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Hope College Anchor LVI-18

Offidol Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland NEchiqan

February 9, 1 9 4 4

WILHELM WILL EDIT South American Pianist

To

Perform in Concert Tonight Chapel W i l l Be Scene

Marisa Regules

O f Cooperative Concert Marisa

Regules, one of

South

America's outstanding pianists, will appear in Hope Memorial chapel tonight in the second concert of the local Cooperative Concert Association series. Students of Hope may

to Christ. Refreshments were served. Then the group was dismissed with a Alpha Chi met February 5 in benediction by Dr. Shafer. the Commons Rooms. The m e e t i n g opened with a song service led by Scalpel Club to Invest Everett Fikse. Robert Schuller w a s in charge of devotions and D i c k In Biology Literature Vriesman s a n g "Jesus Is A l w a y s Scalpel club will meet next There." Dick Hine w a s appointed Wednesday afternoon in the Scitreasurer pro tem in the absence ence Library. The program will of Sylvio Scorza. An informal dis- consist of papers by lorie Strick and cussion on the world situation was Milly Burghardt. T h e members led by Dr. Shafer. He said t h a t the have decided to buy a biological abproblem, a moral one, can be solved stract and will make their selection only by people individually turning at this meeting.

Dr. Shafer Conducts Alpha C h i Discussion

present their activities tickets for admission to the concert which is

In

scheduled for 8:15 p. m. Miss

Regules

has

played

in

The nearest thing to prediction about the invasion day came from Lieutenant General Carl Spaatz, head of United S t a t e s Strategic Air Forces. Cautiously, he said, "given reasonable weather" the Allies ought to be able to knock oirl the German air force this summer.

Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Santia g o de Chile, Lima, and many other South American cities, as well as in Paris and Madrid in Europe. She in recital at Town Hall, N e w York

Concert Artist

City, and soon a f t e r was introduced a s a soloist with orchestra in the Symphony

Washington,

D. C.

orchestra in Among

sym-

phony orchestras who will present her this season is the Philadelphia orchestra, E u g e n e Ormandy conducting. She is the first Argentine artist to be brought to the United S t a t e s under the cultural exchange policy initiated by Columbia Concerts, Inc. o — —

French Club to M e e t O n Thursday Night The

French club will

hold its

meeting Thursday night, February tenth, because of the concert scheduled for the regular club night. The m e e t i n g will include as much conversation as possible. Boots McCann is in charge of the program

Former Hopeite Dies Unexpectedly Mrs. Thomas L. Miholer, formerly Pearl Scholten, died very suddenly early Sunday morning, January 30, f r o m pneumonia following the flu. , Pearl attended Northwestern Junior College, and Western Michigan College, and graduated from Hope last June. During her two and a half years at Hope she was active in English Majors Club, Palette and Masque, and Y.W.C.A. She was a member of the Sibylline Society. A f t e r their marriage in Boyden, Iowa, on September 8, 1943, Pearl and her husband, Thomas L. Miholer, made their home in Three Rivers, Mich. Memorial services were held for Pearl in Three Rivers, Mich., on Monday, January 31. Mr. Thomas Miholer and Mrs. Wm. Van't Hof, Pearl's aunt, accompanied the body to Pearl's home town, Boyden, Iowa. Funeral and burial services were held at Boyden, Wednesday, February 2.

and she will direct the group in games

for which

prizes

will

be

awarded. Singing will be led by Libby Romaine while Marge Emery will take over at the piano.

//%#//

Y " News

members of the faculty played host to some sixty members participat-

Instead of gobbling their food they hoard it, o f t e n saving their bread to munch on later. In order to rehabilitate these children Leningrad last year established a chain of kindergartens where special teachers tried everything they could think of. However, they soon found that "no manner of persuasion has any affect until the children become physically stronger."

We Interview

Helen Wilhelm

German A r t Meeting

cussed with Mary Elizabeth AidBrandli,

P e g g y Cross, Bobby Reed, Harland Steele, and Ruth Van Bronkhorst acting as group leaders. Arrangements for the meeting were made by Vice Presidents Elaine Scholten and Len Sibley. Entertaining faculty members included Misses Elizabeth Oggel, Metta Ross, Elizabeth Lichty; and Profs. Garrett Vander Borgh, Walter Van Saun, Thomas Welmers, and Paul Hinkamp.

Ibsen Will Be Guest O f English Majors

A.S.T.P. Men Back From Furloushs; Gained Twenty-Eight; Lost Forty Lois Mary Hinkamp

With the beginning of a new term on Monday, February 7, several changes were made in the Hope A.S.T.P. program. Week-end passes Tall, graceful, s o f t of speech and for the soldiers will now begin on Saturday noons rather than at four manner is our cover girl this week, in the afternoon as before and will extend to eight Sunday evening. N o w t h a t the Saturday school d a y has been shortened, there are Lois Mary Hinkamp. According to Lois Mary, the four hours of class periods in both the morning and the afternoon instead of the previous f o u r in the morning and three in the afternoon. campus position of a prof's daughter is no different from that of Soldiers Report to Miss Gibbs ^ anyone else — "especially," she A s before there is supervised study for the soldiers. During six says, "since I've never had a course n i g h t s a week they study in the library from e i g h t to ten-thirty in f r o m Dad." Her pater is Professor the evening. Unlike last semester t h e y must report to Miss Margaret P a u E. Hinkamp. Gibbs, the librarian, for study during free hours of the day so that A s for "Hin-kampus" activities, they m e e t the required number of study hours. she g o e s in for "Y" in a big way, Participating in the new program are twenty-eight newcomers, in fact, so big that she has held twenty-seven of them term 3 students from the University of Illinois, the offices of secretary, vice presiand one a term 2 student from the University of Michigan. dent, and president. Alcor numbers Of the 263 arrty students who originally came to Hope, approxiLois Mary a m o n g i t s elite. An "inmately f o r t y have left, a very f e w because of poor scholarship, but tegrated" personality, our weekly many more have obtained entrance into the air force, dentistry, and pin-up gal lists W.A.A. a m o n g her medicine. This leaves around 242 or 245 boys, all of whom are now many activities. She id treasurer term 2 or term 3 students. of said organization. L. M. is also A.S.T.P. Requirements on Queen's Court, and is secretary Both term 2 and term 3 boys must have five hours of military train- of Sorosis society. "Efficiency-expert" Hinkamp, one ing and six hours of physical education. Term 2 boys are required to have five and seven hours respectively of class periods and study in m i g h t call her, a s she g o e s about math, seven and six in physics, six and four in chemistry, two and her extensive Camp Fire work and completes her major in Bus. Ad. three in English, two of each in history and geography. Required hours of class and study for term 3 students are five and (Hidden fact—Did you know that e i g h t of math, six and two of mechanical drawing, seven and six of she is handy at handicraft ? ) "Don't just sit there, do somephysics, t w o of each of English and history, and three of each of thing!" is L. M.'s theme song. She geography, a new course called "geopolitics." g o e s for California grapes, HumTerm Ends April 29th mel cards and figurenes, bike rides, The present term of the A.S.T.P. will end April 29. Term 3 boys flowers in the hair, and traveling. will then be graduated with graduation exercises and certificates. (Ann Arbor, here I come!) F e w c h a n g e s have been made in the faculty arrangements for the Just to prove t h a t she's "jivin'," present term. Mr. Donald Visser will teach only chemistry instead of N o . 1 on her heart parade is the chemistry and mathematics. Mr. Howard Dal man will teach mechanical ever-popular "steak and french drawing only, rather than mechanical drawing and mathematics. fries."

