v e in on Baghdad and depose Saddam Hussein. President Bush hopes to make the pre-emptive strike before the weather gets too hot for our soldiers to be able to maneuver, since they will be in chemical protection gear and are unused to the brutal Iraqi climate. Although many support this action on the part of the U.S., public opinion worldwide is largely unsure or against military invasion and occupation. Parallels have been drawn between an occupation in Iraq and the ongoing occupation of South Korea, where soldiers are frequently abused by the population. Very f e w support a lengthy stay in Iraq. As a matter of fact, most citizens favor diplomatic solutions and hope that war will no longer be a possibility, but Bush has warned us to be prepared. Still, the nation speaks out against the potential strike. "I think war is wrong. War is never the right solution. Ever. The end," said Kyle Delhagen ( 4 04).


^Anchor

A R T S

F e b r u a r y 19,

2003

Exhibit references classic Dutch artwork 'Going Dutch' exhibit goes up in DePree Gallery Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

T h e DePree Gallery is currently housing an expedition of m o d e m Dutch art, but none of the artists featured in the exhibit are Dutch. C o n t i n u i n g t h r o u g h M a r c h 14, " G o i n g Dutch: Contemporary Artists and the Dutch Artistic T r a d i t i o n / ' features four c o n t e m p o rary artists, t w o of which are American, and the other t w o Russian and Indonesian, w h o all reference Dutch art in their work. Deborah Zlotsky is an American painter w h o imitates the Dutch style of still life painting. Dutch still life in the 17th century w a s c o m m o n l y that of flowers, because, according to John Hanson, DePree Gallery Director, "they were reminders of the fact that life is transient, that w e ' r e all going to die." Zlotsky makes full use of this idea in h e r still life paintings, which include flowers as well as a dead hare. T h e c o l l a g e s a n d m o n t a g e s of R u s s i a n painter Valentin Popov reference the work o f R e m b r a n d t , in h i s s e r i e s e n t i t l e d , " R e m b r a n d t / N o t R e m b r a n d t . H a n s o n explains that these works express the love/hate relationship m o d e r n artists h a v e with the great artists of the past.

A/fCHOFf P H O T O

The triptych "Babelicious," by Aristarchus Kuntjara, references the work of Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch in this modern representation. "In a w a y he's thumbing his nose at tradition (through) tribute to Rembrandt," Hanson said. "I think h e ' s just trying to work through that in these works, like it's haunting h i m . " T h e triptych Babelicious by Indonesian artist Aristarchus Kuntjara is based on the

Knick shows films Winter series continues through 'Mostly Martha' Katie Taylor SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

If the cold temperatures and snowy sidewalks leave one w i s h i n g to be a n y w h e r e but Holland, then the winter f i l m series is just in time. On F e b m ary 3 at the Knickerbocker T h e atre, the movie "Rabbit Proof Fence" began transporting viewers to Australia. T h e film ran through Feb. 13 as part of the Hope College winter film series, which will offer three more p i c t u r e s t h r o u g h o u t the n e x t month. T h e series is put on annually to provide H o p e students and the Holland community not only with entertainment to beat the w i n t e r t i m e b l a h s , but a l s o to promote a little culture. T h o s e l o o k i n g to e s c a p e t h e w e s t Michigan winter scene, if only f o r a couple of hours, can head to an Indian reservation in "The Business of F a n c y d a n c i n g . " It will be shown at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. each night this w e e k until Saturday. T h e m o v i e f o l l o w s the different paths taken by t w o best friends after graduating high school and leaving the Spokane Indian Reservation. O n e of the men b e c o m e s an accomplished poet, w h i l e the o t h e r s t r u g g l e s as a m i n o r i t y in a white world. Sixteen years later, they return to the reservation to

BY R O B O N D R A

c o n f r o n t the past and face the present. T h o u g h " T h e Business of F a n c y d a n c i n g " is not r a t e d , it is not i n t e n d e d f o r y o u n g e r audiences. T h e m o o d will lighten on March 3 with "The Secret Ballot," w h i c h will run t h r o u g h M a r c h 8 at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. T h e film is an Iranian c o m e d y with English subtitles. On Election Day in Iran, an officer is t a k e n f r o m his o r d i n a r i l y boring duties and o r d e r e d to help a female election official with the balloting. T h e day turns into a h u m o r o u s adventure as the two of them search f o r v o t e r s and d e v e l o p n e w feelings for each other. ' T h e Secret Ballot" is rated G . T h e final film featured in the series will be "Mostly M a r t h a " on M a r c h 10-15, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. nightly. Martha is one of G e r m a n y ' s finest chefs, but h e r l i f e is c h a n g e d f o r e v e r w h e n her eight-year-old niece Linda is sent to live with her. T h o u g h the film is primarily the story of their cross-generat i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p , t h e r e is good food and a little romance mixed in. "Mostly M a r t h a " is in G e r m a n , but with English subtitles and a P G rating. Each film will be shown at the Knickerbocker Theatre. Tickets are $5 f o r H o p e students and the general public, $4 for senior citizens and children, and can be p u r c h a s e d at the door immediately prior to show lime.

