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AAB deliberates plans to improve English 113 T h e Academic A f f a i r s Board met Wednesday t o discuss suggested changes in English 113, a course required of all f r e s h m e n . MANY MEMBERS of the board advocated a test which would be given s t u d e n t s b e f o r e entering Hope as f r e s h m e n . T h e purpose of it would be to measure writing, reading and listening skills. A s t u d e n t failing any one of the tests would be required t o seek help f r o m the a p p r o p r i a t e supportive service c e n t e r o f f e r e d on c a m p u s .

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V o l u m e 85—1 5

Hope College, H o l l a n d , Michigan 4 9 4 2 3

F e b r u a r y 9, 1 9 7 3

THE QUESTION arose w h e t h e r foreign s t u d e n t s would be required to take the proposed test. Professor of Chemistry and AAB Chairman Irwin Brink suggested that s t u d e n t s whose native t o n g u e is not English should take English as a foreign language. This raised the possibility of w h e t h e r a student w h o was planning to work in g h e t t o areas

would also be e x e m p t f r o m the aural exam. ONE POSSIBILITY mentioned would be a two-grade system, in which the s t u d e n t would get one grade for his work in 113 and a n o t h e r for his reading, writing and listening skills. Brink then suggested the establishment of a three-man c o m m i t tee. The AAB voted u n a n i m o u s l y to give Brink the a u t h o r i t y of a p p o i n t i n g the three m e m b e r s . It will r e c o m m e n d specific testing m e t h o d s and work out the details as to when and where the tests will be taken. J a m e s B u l t m a n , assistant itrcv fessor of e d u c a t i o n , c o m m e n t e d that the AAB was not moving fast enough if they were going to c o m p l e t e a review of the core curriculum by the end of the semester, lie suggested several days be reserved specifically for curriculum review. T h e board agreed in principle but set aside no exact dates.

Approves SCC proposal

Campus Life Board votes to liberalize parietals by Peter Brown H o p e s t u d e n t s n o w have 20 additional parietal h o u r s following action by t h e C a m p u s Life Board at their M o n d a y m e ^ t i n g ^ T h e Board also a p p r o v e d f o r m a t i o n a Student Appropriations C mittee. T H E B O A R D voted t o accept the r e p o r t of the S t u d e n t C o n d u c t C o m m i t t e e which r e c o m m e n d e d m a x i m u m h o u r s of 1 to 11 p.m. S u n d a y s , 7 to 11 p.m. M o n d a y t h r o u g h T h u r s d a y , 7 p . m . to 1 a.m. F r i d a y s and 1 p.m. t o 1 a.m. Saturdays. T h e SCC proposal also eliminates the r e q u i r e m e n t t h a t the h o s t ' s d o o r remain ajar at all times. E n f o r c e m e n t of guest hours is now the responsibility of the hall residents working in cooperation with the residence hall staff instead of an elected unit council. R A T I O N A L E for m o d i f y i n g the original S t u d e n t Congress proposal on parietal h o u r s was expressed by Nancy Wheeler, assistant professor of classical languages. Ms. Wheeler said that expanding h o u r s to 1 a.m. t o 1 p.m. everyday would create security problems and remove " t h e kind of privacy s o m e individuals n e e d . " S t u d e n t board m e m b e r Nan DeVries said each individual unit should be allowed to decide for themselves w h e t h e r t h e y want h o u r s f r o m 1 p.m. t o 1 a.m. Associate Dean of S t u d e n t s Nona Kipp did not agree. " U n f o r t u n a t e ly, our e x p e r i e n c e has b e e n that a unit always chooses the m a x i m u m h o u r s , " stated Kipp. KIPP C R E D I T E D this tend e n c y to peer pressure. S t u d e n t board m e m b e r Bob Schellenberg q u e s t i o n e d why a f t e r n o o n h o u r s could not be instituted during the week. Ms. Wheeler r e s p o n d e d by stating, "Since those are school days, it is m o r e desireable not to have g u e s t s . "

Student board member Cathy Walchenbach also expressed disapproval of the original S t u d e n t Congress p r o p o s a l . Ms. Walchenbach stated a 1 a.m. closing time weeknights w o u l d create r o o m m a t e hassels and t h a t , "it wasn't fair to m a k e an R.A. stay up until 1 a.m. every n i g h t . " T H E R E V I S E D edition of the parietal p r o p o s a l passed with one dissenting vote. Ms. K i p p r e c o m m ended t h a t " t h e new proposal be instituted within a w e e k . " The Student Appropiations C o m m i t t e e was created to review certain s t u d e n t organization budgets and d e t e r m i n e their fiscal needs f o r t h e next school year. The c o m m i t t e e will be working with a set p o r t i o n of the s t u d e n t activity fee, p r o b a b l y a b o u t $35 per s t u d e n t . O R G A N I Z A T I O N S to be f u n d ed u n d e r the newly organized c o m m i t t e e are the anchor, WTAS, Milestone, O p u s , Association of Woman S t u d e n t s , S t u d e n t Congress, S t u d e n t Activities C o m m i t tee and the International Relations C l u b . O t h e r organizations recognized by the E x t r a c u r r i c u l a r Activities C o m m i t t e e , whose emphasis is on campuswide activities, may also submit their budgets. THE APPROPRIATIONS C o m m i t t e e will review each budget and s u b m i t their r e c o m m e n d a tions to t h e S t u d e n t Congress. The S t u d e n t Congress will also act as an appeal board for any organization not satisfied with their budget allocations. T h e C a m p u s Life Board has the final approval or veto of t h e entire b u d g e t . THE STUDENT Appropriations C o m m i t t e e will be c o m prised of five s t u d e n t s , one faculty m e m b e r w h o is the liason f r o m the C a m p u s Life Board, one m e m ber of the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and a m e m b e r f r o m the business o f f i c e . T h e s t u d e n t m e m b e r s of t h e c o m m i t t e e will be m e m b e r s of

Library inventory reveals books, periodicals stolen Results of the most recent inventory at Van Z o r e n Library show a n u m b e r of b o o k s and periodicals missing and p r o b a b l y stolen according to L e r o y Lebbin, director of libraries. " T w o hundred eighty books have been stolen f r o m the lib r a r y , " said staffer Linda Vis-

Take heed Next week's anchor will be the last publication until March 2.

scher. C u r r e n t periodicals such as Time, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report and Psychology Today have also been purloined. This creates a problem for students because the missing i t e m s are in the greatest d e m a n d . "We try to replace the missing b o o k s and periodicals but o u r replacement budget 0 L just isn't large e n o u g h , " stated Ms. Visscher. T h e library s t a f f , headed by L e b b i n , has discussed n u m e r o u s ways of t h e f t prevention. S o m e of the possibilities are a r e t u r n to the use of turnstiles in t h e library or a m a n d a t o r y check of all egressing s t u d e n t s . A c c o r d i n g to Ms. Visscher , there isn't m o n e y available to effectively curtail t h e pilfering.

S t u d e n t Congress and a p p o i n t e d by the S t u d e n t Congress C a b i n e t . The c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r f r o m the business office will not have any voting rights and will act only as a source of reference. D E B A T E ON the proposal t o create a S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e came mainlv f r o m anchor E d i t o r Peter Brown , Asso-

ciate E d i t o r Dave D e K o k and Assistant Professor of Physics J a m e s Seeser, C h a i r m a n of t h e S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t tee. Brown and D e K o k voiced fear t h a t a faculty advisor may e n d a n ger the anchor's press f r e e d o m . Brown cited the inconvience and potential conflict that could arise. Dean of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t

D e Y o u n g settled the c o m p l a i n t s voiced by the anchor e d i t o r s by assuring t h e m t h e y could select their own advisor. D e Y o u n g also s t a t e d that the advisor would have a b s o l u t e l y no power in any policy decisions. A vote was t h e n taken and the measure passed u n a n i m o u s l y .

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r v \ \ \ W \ \ a\< A few m e m b e r s of t h e C a m p u s Life Board p o n d e r issues at last M o n d a y ' s meeting. T h e CLB passed proposals expanding parietal h o u r s and f o r m i n g a S t u d e n t A p p r o p r i a t i o n C o m m i t t e e .

Bellying up

Blue ribbon tour reveals... by Dirk Bloemendaal The n e i g h b o r h o o d bar lies at the r o o t s of America. E m b e d d e d in the n a t i o n ' s past, the A m e r i c a n corner bar has survived taxes, wars, p r o h i b i t i o n , drugs; all the while generating an aura of c o m forting solidness and p e r m a n e n c e

to a c o u n t r y t o r n by inner t u r m o i l and o u t e r strife. U N T O U C H E D BY the ravages of time, it stands as a m o n u m e n t a l pillar in lieu of m a n ' s basic simplicity; in the face of a t h r e a t e n ing e n t i t y , he retreats t o this place where he can m e e t with his friends and feel secure.

Mike V o n Ins, t h e dancing b e a r , d o u b l e s as o w n e r and e n t e r t a i n e r at the Pub.

The corner bar is not new to Holland. (We use the term " c o r n e r b a r " loosely; actually not all of the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s we shall talk a b o u t . are located at an intersection.) IN A C O M M U N I T Y where pillared c h u r c h e s stare out at passersby f r o m every conceivable niche along chuck-holed r o a d w a y s , the cities' drinking business ranks a close second in p o p u l a r i t y . Perhaps it still ranks only second because of H o l l a n d ' s ancient " N o Drinking On S u n d a y " rule. But bars a b o u n d in the t o w n f o u n d e d by puritanical D u t c h settlers. The S e a w a y , the Old Nortii E n d , the O f f i c e Tavern and the East End Bar are just a few that stand so subtly along the streets of a city where o b t a i n i n g a liquor license is h a r d e r t h a n finding a needle in wind-blown h a y s t a c k . T H I N G S C O U L D BE worse. Five miles d o w n M-21, in Holland's sister village, Z e e l a n d , there is not a d r o p to be had. H o p e s t u d e n t s generally arc not familiar with t h e establishments heretofore mentioned. A H o p e i t e ' s ears w o u l d m o r e likely perk u p at the m e n t i o n of The Pub, Skiles and p e r h a p s , Eddie's. please turn to page 6, column

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anchor essay

Vietnamese pact and future prospects examined Editor's note: This is the second of a t w o part series by sophomore political science major Rudy Broekhuis concerning the Vietnam ceasefire. T h e r e was a t i m e - i n t h e war's earlier s t a g e s - w h e n t h e United States might have won t h e war in V i e t n a m with t h e massive weight of American arms, applied swiftly and sharply in a decisive blow. However, by following o u r misguided (albeit w e l l - i n t e n t i o n e d ) policy of gradual escalation, the United S t a t e s wasted its military options. • P E R H A P S , AS SOME would argue, S o u t h V i e t n a m was not i m p o r t a n t to t h e security of the United S t a t e s (I tend to believe it was); b u t regardless, having c o m mitted 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 American t r o o p s alone m a d e S o u t h V i e t n a m imp o r t a n t . With that c o m m i t m e n t , world c o n f i d e n c e in American promises was at stake. Many have scorned such t e r m s as " c r e d i b i l i t y , " but these w o r d s are not e m p t y phrases. O t h e r c o u n t r i e s can only gear their policy to o u r a c t i o n s if t h e y can c o u n t o n o u r steadiness. H A D WE W I T H D R A W N without establishing an honorable peace in V i e t n a m the fighting and killing would have c o n t i n u e d , Americans w o u l d have s u f f e r e d a loss of c o n f i d e n c e in their n a t i o n , and it w o u l d have led t o a b r e a k d o w n of restraints on o t h e r p o t e n tial aggressors and to an even more d a n g e r o u s i n t e r n a t i o n a l situation. Thus, w e m a d e it t h r o u g h Vietn a m - n o t a r o u n d i t - a n d reached a ceasefire a g r e e m e n t . T h e ceasefire a g r e e m e n t is divided into nine basic p a r t s and is s u f f i c i e n t l y vague t o get past unsolved p r o b lems. H o w e v e r , in t h e e s t i m a t i o n of m a n y , t h e objectives of t h e United States can be clearly m e t . T h e nine basic sections are described b e l o w . Additional c o m m e n t s will be a d d e d as necessary. F I R S T , A L L parties are to respect t h e i n d e p e n d e n c e , sovereignty, and u n i t y of V i e t n a m as stated in t h e 1 9 5 4 Geneva Accords. In s h o r t , t h e s t a t e m e n t is a r e a f f i r m a t i o n of t h e 1954 agreements. S e c o n d , a ceasefire is to b e in effect throughout Vietnam. There were, of course, i n f r a c t i o n s of this provision, b u t o n e must never forget t h a t t h e S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e forces and t h e C o m m u n i s t f o r c e s have b e e n at war with each o t h e r f o r a long time. It is n o t easy f o r enemies to lay d o w n their a r m s and forget their suspicions. THE D I S P U T E S have, h o w ever, begun t o lessen, and p e r h a p s the p e a c e k e e p i n g forces can aid in reducing t h e fighting even f u r t h e r . T h e n t o o , a n y d i s p u t e over the control of t e r r i t o r y is to be resolved by a t w o - p a r t y j o i n t military c o m m i s s i o n f r o m t h e S o u t h V i et n a m and Viet Cong c o m b a t ants. Also u n d e r this section, all United S t a t e s t r o o p s are t o be withdrawn from South Vietnam within 6 0 days, and a dismantling of all U.S. military bases t h e r e is to take place. T h e pact has called f o r the U.S. t o provide an a p p r o x imate w i t h d r a w a l schedule. At this writing it h a s n o t been provided, and t h e C o m m u n i s t s have bogged d o w n t h e release of POWs. IN MY e s t i m a t i o n , t h e schedule will be f o r t h c o m i n g and w i t h drawal and prisoner release will c o n t i n u e u n h a m p e r e d . In t h e same b r e a t h , as it were, t h e pact states t h a t t h e r e can be n o ree n t r y of military f o r c e s i n t o S o u t h V i e t n a m a n d n o increase in military e q u i p m e n t .