Wednesday night, February sixteenth, English Majors will meet for the next of their series of discussions on the literature of various nations. The subject f o r this meeting is Norway, the works of Ibsen especially being stressed. Grieg and his music will be included also. Evelyn Shiffner will g i v e the life of Ibsen while his influence on the people and e v e n t s of his day and future days, will be given by Connie Scholten. T h e Doll's House by this same author will be discussed by Marie Jenkins. The meeting will be brought to a close by Rose Winstrom's s i n g i n g of Grieg's I Love Thee.

.

transferred from Geneseo College in N e w York state. Since her arrival here she has been active, bes i d e s her ANCHOR work, in Student Council, W.A.L., and Sibylline. While Helen's ambitions lie in the field of elementary education rathe r than journalism, writing is a hobby in which she has long been interested, having taken prizes in h i g h school and earlier days for e s s a y s and poetry. Takes Over in September Miss Wilhelm will continue in her present capacity a s associate editor for the remainder of the y e a r and will take over her new duties in September. In the spring of this year, candidates will be presented from whom the student body will choose two individuals to serve a s associate editors under M i s s Wilhelm next year.

Petite Editor KU I,

-

• •Ope Man Iniurecl on J,*

a

Way Home to Chicago The regular meeting of German club will be held Thursday evening, February sixteenth. Audrey Scott will be in charge of the m e e t i n g and will direct thought a l o n g the lines of German art appreciation. Records will be played to illustrate different types of music. The members will gather in the Thesaurian room and refreshments will be served.

The subject of marriage was disBill

All-Around Ability

The candidates were judged on the basis of their personally-edited issues, (Miss Wilhelm directed the publication of the December 15 issue, and Miss Crawford turned out the November 24 paper) as well as on general interest, leadership ability, and responsibility. The editor-elect came to Hope as a sophomore, having

-j

i n g in the annual fireside meeting.

Blair,

At a recent meeting of the Board of Publications, Helen Wilhelm was chosen to edit the college publications for the school year 1944-5. The decision of the Board was a close one and made a f t e r a full semester's work had been completed by Miss Wilhelm, Canandaigua, New York, junior, and Constance Crawford, Schenectady, New York, junior, in their capacities as associate editors.

From London last week came a report on the children of Leningrad a f t e r two years of starvation. To some it had caused mental damage so severe that "Soviet authorities feared it would be permanent. There are some who cry at the slightest disappointment. Others cry when they see trinkets such a s earrings which remind them of their parents who had died of exhaustion.

lar time for "Y" meetings, seven

Mary

New York Junior To Succeed Co-editors

Three high British officers who had been prisoners when Italy fell last September escaped during the confusion. Last week London announced they had reached the Allied lines. They were Air Marshal Owen Tudor Boyd, who had been captured when his transport w a s forced down in Sicily late in 1940, Lieutenant Generals Sir Richard N u g e n t O'Connor and Phili N e a m e , V.C., who were taken in 1941 in Libya. General O'Connor's capture was particularly bad a s he was field commander of the North African Army and General Wavell's right-hand man.

On Tuesday evening at the regu-

rich,

College Board of Publications Appoints

Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur W. Tedder, the Allies' most expert wielder of the combined air-ground weapon, arrived in London to take up his duties as Deputy to General D w i g h t D. Eisenhouwer. Major General John C. H. Lee is already serving as General Eisenhower's chief of supply.

made her North American debut

National

Digestion

ANCHOR

Meeting on the Boaru of Publications last week under the chairmanship of Professor Clarence De Graaf were faculty members Miss Metta Ross, and Profs. Garrett Vander Borgh and William Schrier, a s well a s Co-editors R o g e r Kocppe and Mary Blair, and Society Editor Marie Jenkins.

On Saturday, January 29, Sylvio Scorza was critically injured in an unusual accident on the outskirts of Chicago.

The

latest

reports

from the Mercy hospital in Gary, Indiana, is that he has regained consciousness and is f e e l i n g surprisingly well. The tentative diagnosis of the doctor was that he had a broken spinal column but there was no certainty as to the extent of the injury to the spinal cord. The accident occurred when tht truck in which Syl had been riding was stopped for speeding. A s Syl was extinguishing the flares which had been set out around the truck, another truck accidentally ran into the stationary vehicle. The impact was so great t h a t Syl w a s hit and thrown into the ditch a t the side of the road. Scorza, a pre-sem student, came to Hope last September a s a senior. He is a graduate of Chicago Christian high school and attended Wilson Junior college f r o m 1940-42. He took his junior year a t Chicago University. A t Hope he w a s an active member of the Philosophy club and of Alpha Chi.

Schrier's Debaters Return Victorious Hope's debate squad will have i t s first league tournament tryout on February 19th at Michigan State College in East Lansing. Professor Schrier states that all the squad t e a m s will be represented at this tournament which is annually sponsored by the Michigan Intercolleg i a t e Speech League. Besides the regular practice debates, other local debates are pending. At an announcea date in the near future, Calvin debaters will be at Hope to participate in two rounds of debate. This i s in reciprocation f o r Hope's representation at Calvin yesterday a f t e r noon. T w o selected t e a m s will also put on a debate f o r the Ladies' Club of Hope church on the a f t e r noon of February 16th. T w o Hope teams, Luella Pyle, Joanne Decker, and Edith Wolbrink, Ruth Ellison participated in debates a t Western Michigan on January 22nd. They brought back f o u r victories out of s i x tries in Hope's first intercollegiate debati n g this season. T e a m s f r o m Ohio and Michigan were represented.

Eight New Faces Appear Everyone has noticed t h a t some- ble with the juniors over the fore- taking Jimmy Mac's place. "Rich" thing new in the line of civilian population has been added to Hope's campus. Five new girls and three fellows have been m y s t i f y i n g the student body as to their identity. N o w it can be told about the senior, Ruth Van Bronkhorst, who has been A.W.O.L. ("W" standing for "with") for a semester while she took care of her mother at home in Everson, Wash. Old students will be interested i n k n o w i n g that this is Ruth's new address. She moved f r o m Conrad, Mont., this summer. Cornea June; c o m e s a degree and a teaching certificate, the latter to be used in h i g h school teaching some youngsters h o w t o s a y Van Bronkhorst in three different tenses.

going

statement)

Hope

students j u s t graduated in January

from

find the ranks of the junior class Grand Rapids High School so he i s swelled

by one

transfer student a "frosh." He is interested in be-

from Ashbury College.