style of the Dutch painter, Bosch. T h e triptych style is a three-part work. In his triptychs, Bosch would traditionally use the den o u n c e m e n t of sin as his theme, such as in the re-creation of the story of the fall and redemption. In Babelicious, Kuntjara plays on

this t h e m e using a mix of Indonesian and American images to tell the story of m o d e m day over consumerism. T h e central theme of the work is a large cake that is a m o d e m representation of Flemish painter B r u e g h e l ' s Tower of Babel. "It's very f u n to look at, but there is something kind of alarming about it," Hanson said. Charles Krafft is a self taught American ceramics artist w h o traveled to Holland to learn his craft. T h e Dutch artwork he imitates is Delftware, the traditional blue and white china named after Delft, its place of origin. But instead of re-creating tulips and windmills, Krafft makes Delftware machine guns, skateboards, and hand grenades. He got the idea f r o m ads selling Delftware on the back pages of newspapers that were otherwise full of stories of violence. " H e ' s using a technique that normally has very peaceful, pleasing images, and portraying m o d e m disasters," Hanson said. T h e s h o w ' s official opening will take place at 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 28 with a lecture by V a l e n t i n P o p o v , e n t i t l e d " H e r e is no R e mb r a n d t. " Deborah Zlotsky will also be giving a lecture on "Painting Still L i f e s " on March 6. T h e D e P r e e G a l l e r y is o p e n M o n d a y through Saturday f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday f r o m 1 to 5 p.m.

Wind Symphony presents concert Performance in Dimnent is Feb. 26 Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

F r o m a marimba solo to different melodies within pieces, variety w i l l b e a h i g h l i g h t of n e x t Wednesday's Wind Symphony concert. T h e concert will take place at 8 p.m. in D i m n e n t Chapel. Admission is f r e e and all are w e l c o m e to attend. O n e of the features of the concert will be a marimba solo by Greg Secor, instructor of percussion at both Hope and G r a n d Valley Slate University. " I t ' s nice to c o l l a b o r a t e w i t h (Wind S y m p h o n y conductor) Dr. Ward," Secor said. "We have similar tastes in music literature." Secor will play the marimba in "Concerto f o r Marimba and B a n d " by David Maslanka. "I really like the c o m p o s e r and all his other m u si c , " Secor said. O t h e r w o r k s to be p e r f o r m e d include " S y m p h o n y in B-flat" by Paul H i n d e m i t h a n d " B a n k a n d Braes ' O Bonnie D o o n " and "Children's March ' O v e r the Hills and Far A w a y " by Percy Grainger.

A/VCHOff P H O T O

BY R O B O N D R A

The Wind Symphony rehearses on campus for the coming concert in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. " [ H i n d e m i t h ] has the a m a z i n g ability to interweave different melodies into incredibly complex counterpoint," Wesselink said. "It's cool to hear it all c o m e together." T h e students hope the audience will like the piece as much as they have to c o m e to enjoy it. "It will be interesting to get the a u d i e n c e ' s o p i n i o n on the piece since they will only hear it once," VanOss said. " H o p e f u l l y our hard work looking into the complexity of the piece will project as w e perf o r m and they will like it too."

Members of the Wind Symphony have expressed a particular interest in H i n d e m i t h ' s Symphony. " W h e n w e first r e c e i v e d a n d played the piece, I did not really like it and neither did some of my colleagues in the band," said Kate V a n O s s ( ' 0 4 ) , clarinetist. " O v e r t i m e . . .we learned a lot about it and how it fits together between the different instruments and the different movements." Trombonist Paul Wesselink ( ' 0 4 ) believes that these differences are one of the strengths of the piece.

What's Hangin'? hSL Cool Beans C o f f e e h o u s e 7-9:30 tonight T h e Kletz

S y m p h o n e t t e Concert 8 p.m. Friday Dimnent Chapel

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The Business of F a n c y d a n c i n g ' Showing through Sat., 7 - 9 p.m. Knickerbocker Theatre Tickets $5 f o r students

Siblings W e e k e n d at H o p e Ice C r e a m Social 7 : 3 0 p.m. Friday, T h e Kletz

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The L a r a m i e Project' 8 p.m., Wed.-Sun. DeWitt M a i n Theatre Tickets $4 for students

Two World F a m o u s Jugglers 8 : 3 0 p.m. Friday, D o w Dive-In Movie 'Spy Kids' 7-9 p.m. Saturday, Dow -Also showing 7 p.m. Fri. and 3 p.m. Sun. in Graves -All showings $2


' A i - i c l n o r

SPOTLIGHT

February 19,2003

Something fishy at Hope Holly Russcher GUEST WRITER

As mosl Hope students know, the college policy concerning nonhuman life f o r m s in d o r m r o o m s is strict: " N o person shall allow an animal, bird or other pet to reside in a residential facility. (Fish and guide d o g s are exceptions.)" T h i s means that, short of masquerading as a blind student f o r f o u r years with the family dog at their side, c a m p u s residents w h o want pets have had to turn to the scaly side of life—often with interesting and hilarious results. T h e first thing that comes to mind when you say "pet fish" is probably a solitary goldfish in a round glass bowl with rocks and a plastic plant, but both single fish and simple setups actually are the exception on campus. A m o n g the goldfish owners interviewed f o r this story, only one fit the above stereotype: Barbara S t o d d e n ('05)1, who has o w n e d Yep-yep since May. While Yep-yep's accommodations are basic (a plastic bowl with blue "sea glass" in the bottom), his life is far f r o m dull, f o r Stodden arranges plants around his bowl so he can look at them for entertainment and often talks to him as she goes about her daily business. Most goldfish o w n e r s at Hope, however, have two or more of them so that their pets w o n ' t be lonely or bored while their owners are at class. B o o m and B o n i s have lived with Katie Lamonica ( ' 0 4 ) for one and a half and three years, respectively, and Sarah Wilkinson ( ' 0 4 ) r e s c u e d t h r e e s i c k g o l d f i s h , all