VON INS PIZZA WAGON Free Delivery To Dorms On Orders Over $2.50 Call 396-5632 Restaurant & Billiards 102 River Ava, " * •>V -

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RUDY BROEKHUIS This item is p r o b a b l y more i m p o r t a n t t o t h e United States and S o u t h V i e t n a m t h a n to the C o m m u n i s t s . N o w h e r e in the a g r e e m e n t is t h e r e a provision f o r the w i t h d r a w a l of N o r t h Vietnamese t r o o p s . This item will prevent an i n f l u x of m o r e C o m munist t r o o p s and will cut off any m o r e e q u i p m e n t t o those already present. T H E U.S., H O W E V E R , can c o n t i n u e to e c o n o m i c a l l y aid the Saigon g o v e r n m e n t and can, on a r e p l a c e m e n t - t y p e basis, militarily supply t h e S o u t h . T h i r d , all military prisoners must be released within 60 days. There was to be a full a c c o u n t i n g of all such prisoners at t h e t i m e of t h e signing, and b o t h sides are to help d e t e r m i n e t h e fate of soldiers missing in a c t i o n and locate graves. I n d e e d , o n c e all t h e American POWs are released and t h e missing a c c o u n t e d f o r , t h e end of U.S. military involvement in Vietnam will b e c o m e a reality. T H E R E L E A S E O F civilian prisoners held in S o u t h V i e t n a m must be n e g o t i a t e d by t h e t w o powers there. H o w e v e r , it may prove t o be a m o r e difficult task than it s o u n d s . F o u r t h , the people of S o u t h V i e t n a m are specifically a f f i r m e d the right to d e t e r m i n e their o w n political f u t u r e . A National C o u n cil f o r N a t i o n a l Reconciliation and C o n c o r d will be created by the t w o S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e parties to organize i n t e r n a t i o n a l l y supervised elections. Already S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e representatives have met w i t h Viet C o n g representatives and some p r o c e d u r a l p o i n t s have b e e n agreed u p o n . T H E C O U N C I L WILL consist of t h r e e equal s e g m e n t s ( t h e third to be r e p r e s e n t e d by t h e neutralists). All decisions of t h e council must be u n a n i m o u s - s o m e t h i n g that m a y be d i f f i c u l t , b u t there is no o t h e r a c c e p t a b l e alternative. T h e g o v e r n m e n t and President Thieu are at the height of p o p u larity a n d it may be a d v a n t a g e o u s f o r t h e m to hold elections as soon as possible. T h e Viet C o n g , h o w ever, m a y drag t h e i r f e e t . FIFTH, THE Demilitarized Z o n e is recognized as a provisional military d e m a r c a t i o n line b e t w e e n t h e t w o parts of V i e t n a m expected to become reunited t h r o u g h p e a c e f u l n e g o t i a t i o n s between their governments. Thereby S o u t h V i e t n a m was recognized as a separate entity-something which p r o b a b l y acted t o help Thieu swallow t h e ceasefire medicine a f t e r having his nose held b y t h e U.S. which t h r e a t e n e d t o cut off aid t o S o u t h V i e t n a m . H o p e f u l l y , t h e DMZ will be respected by N o r t h and S o u t h V i e t n a m . As long as t h e peace keeping f o r c e s are able t o w a t c h f o r violations, it is d o u b t f u l t h a t either c o u n t r y will risk intern a t i o n a l c o n d e m n a t i o n f o r its actions. Civilian movement t h r o u g h t h e DMZ has y e t t o b e n e g o t i a t e d , b u t it is d u b i o u s t h a t m u c h civilian t r a f f i c will cross t h e line.

SIXTH, VARIOUS joint bodies were created to help supervise the ceasefire. The set-up is more complex than it may appear. At first a four-party joint military commission from among the recent combatants will be formed. It will be composed of 3,000 men deployed across the country to deter and detect violations.

A f t e r 6 0 days, t h e U.S. and N o r t h V i e t n a m will w i t h d r a w , leaving a p e r m a n e n t t w o party j o i n t military c o m m i s s i o n . T H E N T O O , A 1,160 m a n I n t e r n a t i o n a l C o m m i s s i o n of C o n trol and Supervision (ICC) will be located in 55 t r o u b l e s p o t s across S o u t h V i e t n a m . The ICC will report any infractions to the joint c o m m i s s i o n , and the c o m m i s s i o n is t o r e p o r t any i n f r a c t i o n s to t h e ICC In 1 9 5 4 , t h e ICC proved to be a failure. T h e new ICC is somew h a t m o r e promising, but t h e chances of failure are p r e s e n t again t h e r e was n o alternative. A L S O , 30 D A Y S a f t e r t h e ceasefire, an i n t e r n a t i o n a l c o n f e r ence of 13 m e m b e r s will c o n v e n e to a c k n o w l e d g e t h e signing of t h e Washington-Hanoi agreement, g u a r a n t e e the e n d i n g of t h e w a r , and set u p a p e r m a n e n t intern a t i o n a l b o d y to w h o m t h e ICC can r e p o r t a n y a n d all i n f r a c t i o n s . S e v e n t h , n o foreign c o u n t r y is allowed t o m a i n t a i n military bases in either Laos o r C a m b o d i a . Their right to s e l f - d e t e r m i n a t i o n and n e u t r a l i t y was r e a f f i r m e d . N o ceasefire was declared in e i t h e r c o u n t r y as of y e t , and t h e C o m munists have of late neither respected t h e s e l f - d e t e r m i n a t i o n n o r t h e n e u t r a l i t y of these c o u n t r i e s . IT IS H O P E D that a ceasefire can be reached in these areas and t h u s aid in the c u t o f f of any supplies to C o m m u n i s t N o r t h V i e t n a m e s e in S o u t h V i e t n a m . E i g h t h , t h e U.S. pledged to aid in r e c o n s t r u c t i o n e f f o r t s , specifically in N o r t j V i e t n a m and also t h r o u g h o u t I n d o c h i n a , to repair war d a m a g e . A m e r i c a n policy m a k e r s h o p e t h a t this t y p e of olive b r a n c h will placate t h e C o m munists. T h a t is n o t certain, b u t w h a t is certain is t h a t r e b u i l d i n g will k e e p t h e N o r t h V i e t n a m e s e busy f o r s o m e t i m e . F I N A L L Y , A L L t h e parties agreed to i m p l e m e n t t h e agreements. L e t ' s h o p e t h a t t h e y d o so completely. T h a t , in brief, is w h a t t h e ceasefire pact provides. Many of its i m p l i c a t i o n s have b e e n p o i n t e d

o u t , b u t m a n y o t h e r s will e m e r g e . Let's n o w quickly look at t h e f u t u r e p r o s p e c t s for S o u t h e a s t Asia A L L O W ME T O begin by stating t h a t I am convinced t h a t it will be a long, long t i m e b e f o r e the U.S. ever gets involved in " a n o t h e r V i e t n a m . " Many well m e a n i n g people parade a r o u n d declaring t h a t t h e y h o p e t h a t we have learned a lesson and never repeat such a mistake again. T h e r e is, however, little d o u b t in m y mind t h a t should a f r i e n d l y c o u n t r y be faced with an e x t e r nally s u p p o r t e d i n s u r r e c t i o n - e v e n if it were in Latin A m e r i c a neither t h e American public n o r the American Congress would allow any unilateral A m e r i c a n i n t e r v e n t i o n , even at t h e r e q u e s t of t h e f r i e n d l y g o v e r n m e n t . KNOWING THIS A L L too well, t h e c o u n t r i e s of S o u t h e a s t Asia, w h o have t h e t h r e a t of t h e People's Republic of China t o cope w i t h , will find it in their o w n best interest to establish an indigenous Asian f r a m e w o r k f o r their f u t u r e security. These c o u n t r i e s should begin f o r m i n g regional pacts t o act as b u f f e r s t o C o m munist aggression. O N E O F TWO things can be t h u s achieved: either t h e y can contain the aggression b y t h e m selves (with s o m e aid via t h e Nixon D o c t r i n e ) or if t h e y cann o t , t h e u l t i m a t e choice can be presented to the U.S. in clear t e r m s , by n a t i o n s which w o u l d a u t o m a t i c a l l y b e c o m e allies in whatever response might prove necessary. We must not forget t h a t t h e U.S. is a Pacific p o w e r . We d o have a stake in w h a t h a p p e n s in S o u t h e a s t Asia. S y m b o l i c of t h a t fact are the three wars we have f o u g h t there in t h e short span of one g e n e r a t i o n . We m u s t n o t t u r n our b a c k s on the f r i e n d l y Asian c o u n t r i e s , b u t r a t h e r we m u s t help t h e m attain political and econ o m i c stability. HAVING STOPPED Communist aggression in S o u t h Vietnam f o r a t i m e , we m u s t n o w proceed t o s t r e n g t h e n the stability

of t h a t c o u n t r y and o t h e r s so that C o m m u n i s m is n o t allowed t o b e c o m e the wave of Asia's f u t u r e . It is i m p o r t a n t t o r e m e m b e r , t o o , that t h e C o m m u n i s t s of N o r t h V i e t n a m are a revolut i o n a r y p e o p l e . T h e y have f o u g h t off and o n since WW II until t h e present and t h e r e is little reason t o believe t h a t t h e y will n o t again be t e m p t e d t o t a k e u p a r m s . T H E P I C T U R E , h o w e v e r , is not dar k. T h e r e are several viable d e t e r r e n t s t o possible renewed C o m m u n i s t aggression. First, a stable Asian alliance can act as a strong force t o p r e v e n t aggression. S e c o n d , the i n t e r n a t i o n a l peace keeping force and i n t e r n a t i o n a l pressure may serve as a b l o c k . Third, improved relations between t h e P.R.C. and t h e U.S. and the U.S.S.R. and t h e U.S. may serve to cool H a n o i ' s designs. Finally, if t h e r e is no o t h e r alternative, t h e t h r e a t of swift and decisive a c t i o n by t h e U.S. could act as a s u f f i c i e n t d e t e r r e n t . A M E R I C A M U S T NOW avoid falling i n t o an isolationist period. We m a y retreat i n t o o u r b o r d e r s in fear of " a n o t h e r V i e t n a m " and end u p in a s i t u a t i o n far less desirable. At t h e end of each war we scheme and plan on h o w we can prevent t h e last war and fail t o take i n t o a c c o u n t t h e possibilities of a f u t u r e war far d i f f e r e n t f r o m t h e last. We m u s t n o t b e c o m e frust r a t e d , c o n f u s e d o r t i m i d . If we have already b e c o m e c o n f u s e d and f r u s t r a t e d it is o n l y because we have allowed it t o h a p p e n . An h o n o r a b l e p e a c e is t a k i n g h o l d in V i e t n a m . H o n o r a b l e because it has b e e n m a d e as j u s t as possible t o all involved. H O N O R A B L E , T O O , because it has provided p e a c e f o r a i l - n o t just f o r us. H o n o r a b l e because peace itself is a n h o n o r a b l e thing. Let us n o w avoid b e c o m i n g timid and isolationist. 1 am convinced t h a t peace can be m a i n t a i n e d in V i e t n a m and t h r o u g h o u t S o u t h e a s t Asia, b u t only if we m a i n t a i n s o m e leverage, s o m e h o p e and s o m e courage. Let us w o r k f o r all t h r e e .

SPONSORED

ch

BY

Truth as subjectivity by B o b V a n V o o r s t T h e thing is to find a t r u t h which is true for me, t o find the idea for which I can live and die. What would be the use of discovering so-called objective t r u t h . . . . to c o n s t r u c t a world in which I do n o t live b u t only h o l d u p f o r t h e view of o t h e r s ; - w h a t good w o u l d it d o m e to be able to explain t h e m e a n i n g of Christianity if it had n o d e e p e r significance f o r me and m y life? - F r o m Wit Journal of S o r e n Kierkegaard

Soren Kierkegaard's search f o r an idea f o r which he could live and die was an e n i g m a t i c scandal to his 19th c e n t u r y w o r l d . In a world w h e r e Christianity had b e e n i n f e c t e d by t h e c o l d , rigid objectivity of scientism, Kierkegaard b a t t l e d f o r a personal faith and a religion t h a t was real. K I E R K E G A A R D ^ S struggle t o find a personal f a i t h was carried o u t in a b a t t l e b e t w e e n t h e o p p o s i n g f o r c e s of t r u t h as objectivity and t r u t h as subjectivity. T h e s e t w o f o r m s of t r u t h are o u r c o n c e r n in this c o l u m n . " O b j e c t i v e t r u t h " is t r u t h discovered b y reas o n e d , discursive t h o u g h t . It is called " o b j e c t i v e " because t h e t h i n k e r or researcher considers t h e f a c t s or t h e o r i e s u n d e r s t u d y as distinct f r o m his o w n personal life a n d e x p e r i e n c e . F o r e x a m p l e , t h e validity of an e x p e r i m e n t in n a t u r a l o r social science is in part d e t e r m i n e d b y w h e t h e r or n o t t h e e x p e r i m e n t e r h a s p r o j e c t e d himself i n t o his experim e n t a n d t h e r e b y d i s t o r t e d it. Objective t r u t h is i m p e r s o n a l t r u t h of t h e intellect.