T h e stu- i n g an engineer.

dent? His name is Kenneth Stick-

Another frosh addition is A n n

Vander Jagt, a t r a n s f e r f r o m Michigan State in Lansing. S h e lives in Grand Rapids and came to Hope because she p r e f e r s small colleges. Grand Rapids is also the home of Cornelia Isrel, a new freshman. Cornelia i s interested in the mission field and would like to be sent toAnville, Ky., some day. The "frosh" seem to have the g r e a t e s t number of additions t o their class. One is William Haak f r o m Sod us, N . Y. (Bill is a presem. student), and another i s A t h Junior Ranks Swelled V.V. H a s New Whistle lan Lumber from Kalamazoo. InciProgressing down the scale of Perhaps the V a n Vleck g i r l s have dentally, Athlen just w e n t home to dignity f r o m the senior c l a s s t o the noticed a new whistle in t h e halls. graduate f r o m high school last junior class (and w i s h i n g no trou- That's Richard Holbeek, who is week-end. ney and he's a pre-sem. Having been a Methodist preacher with a junior license, he's preached in two churches. Ashbury, by t h e w a y , is near Lexington, Ky. June Darress, otherwise known as "Dusty," hails from Berkshire Valley, N. J. She's a sophomore t r a n s f e r from Patterson S t a t e College and is taking a pre-med course here. The reason we are lucky enough to have her here i s that Eleanor LeNoble did the recruiting job.


Hope College Anchor LVI-18

Official Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland NEchiqan

February 9, 1944

WILHELM WILL EDIT '44-'45 ANCHOR South American Pianist

To

Perform in Concert Tonight Chapel W i l l Be Scene

Marisa Regules

O f Cooperative Concert Marisa

Regules, one of

South

America's outstanding pianists, will appear in Hope Memorial chapel tonight in the second concert of the local Cooperative Concert Association series. Students of Hope may

1

to Christ. R e f r e s h m e n t s were served. Then the group w a s dismissed with a Alpha Chi met February 5 in benediction by Dr. Shafer. the Commons Rooms. The meeting opened with a s o n g service led by Scalpel Club to Invest Everett Fikse. Robert Schuller was in charge of devotions and D i c k In Biology Literature Vriesman s a n g "Jesus Is A l w a y s Scalpel club will meet next There." Dick Hine was appointed Wednesday afternoon in the Scitreasurer pro tem in the absence ence Library. The program will of Sylvio Scorza. An informal dis- consist of papers by lorie Strick and cussion on the world situation w a s Milly Burghardt. T h e members led by Dr. Shafer. He said that the have decided to buy a biological abproblem, a moral one, can be solved stract and will make their selection only by people individually turning at this meeting.

Dr. Shafer Conducts Alpha Chi Discussion

present their activities tickets for admission to the concert which is

In

scheduled for 8:15 p. m. Miss

Regules

has

played

in

a g o de Chile, Lima, and many other South American cities, as well as in Paris and Madrid in Europe. She in recital at Town Hall, New York

Concert Artist

City, and soon a f t e r was introduced a s a soloist with orchestra in the Washington,

D. C.

orchestra Among

in

sym-

phony orchestras who will present her this season is the Philadelphia orchestra, E u g e n e Ormandy conducting. She is the first Argentine artist to be brought to the United States under the cultural exchange policy initiated by Columbia Concerts, Inc. o

French Club to M e e t O n Thursday Night The

French club will hold its

meeting Thursday night, February tenth, because of the concert scheduled for the regular club night. The meeting will include as much conversation as possible.

Boots

Mc-

Cann is in charge of the program

Former Hopeite Dies Unexpectedly Mrs. T h o m a s L. Miholer, formerly Pearl Scholten, died very suddenly early Sunday morning, January 30, from * j e u m o n i a following the flu. , 4| Pearl attended Northwestern Junior College, and Western Michigan College, and graduated from Hope last June. During her two and a half years at Hope she was active in English Majors Club, Palette and Masque, and Y.W.C.A. She was a member of the Sibylline Society. A f t e r their marriage in Boyden, Iowa, on September 8, 1943, Pearl and her husband, Thomas L. Miholer, made their home in Three Rivers, Mich. Memorial services were held for Pearl in Three Rivers, Mich., on Monday, January 31. Mr. Thomas Miholer and Mrs. Wm. Van't Hof, Pearl's aunt, accompanied the body to Pearl's home town, Boyden, Iowa. Funeral and burial services were held at Boyden, Wednesday, February 2.

.

and she will direct the group in games

for which

awarded. Singing

prizes will

will

be

be led by

Libby Romaine while Marge Emery will take over at the piano. o

" Y " News

Instead of gobbling their food they hoard it, o f t e n saving their bread to munch on later. In order to rehabilitate these children Leningrad last year established a chain of kindergartens where special teachers tried everything they could think of. However, they soon found that "no manner of persuasion has any affect until the children become physically stronger."

members of the faculty played host to some sixty members participat-

We Interview

The subject of marriage w a s discussed with Mary Elizabeth AidBill

Brandli,

P e g g y Cross, Bobby Reed, Harland Steele, and Ruth Van Bronkhorst acting as group leaders. Arrangements for the meeting were made by Vice Presidents Elaine Scholten and Len Sibley. Entertaining faculty members included Misses Elizabeth Oggel, Metta Ross, Elizabeth Lichty; and Profs. Garrett Vander Borgh, Walter Van Saun, Thomas Welmers, and Paul Hinkamp.

Ibsen Will Be Guest O f English Majors

Gained Twenty-Eight; Lost Forty Lois Mary Hinkamp

With the beginning of a new term on Monday, February 7, several changes were made in the Hope A.S.T.P. program. Week-end passes Tall, graceful, s o f t of speech and for the soldiers will now begin on Saturday noons rather than at four manner is our cover girl this week, in the afternoon a s before and will extend to eight Sunday evening. N o w t h a t the Saturday school day has been shortened, there are Lois Mary Hinkamp. According to Lois Mary, the four hours of class periods in both the morning and the afternoon incampus position of a prof's daughstead of the previous four in the morning and three in the afternoon. ter is no different from that of Soldiers Report to Miss Gibbs anyone else — "especially," she As before there is supervised study for the soldiers. During six says, "since I've never had a course nights a week they study in the library from e i g h t to ten-thirty in from Dad." Her pater is Professor the evening. Unlike last s e m e s t e r they must report to Miss Margaret Pau E. Hinkamp. Gibbs, the librarian, for study during free hours of the day so that A s f o r "Hin-kampus" activities, they m e e t the required number of study hours. she g o e s in for "Y" in a big way, Participating in the new program are t w e n t y - e i g h t newcomers, in fact, so big that she has held twenty-seven of them term 3 students from the University of Illinois, the offices of secretary, vice presiand one a term 2 student f r o m the University of Michigan. dent, and president. Alcor numbers Of the 263 army students who originally came to Hope, approxiLois Mary a m o n g its elite. An "inmately forty have left, a very few because of poor scholarship, but tegrated" personality, our weekly many more have obtained entrance into the air force, dentistry, and pin-up gal lists W.A.A. a m o n g her medicine. This leaves around 242 or 245 boys, all of whom are now many activities. She id treasurer term 2 or term 3 students. of said organization. L. M. is also A.S.T.P. Requirements on Queen's Court, and is secretary of Sorosis society. Both term 2 and term 3 boys must have five hours of military train"Efficiency-expert" Hinkamp, one ing and six hours of physical education. Term 2 boys are required to might call her, as she g o e s about have five and seven hours respectively of class periods and study in her extensive Camp Fire work and math, seven and six in physics, six and four in chemistry, two and completes her major in Bus. Ad. three in English, two of each in history and geography. (Hidden fact—Did you know that Required hours of class and study f o r term 3 students are five and she is handy at handicraft ? ) eight of math, six and two of mechanical drawing, seven and six of "Don't just sit there, do somephysics, two of each of English and history, and three of each of thing!" is L. M.'s theme song. She g e o g r a p h y , a new course called "geopolitics." g o e s for California grapes, HumTerm Ends April 29th mel cards and figurenes, bike rides, The present term of the A.S.T.P. will end April 29. Term 3 boys flowers in the hair, and traveling. will then be graduated with graduation exercises and certificates. (Ann Arbor, here I come!) F e w c h a n g e s have been made in the faculty arrangements f o r the Just to prove that she's "jivin'," present term. Mr. Donald V i s s e r will teach only chemistry instead of No. 1 on her heart parade is the chemistry and mathematics. Mr. Howard Dalman will teach mechanical ever-popular "steak and french drawing only, rather than mechanical drawing and mathematics. fries."