n a m e d B o b , in S e p t e m b e r 2 0 0 2 f r o m a w o m a n whose son did not k n o w h o w to take care of t h e m . Having nursed them back to health in short order, she proudly notes that they are now spoiled" in their 8-gallon filtered tank and even have a " f a n club of people who c o m e to the apartment to talk with the Bobs, see what they think." Except for occasional overfeeding and the possibility that the trio will outgrow their h o m e , Wilkinson reports no problems keeping goldfish on campus, saying'Mt's enjoyable. T h e r e s i l i e n c y of g o l d f i s h is something Lamonica can relate to as well, for despite occasional probl e m s with water quality, her t w o fish have never contracted " i c k " — a s c o u r g e of a q u a r i u m s e v e r y w h e r e — a n d the only difficulty she has ever experienced involved having to bring them home over Christm a s break. Christmas break, in fact, is the largest concern of fish owners on H o p e ' s campus. Jessica D o r e ( ' 0 3 ) whose aquatic children include seven bettas, two guppies and a pair of black tetras, has bad m e m o r i e s of last Christmas break, f o r she had first been told that she and her 13 (at the time) fish could stay in her Brumler residence over break due to her oncampus job. Just three days b e f o r e e x a m s b e g a n the c o l l e g e backpedaled on this agreement and she w a s , as she b l u n t l y puts it, "thrown out, fish and all" with no recourse except to drive them all to a friend's house in Jenison. In the ensuing upheaval three of her fish s u c c u m b e d to c o l d a n d s t r e s s .

Some students have as many• as four fish.

something she has not forgotten and will not quickly forgive. "It w a s obnoxious, being told at first 4 Oh, you can stay' and then finding out that 1 w o u l d h a v e to leave. S o m e of them didn't survive, and that's w h y I have a few new arrivals (a gold-colored algae eater and t w o cloudfish)." Were it not for this incident, D o r e ' s overall opini o n of f i s h k e e p i n g o n c a m p u s would be positive, especially since her fish are well-socialized and she makes sure to enrich their lives in m a n y ways. " W e put the male bettas in their hex-tanks side by side so they see each other and do their fight d i s p l a y s , " she says, " a n d I move t h e m f r o m place to place in the apartment so they get to see different things." While her large aquarium (housing two of her three f e m a l e bettas, the algae eater and her other smaller fish) has occasional bouts of ick, she has never had any serious health p r o b l e m s with the male bettas or the rogue female, Indra, all of w h o m are in hex-tanks. D o r e ' s interest in fish q u i c k l y caught on with her roommate, Ashley Koebel ('03), who also o w n s three bettas ( m a l e s n a m e d Oberon, Orlando and Legolas after c h a r a c t e r s f r o m t h e w o r k s of Shakespeare and Tolkien). Indeed, Koebel and Dore swapped fish once: Bert, D o r e ' s oldest male betta, originally b e l o n g e d to Koebel, but after Dore bonded with the v e n e r a b l e f e l l o w s h e g a v e Koebel Oberon and adopted Bert for her o w n . K o e b e l ' s methods of enriching her fishes' lives are even m o r e handson than D o r e ' s are, f o r she admits to "taunting" her bettas with a wiggling finger until they go into a fight display. Like Dore, she has experienced a few Christmas break difficulties. Fox, one of her first fish, did not survive being left in an unheated apartment f o r three weeks, and the 120-mile trip to her parents' house is "hard for the fish to take." Still, she enjoys having her fish with her; as she says, "it's nice to have a pet. Dore and Koebel aren't the only betta fanciers at Hope, f o r Kristen Stolle ( ' 0 3 ) has had Flushie, her male betta, f o r t w o years. Since his setup is simple, a vase with glass beads in the bottom, — all- she — — has to —

A M C H O f t P H O T O S BY R O B O N D R A

Fish bowls fit in rooms with many uses. do is feed him regularly and change the water every t w o weeks. Lori D o w d y ( ' 0 4 ) owns another betta, a 3-month-old male n a m e d Felix. Like many other fish owners. Dowdy talks to her little swimming roommate; she also decorated his bowl with a f a k e plant so he would feel more at h o m e in it. Not every betta on c a m p u s is l u c k y e n o u g h to h a v e a c a r i n g owner like Dore, Dowdy or Koebel, unfortunately. Kelly Bauer ('05)1, neglected her betta so much that it d i e d — a n d she then forgot to remove the decomposing corpse until her r o o m m a t e disposed of it and subsequently r e f u s e d to let Bauer o w n any more fish. Bauer views the experience pragmatically, stating "1 just w a s n ' t responsible e n o u g h . " While Bauer m a y represent the dark side of fishkeeping at Hope, Carol Belman ( ' 0 4 ) is the perfect opposite: Her black mollies. Princess and Arrow, have a filter, heat lamp, air pi —u m pi and all the T V they r -

can watch, as their tank is close to the television set. She started out with three mollies, but after Arrow a n d P r i n c e s s b o n d e d , the third. Midnight, died suddenly of what she suspects w a s a broken heart. Princess, the female, is "one tough fish", according to Belman. She has gotten stuck in the filter's intake twice and survived with only a few m i s s i n g scales and a sore fin to show for her ordeal. T h e pair sleep in a f a k e c o r a l h o u s e o n e of Belman's housemates gave her, and w h e n not in it t h e y ' r e either cruising f o r food or hanging out behind the fake plants. Despite occasional difficulties, none of the fish owners interviewed said they would do anything differently when it comes to owning fish. It may be true you can't romp with a fish like you can with a dog,, but just b e c a u s e fish are physically c o l d b l o o d e d d o e s n ' t m e a n they can't bring emotional warmth into someone's day. •