"SUBJECTIVE TRUTH" is truth discovered by taking a problem into one's own life to test its validity and importance. The statement "Jesus is Lord" obviously cannot be verified by objective means; rather, in the commitment of personal faith one comes to terms with religious statements and works them out in one's life. The intellect is involved here, to be sure; but the subjective search for truth involves the whole man: will, emotions, and intellect. Subjective truth inte* grates the whole man. v »<v V'w V —#

THE

MINISTRY OF

CHRIST'S

P E O P L E

A D A N G E R T O WHICH t r u t h as subjectivity is always e x p o s e d is t h a t it may d e g e n e r a t e i n t o a flight of subjectivism. Subjectivism d e n i e s t h e reality of a c o m m o n , historical t r u t h w h i c h can be sought and shared in an i n t e r p e r s o n a l w a y ; it is pessimistic a n d a t o m i s t i c . P l a t o ' s a r g u m e n t against P r o t a g o r a s can still be invoked against t h o s e w h o twist s u b j e c t i v i t y i n t o subjectivism: If t r u t h is o n l y w h a t y o u or I h a p p e n to believe, t h e n t h i s assertion itself is o n l y w h a t w e h a p p e n t o believe and no more. In s u m , subjectivity is m a k i n g t h e t r u t h o n e ' s o w n ; subjectivism is making one's own truth. A D I S C O V E R Y O F t h e possibilities of subjective t r u t h can revitalize o n e ' s a c a d e m i c a n d religious life. T h e d e m a n d of t r u t h as subjectivity is t h a t we p u t ideas t o w o r k in o u r lives a f t e r o u r m i n d s have finished r e f l e c t i n g on t h e m . S h o u l d s t u d e n t s and faculty alike e x t e n d t h e use of classroom k n o w l e d g e to all of life, a c a d e m i c s t u d y w o u l d b e c o m e m o r e vital and v i b r a n t . A n y discipline t h a t is w o r t h s t u d y i n g is w o r t h i m p l e m e n t i n g ; t o k e e p a discipline a t an a r m ' s length f r o m o u r lives is t o d e n y ourselves t h e b e n e f i t s of t h e skills and k n o w l e d g e t h a t t h e classroom h a s t o o f f e r . T R U T H A S S U B J E C T I V I T Y , as applied t o t h e lives of C h r i s t ' s p e o p l e , d e m a n d s t h a t f a i t h go b e y o n d a m e r e creed a b o u t G o d t o a living c o n t a c t with G o d . It is n o t e n o u g h t o believe that G o d did so-and-so; o n e m u s t believe a n d t r u s t in G o d . Objectivity in o n e ' s dealings w i t h G o d is n o t t r u e belief; s u b j e c t i v i t y , as Kierkegaard tells us, is t h e only w a y t h a t G o d can b e t r u l y k n o w n . In c o n c l u s i o n , t r u t h as s u b j e c t i v i t y is a via media b e t w e e n t w o devils t h a t h a u n t t h e m o d e m w o r l d : a rigid o b j e c t i v i t y w h i c h exalts t h e s c i e n t i f i c m e t h o d a n d tr ies t o a p p l y it t o every s p h e r e o f life; a n d a subjectivism w h i c h d e s t r o y s b o t h r e v e l a t i o n a n d reason a n d p u t s o u r h u m a n c o m m o n e s s t o flight.

Using truth as subjectivity as a compass, we must steer our course between the Scylla of rigid objectivity and the Charybdis of extreme subjectivism. When* ideas are tested and used in the laboratory of life, we will t » m * to know that God's truth is m l , and Jbow we can realize the truth.


February 9 , 1 9 7 3

Hope College anchor

Three

Coed homing lauded

Hope housing needs explored by Annetta Miller According to a housing report p r e s e n t e d t o t h e B o a r d of Trustees o n J a n . 18 b y N o n a K i p p , associate d e a n of s t u d e n t s , U A s y s t e m a t i c e v a l u a t i o n of h o u s i n g n e e d s is b e i n g u n d e r t a k e n a n d we are p l a n n i n g t o establish priorities for refurnishing and remodeling h o u s i n g u n i t s over a five year period." S O M E O F t h e p r o p o s e d changes, f i n a n c e s p e r m i t t i n g , i n c l u d e replacing or r e p a i r i n g f u r n i t u r e , c a r p e t i n g , p r o v i s i o n of private lounge areas a n d k i t c h e n e t t e s as well as s t u d y a n d t y p i n g r o o m s . The report pointed out the immediate need . f o r u p g r a d i n g the lounge f u r n i s h i n g s in m a n y resid e n c e halls. " W o m e n in P h e l p s Hall have r e q u e s t e d t h e use of s o m e s t u d e n t r o o m s for f l o o r lounges. T h i s need is p a r t i c u l a r l y critical since the b a s e m e n t area is used a l m o s t entirely b y t h e a r t d e p a r t m e n t and t h e public l o u n g e , d u e t o the p r o x i m a t e l o c a t i o n of t h e main dining hall, is used b y m a n y stud e n t s n o t r e s i d i n g in P h e l p s , " Ms. K i p p said. S H E S A I D t h a t c o n d i t i o n and i n v e n t o r y f o r m s are b e i n g s e n t to all r e s i d e n c e hall a n d c o t t a g e staff to provide f e e d b a c k o n the a m o u n t a n d t y p e of r e m o d e l i n g n e e d e d . T h e h o u s i n g r e p o r t also s t a t e d t h a t , f o r t h e m o s t p a r t , last y e a r ' s s h i f t s in h o u s i n g w h i c h att e m p t e d t o s e x u a l l y i n t e g r a t e the c a m p u s have w o r k e d o u t well. Charles Morris, h e a d r e s i d e n t of D u r f e e Hall believes t h a t m e n e n j o y living in D u r f e e ' s a t m o s p h e r e . Morris said t h a t " t h e size is g o o d - l a r g e e n o u g h t o create diversity y e t small e n o u g h s o t h a t no o n e gets lost in t h e c r o w d . " He i n d i c a t e d , h o w e v e r , t h a t imp r o v e m e n t s w e r e n e e d e d in the m a i n l o u n g e f u r n i s h i n g s a n d carpet as well as u p k e e p in general.

ACCORDING T O the Housing R e p o r t "all r e a c t i o n s t o t h e Kollen Hall living s i t u a t i o n have b e e n p o s i t i v e . " It states, " T h e r e is a great deal of i m p r o m p t u activity involving b o t h m e n a n d w o m e n in the lounge and public a r e a s conversation, studying, watching T V , singing, p l a y i n g musical ins t r u m e n t s a n d card p l a y i n g . " " T h e r e is also a higher p e r c e n t age of r o o m visitation in Kollen t h a n in a n y o t h e r residence hall, with o n l y a f e w r e p o r t e d violations, it a d d s . " T o m Bos, h e a d r e s i d e n t at Kollen, r e i t e r a t e d t h e need f o r b e t t e r l o u n g e f u r n i s h i n g s . Bos said, " t h e lounge d e f i n i t e l y needs more f u r n i t u r e . " C O M M E N T I N G O N the situat i o n in t h e K n i c k H o u s e , Ms. K i p p said, " w o m e n have f o u n d living t h e r e a m i x e d blessing. A l t h o u g h t h e y f i n d it a good place t o live, t h e noise f r o m t h e f r a t e r n i t y c o m plex a n d Kollen Hall p a r k i n g lot is d i s r u p t i v e . " A c c o r d i n g t o Ms. K i p p , a l m o s t o n e - t h i r d of t h e hall r e s i d e n t s m o v e d o u t at t h e end of fall s e m e s t e r . A l t h o u g h n o f u r t h e r changes in h o u s i n g are p l a n n e d f o r n e x t y e a r , t h e possibility of s e t t i n g aside o n e residence t o p r o v i d e singles f o r b o t h m e n a n d w o m e n is b e i n g discussed. T h i s w o u l d m e e t an o f t e n - e x p r e s s e d r e q u e s t of stud e n t s f o r single r o o m s . A T P R E S E N T , p a r t of Z w e m e r is available t o m e n , b u t there h a s n o t b e e n a n y space o n c a m p u s d e s i g n a t e d as single r o o m h o u s i n g f o r w o m e n unless o c c u p a n c y is d o w n . A c c o r d i n g t o Associate Dean of S t u d e n t s , Michael G e r r i e , college h o u s i n g p o l i c y f o r n e x t year will r e m a i n t h e same as in previous years. S t u d e n t s will b e e x p e c t e d t o live o n c a m p u s , unless married or living at h o m e . E x c e p t i o n s will be g r a n t e d p r o v i d i n g all o n - c a m p u s

r e s i d e n c e s are filled. P r e f e r e n c e will be given t o seniors. " L a s t year, when housing contracts were issued, a l m o s t a n y s e n i o r w h o m a d e a r e q u e s t was allowed t o live o f f c a m p u s , " Gerrie s t a t e d . HE SAID that the total numb e r of s t u d e n t s living in n o n c a m p u s h o u s i n g is a r o u n d 5 6 0 , a little over o n e - f o u r t h of t h e college p o p u l a t i o n . " T h a t n u m b e r will p r o b a b l y s t a y a b o u t t h e s a m e n e x t y e a r , " he a d d e d . According t o Gerrie, cottages have b e e n steadily increasing in p o p u l a r i t y and are a m o n g t h e most frequent choices on housing c o n t r a c t s . H o w e v e r , m a n y of t h e c o t t a g e s s u c h as Mandeville, have plagued the . occupants with cracked plaster, p o o r plumbing a n d c h i p p e d p a i n t and c o n t i n u e d use of t h e m m a y n o t be feasible. He also expressed c o n c e r n f o r t h e lack of h o u s i n g f o r married c o u p l e s o n H o p e ' s c a m p u s and h i n t e d t h a t a residence f o r married s t u d e n t s m a y b e c o m e a reality in t h e n o t - t o o - d i s t a n t f u t u r e .

H o p e s t u d e n t s have l o n g fostered t h e m y t h a b o u t f e l l o w collegians a b a n d o n i n g their college c a m p u s like l e m m i n g s r u n n i n g in an e x o d u s t o t h e sea. COUNTERING THIS unfounded belief at t h e s e m e s t e r ' s beginning, Registrar J o n H u i s k e n released a r e p o r t w h i c h set the attrition rate among entering f r e s h m e n at 4 0 p e r c e n t . T h i s figure is well b e l o w t h e n a t i o n a l average f o r f o u r - y e a r colleges, estimated to be 50 percent. A statistical p r o f i l e of t h e n o n returning student indicates that t h e p e r s o n is p r e d o m i n a n t l y female, 19 y e a r s o l d , p r o b a b l y t r a n s f e r i n g t o s o m e o t h e r college or university w i t h o u t having declared his or h e r m a j o r . T H E S T U D E N T h a s g o o d acad e m i c s t a n d i n g , possesses high s c h o o l a n d H o p e g r a d e p o i n t aver-

Family Planning Clinics deal with birth control

i

T H E O T T A W A C o u n t y Health D e p a r t m e n t has t w o federally f u n d e d F a m i l y P l a n n i n g Clinics in H o l l a n d . T h e clinics are h e l d every second and f o u r t h M o n d a y from 2-5:30 p.m. Ms. l o n a T r a p p , h e a d of t h e clinics, s t a t e d t h a t " e d u c a t i o n is t h e k e y t o t h e p r o g r a m . O u r aim is n o t j u s t t o pass o u r pills o r o t h e r f o r m s of b i r t h c o n t r o l , b u t t o h e l p w o m e n as p e r s o n s . We care a b o u t t h e w o m a n ' s m a t e r n a l h e a l t h as well as t h e size of h e r family," she a d d e d . T h e clinic b e g a n J u l y 1, 1972 and serves a n y o n e 18 y e a r s o r older that can't find or afford services e l s e w h e r e . F o r w o m e n u n d e r a g e , unless t h e y iire p r e g n a n t , p a r e n t a l c o n s e n t is r e q u i r e d . T W E N T Y a p p o i n t m e n t s are s c h e d u l e d f o r e a c h clinic. A d d e d t o T u e s d a y ' s s c h e d u l e is t h e issu•

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ing of s u p p l i e s . " A l t h o u g h t h e pill is t h e m o s t p o p u l a r f o r m of b i r t h c o n t r o l , " Ms. T r a p p e x p l a i n e d , " w e also issue t h r e e t y p e s of intrauterine devices, c o n d o m s , f o a m and d i a p h r a m s . " T h e clinic also provides c o u n seling services, p r e g n a n c y t e s t s and a n s w e r s q u e s t i o n s a b o u t b i r t h c o n t r o l . " I f a p e r s o n desires an a b o r t i o n we can r e f e r t h e m t o a clinic o r h o s p i t a l w h e r e a b o r t i o n s are p e r f o r m e d " , she said. " W e encourage the w o m e n to make their o w n decisions, however." T H E F A M I L Y P l a n n i n g Clinic has o n e m e d i c a l d o c t o r a n d an advisor. T w o o t h e r clinics are loc a t e d in G r a n d H a v e n . F r o m J a n . 1 t o S e p t . 1, 1 , 0 0 0 visits w e r e r e c o r d e d at t h e O t t a w a C o u n t y clinic. Ms. T r a p p a d d s , " T h e aim f o r *72 is t o d o u b l e t h e number."