-•|.A . A

_-

L

Audrey Scott Directs German A r t Meeting The regular meeting of German club will be held Thursday evening, February sixteenth. Audrey Scott will be in charge of the meeting and will direct thought along the lines of German art appreciation. Records will be played to illustrate different t y p e s of music. The members will gather in the Thesaurian room and refreshments will be served.

ing in the annual fireside meeting.

Blair,

The candidates were judged on the basis of their personally-edited issues, (Miss Wilhelm directed the publication of the December 15 issue, and Miss Crawford turned out the November 24 paper) as well as on general interest, leadership ability, and responsibility. The editor-elect came to Hope as a sophomore, having

Helen Wilhelm

Wednesday night, February sixteenth, English Majors will meet for the next of their series of discussions on the literature of various nations. The subject for this meeting is Norway, the works of Ibsen especially being stressed. Grieg and his music will be included also. Evelyn Shiffner will give the life of Ibsen while his influence on the people and events of his day and future days, will be given by Connie Scholten. T h e Doll's House by this same author will be discussed by Marie Jenkins. The meeting will be brought to a close by Rose Winstrom's singing of Grieg's I Love Thee.

transferred from Geneseo College in N e w York state. Since her arrival here she has been active, besides her ANCHOR work, in Student Council, W.A.L., and Sibylline. While Helen's ambitions lie in the field of elementary education rather than journalism, writing is a hobby in which she has long been interested, having taken prizes in high school and earlier days for e s s a y s and poetry. T a k e s Over in September Miss Wilhelm will continue in her present capacity a s associate editor for the remainder of the year and will take over her new duties in September. In the spring of this year, candidates will be presented from whom the student body will choose two individuals to serve as associate editors under M i s s Wilhelm next year.

Petite Editor KU U

kJ

"

J

Hope ^raan Iniured on . . .

lar time for "Y" meetings, seven

Mary

All-Around Ability

From London last week came a report on the children of Leningrad a f t e r two years of starvation. To some it had caused mental damage so severe that "Soviet authorities feared it would be permanent. There are some who cry at the slightest disappointment. Others cry when they see trinkets such as earrings which remind them of their parents who had died of exhaustion.

On Tuesday evening at the regu-

rich,

At a recent meeting of the Board of Publications, Helen Wilhelm was chosen to edit the college publications for the school year 1944-5. The decision of the Board was a close one and made after a full semester's work had been completed by Miss Wilhelm, Canandaigua, New York, junior, and Constance Crawford, Schenectady, New York, junior, in their capacities as associate editors.

Three high British officers who had been prisoners when Italy fell last September escaped during the confusion. Last week London announced they had reached the Allied lines. They were Air Marshal Owen Tudor Boyd, who had been captured when his transport was forced down in Sicily late in 1940, Lieutenant Generals Sir Richard N u g e n t O'Connor and Phili Neame, V.C., who were taken in 1941 in Libya. General O'Connor's capture was particularly bad as he was field commander of the North African Army and General Wavell's right-hand man.

A.S.T.P. Men Back From Furloughs;

&

Digestion

New York Junior To Succeed Co-editors

Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur W. Tedder, the Allies' most expert wielder of the combined air-ground weapon, arrived in London to take up his duties as Deputy to General D w i g h t D. Eisenhouwer. Major General John C. H. Lee is already serving as General Eisenhower's chief of supply.

made her North American debut

Symphony

.

The nearest thing to prediction about the invasion day came from Lieutenant General Carl Spaatz, head of United States Strategic Air Forces. Cautiously, he said, "given reasonable weather" the Allies ought to be able to knock out the German air force this summer.

Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Santi-

National

.

College Board of Publications Appoints

-j

Way Home to Chicago

Meeting on the Boaru of Publications last week under the chairmanship of Professor Clarence De Graaf were faculty members Miss Metta Ross, and Profs. Garrett Vander Borgh and William Schrier, as well a s Co-editors Roger Koeppe and Mary Blair, and Society Editor Marie Jenkins.

On Saturday, January 29, Sylvio Scorza was critically injured in an unusual accident on the outskirts of

Chicago.

The

latest reports

from the Mercy hospital in Gary, Indiana, is that he has regained consciousness and is feeling surprisingly well. The tentative diagnosis of the doctor w a s that he had a broken spinal column but there was no certainty as to the e x t e n t of the injury to the spinal cord. The accident occurred when tht truck in which Syl had been riding was stopped for speeding. A s Syl was extinguishing the flares which had been set out around the truck, another truck accidentally ran into the stationary vehicle. The impact was so great that Syl was hit and thrown into the ditch at the side of the road. Scorza, a pre-sem student, came to Hope last September as a senior. He is a graduate of Chicago Christian high school and attended Wilson Junior college f r o m 1940-42. He took his junior y e a r at Chicago University. A t Hope he w a s an active member of the Philosophy club and of Alpha Chi.

Schrier's Debaters Return Victorious Hope's debate squad will have its first league tournament tryout on February 19th at Michigan State College in East Lansing. Professor Schrier states that all the squad teams will be represented at this tournament which is annually sponsored by the Michigan Intercollegiate Speech League. Besides the regular practice debates, other local debates are pending. At an announcea date in the near future, Calvin debaters will be at Hope to participate in two rounds of debate. This is in reciprocation for Hope's representation at Calvin yesterday a f t e r noon. T w o selected t e a m s will also put on a debate for the Ladies' Club of Hope church on the afternoon of February 16th. Two Hope teams, Luella Pyle, Joanne Decker, and Edith Wolbrink, Ruth Ellison participated in debates at Western Michigan on January 22nd. They brought back four victories out of s i x tries in Hope's first intercollegiate debating this season. T e a m s f r o m Ohio and Michigan were represented.