Spectre of Iraq attack puts Hope student on notice Erin Riley SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

She sits staring into space, eyes heavy, still dressed in black boots and the c a m o u f l a g e she's worn for the past three days. Tired from keeping fire watch more hours than her male counterparts and simulating squad infantry tactics, she tries to articulate the passion that drives her. Her muscles ache f r o m the a m bush runs and brutal physical training she endured without sleep and nothing more than mere rations to eat, but when all is said and done she says, "1 made it through! Let's go do it again!" Those are the words only a dedicated cadet can utter at the end of a weekend of training and initiation. Private Liz Reimink ( ' 0 4 ) of Hamilton, has met the challenges and rec e n t l y f i n i s h e d t r a i n i n g to be a W e s t e r n Ranger, "it is the Pull times a million," she says. Reimink, originally applied and was qualified to attend West Point A c a d e m y ; however.

because her medical results arrived a day after the deadline she w a s not appointed. T h e only other college she had applied to was Hope and after receiving a hefty scholarship f r o m the R O T C she enrolled. A r m y R O T C is a college elective you can try out for u p to t w o years with no obligation. Unlike traditional college programs. A r m y R O T C gives you a wide range of experiences while you work toward a degree. According to the R O T C , founded in 1916, they have produced m o r e than one-half million lieutenants for A m e r i c a ' s Army. It rem a i n s the b r o a d e s t a v e n u e f o r m e n and w o m e n s e e k i n g to s e r v e as o f f i c e r s in A m e r i c a ' s Army. An Army officer is a prestigious professional w h o serves as a leader of the most respected institution in America.. Reimink says that the program has been very beneficial in providing her with leadership skills and mental agility. A r m y R O T C works hard to teach you how to succeed in a competitive world both in college and be-

yond. " A lot of what I learned I can see m y s e l f u s i n g in f u t u r e e n d e a v o r s , " s a y s Reimink. Enrolling in the R O T C is not like enlisting, however. " Y o u ' r e not signing your life away, y o u ' r e still a college kid," she says. Following her four years at Hope, Reimink hopes to fulfill the required f o u r years of active duty in the infantry. " W o m e n are not allowed in combat and that sucks, but I want to do something with them or military intelligence," she says. Reimink has developed a strong feeling of patriotism and passion f o r "protecting the f r e e d o m s war has w o n " for our country. "If our country came to the point of calling for a draft I would pull out of the R O T C and enlist. T h e creed I ' v e had to m e m o r i z e says that we are called to give 100 percent and then s o m e - I ' v e got to do more than my share," she says. T h e R O T C h a s not a l w a y s b e e n e a s y though. Unlike Hope, the Army R O T C is male-dominated and that created extra chal-

lenges for any female enrolled. "It is definitely a b o y ' s club," says Reimink, "at first I w a s n ' t accepted because I was a female but I picked up the mental slack." During one interview in the R O T C , Reimink was asked by a superior, "why do you deserve to be a ranger?" She responded, "I know I ' m not the best nor the physically strongest, but I am mentally apt and determined to do what is right - 1 will never quit doing what's right." Reimink gradually gained the respect of her classmates by pulling extra shifts on fire w a t c h , eating less of the rations, a l w a y s knowing required information, and pushing herself to do all she could for the team during training. " S o m e of these guys are like my older brothers now. The cameraderie and friendship among soldiers should be echoed by the country they are protecting." For information on western M i c h i g a n ' s R O T C visit www.wmich.edu/rotc/ or the national site at w w w . a r m y r o t c . c o m / i n f o r m a tion.


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'Laramie Project' is important for all of Hope community T h e h i g h l i g h t of my w e e k e n d w a s s e e i n g the T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t ' s p r e s e n t a t i o n of " T h e L a r a m i e P r o j e c t . " T h i s p r o d u c t i o n p r e s e n t s the c o l l e g e c o m m u n i t y with an i m p o r t a n t and u n i q u e o p p o r t u n i t y . T h e r e are m o r e r e a s o n s than the s u p e r b a c t i n g to c a t c h o n e of the r e m a i n i n g p e r f o r m a n c e s of ' T h e L a r a m i e P r o j e c t " this w e e k . B a s e d o n i n t e r v i e w s of the t o w n s p e o p l e of L a r a m i e , W y o . a b o u t the m u r d e r of M a t t h e w S h e p a r d , the p r o d u c t i o n p r e s e n t s its a u d i e n c e w i t h m a n y d i f f e r e n t o p i n i o n s . O n e of the best t h i n g s a b o u t the f o r m a t of the play is the w a y it strings t o g e t h e r r e s p o n s e s in i n t e r v i e w s a n d real o c c u r r e n c e s . T h i s m e a n s that n o v o i c e is left out. N e i t h e r t h o s e w h o b e l i e v e h o m o s e x u a l i t y is right, n o r those w h o b e l i e v e the o p p o s i t e d o m i n a t e the play. T h e o v e r a r c h i n g m e s s a g e of the p l a y d o e s not deal w i t h h o m o s e x u a l i t y , b u t is i n s t e a d anti-hate. T h e material is p r e s e n t e d in an u n b i a s e d m a n n e r so the a u d i e n c e can d r a w u p their o w n c o n c l u s i o n s o n the s u b j e c t . T o assist in m a k i n g t h e s e c o n c l u s i o n s , a n d to h e l p sort