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U G H ! — E m e r s o n i a n S c o t t P e n n i n g smears, s t u f f s and s l o b b e r s his w a y t o v i c t o r y in t h e pie eating c o n t e s t h e l d last T h u r s d a y in Phelps dining hall. T h e c o n t e s t was part of last w e e k ' s Winter Carnival s p o n s o r e d b y t h e S t u d e n t Activity C o m m i t t e e .

College renters protected Hope's o f f - c a m p u s dwellers n o w s h a k e p o w e r f u l fists over t h e h e a d s of t h e i r l a n d l o r d s . G O V E R N O R William G. Millik e n ' s J g n . 9 signing of a n e w Landlord-Tenant Bill was acc e n t e d b y his p r o c l a m a t i o n of t h e bill as " a m a j o r b r e a k t h r o u g h in establishing and protecting tenant rights." Though the bill m a k e s a n u m b e r of c h a n g e s in t h e Michigan lease law, t h e m o s t significant is in t h e area of security d e p o s i t s . T h e n e w law limits t h e use of security deposits to "actual dam-

Reasons for attrition cited ages of 2.5 t o 3.0 and has c o m pleted 25 t o 5 0 credit h o u r s . Fifty-six women students t r a n s f e r r e d in . 1 9 7 1 - 7 2 to o t h e r a c a d e m i c i n s t i t u t i o n s . Leaving f o r diverse reasons, special p r o g r a m s not available at H o p e (nursing, special e d u c a t i o n , e t c . ) were t h e m a i n criteria f o r t r a n s f e r . Marriage, a c a d e m i c p r o b l e m s and "general dissatisfaction" were n e x t in t h a t o r d e r . T W E N T Y - F I V E MEN s t u d e n t s also t r a n s f e r r e d t o o t h e r institut i o n s last y e a r . N o n - e x i s t e n t special p r o g r a m s , f i n a n c i a l d i f f i c u l ties, a c a d e m i c p r o b l e m s and " a t t e n d i n g college closer t o h o m e " were t h e r e a s o n s o b t a i n e d . S e a r c h i n g f o r u n d e r l y i n g reasons f o r t h i s p h e n o m e n o n w h i c h o c c u r s e a c h y e a r , t h e O f f i c e of E d u c a t i o n a l R e s e a r c h in 1 9 7 0 released t h e Myers-Bishop r e p o r t . In it, a survey given t o 2 3 2 r a n d o m students indicated two pat-

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New bill signed

Why students leave b y Dirk B l o e m e n d a a l

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t e r n s of response w h i c h c o m pared t h o s e staying and t h o s e leaving. F I R S T , S T U D E N T S indicating they might not return reported f e w e r c o n t a c t s and f r i e n d s h i p s w i t h f a c u l t y . T h e Myers-Bishop report tentatively concluded that intimate faculty-student contact r e d u c e s t h e l i k e l i h o o d of a s t u d e n t ' s leaving t h e college and t h a t g r e a t e r f a c u l t y interest in advisees a n d s t u d e n t s o u t s i d e of class is needed. Secondly, potential transfers were f o u n d t o be m o r e liberal a n d divergent f r o m t h e college in their value o r i e n t a t i o n s . T h e y were less likely t o be m e m b e r s of t h e Ref o r m e d C h u r c h ( 3 8 vs. 5 3 perc e n t ) , less likely t o o p p o s e a d o p t i o n of p a r i e t a l h o u r s (eight vs. 22 p e r c e n t ) , m o r e likely t o feel t h e college s h o u l d n o t " c o n t i n u e t o be a church related institution" ( 3 9 vs. 16 p e r c e n t ) and m o r e likely t o agree t h a t " t h i s college exercises t o o m u c h a u t h o r i t y over s t u d e n t life o u t s i d e t h e classr o o m " ( 8 9 vs. 69 p e r c e n t ) . In addition, transfering students w e r e less likely t o believe t h a t " J e s u s C h r i s t is t h e Divine S o n of G o d " ( 6 2 vs. 7 9 p e r c e n t ) , m o r e likely t o h a v e not " a t t e n d e d n o n r e q u i r e d religious services in t h e past f o u r m o n t h s " ( 4 7 vs. 25 p e r c e n t ) and less likely t o believe t h a t b l a c k s s h o u l d b e m o r e pat i e n t ( 3 5 vs. 51 p e r c e n t ) . P e r h a p s t h e m o s t striking asp e c t of t h e survey was t h e indicat i o n of m o r e dissatisfaction w i t h t h e social t h a n t h e a c a d e m i c envir o n m e n t . T w e n t y - t w o p e r c e n t rep o r t e d t h a t H o p e ' s a c a d e m i c envir o n m e n t " i s n o t as g o o d as I had e x p e c t e d " while 5 3 p e r c e n t res p o n d e d t h a t t h e social e n v i r o n m e n t w a s n o t as g o o d as e x p e c t e d .

Join the anchor and share the blame

ages t h a t are t h e direct result of conduct not reasonably expected in t h e n o r m a l course of h a b i t a t i o n " o r f o r back r e n t a n d u n p a i d utilities. T H E L A N D L O R D is also required t o f u r n i s h t h e t e n a n t w i t h an i n v e n t o r y checklist so t h a t existing d a m a g e s m a y be n o t e d b e f o r e t h e t e n a n t m o v e s in. Daily p h o n e calls c h e e r f u l l y r e m i n d i n g t e n a n t s t h a t their leases have expired will n o longer harass r e n t e r s . T h e L a n d l o r d - T e n a n t Bill requires t e n a n t s t o n o t i f y t h e landlord, in writing, of their new address w i t h i n f o u r d a y s a f t e r t h e t e r m i n a t i o n of t h e lease. Failure to provide a forwarding address relieves t h e l a n d l o r d of t h e 30-day notice requirement. N O P O R T I O N of t h e s e c u r i t y d e p o s i t m a y be r e t a i n e d by t h e l a n d l o r d unless t h e f o l l o w i n g c o n d i t i o n s o c c u r . First, a l a n d l o r d must o b t a i n a c o u r t o r d e r f o r t h e disputed amount. Secondly, the l a n d l o r d m u s t prove t h a t he cannot o b t a i n services f o r t h e t e n a n t . If t h e t e n a n t leaves n o f o r w a r d i n g address or if t h e r e n t e r does n o t r e s p o n d t o n o t i c e of d a m a g e s t h e l a n d l o r d also m a y k e e p t h e deposit. If t h e l a n d l o r d fails t o c o m p l y

with this section of t h e law, t h e t e n a n t m a y recover d o u b l e the a m o u n t of the s e c u r i t y d e p o s i t retained. O T H E R protective measures c o n c e r n i n g security d e p o s i t s are t h a t t h e y can no longer be for m o r e t h a n o n e a n d one-half m o n t h s ' r e n t . In a d d i t i o n , d e p o s i t m o n i e s m u s t be placed in regulated financial i n s t i t u t i o n s . If t h e l a n d l o r d desires t o use the m o n i e s , he must secure a surety b o n d a c c e p t a b l e t o t h e A t t o r n e y General and d e p o s i t e d with t h e Secretary of S t a t e . " T H I S BILL represents a major b r e a k t h r o u g h in establishing and p r o t e c t i n g t e n a n t r i g h t s , " Milliken said. " F o r t h e first t i m e in Michigan, r e n t e r s are given s u b s t a n t i a l rights n o t previously w r i t t e n i n t o law. T h e law establishes a clear r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n l a n d l o r d and t e n a n t , and is a m a j o r s t e p forward in state c o n s u m e r legislation. " I t s e n a c t m e n t r e p r e s e n t s extensive bipartisan legislative w o r k that will be of p a r t i c u l a r significance t o college c o m m u n i t i e s and u r b a n a r e a s , " he a d d e d . T h e new law t a k e s e f f e c t April 1 and applies t o all leases e n t e r e d i n t o , r e n e w e d or r e - n e g o t i a t e d after that date.

Students get boost in aid; Mich, tuition grants hiked by Chris Liggett A c c o r d i n g t o d i r e c t o r of f i n a n cial aid, Bruce H i m e b a u g h , stud e n t s n o w receiving f i n a n c i a l aid f r o m t h e state of Michigan can e x p e c t a raise in their g r a n t s e f f e c tive J u l y 1, 1 9 7 3 . Himebaugh stated that there will be a raise in Michigan t u i t i o n g r a n t s f r o m a m a x i m u m of $ 8 0 0 t o $ 1 2 0 0 per y e a r . G o v . William Milliken signed a bill early t h i s year t o a p p r o v e raises in g r a n t s . P r e s e n t l y , t h e r e is a bill b e f o r e t h e Michigan S e n a t e t h a t w o u l d

give t h e s a m e $ 1 2 0 0 m a x i m u m t o t h o s e s t u d e n t s w h o have w o n a Michigan C o m p e t i t i v e Scholarship. H i m e b a u g h h o p e d t h a t this bill w o u l d b e passed, " W e e x p e c t t o begin n e x t y e a r w i t h Michigan g r a n t s and scholarships at $ 1 2 0 0 , " he said. H e stressed t h a t t h e applicat i o n s f o r Michigan aid m u s t b e in by March 2. Materials s h o u l d have already b e e n sent t o t h e s t u d e n t ' s h o m e a n d f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t s are available at t h e f i n a n c i a l aid o f fice. T h e a p p l i c a t i o n d e a d l i n e is May 1 a n d s h o u l d be s e n t to t h e College S c h o l a r s h i p Service.

This Wednesday is VALENTINE'S DAY! Come in and see our selection of valentines, cards and stationary. Also...

SUPER POSTER SALE ANY POSTER IN THE STORE FOR ONLY 50c Offer good only until Sat. the 17th

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February 9 , 1 9 7 3

Hope College anchor

Four

Intramural Politics In the face of widespread rumors regarding the circumstances surrounding the resignations of Ervin and McBride, Ed Ervin with the expressed consent of President Gordon Van Wylen has released the following statement: "Dr. Van Wylen and I have discussed the matter of my resignation at length. We both agree that this matter requires further study before either of us wish to issue any further comments." Through all available channels, the anchor has gathered enough in-

editorials formation regarding this incident to raise certain questions. Van Wylen, in his Feb. 5 memorandum to the faculty, stated that " . . . the chairman's recommendation was to go to the Status Committee in accordance with the usual procedure, and the faculty members would have the right to appeal the decision of the Status Committee to the Professional Interest Committee. However, the faculty members after being informed of the department chairman's decision, submitted their resignations." Anonymous sources revealed to the anchor that this may not have been entirely accurate. The sources disclosed that if McBride and Ervin did indeed withhold their resignations and appeal the decisions through the proper channels, a letter from the administration would be sent to them requesting their resignations. The implication here is that if the letter were sent, it would appear on their record where future employers would view it unfavorable. If, however, the two resigned immediately their records would remain unblemished. The anchor is not in the position to accuse anyone or place blame irresponsibly, but asks Van

Wylen to answer the question: was there pressure to resign? In Ervin and Van Wylen's statement to the anchor, a "further study" was mentioned as necessary before any final decision would be made. Van Wylen ought to reveal to the campus community the exact nature of a "further study." Does it mean presenting Norton's recommendation to the Status Committee, or does it mean that Van Wylen is delaying action in view of mounting tensions? Van Wylen should answer the question: what is the status of Ervin's resignation? Another matter indirectly involving Ervin and McBride concerns the power of the department chairman. All indicators from Van Wylen point to his placing a strong emphasis on the opinion of the department chairman. While the department chairman may head the hierarchical structure in certain fields, i.e., natural sciences; in other academic areas the chairman is not necessarily the foremost authority or power figure. Even if the chairman were a de facto leader of the department, this does not guarantee that his recommendations will be void of any personal biases. Van Wylen should answer the question: how influential is the department chairman? Finally, the college awaits an explanation of what Van Wylen means by his statements regarding "the standards of excellence." This term is vague and ought to be nailed down to a workable criteria. Many faculty members have expressed their concern over the rumor that they must "publish or perish." This also warrants an answer. The anchor raises these questions so that the college community might attain more honest interaction. No college president can afford to turn his back on the above questions and still maintain his credibility as the campus leader.