Eight New Faces Appear Everyone has noticed that some- ble with the juniors over the fore- taking J i m m y Mac's place. "Rich" thing new in the line of civilian population has been added to Hope's campus. F i v e new girls and three f e l l o w s have been m y s t i f y i n g the student body as to their identity. N o w it can be told about the senior, Ruth Van Bronkhorst, w h o has been A.W.O.L. ("W" standing for "with") for a semester while she took care of her mother at home in Everson, Wash. Old students will be interested in knowing that this is Ruth's new address. She moved f r o m Conrad, Mont., this summer. Comes June; c o m e s a degree and a teaching certificate, the latter to be used in high school teaching some youngsters how to say Van Bronkhorst in three different tenses.

going

statement)

Hope

students just graduated in January from

find the ranks of the junior class Grand Rapids High School so he i s swelled

by one

transfer student a "frosh." He is interested in be-

from Ashbury College.

The stu- ing an engineer.

d e n t ? His name is Kenneth Stick-

Another frosh addition is Ann

Vander Jagt, a t r a n s f e r from Michigan State in Lansing. S h e lives in Grand Rapids and came to Hope because she prefers small colleges. Grand Rapids is also the home of Cornelia Isrel, a new freshman. Cornelia i s interested in the mission field and would like t o be sent toAnville, Ky., some day. The "frosh" seem to have the g r e a t e s t number of additions t o their class. One is William Haak from Sodus, N . Y. (Bill i s a presem. student), and another i s A t h Junior Ranks Swelled V.V. Has New Whistle lan Lumber from Kalamazoo. InciP r o g r e s s i n g down the scale of Perhaps the Van Vleck girls have dentally, Athlen just w e n t home to dignity f r o m the senior class to the noticed a new whistle in the halls. graduate from high school last junior class (and wishing no trou- That's Richard Holbeek, who i s week-end. ney and he's a pre-sem. Having been a Methodist preacher with a junior license, he's preached in two churches. Ashbury, by the w a y , is near Lexington, Ky. June Darress, otherwise known a s "Dusty," hipte f r o m Berkshire Valley, N . J . ^ She's a sophomore t r a n s f e r from Patterson State College and is taking a pre-med course here. The reason w e are lucky enough to have her here is that Eleanor LeNoble did the recruiting job.


Hope College Anchor

Page Two

Hope College Anchor

A l l About '20-20 Cookie', an A.S.T.P. #

MrmPrt

Associated GoBediate Press MARY BLAIR I ROGER KOEPPE

CO-EDITORS ^

Helen Wilhelm Melba L. Dings

1

Associate Editor Business Manager

STAFF Feature Editor Society Editor. "Camp to Campus" Editor Typists Circulation Manager A s s i s t a n t Business Manager

-

Rose Seith Marie Jenkins Evelyn Shiffner Vivian Dykema, J e r r y Uppleger .....Elaine Scholten P e g g y Cross

EDITORIAL Crawford Finlaw Steele

.

,n 0*SSS Bleecker Decker Van Raalte Jolderama Lemmer Burghardt Jonkman

M. Scholtcn De W®«rd Romaine

MANAGERIAL Fichtner Timmemian

W."' Barnes Kile Hem met B. Bilkert Otteman Richardu

Uppletrvr

CIRCULATION y . B Ikert Elliaon KrueKer Mackepramt Sandee

Saundert C. Scholten Strick Van Duzer Walbrlnk Slebert

Published every two week* d u r i n g the ichool year by t h e i t u d e n t a of Hope College. Entered as second class m a t t e r at t h e poet office of Holland, Michigan, a t special rate of postage provided for In section 1103 of A c t of Congress, October S, 1917, and a u t h o r i i e d October 19, 1918.

Mail subscriptions, one dollar per year Address — The Anchor, Hope College, Holland, Michigan •' Telephone 9436 P R I N T E D A T OLD N E W S P R I N T E R Y

Let's Live Today On campus, off campus, at any Bull Session the same topic of conversation is enthusiastically pursued, "those were the good old days" — and they were; filled to midnight and after with coke dates and ball games and all of Hope's endearing traditions. We sit around at the age of nineteen as if we were ninety with our best days behind us. Hope is different this year, every college in America is, to survive it must change with changing conditions. We were happy and carefree with only the regular responsibilities of a college student. This year we have the increased responsibilities of a country at war but it is still possible to be happy and if not carefree then a calmness of spirit. None of us are given burdens which are heavier than we can carry. Maybe we aren't finding good times possible in the exchange dinners and fraternity parties, but they were the more thrilling parts of the "good old days." Today we will find happiness and satisfaction whenever we make the effort. Happiness and good times are a habit earned by faithful cultivation. We will get out of these days whatever we put into them and nothing more. If we have found boredom is it not our laziness coming back to us? It may take more effort and ingenuity to make us shout for joy, but this effort will make our lives more worthwhile and we will be the stronger for it. For those who have left us to keep a bigger Harne alive we must keep shining the spirit of Hope for their return. If we were in their place it would be a real help to know that back here at least things are the same. Memories can be one of the treasures of life but they are for our rocking chair days, not sufficient for today. We should be making memories. Dreams are for us, of course, but they will never be realized by just wishing. It has been said we should love as if we would soon lose them — college days fly swiftly and four years of fellowship and sharing of dreams are gone before we know it. Make the most of today. It can i)e one of the "good old days" of tomorrow! H. W.

I'm a C o w a r d ! ! The following article was written about a year ago by a student now on the campus of Hope. We, the editorial staff of the ANCHOR, do not necessarily endorse it. though we do believe it to be very thought provoking. Any rebuttals will be welcome. Yes, I'm going to become an active participant in the military scheme of things. ! wish to join those other uniformed women who are aiding so aptly. Only my reason for enlisting is not at all noble. I'd like to say that it's because I have a strong desire to become a working part of our vast war machine — that a fiery patriotism burns in my heart. In part, these statements are true. Like every other loyal American, I wish to engage actively in this battle for the Right. But the battlefront knows no bounds. I can do a great deal for my country right at home. War Relief Societies, Civilian Defense Headquarters, Y.W.C.A. Workshops, U.S.O. clubs — innumerable agencies seek my aid. Careful buying, conservation, level-headed observations, discreet optimism, willingness to share and to do without — all these little things go to build causes of startling significance. Yes, there are countless ways in which I can be of service on the home front — and now! Why, then, am I eager for women's training camps? — Because I am a coward. That sounds like a paradox but it really isn't at all. If I face the truth it becomes clear to me that my wish for more active service is really a form of cowardice. You see, I'm not brave enough to face the demands of life at home. Courage is not some innate quality that springs up in me whenever I have need of it. Courage is something that bursts forth in a crisis. It grows to meet a crying demand. I know that the security of the commonplace life at home, the some-