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Campus needs more space for community, conversation To the Editor: A college coffeehouse. Students sit on unmatched overstuffed furniture debating the death penalty. T h e s e chairs and couches are arranged in conversational disorder, c o m p l i m e n t e d by small tables of b o o k s and m a g a z i n e s . O t h e r stud e n t s discuss last night's Visiting Writers Series at a table designed by a senior art major. T h e walls are dark, but they are covered with student paintings and poetry. On the f r o n t p o r c h , a n o t h e r student expresses her n e w f o u n d understanding of God to her best f r i e n d . A b u n c h of m u g s lie on the c o f f e e

counter, each one unique because they were designed by ceramics students. In a c o m e r of the r o o m a student plays guitar to a small audience. T h e emphasis of a coffeehouse is the place itself, a place that cultivates community, conversation, art, and the energy of life. Passions, b e l i e f s , and ideas need s p a c e to grow, space to breath, and space to run free. Take away the quest f o r a m a j o r and an occupation and the most crucial part of these four years remains: the quest of self-discovery. Yet, Hope College is largely lacking in spaces that promote this type

W i t h e v e n r e p r e s e n t a t i o n of faculty, staff and students, t h e s e d i s c u s s i o n s take the e x p e r i e n c e of s e e i n g " T h e L a r a m i e P r o j e c t " to a w h o l e n e w level of u n d e r s t a n d i n g . A f t e r seeing the p l a y a n d p a r t i c i p a t i n g in the d i s c u s s i o n , 1 h a d f o u n d a n s w e r s to s o m e of m y q u e s t i o n s , a n d f o u n d s o m e a l t o g e t h e r n e w q u e s t i o n s . It is i m p o r t a n t that e v e r y o n e o n this c a m p u s , no m a t t e r their v i e w s o n h o m o s e x u a l i t y , see this p l a y s o m e t i m e this w 6 e k . T h e r e are f o u r p e r f o r m a n c e s l e f t , t o n i g h t

T o the Editor: I am studying abroad in Spain this semester and w a s pleased to receive a stack of Anchors in the mail today. H o w e v e r I was very displeased by something I learned f r o m the 2/5 issue. It i n f o r m e d m e that Stacy Kemper, a highly respected and well-liked Residential Life staff member, had decided to resign f r o m her position because Hope College would not be renewing her contract. After reading that article and a letter to the editor concerning the s a m e issue, I felt inclined to voice my opinion. T h i s is not the first time that Hope College has refused to renew contracts f o r well-deserving faculty and staff m e m b e r s . This has happened unwarranted in the

t h r o u g h S a t u r d a y in the D e w i t t T h e a t r e .

Watch this space

of self-discovery. It needs a physical place devoted to conversation. As Professor Jane Tompkins notes, c o f f e e h o u s e s o f f e r "a looser, less p r e d i c t a b l e c o n v e r s a t i o n than is possible in an office or a classroom or a cafeteria. Do you think there are enough informal student spaces on H o p e ' s C a m p u s ? D o you ever feel there is a lack of intellectual discussion outside of the c l a s s r o o m ? A lack of venues f o r student artists? Would you use an on-campus coffeehouse? Would it help you discover yourself? — P h i l Waalkes ('04)

Retaining talent should be priority for Hope administration

t h r o u g h the v a r i o u s e m o t i o n s that the p r o d u c t i o n d r e d g e s u p , there is a panel d i s c u s s i o n at t h e e n d of e a c h p e r f o r m a n c e .

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past, and it seems that Hope College has created a bad habit of letting their best go because of an unwillingness to renew contracts... or is it an unwillingness to pay what is well-deserved? If Hope keeps killing contracts, our college will b e c o m e a place of unfamiliar, inexperienced professors and unhappy, ill-educated students. T h i s is not what I have c o m e to Hope College for, and I believe that there are 3,000 other students w h o w o u l d agree with me. I am usually proud of Hope College as an institution, but this time I am very disappointed. I am sorry to be losing Stacy as a Resident Director, friend, and supervisor. M a y b e Hope doesn't deserve her. — M a r i a H o o g e n d y k ('04)

Anchor makes mistakes, but understandably so To the Editor: In 2001, Student Congress used $500 of the student activity fee to buy this scrolling marquee sign in the lobby of DeWitt Center. Although active in 2001, the sign has yet to display anything since. A s a service to you. T h e A n c h o r will k e e p track of h o w m a n y weeks it has been blank since installed.

Today's Count: 83 Anchor Staff

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Staff

Staff

editor-in-chief Nick Denis production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Anjey Dykhuis Kurt Koehler arts editor Maureen Yonovitz sports editors Dave Ye Iter photo editor Rob Ondra business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants ad manager Ana Santibanez Zamora production asisstant Jason Johnson advisor Mark A. Lewison Senior Staff Reporter: Erin RHey, Katie Taylor Staff Reporters: OhmAHmov, Glenn Lester

A s an alumni editor of the A n chor, I have noticed several disturbing trends in the A n c h o r over the course of the year. T h e letter in the 2/5 issue f r o m Professor Carla Vissers, et al, about an ill-chosen Public Service A n n o u n c e m e n t was only the latest to complain about sloppy decision m a k i n g by the Anchor. Also, corrections and apolog i e s h a v e had to be run s e v e r a l times. H o w e v e r , the m o s t d i s t u r b i n g thing I ' v e noticed, and what I see as the root of the problem, is that not a single section editor has remained on staff f r o m when I was editor, just a year ago. E v e n worse, only o n e s e c t i o n e d i t o r r e m a i n s f r o m last semester! T h i s is w h y I d o n ' t b l a m e any of the A n c h o r ' s problems on the current editor or his staff. With such a small and inexperienced staff, everyone ends u p doing m u c h more work than they signed on for. A result of this is rash, last-minute decisions made just to meet deadline. Oftentimes there is no time to check over the work as carefully as they w o u l d like. 1 was always a m a z e d