Insinuendos Although President Gordon Van Wylen wants to "avoid any tendency to respond to issues raised by the anchor", as stated in his Feb. 5 memorandum to the faculty, certain statements and allegations made in that memo require a response on our part. First, in all due fairness, the anchor apologizes to Hope accountant Warren Faloon for quoting him on financial and administrative policies in last week's issue of the anchor. Faloon, "who has worked for the college for about four months," was not in a position to comment on administrative policy. This, however, does not invalidate Faloon's statements, which were accurate. Van Wylen also commented on the article in last week's issue of the anchor written by Ms. Lois Atherley. He stressed the point that he never met Ms. Atherley and "that she receivecf *ier information second hand." Although the author of an article is usually the interviewer, in this case Associate Editor Dave De Kok interviewed Van Wylen and supplied accurate quotes for Ms. Atherley's article. He also reviewed and edited her article before publication to insure the statement's credibility and validity of context. If the article sounded

one-sided, it was not intentional. Due to the hostility and unwillingness of Norman Norton, chairman of the biology department, to speak to the anchor, his side was not able to be heard as well as Ervin's and McBride's. One other accusation deserves an answer. It is the inference by Van Wylen that Nona Kipp, associate dean of students, was either misquoted or quoted out of context. The anchor refutes these innuendos completely. Ms. Kipp's comments were both in context and one hundred percent accurate. She also left many of the Student Conduct Committee members shocked and dismayed at her emotional outburst, when she discovered that anchor Editor Peter Brown was recording her statements. The anchor's only response to Van Wylen is that he should have spoken to other members of the committee besides one obviously emotional administrator before mentioning any "error" on the part of the anchor. The editorial staff of the anchor prides itself on objective, honest journalism. Thus, the anchor stands behind last week's issue. The policy of the anchor is not to act as a public relations sheet for Hope College but 'orum for campus issues.

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The crisis clinic by Art Buchwald Copyright Š 1 9 7 2 , Los Angeles Times Syndicate

WASHINGTON-It is n o t generally k n o w n , but whenever n e w s p a p e r m e n in Washington run o u t of things to write a b o u t t h e y go to a small store a few blocks f r o m t h e White House k n o w n as " C h a r l e y ' s Crisis S h o p . " T H E O W N E R , Charley B u m m e r , has been peddling crises in t h e n a t i o n ' s capital for nearly 50 years. I w e n t to visit h i m the o t h e r d a y , as I usually d o w h e n things get quiet.. ' "Having a close-out sale o n V i e t n a m crises," Charley said. " Y o u can grab a n y one o n the table f o r $ 1 . 9 5 . As soon as the POWs have r e t u r n e d h o m e , y o u ' r e n o t going to be able t o give away a V i e t n a m crisis." " T H E N WHY should I b u y o n e ? " I asked. " A n y t h i n g o n V i e t n a m could be a collector's item." " F r a n k l y , Charley, I ' m not looking f o r bargains. I'd like a real 18-carat crisis f o r m y c o l u m n , " I said. " W E L L , WHY d i d n ' t y o u say s o ? " Charley replied. " I ' v e got s o m e t h i n g in the w i n d o w t h a t ' s been o n e of t h e h o t t e s t sellers in m o n t h s . It's an Energy Crisis. E v e r y o n e has b o u g h t i t - t h e New Y o r k Times, The Washington Post, CBS News, T i m e , Newsweek. I can't k e e p it in s t o c k . " " I t looks p r e t t y g o o d , " I said, inspecting it. " H o w long d o y o u t h i n k it will last?" " I T ' S G U A R A N T E E D f o r six m o n t h s , and we'll replace any parts if it d o e s n ' t fly." " T h a t ' s t h e big crisis of t h e m o n t h ? " 1 asked. " I T ' S T H E best I've got. T h e n e x t most p o p u l a r item is t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n a l Crisis." Charley t o o k o n e out of a glass case and held it u p to the light. " T h i s crisis is b e t w e e n Congress and t h e President. As

y o u can see, t h e executive b r a n c h k e e p s whittling a w a y at congressional p o w e r s . " " I t d o e s n ' t l o o k very n e w , " I observed. " O F C O U R S E it isn't n e w , " Charley said i n d i g n a n t l y . " I t ' s an a n t i q u e . But t h e r e ' s a big d e m a n d n o w f o r this kind of crisis. It had b e e n sitting o n t h e shelf and I h a d n ' t had a single call f o r o n e in 25 years. But in less t h a n t w o m o n t h s I've had o r d e r s f o r 30, a n d t h e y d o n ' t care w h a t it c o s t s . " "Who's 'they'?" "Political c o l u m n i s t s and editorial writers. N o w t h a t t h e U n i t e d States is g e t t i n g out of V i e t n a m , t h e c o l u m n i s t s and editorial p e o p l e f i n d themselves d e s p e r a t e l y short o n crises w h i c h t h e y have to s u p p l y their readers every d a y . " " W O U L D Y O U say n e w s p a p e r m e n are having a 'Crisis Crisis'?" I asked. " I d o n ' t k n o w if it's reached crisis p r o p o r t i o n s , " Charley said. " D o n ' t f o r g e t , we still have t h e Middle East, air and w a t e r p o l l u t i o n , t h e flu and t h e g o v e r n m e n t credibility crises. These k e e p selling n o matter what happens. " B U T W H E R E people in m y business have b e e n h u r t , " Charley c o n t i n u e d , " i s w h e n s o m e u n s c r u p u l o u s dealers have b e e n pushing p h o n y crises t h a t d o n ' t hold u p , so n o w t h e c o n s u m e r is b e c o m i n g w a r y of a n y t h i n g called crisis." An editorial writer c a m e i n t o the s t o r e . " C h a r l e y , " h e said, " I need a crisis f o r m y next S u n d a y ' s piece. Y o u have a n y t h i n g t h a t ' s a little d i f f e r e n t ? " " I ' V E G O T a S u p r e m e C o u r t Crisis on O b s c e n i t y , " C h a r l e y said! "I just got it fresh in this m o r n i n g . " " O k a y , I'll t a k e it with m e , " t h e editorial writer said. " Y O U W A N T it gift w r a p p e d ? " Charley asked. " N o , j u s t give it to m e in a plain b r o w n wrapper."

â&#x20AC;˘ope college

anchor

lOLLAND, MICHIGAN Ml(

Published d u r i n g t h e college year e x c e p t vacation, h o l i d a y and e x a m i n a t i o n p e r i o d s b y and f o r t h e s t u d e n t s of H o p e College, H o l l a n d , Michigan, u n d e r t h e a u t h o r i t y of t h e S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t t e e . S u b s c r i p t i o n price: $7 per year. Printed by t h e C o m p o s i n g R o o m , G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. M e m b e r , A s s o c i a t e d Collegiate Press, U n i t e d S t a t e s S t u d e n t Press Association. O f f i c e l o c a t e d o n g r o u n d floor of Graves Hall. T e l e p h o n e 3 9 2 - 5 1 1 1 , E x t e n s i o n 2 3 0 1 a n d 2 2 8 5 . T h e o p i n i o n s o n this page are n o t necessarily t h o s e of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , f a c u l t y o r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of H o p e College.

Editor Associate Editor News Editor Copy Editor Editorial Assistant

Peter Brown Dave DeKok Paul Timmer JXrk Bloemendaal Gary Gray


Five

Hope College anchor

anchor review

Roszak seeks return to more humanistic society Editor's note: this week's anchor review is w r i t t e n by junior psychology major Paul Bach. He reviews Where the Wasteland Ends, by Theodore Roszak (Doubleday and Co. $9.95).

be placed at t h e dictates of h u m a n and spiritual g r o w t h , in t h e n a m e and f o r t h e p u r p o s e of increased human community. Technology should not d i c t a t e t h a t g r o w t h o r f o r m t h e limits of t h a t c o m m u nity.

T h e o d o r e Roszak h a s a strange tale t o tell in his new b o o k Where the Wasteland Ends. He is not a sociologist, or an e c o n o m i s t o r any discernable " - i s t . " His message is simple and familiar. Society h a s gone t o o far in its search for objective t r u t h and u l t i m a t e happiness through technology. T H E TIME has c o m e f o r a reversal, a r e t u r n to t h a t which is more h u m a n t o believe in t h a n a c o m p u t e r , m o r e b e a u t i f u l to l o o k at t h a n industrial w a s t e . R o s z a k ' s lack of professional credentials ( a n d p r e t e n s i o n s ) is at once the w e a k n e s s and the strength of his a r g u m e n t s . While the a r g u m e n t a t i o n is definitely one-sided and t h e empirical e x a m ples chosen with a bias, R o s z a k ' s singularity of p u r p o s e allows a u n i t a r y insight and f e r v o r in argumentation. T O BE O B J E C T I V E would be self-defeating. R o s z a k ' s plea is n o t for a m o r e explicit analysis of t h e p r o b l e m s and alternatives. It is a plea t o wrench the test tube f r o m the c e n t e r of t h e universe and reinstate m a n - m a n the creator, not m a n the m a n i p u l a t o r . It can be o b j e c t e d t h a t Roszak ignores progress (if t h a t word still m e a n s a n y t h i n g ) and t h e easing of human suffering which technology has facilitated. While an international military technology aimed at m e g a - d e a t h has m a d e peace seem as far a w a y as ever, the massive i n f o r m a t i o n storage and retrieval capacities of c o m plex c o m p u t e r s y s t e m s and t h e instant c o m m u n i c a t i o n which is possible world-wide have also m a d e peace as possible as it has ever b e e n . F U R T H E R , R O S Z A K fails t o m e n t i o n that t h e centralization of p o w e r in the h a n d s of t e c h n o l o g y t h r o u g h o u t t h e world increases the s u p e r f l u i t y of political a n d geographic d e m a r c a t i o n s - w i t n e s s the r e p o r t t h a t t h e Russians were willing to m a k e s o m e m i n o r political concessions f o r a Pepsi-Cola f r a n c h i s e b e h i n d t h e iron c u r t a i n . (Caveat emptor). But such o b j e c t i o n s do n o t so m u c h damage R o s z a k ' s thesis as do t h e y a u g m e n t it. T h e point is not t h a t m o d e r n technocracy m u s t be d e s t r o y e d in favor of paleolithic t r i b a l i s m . R a t h e r , t h a t t e c h n o l o g y w h i c h is at h a n d m u s t

IT C A N A L S O be p o i n t e d o u t t h a t , like so m a n y o t h e r social analysts, Roszak defines t h e p r o b lems of society quite p r o p e r l y , but fails t o provide an intelligible alternative. - H e seems to c o n t e n d t h a t t h e s o l u t i o n resides o n t h e o t h e r side of inevitability and just this side of individual actualization, self-realization and good old personal g r o w t h . . But p e r h a p s Roszak again displays a bit of his perverse w i s d o m . Were a d e f i n i t e b l u e p r i n t provided, it could d o u b t l e s s be squelched by the academicindustrial brain bank as u n w o r k able. An o t h e r w i s e readable and significant analysis of s o c i e t y ' s

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t i o n of t h e excess that t e c h n o l o g y has advertised and sold t o the Western w o r l d , he is t o o verbose. F O U R H U N D R E D f i f t y pages is a lot of b o o k , and o n e is never q u i t e convinced t h a t t h e e f f o r t t o wade t h r o u g h it was w o r t h the e f f o r t . But t h a t is t r u e of t o o m u c h t o d a y a n d , a f t e r all, the $ 9 . 9 5 price tag has t o b e justified by D o u b l e d a y in s o m e m a n n e r . But even if R o s z a k ' s virtues d o n o t include o b j e c t i v i t y , brevity or a degree in social engineering, his message rings t r u e with w h a t m o s t of us k n e w , or h o p e d w e k n o w , all the t i m e . A B U R G E O N I N G desire f o r the t r u t h , as well as m o r e physical c o m f o r t and security h a s spawned a massive and p o w e r f u l science which provides the raw data for a t e c h n o l o g y hell-bent on e c o n o m i c g r o w t h and progress. This drive f o r e c o n o m i c success has placed d e m a n d s on b o t h every individual of society and the t o t a l social e n v i r o n m e n t so that b o t h the individual and t h e e n v i r o n m e n t are unrecognizable as what t h e y were even 50 years ago. R a t h e r t h a n serve t h e p u r p o s e s of t r u t h and progress, this new t e c h n o c r a c y has a c c u m u l a t e d econ o m i c and political p o w e r to the e x t e n t that h u m a n existence is willfully m e c h a n i z e d , m a n is corp o r a t e l y ripped f r o m t h e n a t u r e f r o m which he evolved and t h a t n a t u r e is ignorantly d e s t r o y e d . Y E A T S PUT it best when he w r o t e , " T h i n g s fall a p a r t , the center c a n n o t hold . . . t h e best lack all conviction while t h e worst are full of c e r t a i n t y . " T h e answer does n o t reside in Weinerian cybernetics, McLuhanesque worldc o m m u n i t y or a Fullerian superworld t h r o u g h m o r e p o w e r f u l t e c h n o l o g y . O n e does n o t t h r o w a d r o w n i n g man a glass of w a t e r .

desperate position would t h e n be rendered impotent. F U R T H E R , IF an organic solution is to be f o u n d , w o u l d n ' t it be a bit p r e s u m p t u o u s to prognosticate w h a t t h a t solution should be b e f o r e t h e actual m e m b e r s of a solution-seeking c o m m u n i t y are themselves involved in t h e process? T h e final p r o b l e m w i t h t h e work is its length. A l t h o u g h Roszak is u n q u a l i f i e d l y on-target in his analysis, and more t h a n d e f t in his case f o r a r e t u r n t o t h e fulfillment of basic emotionalspiritual h u m a n needs and a nega-

Ms. Bates to perform senior recital Friday S o p r a n o C y n t h i a Bates will p r e s e n t her senior recital F r i d a y , F e b . 9, at 8 : 1 5 p . m . in Wichers Auditorium. She will be a c c o m p a n i e d by harpsichordist-pianist Janet K o o l haas, a senior f r o m Holland, and clarinetist T h o m Working, a 1969 g r a d u a t e of H o p e f r o m H o l l a n d . Ms. Bates has appeared f r e q u e n t l y in c o n c e r t and musical p r o d u c t i o n s including West Side Story in M u s k e g o n , as a w i n n e r of the H o p e C o n c e r t o - A r i a c o n t e s t last spring, and was heard in t h e college's fall p r o d u c t i o n of t h e Beggar's Opera. S h e will also be h e a r d in Cyrano de Bergerac in March.