Good evening, Pvt. and Mrs. Dutch Aimerica and all the g a l s at sea. Y o u who have recently climbed out of a ten-day rut and back into a three-month groove, is ev'rybody h a p p y ? . . . Speaking of Happy, didj'all know Pvt. S t e r l i n g left a piece of hardware on Miss Maatman's third finger l e f t hand? A kinduva pre-engagement, we hear. Once again it's time for the old rhapsody — bits of ribbon or paper lace and many hearts involved. What could be nicer for the weaker sex than leap year and Valentine's Day all at once? A cloud of dust, the speed of light, and a hearty: "Hey, wait for me!" No, 'twasn't the masked rider of the plains, just a plain case of riding on a street car. Hold everything, we'll unbaffle youse. It seems Fritz Colenbrander, one of the gruesome Chicago-goers of awhile back, couldn't elbow her w a y to the trolley exit in time. Her colleagues stood open-mouthed looking anxiously through the crowds of State Street. At long last Fritz came on the run, her hair flying in the wind. Exciting, y e s ? Dates 'n' doin's: Ah! a vicious triangle! Are Earl Holkeboer and Del Boersma really feudin' over Elaine Mensinger or is that the well-known Navy g a m e ? So far there are things involved like military balls and lotza letters . . . The ole flame flickered again when Melba Dings and "Gob" Hesch got together last week-end. Bob w a s looking mighty sharp in his crew cut and navy blue. He looked nice with Dings on his arm, too. How's yer knittin', kitten? . . . It's about time we had a little knitters' review . . . Foist, Miss Lichty did her Red Cross wrong and had to rip out each pearly stitch and start anew . . . Velma Glewen finished her blue sweater . . . i.Miss Burrows is doing a smart two-tone job on a brown one featuring a tan skier.

Me" at the dorm spread last week . . . Marion Reus tore off to S t a t e to a navy military ball, a f t e r a tough s t r u g g l e with a campus . . . Speaking of campuses, there were quite a list of campus queens this week. The Anchor staft lias taken to culture and the finer t h i n g s of life. Much to the dislike of one of the editors, Mr. Editor-in-Chief likes operas. Personal note to the latter (quote) You Square! This is a sleepy week, This is a sleepy column. Ho, hum . . . s'long — whoozit.

Dos Biscuit' and a 'Cute Cracker'

It all started way back when, and there really isn't much to the story except a lot of what not, but since you've asked me for the lowdown I'll dish out with the details. This took place in Holland but it could happen almost a n y w h e r e and at any old time. 1 ^uess it w a s love at first sight when this certain little 20-20 cookie s a w this certain A.S.T.P. dog biscuit. You all know how the s o n g goes, "There's a "he" bee for every "she" bee and a "he" mouse for every "she" mouse," or somepin like that — I t happens in the best of f a m ilies. I don't know w h a t first attracted "him" — almost a n y t h i n g does — but a n y w a y "she" w a s looking over all the new morale-boosters

and I g u e s s she liked his uniform. It fit the best. •Well,

the

inevitable

happened

and "he" asked "her" for a date. A f t e r consulting Emily Poet, her latest letters from Dorothy Dix on "Should I or Shouldn't I," a n d Dean Lichty, she accepted and t h e y putted down to the Model for a coke — there.

every good thing s t a r t s

They

learned each others

names and found out their likes and dislikes.

They even had

a fight

about Frank Sinatra and Lana Turner — some discussion about morale builders or something. B e f o r e they l e f t the Model they both decided they liked cokes and planned on coming back for another one some time.

«

Then t h i n g s really began to buzz

The Ten Best

in earnest. They caught a g l i m p s e

Eight of the ten best new stories of 1943 developed outside of the United States, but all were directly or indirectly related to to the war. That's the studied opinion of journalism students at T e x a s Christian University who were asked by Prof. J. Willard Ridings, head of the department of journalism, to pick the ten big stories.

of each other a f t e r every class. She walked to class with him once but had a hard time keeping in s t e p with the rest of the section — too f a s t for her she decided. The Model w a s still their f a v o r i t e

The Fall of Italy got top billing in a year when big headlines were the rule of the day. It w a s placed among the first ten by every student in the department, the only story to be unav.mously chosen. "Sudden death to one of the A x i s members, who, a f t e r all, never got any farther than the balcony!" was a typical comment.

"Wooing ground." That

was

the

closest they could get to a cozy B-24

cockpit.

He a l w a y s

had

a

large coke and she a l w a y s had a small one. If he wasn't broke he'd

T w e n t y - s i x stories were nominated for final consideration, and from these the 10 best were named by the journalism students, each one supporting his selections by pertinent comment.

put a nickel in the "juke box," and play s o f t and mellow s o n g s like "Pistol

Here are the remaining nine stories, with added comment:

Packin'

Mamma,"

and

"Rosie the Riveter." Then they'd 2. Four-Power Conference. The four Mr. B i g s of the war plan for peace. Plans are formed at d e v a s U t i n g diplomatic dinners which will wreak eventual devastation upon the Axis.

sit and stare circles around each others heads, big circles, little circles,

3. John L. Lewis and the Coal Miners. Trouble and confusion on the home front. The thermometer of public opinion—on both sides—registers the high interest rating of this news.

they'd just stare. Another favorite pastime

9. General Patton Case. General Patton struck a shellshocked soldier. A shocked American public opinion struck General Patton. 10. Jap Slaying of Captured Doolittle Fliers. Tojo makes sure that the U. S. will "Remember Pearl Harbor." Stories ranked as the Second 10-Best-of-the-Year included: Casablanca Conference, Errol Flynn Trial, Gasoline Rationing, Rickenbacker and Companions, De Marigny Trial, Congressional Revolt against the New Deal, Visit of Madame Chiang Kai-Chek, Bombing of Rumanian Oil Fields, Discovery of Penicillin and the Battle of Tarawa.

Above C. Thomas' Store what humdrum tasks that are demanded of me, and the gnawing anxiety over what is really going on in the tension- Headquarters for . . . . centers of the world are more than I can bear. I cannot go about in a quiet civilian way, spreading the gospel of hope ~ ROBLEE, AIR-STEP and working tirelessly at countless little tasks that command AND BUSTER BROWN my attention. No, I must be in the heart of things. SHOES I want to be buoyed up by the noble thought that I am really a part of the excitement and turmoil that throbs in the breast of this weary old world. I want Uncle Sam's label. S P A U L D I N G ' S I'm for the olive drab and for the strong force of responsiSHOE STORE bility that goes with it. I haven't the dauntless, undying courage that survives under the stress of the somewhat serene life of a quiet town. I don't want to be on the bottom, straining to hold things up; I want to be on top, warding off danger.

"All the world's a stage" — Ah yes, but in war time, all the strong, brave women bend their backs to the task of building the stage; of furnishing all the props and backdrops — the weapons of conflict, both material and spiritual. But I — I haven't the stamina to become a "stage hand." I want to be one of the actors! I want to be the center of the struggle. I am a coward. . . .

a

s

h

light

"He" was really a swell "sugar daddy." He used to bring her Hershey bars from the canteen and give her a piece a f t e r every meal. Sometimes if they Uiad steak for "chow" he'd bring p L t along, too. She a l w a y s g a v e him cough drops cause they were the only thing l e f t in the drug stores for a nickel — and, besides, they were good for cold feet. This "heaven on earth" lasted f o r quite awhile but broke up sooner or later. I can't remember just which it was. It all came about when "cookie ' s a w a "cute cracker" with gold bars on his shoulders and a zoot-suit that fit even better than "dog-biscuits." He w a s a s u g a r daddy with the real goods and no Hershey bar w a s g o i n g to stop her — so "cookie" fell — but hard. So that's the score, kids. That's w h y "he" and "she" aren't g o i n g together any more. Wait long enough and there will be another one along some day — s u g a r daddy, I mean. You want to know what happened to "dog-biscuit"? Oh, he's on skirt patrol and i s f a s t turning wolf.

iAL

s

C

the

love and nothing mattered.