w h e n we went to newspaper conferences and met newspaper staffs three t i m e s the size of ours f r o m colleges the same size as Hope. This year, the problem is the worst it's ever been. T h e blame f o r this, I think, lies with the college community. First of all, Hope College students are b e c o m i n g less and less interested in any activities outside the academic realm. T h o s e w h o join the A n c h o r are unwilling to make it the priority it should be b e c a u s e it takes t h e m away f r o m any school work they have to do, and they end up leaving the staff. I admit, the Anchor is a lot of work, and had I not been on the staff during college, my grades w o u l d have been a lot better. But, I also realize, and Nick and his staff do as well, that the A n c h o r w a s a m o n g the m o s t i m p o r t a n t things I ' v e ever done in my life. It gave me the opportunity to make a difference and speak the truth to a c a m p u s that too often gets information through r u m o r or not at all. Secondly, I don't think the faculty at Hope makes enough of an effort to encourage their students to join the Anchor (although some do). I can't tell you how many students

I met w h o told me they were interested in j o u r n a l i s m but had never t h o u g h t of j o i n i n g t h e A n c h o r . T h a t ' s like w a n t i n g to b e c o m e a singer, but not joining choir. T h e college needs to start viewing the A n c h o r as an educational opportunity. Finally, the administration of the college has not shown m u c h of an interest in helping out the Anchor. Although there are those in the Student D e v e l o p m e n t o f f i c e and the Student Media Committee w h o are well aware of how overworked and under appreciated the A n c h o r staff is, little to nothing has been done to help the Anchor solve its problems. It's good that students and faculty are keeping the A n c h o r staff responsible for their mistakes, but recognizing the importance of the student press, it's time to put your m o n e y where your m o u t h is and work together with the A n c h o r to solve its problems. Next time you see an Anchor staff m e m b e r around campus, congratulate th e m on all their hard work and encourage th e m to keep it up. — M a t t C o o k ('02)

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to anyone within the college and related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r reserves the right to edit d u e to space constraints

Photo Assisstant: Anneke Meeter The Anchor is a product ofsludenl effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Utters to the editor are encouraged, though due lo space limitations the Anchor resen es the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the

Anchor

2003 spring semester,

Issue #18of 25

N o personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous Letters chosen on a first c o m e first serve basis, or a representative sample is taken N o a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief m a y verify identity of writer T h e A n c h o r reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter submitted

Mail letters to the A n c h o r c/o H o p e College, drop them off at the A n c h o r office (located in the center of Dewitt, b e h i n d W T H S ) , or e - m a i l A n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u


February

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

19, 2 0 0 3

"

A

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c

h

o

r

Student appreciates, adds to Chapel series on sex a n d . . . B I N G B A N G B O O M they h a v e sex. T h i s situation c o u l d h a v e b e e n avoided: not

b o u n d a r i e s on a relationship and say, " I ' m not g o i n g past h o l d i n g h a n d s , " or " I ' m not

w a t c h i n g the trashy m o v i e , not b e i n g alone in a s e c l u d e d area, a n d d r a w i n g p h y s i c a l

going to put myself in a situation where w e ' r e a l o n e in m y r o o m , " then it is easier to avoid

talk a b o u t sex f r o m a Biblical p e r s p e c t i v e , especially w h e n we are all daily b o m b a r d e d

b o u n d a r i e s on their lips a n d h o r m o n e s . W h a t people o f t e n fail to realize is that they set themselves u p for temptation because they

sexual sin. A l s o , r e m e m b e r that sexual sin isn't just h a v i n g sex, but can i n c l u d e the pre-

by the lies of a s e x - c r a z e d w o r l d . T h e speak-

d o n ' t set b o u n d a r i e s , or limitations, for their

ers encouraged us to f o r m g o o d relationships, not r o m a n c e s centered on o u r physical worth,

relationships. T h i s obviously has natural cons e q u e n c e s such a s guilt, S T D s , p r e g n a n c y ,

but b a s e d on true l o v e for the entirety of another person. A h u g e detail that w a s not e m -

etc. If you, H o p e C o l l e g e student, truly desire to b e a m a n or w o m a n of Christ, you are

p h a s i z e d is the idea of B O U N D A R I E S . Sex d o e s n ' t just h a p p e n by itself; it h a s to start

to flee t e m p t a t i o n . R o m a n s 13:14 says, " R a t h e r , c l o t h e y o u r s e l v e s with the L o r d

s o m e w h e r e . F o r instance, s u p p o s e a Chris-

J e s u s Christ, a n d d o not think a b o u t h o w to

other a r e a s of t e m p t a t i o n a n d sin is crucial a s well. T r y i n g not to d r e s s like a sex s y m -

tian c o u p l e f r o m H o p e C o l l e g e g o e s to W i n ter Fantasia, then w a t c h a m o v i e (with sex in

gratify the desires of the sinful n a t u r e . " Now, I ' m not saying that I d o n ' t struggle; I battle

bol, avoiding p o r n o g r a p h y (a h u g e p r o b l e m ) , and s q u e l c h i n g lustful desires are all impor-

it) in a s e c l u d e d b e d r o o m , start m a k i n g out.