Her program will include Alessandro Scarlatti's C h a m b e r Solo Cantata, " Q u a n d o non e Ferirmi," and S c h u b e r t ' s " T h e S h e p h e r d on the R o c k " f o r voice, p i a n o and clarinet. S h e will sing t h r e e songs by H u g o Wolf, R e y n a l d o H a h n ' s " L ' H e u r e E x q u i s e , " and Delibes' " L e s Filles des C a d i x . " She will present Puccini's aria, " I n quelle trine Morbide" from Manon Lescaut, as well as five c o n t e m porary art songs. Ms. Bates, a vocal e d u c a t i o n m a j o r , has studied voice with Mrs. Margaret S h e r m a n and is currently a s t u d e n t of J o y c e Morrison, assistant professor of music.

Doonesbury

Gary Trudeau

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Dead wood falls by Paul Boddy Spiro Agnew is n o f u n since he decided t h a t he is presidential t i m b e r . T h e old Agnew was a c o n s t a n t delight \tfith his flair f o r coining a phrase, his t a l e n t f o r slicing a golf ball and his u n c a n n y ability t o fit his size 11 f o o t into his ever a r t i c u l a t e m o u t h . T H E P R E S I D E N T has m a d e his lack of confid e n c e in Agnew p e r f e c t l y clear by relieving him of his d u t i e s as liaison t o s t a t e and city g o v e r n m e n t s . If t h e President sees himself as King R i c h a r d , surely he envisions Agnew as t h e c o u r t jester. If Agnew s h o p e s of b e c o m i n g President in 1 9 7 6 are realized, it will be his best and biggest j o k e . T h e Winter Carnival p a r t y was a smashing success and so was t h r o w i n g pies at t h e c a m p u s n o t o r i o u s .

C L I F F ' S N O T E S C O S T a dollar each (unabridged p a p e r b a c k versions o f t e n sell for less) and c a n n o t be read in less t h a n an h o u r . Many H o p e s t u d e n t s are f o r c e d to c h o o s e b e t w e e n b u y i n g t h e boring Cliff's Notes and losing a dollar or reading t h e entire classic in its original f o r m and sacrificing an evening at Skiles.

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I F T H E C O S T U M E S f o r " T h o s e Were T h e D a y s " are a n y i n d i c a t i o n , H o p e i t e s believe that t h e m o b ster and the greaser d o m i n a t e d t h e decades preceding ours. T h e p r e p o n d e r a n c e of w e t h e a d s occasioned one o n l o o k e r t o c o m m e n t , "What is this? A Dean Gerrie look-alike c o n t e s t ? "

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An intellectual w h o watches television is like a d o c t o r w h o s m o k e s cigarettes. A C C O R D I N G T O t w o University of California scientists, t h e preservative s o d i u m nitrate, w h i c h is mixed into s o m e h o t dogs, can cause h e a d a c h e s . Saga hot dogs cause migraines, regardless of their sodium nitrate content. T h i s w e e k ' s s t u d y tip; Cliff's Notes editions of classical literature are unsuitable for t h e serious s t u d e n t . Cliff's Notes d o an injustice by translating the brilliant and e d i f y i n g language of a play like Hamlet i n t o simple s e n t e n c e s w h i c h are dull and sterile.

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which remain inarticulable in all of m a n k i n d which can and should direct t h e ongoing tool-making, thought-thinking, thing-doing practices of m a n . And those non-rational r o o t s can only be t a p p e d individually or in small groups. T h e s u b u r b s and super-highways are n o t the BUT P L A T O has been read as places where t h e y can be f o u n d . saying t h a t t r u t h is t h e only virF r e e d o m is b e c o m i n g an increastue. Such is hardly the case. While ingly silly c o n c e p t intellectually. one looks f o r objective t r u t h in Yet all of us feel ourselves free one m a n n e r , and personal salvaand in c o n t r o l b y s o m e experiention and satisfaction in a n o t h e r , tial, c o m m o n - s e n s e m a n n e r . that does n o t m a k e the one b e t t e r IT IS T H A T c o m m o n - s e n s e , than t h e o t h e r . Man d o e s not live t h a t h u m a n e s s which defies verin a l a b o r a t o r y n o r was h u m a n i t y balization that Roszak c h o o s e s as designed t h e r e . the inevitable foil for t e c h n o c racy. It's a strange sort of tale, b u t T h e r e f o r e , if ( a n d it is this " i f " one that should be read if only f o r which is d e b a t a b l e ) one chooses a its sheer courage. culture which a c c e n t u a t e d those Roszak writes, "We are beaspects of man w h i c h are peculiartween a death and a d i f f i c u l t ly h u m a n , one should n o t look to birth. T h e possibilities are clear t o the artificial thing-makers of techsee. I k n o w which I reject I long nology f o r personal or cultural to see achieved. But I trust t o salvation. n o b o d y ' s o p t i m i s m , n o b o d y ' s deR A T H E R , IT is in t h o s e spirispair. N o t y e t . " tual-mystical r o o t s , t h o s e things

Protagoras said, " M a n is the measure of all t h i n g s , " and Plato disagreed with h i m , d e m a n d i n g some objective d e f i n i t i o n of t r u t h . Western t h o u g h t has never quite recovered. While Plato was right and Protagoras w r o n g , t h e y were talking a b o u t t r u t h .

FHERIW UBBY p.X! SOT we NEU) DYUM FOR you, FOLKS.. .HMH.. Bern

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' A f i N e u o ' s T l M B e R uu â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Happily, there is a solution t o the p r o b l e m . Comic Classics published by Dell relate t h e masterpieces of western c u l t u r e in vivid and p i c t u r e s q u e detail. T h e reading t i m e for Moby Dick is o n l y 15 m i n u t e s . Moby Dick and t h e o t h e r classics ranging f r o m Beowulf t o Huckleberry Finn can provide e n l i g h t e n m e n t and e n j o y m e n t f o r a q u a r t e r .

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Hope College anchor

February 9 . 1 9 7 3

Never on Sunday

Skiles, Pub, Eddie's — "best reason in the world,,," continued

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page 1

L E T ' S T A K E A look inside these three establishments. T h e P u b is a plain, rust-colored building east of the same railroad t r a c k s which bring trains rambling f r o m Chicago t o Muskegon at 10 p . m . each night. P e r h a p s the atm o s p h e r e o u t s i d e seems dingy because of t h e s t r u c t u r e ' s a g e - b u i l t in 1908, and christened the Vanassel H o t e l . T h e sign out f r o n t has undergone n u m e r o u s changes. The Vanassel b e c a m e the Asselton and t h e n t h e M a r q u e t t e , in an e f f o r t to a t t r a c t business f r o m travelers o n t h e then-flourishing Pere Marq u e t t e Railroad. In 1939, the s t r u c t u r e b e c a m e k n o w n as the Hollander Hotel. When Mike and Charlene Von Ins t o o k over in 1962, the couple changed the signboard to The Pub. A L T H O U G H T H E the exterior of their establishment may seen t i m e - w o r n , t h e a t m o s p h e r e changes when one enters into a c o m f o r t a b l e low-ceilinged r o o m , furnished with red-checkered tables. Mike, heavily b e a r d e d , is working t h e bar while Charlene is b o p p i n g f r o m table t o table. The t w o run the business themselves and have hired o n e b a r t e n d e r so they may have s o m e nights o f f . According to Mike, The Pub has served a great n u m b e r of college s t u d e n t s since January of 1972 w h e n the age of m a j o r i t y was lowered, b u t business f r o m t h e college has slackened recently. " T H A T ' S WHY WE'VE been trying to change o u r image to fit the b u s i n e s s m a n , " asserted Mike. "We used t o serve only sausage, hot dogs and corned beef but this

P e r h a p s t h e most novel f e a t u r e a b o u t the bar apart f r o m the air-hockey game in t h e back is its j u k e b o x . Charlene p o i n t e d o u t , "We're p r o u d of it; people give us records f r o m t h e '^O's, 4 40's, and 'SO's, a f f o r d i n g o u r j u k e b o x a most u n i q u e collection. I N D E E D , WITHIN this u n u s u a l record collection are such golden oldies as D a n n y and t h e J u n i o r s ' " A t t h e H o p , " the Coasters' "Three Cool Cats," Chubby Checker's " L e t ' s T w i s t , " and Jerry Lee Lewis' "Whole Lot of Shakin' G o i n g O n . " We r n o w turn to yet - a n o t h e r Holland f i x t u r e - S k i l e s T a v e r n , 154 East Eighth Street. T h e aging tavern, perched on C o l u m b i a facing The S t r i p , appears to have an almost vulturish quality a b o u t it as it surveys its pickings along Holland's main drag. ITS E X T E R I O R is a dirty brick, b r o k e n only by the proclamation S K I L E S T A V E R N on its o u t e r f a c a d e . Owned by the recently divorced Dave and Delores Skiles since 1967, the tavern was f o u n d e d by Dave's f a t h e r , Chester, in 1950. Since t h e n , the drinking establishment has doubled in size, expanding in 1966 by assimilating the grocery store next to it. T w o years ago, Skiles decided to pursue r e s t a u r a n t aspirations. The venture failed as the tavern maintained business f o r only f o u r months. D A V E R E L A T E D , "We specialized in Italian f o o d : lasagna, pizza and t h e like. T r o u b l e was, Holland people d o n ' t go f o r anything new and m y r e s t a u r a n t was

H y n a , stoic figure gracing t h e end of the bar at Skiles, serves as a n o t h e r t y p e of house m o t h e r for her s t u d e n t customers. When the price of beer went u p last year, we still observed our old prices. This year, the breweries t o o k away their breakage allowance. Left out in t h e cold, we had to hike our beer and wine prices." Skiles o f f e r s less variety t h a n the versatile Pub. Relying solely on d r a f t Budweiser s u p p l e m e n t e d by canned Pabst, Schlitz and B u d ,

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Local wage earners gather at Eddie's to escape t h e d o m e s t i c scene and relax w i t h the brew and t h e b o y s . year one can find all sorts of sandwiches on o u r m e n u ; n o hot dogs." T o wash these delicacies d o w n , T h e P u b serves d r a f t F a l s t a f f , Schlitz and Pabst Blue R i b b o n in frosted glasses. Charlene was p r o u d to a n n o u n c e t h a t , "We're soon going to have Andeker on tap." MIXED D R I N K lovers, expecting t h e Pub to o b t a i n a liquor license, may have to wait awhile. L o o k i n g ahead, Charlene s t a t e d , " W e h a v e n ' t applied f o r a license y e t , b u t we plan to file an applicat i o n in the near f u t u r e . At the same time, we are considering e x p a n s i o n very seriously." Wearing her P.O.W. bracelet p r o u d l y , she c o n t i n u e d , "Business has been good e n o u g h to facilitate such a move. We already have s o m e special things going on. F o r instance, every Wednesday The P u b has Italian night when we serve platters of spaghetti, our o w n garlic bread and a glass, of Chianti." T H E PUB IS one Holland bar t h a t d o e s n ' t sell Michigan lottery t i c k e t s . Mike, u n a b l e to speak because of a t h r o a t i n f e c t i o n , scribbled on a P u b n a p k i n , " I t doesn't pay t o h a n d l e t h e tickets. With all t h e work involved, the m o n e y isn't w o r t h t h e t r o u b l e . » »

no e x c e p t i o n . T h e y w a n t e d steaks and c h o p s . " The tavern seats 136 people c o m f o r t a b l y . Does Skiles have any plans for e x p a n s i o n ? Delores answered, "We applied for a Holland liquor license, but it must still go b e f o r e the C i t y Council. If it does go t h r o u g h , we have h o p e s of moving t h e bar against the east wall and filling the e m p t y space with t a b l e s . " H Y N A , V E T E R A N b a r m a i d of 19 years, o f f e r e d her impressions of the trade as of late: " I t ' s been real b u s y , especially on M o n d a y s and Fridays. Since the 18-year old drinking law has gone i n t o e f f e c t , business has d o u b l e d all a r o u n d . " T o handle this u p w a r d t r e n d , Skiles has been hiring more people than e v e r - 1 4 are now on the staff. Five of these e m p l o y e e s are pizza-makers, t w o of t h e m H o p e s t u d e n t s . Delores explained, " N o r mally, we carry more college people, but on vacations we d o n ' t have their help. As a result, we moved away f r o m the practice this y e a r . " S T A N D I N G AT T H E bar beneath the revolving W O R L D CHAMPION CLYDESDALE T E A M l a m p , p u f f i n g on a cigare t t e , she c o n t i n u e d , " M a n y p e o p l e have b e e n asking a b o u r o u r rise in prices. It was a necessary m e a s u r e .