8. Invasion of Sicily. American boys help to drive the first blow into the "soft underbelly" of Europe.

I want to be the pulse of the nation, not its life-blood. I want the uniform — not the glory of it in others' eyes but the valiant song that it sends rushing to my heart. I am not the steadfast type — the foundation of the nation. If I remain a part of the foundation, I shall not feel that I am supporting the vastness above but rather that it is crushing down on me.

"tripping

was fantastic — but t h e y were in

6. U. S. Race Riots. Black, brown and white men are caught in an undertow of prejudice and misunderstanding. Detroit, Beaumont and Los A n g e l e s share the shame of the spotlight. 1. Russian Summer-Fall Successes. The Russians give Hitler's men the bum's rush. The most consistent headline-holder in the war news.

Your ANCHOR Prinfert

was

fantastic" at the U.S.O. Their trip

5. Capture of North Africa. American, British and French forces get together for the first important Allied victory. .Hitler's African ambitions die along with the Africa Korps.

OLD NEWS PRINTERY

circles, half-circles,

and s o m e t i m e s not even circles —

4. Bombing of Berlin. Allied theme song becomes " N i g h t and day, you are the one!" Certain Nazi b i g w i g s said it couldn't be done, f o r g e t t i n g that England and the United S t a t e s specialize in the impossible.

Personalities on the loose: Cris Christie, who has recently joined the distinguished names club, really did a torrid job on "My Heart Tells

medium

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a

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e

a

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C

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"Omeg." i. Theme of Tri-Alfa's Formal

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Using as their theme the Greek symbol

DORIAN

SIBYLLINE

A f t e r a week of e x a m s and nerv-

Friday

SOROSIS

Sorosites living in Holland and ous tension, Dorian found relaxa- Sibyllines met for an informal busidormitories who didn't go home tion in a four o'clock t6a. Local ness meeting in the Sib room. The during exam week celebrated setalent was imported f o r the occa- business having been completed, the mester's end by throwing all care sion in the person of a Holland meeting was adjourned to a social to the winds and having a games' High junior, who gave dramatic meeting at the home of former party in the sorority room Friday night, January 28. presentations: "Little Red Hood- Sibylline, Mrs. Howard Maatman. Bridge and Hearts were played ing Rod," among others. Tea w a s A song-fest was led by "Spike" and other members busied thempoured by the vice president, Eve lyn Shiffner, in the absence of the Sawitsky after which Mrs. Maat- selves with sending out announcepresident, Marian Bandee. A short man told the group a little about ments f o r the coming alumnae business meeting followed, and the N e w Mexico and our Reformed meeting. Vivian Tardiff was in ! members of Kappa Beta Phi were church mission in Dulce, where she charge of the informal get-togeth! dismissed a f t e r raising their voices spent last summer. Refreshments er. in the form of popcorn and apples A brief business meeting was to "Old Dorian." were enjoyed to the full. also held.

WOMEN'S

Hope Church was the scene of a very lovely evening wedding Janu-

By Hi-Stepping Hi-JinkH

ary 29 at 8:00, when Phyllis Pel-

Blow your whistles, girls, ring

grim, Hope graduate, became the

your bells; here we have it — an-

bride of Seaman James White of other leap year. Leap right in the Merchant Marine. there — you can ask that A.S.T.P.The church was decorated with er (the one you've been casting palms and lilies. At the altar were wishful glances on) to go hiking lighted tapers. or bowling.

The four-mile is al-

The maid of honor was Persus ways fun for hikes, especially in Parker, Hope senior. Norma Lemmer, senior from Kalamazoo, and the daylight or even in the moonJean Brummer of Chicago were light (of course, those aren't any bridesmaids. of W.A.A.'s business).

Morris Tardiff, Hope *42, acted as Buuuuuuurrt — went the whistle best man. Ushers were Willard and the dribbling basketballites Pelgrim, Lt. Howard Nevenzel, Pfc. were off to a rough start. Yes, 1 Raymond Van Ommen, Pfc. Wilreally mean rough. The casualty liam Tappan and Don Leviense. list includes Phyl Haskins. who The bride wore a white jersey doubled up on her ankle, and Norgown, featuring a simple V-neck, ma Lemmer was leaning over when tight fitting bodice and long train. Her fingertip veil was caught with all of a sudden up came Rose Winclusters of orange blossoms. H e r strom's fist and, oh, what a pretty bridal bouquet was of white roses. red nose Norma had! Jack acted The maid of honor wore a simple as referee and fixer-upper. About dusty rose gown with the simple 35 girls turned out, and they were V-neck and single large button. She divided into six teams — two teams carried yellow roses. The brides- playing at one time. It was a rough maids wore similar dresses of ice and tough tussle with everyone blue and carried tea roses. On their heads were J j j ^ t caps of rose Board. She has been accepted at petals. [Wf Northwestern University to do Mrs. White gfa'duated from Hope graduate work. in January. While at Hope she was Seaman White attended Hope. a member of Sorosis society, Alcor, While here, he was a member of Scalpel Club, Co-Art editor of the Fraternal society and plaved foot'43 Milestone and on the W.A.L. i ball.

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Class and

Friday

night, which marked the end of the semester. Dinner tables, arranged in the shape of an Omega sign were decorated .with the same three-sided symbol which was also carried out on the place cards. Lighted candles and appropriate posters were also featured.

Jay Van Zoeren, Frieda Grote, Harold Vande Bunte, Mary J a n e Mulder, Gradus Shoemaker, Mitzi Bode, Carl Koning, Martha Pleasant, Adrian Bos, Myra Brouwer, Gregg Keizer, Evelyn Reus, John Mooi, Phyllis Haskin, Eugene Van Tamelen, Marian Reus, Walter Krings, Betty Kingsfield, Russell Kraay, Marian Korteling, Leonard Sibley, Josephine Fitz, Clarence Stryker, Barbara Van Raalte, Robert Danhof and P e g g y Den Herder.

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Expert Radio Service on all

CAR and HOME RADIOS Radio Tubes Tested Free

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BEERNINK STUDIO Portrait Photography Next to Center Theatre 7 W est 8th Street

Attention... Hope Students! Have You Ever Tried Our Economy Fluffed Dry Service at 10c per Pound? SAiMPLE B U N D L E : 3 shirts, 2 drawers, 2 undershirts, 1 pajama, 3 pair socks, 6 handkerchiefs, 3 s o f t collars, 3 towels, 3 wash cloths. Average weight, four pounds—40c NOTE I: This is probably less than the parcel post charge for sending home and return. NOTE II: You mav have any or all of the shirts in this bundle finished a t 11 cents each.

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flying.

eo^loff%h T Sg' " are greatly reduced for pilots when they n t n t ba on l ?K« Y 0 0 1 b y L ; n k Trainer InstructMHU MJ ^ c h e r . A new booklet about the W A V E S is available at Navy Recruiting Offices.