with t e m p t a t i o n e v e r y day. But if you set

tant areas t o a s k G o d f o r g u i d a n c e to h e l p

To the Editor: I w o u l d like to t h a n k the chapel staff f o r d e v o t i n g a w e e k of chapel t o " S e x u a l i t y in Christ." It w a s e n c o u r a g i n g to h e a r speakers

ceding e v e n t s . J e s u s said, " B u t I tell you that a n y o n e w h o l o o k s at a w o m a n lustfully has

you c h a n g e . Additionally, although it is difficult to talk about things like p o r n o g r a p h y , m a s t u r b a t i o n , and lust, we m u s t b e honest and o p e n with one another, so that we can e n c o u r a g e and pray f o r e a c h another. It is these t y p e s of sins that distort o u r thoughts on h o w w e v i e w sexual intercourse and h o w we e v a l u a t e the opposite gender. T h a n k G o d t h e r e is g r a c e a n d f o r g i v e n e s s ; o t h e r w i s e w e ' d all be d a m n e d ! But we c a n ' t k e e p abus-

already c o m m i t t e d adultery with h e r in his h e a r t . " M a t t h e w 5:28. E v e r y person is different. S o m e have more w i l l p o w e r than others, but we all are vulner-

ing grace and forgiveness and continue in our s e x u a l sin. G o d d e s i r e s a c h a n g e in o u r m i n d s e t s and lifestyles. Avoiding temptation has to start with setting b o u n d a r i e s , b e c a u s e

able to s u c c u m b to t e m p t a t i o n . D e a l i n g with

"if you stand for nothing, y o u ' l l fall f o r a n y thing." — M i c a h Holden ('04)

Message in "Bowling for Columbine" important for all to hear non-mainstream film to campus.

To the Editor: 1 a t t e n d e d the S A C m o v i e this Friday, " B o w l i n g f o r C o l u m b i n e . " I h o p e m a n y of you d i d n ' t k n o w it w a s here, as there w a s limited advertising. I w e n t t o the 7 : 0 0 s h o w and t h a n k e d the student taking m y ticket m o n e y b e f o r e h a n d , c o m m e n t i n g o n my surprise a n d a p p r e ciation that S A C c h o s e to bring a

i i i i i i i i i i

H e said that S A C c h o s e this w e e k e n d b e c a u s e the timing w a s right with F a n t a s i a o n S a t u r d a y , e x p e c t ing f e w e r people r e m a i n i n g on c a m p u s s o it w a s better to not bring in a big headliner. A film this rele v a n t to o u r e d u c a t i o n a n d culture s h o u l d not be r e l e g a t e d t o an unpopulated weekend. There were 15 p e o p l e a t t e n d i n g the s h o w i n g .

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w a s on Saturday night at 9:30, there were, o n a v e r a g e , 2 0 0 v i e w e r s per w e e k e n d this semester. S o w h e r e w e r e the other 185 of y o u ? " B o w l ing for C o l u m b i n e " is a d o c u m e n tary on school s h o o t i n g s and g u n s in the U.S.. W i t h c o m e d i a n C h r i s Rock, American Bandstand host

and country. W h e t h e r y o u b e l i e v e in the right to b e a r a r m s for protection or the right to protest f o r better gun c o n t r o l , you s h o u l d h a v e b e e n there. You s h o u l d see it. It m a k e s you t h i n k a b o u t w h a t we

seek out another opportunity to e d u c a t e y o u r s e l f f u r t h e r . As stud e n t s of H o p e C o l l e g e , an institution dedicated to learning and experience, you should have been t h e r e — i t w a s a sight to see. — G r e t c h e n Schmidt ('05)

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'ts

Snorts

Sport

noi

Sports

Issue 18 of 25, published

Sports Sports Sports Spot Sports * F e b r u a r y 19, 2003

Hope defeats Calvin, then falls to Albion Loss gives Dutchmen tie in MIAA standings David Yetter SPORTS EDITOR

a s h a r p contrast to the inspired game that they had played just a few days earlier. On Wednesday night at the Civic Center, Hope defeated Calvin by a score of 92-76 in front of a sellout crowd. The Dutchmen got off to a great start and ran away with the game early. They went on a 20-6 run to start the game and never looked

The Flying Dutchmen were flying high after Wednesday's big win over Calvin, but they were brought back down to earth on Saturday, s u f f e r i n g a 6 9 - 6 5 d e f e a t at the hands of Albion College. With the loss to Albion, Hope back. Hope drove the lane and develnow has an 8-2 record in the M I A A and an 18-4 overall record. They oped an inside game, which in turn created perimare tied in eter shots. Chad the M I A A Carlson ('03), standings who was held w i t h scoreless in Albion and H o p e ' s ' f i r st both teams m e e t i n g w i t h have two C a l v i n , hit an m o r e early threel e a g u e p o i n t e r that set g a m e s bethe tone f o r the fore the night. Hope held M I A A onto their lead to u rn at h r o u g h o u t the ment beChad Carlson ('OS) shoots. first half and Junginning ior Matt Taylor February nailed a three-pointer with just un26. der a minute left in the half that Hope led the game by a score of gave Hope a 20-point lead. After 63-57, but Albion went on a run to end the g a m e and outscored the f r e e throws by each team, Hope Dutchmen 12-2 over the last five went into the break with a 48-28 minutes. Don Overbeek ('03) was the only Hope scorer in double figures, but only m a n a g e d f o u r points in the second half. The Dutchmen's poor play was

lead. C o a c h Glenn Van Wieren w a s pleased by the Dutchmen's performance in the first half. They shot 7 - f o r - 1 0 f r o m three-point r a n g e w h i l e Calvin only shot l - f o r - 7 .