the tavern utilizes a coldline h o o k up (lines running f r o m the taps t o barrels in t h e back r o o m ) . D E L O R E S E X P R E S S E D distaste for the cheaper brew: "I c a n ' t drink d r a f t b e e r ; I get heada c h e s . " She c o n t i n u e d , " F r e q u e n t l y a bar has t r o u b l e with their draft-beer s y s t e m . Once disaster hit us. Dave was on vacation with his new wife and our beer line b r o k e . It was a f l o o d ; we were w i t h o u t d r a f t f o r three d a y s . " Skiles' second-biggest m o n e y m a k e r is pizza. Just last week, the pizza-making facilities were moved f r o m next t o the m e n ' s r o o m to a spanking new k i t c h e n a d j a c e n t to the main r o o m . Delores does the b u y i n g f o r t h e business and a typical o r d e r runs along these lines: " S e n d me 2 5 0 grated cheese, 10 grated v e r m a n o , 80 p o u n d s of pepperoni. . . . H o w ' r e you ridin' on the red peppers, H y n a ? " U N D E R A B o o n e ' s F a r m Wild M o u n t a i n poster rests t h e t a v e r n ' s lone j u k e b o x . N o t used very o f t e n , t h e music-maker c a n n o t be heard in the main r o o m . " A n y h o w , " said Delores, " t h e T V is o n m o s t of t h e t i m e . " A n o t h e r t r a d e of t h e local est a b l i s h m e n t is t h e d i s t r i b u t i o n of l o t t e r y chances. Unlike their c o m p e t i t o r T h e P u b , Dave and De-

lores f i n d it p r o f i t a b l e and e n j o y able dealing in this c o m m o d i t y . T h e y ' v e had 15 winners so far. Delores m o a n e d , " H y n a and 1 haven't won y e t . " H Y N A , T H E gray-haired, matronly b a r m a i d , o f f e r e d some of her c o m m e n t s on the bar business, " O n e t h i n g that really gets me mad is when people try to bring their o w n stuff in here. One guy b o u g h t a six-pack t o take out but sat d o w n at the bar with it. He o p e n e d o n e but b e f o r e he could drink it, 1 grabbed it and poured a full Bud d o w n the drain. Boy, was he m a d , " she c h u c k l e d . H y n a is a very o p i n i o n a t e d lady f o r her years. She professed a clear-cut p r e f e r a n c e f o r the t y p e of people she prefers in Skiles. Growling, she made it perfectly clear, "We d o n ' t want t h e f a c t o r y crowd. T h e y just d o n ' t create a good atmosphere. D o n ' t misu n d e r s t a n d me, t h e y need a place to go t o o . T h e y ' r e just a harderdrinking, rougher-talking b u n c h . " J U S T W H E R E does the bluecollar w o r k e r go for a f e w beers? More t h a n likely, he visits A d a m L e w a k o w s k i , o w n e r of Eddie's bar. E d d i e ' s , an old two-storied one-time f u r n i t u r e building west of A & W, t h r u s t s its n e o n t o n g u e out over eighth street. C o n v e r t e d into a d r i n k i n g establishment in 1946 and o w n e d by a Holland fire chief at one t i m e , the bar is n o w run by L e w a k o w s k i . T H E BAR L E A N S heavily on the transit t r a d e riding past on main street each day. A d a m explained, " T h i s is the first bar people see w h e n they c o m e into t o w n . T h e y ' v e gone past t w o already, East E n d and Skiles but t h e y s t o p in h e r e . " When new c u s t o m e r s do s t o p in, t h e y are likely to see business b o o m i n g at all h o u r s of the day and night. O p e n at 7 : 3 0 a.m. t o serve t h e w o r k e r s c o m i n g off t h e third s h i f t , E d d i e ' s is usually full of retirees and f a c t o r y w o r k e r s in the day. At night, t h e y o u n g e r crowd c o m e s in and in a sense, takes over. ADAM E X P L A I N E D , " T h e r e is a d i f f e r e n t class of people in each bar. T h e East E n d has the Chicanos and Blacks, while Skiles and the Pub serve mainly the younger, white c r o w d . People are like d u c k s , t h e y follow each other." E d d i e ' s serves as a gathering place f o r all types of people. L e w a k o w s k i e x p o u n d e d , "We get the Holland R o a d Knights a f t e r their meetings. S o m e t i m e s we get the Holland Searchers. T h e y get along well; m a n y of t h e m are friends." T H E B A R ' S interior has a redneck, hillbilly a t m o s p h e r e to it. Like a hollow s n a k e , t h e bar itself curves o u t i n t o the r o o m , encircling o n e of five d i f f e r e n t bart e n d e r s and b a r m a i d s . A pale-blue cloud of s m o k e d r i f t s u p i n t o t h e air and f l o a t s t h e r e , f o r m i n g angel rings a r o u n d t h e m e n sipping their

beer. In the corner, a j u k e box twangs out t u n e s by J o h n n y Cash, Loretta Lynn and Lynn Anderson. Amid the d i n , men with slickbacked hair s h o o t pool on a lone table while their c h u b b y , platin u m - b l o n d e girlfriends look over the new arrivals. T H E C O M B I N A T I O N of city and c o u n t r y styles clash. Longhaired Road Knights strut f r o m table t o table talking bikes, places and w o m e n , while their girls d o w n beer a f t e r beer. Many of the girls aren't blonde but are dark-haired, hard-looking things wearing jackets e m b l a z o n e d with the w o r d s " P r o p e r t y of R i c h , " or w h o m e v e r . T h e f a c t o r y workers stay away f r o m the y o u n g e r crowd, p o p p i n g hard-boiled eggs and Polish peppers into their m o u t h s which come f r o m fat jars resting at the end of the bar. T H E L I T T L E SIGNS hanging a r o u n d the r o o m appeal to t h e m . Hanging above the TV which is never o n , rests a c a r d b o a r d b a n n e r proclaiming " G e t a Kick, Try a Mick." The w o r k e r s kid Adam a b o u t his Polish d e s c e n t , giving him gifts like t h e Polish Hack Saw which hangs on the " f a r wall; a hack saw with link chain instead of blade. Many of the middle-aged w o r k ers drink u n t i l d r u n k and the proceedings b e c o m e r o w d y and boistrous. One Hopeite described his first experience at E d d i e ' s : "A huge man, picking his r o t t i n g teeth with a t o o t h p i c k , leaned heavily against the bar. A green h u n t i n g hat rested on his head with t h e red flaps t u r n e d up, he t o o k on the a p p e a r a n c e of an a n c i e n t , misshapen World Wa; 1 aviator." HE C O N T I N U E D , laughing, " A waitress sidled up to the barside f o r more b e e r ; she had her m o u t h drawn to one side, it appeared to be a facial p r o b l e m . T h e man stuck his big paw a r o u n d her and with his t o o t h p i c k moving a r o u n d and a r o u n d in his m o u t h , he talked to her in a slow, d r u n k en t o w n . " " A s he did s o , " he a d d e d , " h i s hand slowly m o v e d d o w n t h e o u t side of her blouse until she cried, 'Just w a t c h t h e h a n d s . ' E v e r y o n e started g u f f a w i n g and w i t h t h a t , she was o f f . " T H E HOPE S T U D E N T described a n o t h e r scene: " A big, big C h i c a n o in an a r m y fatigue j a c k e t asked the b a r t e n d e r , " C a n I have just o n e m o r e ? " T h e b a r t e n d e r refused him, and with t h a t he s t u m b l e d o u t of the bar o n t o Eighth Street and was g o n e . Perhaps E d d i e ' s p o r t r a y s best the American bar. Its m i x t u r e of lifestyles r e p r e s e n t s America and its l o u d , b o i s t r o u s beginnings. F r o m those i n f a n t years sprang the A m e r i c a n taverns and bars such as Skiles, T h e P u b and E d d i e ' s which have r e f r e s h e d and sustained men t h r o u g h o u r c o u n try's troubled and peaceful times.


Seven

Hope College anchor

February 9 . 1 9 7 3

Higher Horizons seeks help of student body In a n era of i n t r o s p e c t i o n , activism has o f t e n been replaced by getting o n e ' s o w n head t o g e t h e r . But at H o p e , d e d i c a t e d s t u d e n t s can c h a n n e l t h e i r c o n c e r n f o r society i n t o t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n . Higher Horizons. SEVEN Y E A R S ago, w h e n the student-initiated p r o g r a m began, there were m a n y c o n s c i e n t i o u s participants. S t u d e n t s f l o c k e d to the b a s e m e n t of Van Vleck j u s t to be ' ' i n " . N o w t h a t t h e activist fad seems to be dying, m o r e sincere participation has evolved. . Bruce S t r u i k , d i r e c t o r o ^ H i g h e r Horizons, said, " T h o s e s t u d e n t s presently p a r t i c i p a t i n g in t h e organization are really involved. T h e y aren't just ' w a r m bodies'. The caliber of t h e present v o l u n t e e r s is also higher t h a n b e f o r e because of their varied b a c k g r o u n d s and pre-

vious experiences. Higher H o r i z o n s a t t e m p t s t o place a m a x i m u m of 3 0 0 children with s t u d e n t volunteers, b u t despite t h e e f f o r t s of t h e organizat i o n , 150 b o y s still seek a big brother. S T R U I K SAID t h a t a financial p r o b l e m arises w h e n m o r e kids t h a n usual are a c c o m m o d a t e d and also supervision b e c o m e s a probl e m . T h e program n o w serves 2 5 0 children with 5 0 m o r e s o o n to be added. Higher H o r i z o n s a t t e m p t s to m e e t j h e needs of f r u s t r a t e d . ; d e - r prived and lonely children of t h e Holland c o m m u n i t y . Each s t u d e n t v o l u n t e e r s to be a friend to o n e child and pledges time, c o n c e r n , e m p a t h y and g u i d a n c e t o w a r d the d e v e l o p m e n t and e n r i c h m e n t of Hope students from Qutar display their native costumes. Next Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Cultural Center his little b r o t h e r ' s o r sister's life, these same students will give a presentation describing their culture and heritage.

Energy crisis: a subtle look at a grave situation E d i t o r ' s n o t e : T h e following feature story is w r i t t e n b y J o h n A n d e r s o n , assistant p r o f e s s o r of geology. A n d e r s o n ' s f i c t i o n story concerns t h e energy crisis and its possible implications. During previous years, a n u m ber of scientific papers have been written c o n c e r n i n g the ancient c o n t i n e n t of A m e r i c u s a n d those creatures of t h e species Homo americus which are believed t o have thrived there only a few t h o u s a n d years ago. I SHALL p r o p o s e a t h e o r y which will e x p l a i n t h e e v e n t u a l d e s t r u c t i o n of this c o n t i n e n t and those w h o i n h a b i t e d it. I m u s t , in all h o n e s t y , p o i n t o u t t h a t this t h e o r y is based u p o n limited scie n t i f i c d a t a a n d , t h e r e f o r e , will n o d o u b t be m e t w i t h a great deal of skepticism by m y colleagues. I t h e r e f o r e e n c o u r a g e and w e l c o m e c o n s t r u c t i v e criticism. R e c e n t geologic findings would suggest t h a t A m e r i c u s has n o t always been a lifeless, d e s e r t - t y p e e n v i r o n m e n t as we k n o w it t o d a y .

Quite t h e c o n t r a r y , we n o w k n o w t h a t A m m c u s o n c e b l o o m e d with rich green forest and was inh a b i t e d b y m a n y organisms, most of w h i c h were at peace with the land. O n e o r g a n i s m , however, Homo americus, a p p a r e n t l y had great d i f f i c u l t y in o b t a i n i n g a niche w i t h i n this e n v i r o n m e n t . IT IS p r o p o s e d t h a t Homo americus did n o t always d o m i n a t e Americus, b u t was instead j o i n e d by a new family of o r g a n i s m s which we shall collectively term Cariidae. It may even be t h a t Homo americus himself created the Cariidae f o r t h e p u r p o s e of assisting him in his labors. T h e first Cariidae were q u i t e primitive and are believed t o have fed u p o n h o o f e d animals, as evidenced b y t r a c k s f o u n d preserved in t h e rocks, w h i c h suggest t h e stalking habits of these primitive creatures CONTINUED e v o l u t i o n of t h e Cariidae b r o u g h t changes in their life h a b i t s and their diet is believed t o have b e c o m e restricted to p e t r o l e u m (a simple organic

substance which geologists believe was o n c e c o m m o n in t h e e a r t h ' s crust). Tremendous quantities of p e t r o l e u m were a p p a r e n t l y consumed by m o r e advanced species of Cariidae, as evidenced b y large quantities of heavy e l e m e n t s f o u n d in r o c k s of this age. During a p p r o x i m a t e l y the 2 0 t h c e n t u r y A.D., a drastic change in t h e life habits in Americus is believed to have o c c u r r e d . V E R Y LARGE and c o m p l e x genera of Cariidae evolved, including such f o r m s as Cadillacus, Oldsmobilus and Fordii. F o r t h e first t i m e t h e Cariidae far o u t n u m b e r e d Homo americus, and it would a p p e a r , based u p o n archaeological evidence, t h a t Homo americus b e g a n in s o m e c r u d e fashion t o w o r s h i p t h e Cariidae. Homo americus lavishly d e c o rated their g o d s with t h e finest of c h r o m e , glass and n a t u r a l l e a t h e r . He even constructed temples which are believed t o have served as sanctuaries for Cariidae and himself o c c u p i e d a d j a c e n t dwellings so t h a t he could m o r e easily care f o r t h e m . CONTINUED e v o l u t i o n and g r o w t h of Cariidae a p p a r e n t l y left

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americus and n a t u r e ) , a n d s o m e would m a i n t a i n were a c t u a l l y cons t r u c t e d b y Homo americus in his e f f o r t to appease t h e starving gods. Cariidae t h u s began t o seek r e f u g e in those areas w h i c h had previously b e e n accessible only t o Homo americus and o t h e r beasts. DURING THE late stages of the Recent Period n e w and smaller species of t h e Cariidae evolved, of w h i c h Volkswagonensis and Datsunasus were m o s t successful. These species are believed to have originated on s o m e distant c o n t i n e n t and t o have migrated t o Americus just prior t o t h e R e c e n t Period. Despite their m o d e r a t e need f o r p e t r o l e u m , these species did not evolve fast e n o u g h t o d o m i nate A m e r i c u s . L a t e r , smaller derivatives of those larger Cariidae evolved, b u t t h e y w e r e far o u t n u m b e r e d by their larger ancestors. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , an i m c o m p l e t e geologic record seriously hinders my i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of l a t e r events. It is believed, however, t h a t Homo americus never again regained his role as t h e d o m i n a n t species of Americus.

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t h e m with an i m m e n s e a p p e t i t e f o r p e t r o l e u m , t h u s forcing Homo americus to sacrifice m a n y of his o w n necessities and his previously quiescent e n v i r o n m e n t in search of a d d i t i o n a l p e t r o l e u m supplies. Geologists refer to this particular period of t i m e as t h e R e c e n t Period. Geologic findings in t h e coastal waters of Americus have revealed t h o u s a n d s of submerged derricklike s t r u c t u r e s and are believed to indicate t h e t u r n i n g of Cariidae to t h e o c e a n s in search of p e t r o l e u m . L A T E R , AS these supplies d i m i n i s h e d , t h e y are believed to have t a k e n t o scavenging t h e lands in search of f o o d , o f t e n relying o n coal and o t h e r c r u d e f o r m s of p e t r o l e u m f o r their n o u r i s h m e n t . Huge diggings, o f t e n t e n s of miles wide, were left b e h i n d , scaring t h e A m e r i c u s c o n t i n e n t as these c r e a t u r e s a p p a r e n t l y devoured all t h a t was in r e a c h . F U R T H E R evidence of t h e d o m i n a n c e of Cariidae over Homo americus is seen in t h e t r e m e n d o u s increase of h i g h w a y s (asphalt trails t h a t are believed t o have formed a branching network which ultimately transgressed t h o s e sacred regions of Homo

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CONTACT: HOPE COLLEGE Student'Acflv!ties Office Student Union 392-5111, ext. 2254

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Hope College anchor

Eight

February 9, 1 9 7 3

Brandsma nets 24

Calvin nips Flying Dutchmen by Gary Jones

40

ÂŤ . . * e i i â&#x20AC;˘ 1 ^ 0 ^ j * Lee Brandsma shoots over Calvin defenders during last Saturday s game in the Civic Center. Hope went o n to lose the game 74-71, to extend to aeven its losing skein with Calvin.

H o p e lost its seventh straight game t o Calvin last S a t u r d a y night in an exciting but discouraging game, 74-71. COACH D E V E T T E S squad was r u n off t h e cour t early in t h e third q u a r t e r as Calvin coach, Ralph H o n d e r d c a m e o u t with an aggressive full court press t h a t proved t h e o u t c o m e of t h e game. T h e Flying D u t c h m e n were easy prey f o r the aggressive d e f e n s e . Calvin scored t h e first 2 0 p o i n t s of t h e second half while holding Hope scoreless. The D u t c h m e n t h r e w the ball away n u m e r o u s times and failed to break Calvin's press. COACH DEVETTE c o n t i n u e d with his game plan of slow set u p basketball while Calvin kept ripping H o p e ' s o f f e n s e apart and scoring with easy lay-ups and steals. H o p e ' s need f o r c o n f i d e n t and c o m p e t e n t ball h a n d l e r s was apparent. T h e D u t c h m e n seemed to o u t class Calvin with fine s h o o t i n g and overall team strength but t h e y couldn't make the important foul s h o t s o r s t o p Calvin's second-half rally. Lee Brandsma p l a y e d one of his best games, p e n e t r a t i n g Calvin's d e f e n s e w i t h p o w e r f u l drives and fine o u t s i d e s h o o t i n g , total^ 24 p o i n t s d a V F HARMELINK was secj ^ for on( S C oring c o l u m n

H o p e w i t h 2 0 p o i n t s . Harmelink scored consistently with long o u t side j u m p e r s . Brian Vriesman played a solid game defensively and offensively f o r H o p e , finishing the game with 15 p o i n t s and 12 rebounds. Art Tuls, Calvin's t a l e n t e d 6 ' 1 " senior guard, c a m e back a f t e r a serious eye injury and led Calvin's o f f e n s e with 28 p o i n t s . It seemed that Tuls would be replaced a f t e r a painful collision, but he remained in the ball game. HIS I N J U R Y d i d n ' t seem to a f f e c t the fine s h o o t i n g , passing, and dribbling which has given him the r e p u t a t i o n of being the best guard in the MIAA. Dick F r e n s played a well-balanced game for Calvin,scoring 10 p o i n t s and pulling d o w n 12 of Calvin's 38 team r e b o u n d s . Larry V a n d e r V e e n cont r i b u t e d 18 p o i n t s f o r Calvin. Brandsma, Harmelink and Vriesman tallied 13, 10 and eight

p o i n t s respectively f o r t h e Dutchmen in t h e first half to lead H o p e to a 4 7 - 3 8 margin. It has been said t h a t Coach D e V e t t e ' s t e a m is inexperienced but this was H o p e ' s t u r n to beat Calvin. H o p e is e q u i p p e d with m o r e t a l e n t t h a n p r o b a b l y any o t h e r t e a m in t h e MIAA. It's too bad t h a t this fine talent d i d n ' t congeal to b e c o m e the MIAA leader.

SAC PRESENTS

Klute DEWITT THEATRE Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,

JAM SESSION

the 9th and 10th

DWCC REC ROOM Saturday, January 10th 8 - 1 2 p.m.

7:00 and 9:30 p.m. $1.00

Winklerprins standout

Grapplers sneak past Calvin When t w o H o p e and Calvin squads m e t S a t u r d a y , D u t c h netters f o u n d exciting finishes not t o o exciting a f t e r all, b u t their wrestling c o u n t e r p a r t s o n c e again f o u n d t h e s t r e n g t h to eke out a close win over t h e Knights. REMEMBERING A clutch finish against Calvin last D e c e m b e r , D u t c h f a n s breathlessly w a t c h e d the e f f o r t s of Maurice Winklerprins w h o , as he had d o n e last year, assured a H o p e victory with a brilliant p e r f o r m a n c e , this time ending in a 14-1 decision. This

^superior decision" earned him f o u r instead of the usual t h r e e p o i n t s for a decision a n d gave t h e D u t c h a one point v i c t o r y , 25-24. Of course if u n d e f e a t e d heavyweight Paul Cornell had f a l t e r e d , Winkelprins' m a t c h w o u l d n o t have meant t h a t m u c h . However, Cornell sustained his m o m e n t u m , pinning Jim Andella in 1:46. W O R T H N O T I N G is that for the first time since t h e beginning of the school's spring semester, H o p e ' s wrestling r o s t e r against Calvin bore n o resemblance to the

a t t e n d a n c e list at the mid-week player meeting. Ed Chavez has rejoined t h e t e a m at 118 lbs. and t o o k Mark S c h r o t e n b o e r t o the m a t in 1:46. Dave K i e f f e r has recovered sufficiently f r o m a very painful s h o u l d e r injury t o c o m p e t e at 150 lbs. and Jim C a n n o n overcame his season-long weight struggle t o wrestle at 158 lbs. T H O U G H BOTH m e n were defeated in their c o m e - b a c k m a t c h e s t h e y should c o n t r i b u t e their share of p o i n t s by season's e n d .

A

H Club honored by Merlin Whiteman This week t h e sports spotlight falls o n (crash!) the H Club of H o p e College, a g r o u p m a d e up of Hope alumni w h o were also award winners in a varsity sport. T h e group was initiated in the early SO's, and while t h e n u m b e r of active m e m b e r s is small, t h e H Club has provided service t o t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y , especially the a t h l e t i c d e p a r t m e n t . R E V E R E N D D o n Van Hoven, president of the H Club, talked w i t h me over t h e p h o n e Wednesday a b o u t this group. "We are basically a s u p p o r t g r o u p , helping o u t wherever we can in t h e college and w i t h athletics. One of o u r big things is t h e a w a r d s b a n q u e t we h e l p p u t on. We also have b e e n interested in t h e planned physical e d u c a t i o n building and have s p o n s o r e d the initial s t u d y f o r t h a t building. "We help to k e e p a n u m b e r of m e n in t o u c h w i t h the athletic p r o g r a m , and provide seed m o n e y . " A T H L E T I C Director G o r d o n Brewer added to these activities. " T h e m e m b e r s help t o put us on t h e trail of good high school athletes. A t times, m e m bers have checked out t h e kind of s t u d e n t t h e athlete is and w h e t h e r he could m a k e it here at Hope. Also, t h e H Club has given a w a r d s to every m e m b e r of a c h a m p i o n s h i p t e a m . " Brewer is an e x - o f f i c i o o f f i c e r of the board as well as a m e m b e r of the g r o u p b y virtue of winning letters while at H o p e , . " W e have a mailing list of around 1200 n a m e s , a g r o u p w h i c h annually receives f r e e passes to o u r f o o t b a l l games. T h e really big get-together is the l u n c h e o n we have at n o o n t h e Saturday of H o m e c o m i n g . This year we h o n o r e d A1 Vanderbush." WHILE I had him on t h e line, I t h o u g h t I would ask Van Hoven a b o u t H o p e ' s a t h l e t i c p h i l o s o p h y . It is interesting t o n o t e t h a t Van H o v e n is a minister on a large college c a m p u s (Western Michigan University) w h i c h belongs t o a c o n f e r e n c e t h a t is trying t o g o big-time in athletics. He d o e s follow sports, telling m e t h a t t h e B r o n c o s had lost eight games b y i t o t a l of eleven p o i n t s this year. V a n H o v e n characterized H o p e ' s p h i l o s o p h y as this: " P e o p l e r e m a i n f o r e m o s t . T h e y have t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o p a r t i c i p a t e in a w a y t h a t will

e n h a n c e their o w n g r o w t h and serve t h e a c a d e m i c c o m m u n i t y . T h e y o u n g m a n ' s interest is f i t t e d in. "I BELIEVE t h e recruiting and choice of staff people reflect this p h i l o s o p h y . T h e interest is not in building a huge m o n u m e n t to intercollegiate athletics. " I f athletics are to m a k e a success o n a liberal arts c a m p u s , this p h i l o s o p h y seems best. T h e wholeness of the individual is at stake; y o u c a n ' t distort a p e r s o n ' s p e r s o n a l i t y by overemphasizing athletics. "I WOULD be u p s e t if my kids w e n t t o college and a t h l e t e s were m o r e i m p o r t a n t t h a n s o m e o n e in research. Y o u can d o w h a t y o u can f o r a good c o m p e t i t i v e e x p e r i e n c e , b u t y o u m u s t be c a r e f u l n o t to e m p h a s i z e the a t h l e t e as a special p e r s o n or give him special privileges." T h i s t h e n , is w h a t a H o p e a l u m n i t h i n k s a b o u t a t h l e t i c s at H o p e . What Van H o v e n says is n o t m u c h d i f f e r e n t f r o m a s t a t e m e n t issued by t h e physical e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t in t h e s u m m e r , 1972 issue of the a l u m n i magazine. I BELIEVE certain p r o b l e m s are caused by this p h i l o s o p h y . O n e p r o b l e m is that t h e p h i l o s o p h y of a t h l e t i c s at H o p e is d i f f e r e n t f r o m t h a t f o u n d in m o s t high schools. T h e i n c o m i n g a t h l e t e can find the t r a n s i t i o n d i f f i c u l t . T h e p h i l o s o p h y at H o p e is such t h a t coaches will n o t put a lot of pressure ( n o r could t h e y ) on athletes, e.g., to get in s h a p e in t h e off season. In high school, t o w n s p e o p l e , p a r e n t s , newspapers, etc., put pressure on t h e a t h l e t e , not t o m e n t i o n coaches w h o verbally vilify or belittle t h e a t h l e t e . At H o p e , and at m a n y small colleges, a lot is left t o the self-discipline of t h e a t h l e t e , a responsibility s o m e c a n n o t a c c e p t . THIS PHILOSOPHY is n o t w r o n g in itself b u t it is w h a t p e o p l e i m p l i c a t e f r o m it t h a t is e r r o n e o u s . T h e r e are s o m e w h o i n t e r p r e t t h i s belief in n o t overemphasizing a t h l e t i c s as an a p a t h e t i c a t t i t u d e t o w a r d winning. Winning and t h e p h i l o s o p h y of t h e a t h l e t i c d e p a r t m e n t are n o t i n c o n s i s t e n t . People, including J a c k S c o t t ( t h e last I h e a r d t h e y were still k e e p i n g score at Oberlin a t h l e t i c c o n t e s t s ) , all lide to w i n ; H o p e c o a c h e s are n o e x c e p t i o n , b y a n y means.

Comin' on strong . . . stronger! They're the soul of casual fashions. The new jeans shoe, if you please. Low wedge heels set of sporty uppers of leather or suede. The classic clog in Red White or Navy perf. leather uppers. $12.00

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Boor's


02-09-1973