AMCHOff P H O T O S BY R O B O N D R A Don Overbeek ( 03) dunks in Hope's 92-76 win over Calvin. Overbeek was named the MIAA men's player of the week for the third time this season and sixth in his career. a consistent 50% from the threeThey also grabbed 12 offensive repoint line and made 27 of their 30 bounds, while the Knights could free-throw attempts. They also had only manage five. 10 more rebounds than the Knights, Hope kept the pressure up in the who fell to 5-5 in the M I A A standsecond half and never let Calvin get ings. back in the lane. Don Overbeek had Chad Carlson ( ' 0 3 ) finished the a masterful game for the Dutchmen and was all over the glass. He fin- game with a team-high 19 points, including 5 three-pointers. ished the game with 14 points, 18 "1 was the man that happened to rebounds, 8 blocks and 5 assists. Calvin never got closer than 14 be open," Carlson said after the game. "We were moving the ball points and Hope cruised to an easy around real well and I was the one 92-76 victory. The Dutchmen shot

Lady Dutch swim to MIAA title David Yetter S P O R T S EDITOR

The Flying Dutch swim team defeated five other schools, including Calvin, and captured the M I A A w o m e n ' s swimming and diving championship on Saturday at the Holland Community Aquatic Center. The championship marks the team's 10th championship in the last 12 years and the 20th in school history. A number of girls conditionally qualified for the N C A A Division III championships in Atlanta next month. Michelle Smith ('04). Audrey Arnold ("04), Erika Steele ("05), Kelly Parker ('03), Meagan O'Neil ("06) and Erin Vandenberg ( ' 0 3 ) are all in consideration for the tournament. During the meet, the women won three of the five relay races. They came out on top in the 200-yard and 400-yard medley and also in the 800-yard freestyle relay. The Flying Dutch also had three double-winners. Senior Kelly Parker won the 100-yard and 200-yard breaststroke, Junior Michelle Smith won the 500-yard and 1,650-yard freestyle and Junior Audrey Arnold won the 100-yard and 200-yard backstroke.

The m e n ' s team also had a good weekend, although they were not as productive as the women. The Dutchmen finished second to M I A A champion Kalamazoo. Kalamazoo finished with 660 points, while Hope ended up with 507 points and Calvin totaled 418.5. The Flying Dutchmen captured three relay championships. T h e y won the 200-yard freestyle relay and the 200-yard and 400-yard medley relay. The 400-yard medley team qualified for nationals with a time of 3:25.57. Brian Slagh ( ' 0 3 ) won the 500-yard freestyle with an N C A A qualifying time of 4:33.88. Ian Kobes ('04) won league championships in the 100-yard and 200yard backstroke for the third straight year. Hope also had a number of conditional qualifying performances for the national tournament, including Daniel Bouwens ('03) in the 100-yard butterfly and Chris Hamstra ('04) in the 50-yard freestyle. "Everybody that I expected to make nationals ended up making them," said coach John Patnott. "I think that the m e n ' s times were very solid." Those who qualified for the N C A A championships will compete in Atlanta f r o m March 13-15.

Hope teams are on a winning streak David Yetter S P O R T S EDITOR

H o p e ' s sports t e a m s have had one of the more productive weekends of the year. Teams are winning tournaments, clinching championships, and qualifying for nationals. Here is a brief rundown of some of the things that the teams accomplished this weekend. The Lady Dutch basketball team defeated Albion by a score of 7056 on Saturday and clinched their fourth consecutive M I A A champi-

onship. They also extended their unbeaten streak to 23 games. The Hope Ice Hockey Club defeated Calvin by a score of 4-2 on Saturday night to win the M C H C championship. Hope plays Lansing and Kalamazoo next weekend bef o r e h e a d i n g to M u s k e g o n on March 6-8 for the M e n ' s Division 111 National Tournament. The women's swimmers won their 10th M I A A championship in the last 12 years last Saturday, defeating five other teams. Hope had

three d o u b l e w i n n e r s during the meet and won three of the five relay races. Six women and five relay teams conditionally qualified for nationals. The men took second in the M I A A finals. S w i m m i n g coach John Patnott was very pleased with the team's performance over the weekend and is looking forward to nationals. "I was proud of both t e a m s , " Patnott said. "Mostly everybody swam their lifetime best. I couldn't have asked for more."

that was getting the shots and they were falling for me tonight." Coach Van Wieren was h a p p y with the performance of the team after the game. "We played a really solid second half d e f e n s i v e l y , " he said. " W e made our free throws and tonight was a really good win for Hope." The Flying Dutchmen play tonight at Olivet at 7:30 p.m. and at Kalamazoo at 3 p.m. on Saturday afternoon.

Track tunes up at GVSU Olim Alimov STAFF REPORTER

The Hope College Track and Field teams traveled to Grand Valley State University on Friday to participate in an indoor invitational. This trip and their other upcoming indoor events will help the team get ready for the season. Kara Van Assen ('03) won the triple j u m p (33 , 7.5") and came in third in the high j u m p (4' 11"). ' T h i s trip was meant for us to go out there and to gel some experience," said Van Assen. "It is important for us to start building so that everybody will be ready when we go outdoors." Hope competed against a good number of Division II schools, resulting in moderate finishes. Jessica Oosting ('03) finished third in the 800-meters (2:25.73), while Freshman Allison Trotter finished sixth in the triple j u m p (30' 11.5"). Among the men. Sophomore Peter Derby finished fifth in the mile (4:26.15) and seventh in the 800-meters (2:02.78). Hope's biggest competition this season will come from rival Calvin College, w h o m Hope has lost to the past couple of years: "Our goal is to close the gap with Calvin and hopefully beat them when everything comes together," Van Assen said. Hope's next indoor competition will be in Chicago on March 1.

HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR 141 E I2TH ST PO BOX 9 0 0 0 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

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Profile for Hope College Library

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