Included on the guest list were Roger Koeppe, Marjorie Emery, George Claver, Dorothy Wichers, Carl Schaftenaar, Lois Plaggemars, Murray Snow, Jackie Granert, Harland Steele, Evelyn Vermulm, Dick Hine, Jean De Ruiter, James MacKechnie, Jane Waldbillig, Sylvio Schorza, Elaine Mensinger, David Menchofer, Libby Romaine, Everett Fikse, Eleanor Holleman, Owen Koeppe, Phyllis Barense, Delbert Vander Haar, Gertrude Maassen.

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Clothing, Furnishings, Shoes ALWAYS

Men's union entertained guests at

During the meal recordings of classical selections were enjoyed. Faculty guests were Prof, and Mrs. Clarence Kleis who were welcomed and introduced by President Harland Steele. Leonard Sibley pronounced the invocation. A f t e r the dinner Roger Koeppe was sworn in as the organization's newly-elected president by Mr. yelling their lungs out and really Steele. fighting for that ball. When it was George Claver as the s c h o o l time to sca-doo. Jack had to practeacher and Gregg Keizer, Adrian tically kick the gals out of the Bos and Everett Fikse as some of gym. We're all waiting anxiously his unruly students participated in for the next opportunity to play. an opening skit on the program for Teams will be organized in a couwhich Mr. Steele was master of ple weeks. ceremonies. The numbers were arBowling is still going strong. ranged so as to celebrate the end Practice makes perfect, so don't of school, the end of romance and forget — every Friday from 1 to the end of war. John Mooi's piano 4. It's a date! solo and encore were followed by Basketball and bowling are espe- Carl Koning and Owen Koeppe who cially good muscle builders. Why presented a humorous skit marking not lose that extra layer of flabby the end of Hitler. "The End of a ituff — better known as f a t ? Spare Perfect Day" was sung as a vocal tires around your waistline vanish solo by Jim MacKechnie, accomand your hips fade into nothing- panied by Mr. Mooi. ness! That's spreading it on a bit The end of the war was the too thick, huh? theme for Delbert Vander Haar's And that is all of the latest dope serious paper which emphasized the for* now except that a ping-pong responsibilities the home front will tournament and a tennis tournahave to meet before the war's end. ment are in the offing. So at this Humorously depicting the "end of point hi-jinks takes a leap — into romance" were Murray Snow and bed! Mooi in a shaving scene duel with Don't forget — all out for good Snow playing the harrassed hushealth. band and Mooi the irate wife. The singing of an original dishwashing ditty by Steele, Fikse and Sylvio Schorza concluded the program. Assisting General C h a i r m a n ACCIDENT I N S U R A N C E FOR Roger Koeppe with party arrangements were Gradus ShoeHOPE COLLEGE S T U D E N T S maker, food; A1 Staver and Gene Holland State Bank Bldg. Van Tamelen, decorations and invitations Dick Hine and Wesley Dykstra, program and Murray Snow, music.

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Hope College Anchor

Page Four

Coeds Await Cupid's Day

fa

HruRRers Cpl. Glenn BrugRers has been transferred to Chanute Field ' just sixty miles from home'." "I seel the war time manpower shortage is affecting your dorm life. No cook is a bad situation. There arc about two things every Army man looks for, and one is food . . . Life down here isn't too bad. 1 have completed about four weeks of a prescribed eight weeks. How many more weeks i will complete 1 don't know. Old Man Winter has been very good around here. We have had some cold weather, but no snow." IT'S W O N D E R F U L . A / C Bill Midavaine is at Y a l e University, where it is "wonderful," and he lives in a dorm about the size of Hope College. "All the buildings are wonderful. They treat us wonderful, but we don't get any time off. We get up at 4:30 A. M.. go to breakfast ( m e s s ) at .'>:()(). Classes from 6-12, physical training after noon mess, from 1-3. Recuperating from 3:00 to 3:05. Retreat follows and evening mess. Studies from 6:30 to 8:30. Lights out at 8:30. Rugged I" I)e V e t t e Pvt. Russ De Vette, Marine, is Captain of Denison's basketball t e a m . Last S a t u r d a y night they played Wooster, which team had not been defeated on its own floor f o r eight years. T h e score was 44 38 in f a v o r of Denison. De Vette and Higgs, another m e m b e r of the t e a m , visited " P h i d " Van Duzer, f o r m e r Hopeite, and now senior at Wooster. Pvt. J e r r y Van Singel, U. S. M. C. A., spent his last week at C a m p Lejeune in New River, North Carolina, finishing his s t u d y i n g , " r o u g h ing it" on m a n e u v e r s for three days, and then cleaning the guns— "This has been a v e r y monotonous task and 1 sure am glad it's over with." He expected to be shipped the first of the week. Lucking Mid. Bob Lucking is in the Navy Supply Corps School, at H a r v a r d University. Of Boston Bob says, ' the s t r a n g e s t city I've ever seen. The s t r e e t s are n a r r o w with narrow sidewalks — they look like alleys. There are no street c a r s or busses runninR downtown . . . 1 like the Navy, but I do not p r e f e r it to Hope College. I surely cannot kick about our setup here, it is wonderful to say the least. No reveille is sounded — we gft up by ourselves and no calisthenics until the weather permits in the S p r i n g . Classes run from 0830-1600 with one hour and a half for noon, and a ten-minute blow between each hour. For the first seven weeks we shall study Disbursing, then we take up another phase of the work . . . We even have maid service. The maids make our sacks and clean the rooms every morning- We a r e barracked in the d o r m s of the G r a d u a t e School of Business Administration. The Navy has taken over the e n t i r e Business School . . . about 12 or 13 hundred Navy men, both officers and Midshipmen . . . We reported here on J a n u a r y 14 and shall probably g r a d u a t e , at least those who make the grade, the middle or last of May."

The Kibitzer

De Boer A / C Willis De Boer, O n ta r io , Calif., was m a r r i e d at S a n t a Ana. He hopes " t h e A.S.T.P. boys e n j o y t h e i r stay as much a s I enjoyed mine a t my C.T.D. at Reno, University of Nevada . . . Now about my life as a ' g a d g e t . ' F i r s t , m a y I say t h a t 1 really have e n j o y e d every bit of my t r a i n i n g so f a r and really will enjoy the r e s t as m y bars and w i n j s aren't f a r off. Some of t h e training has been a bit rough, but it is ail for our benefit. I completed my P r i m a r y phase of t r a i n i n g here and then about the t i m e we w e r e ready to be t r a n s f e r r e d to a Basic school, this place was changed to a Basic and we were f o r t u n a t e l y allowed to remain here and t a k e our basic t r a i n i n g here. Now 1 have anly one week left in basic and then off we go to Advanced where upon completion 1 will receive my wings and bars. Flying is as interesting and e v e n t f u l as you might anticipate — never a dull moment, especially not u p s t a i r s . 1 have had my scares and worries, especially »vhen 1 got lost and landed at a little airport 4()() miles from my base field! 1 c a m e back on my own locomotion, too . . . The best of luck and Godspeed to t h e faculty and all the Hopeites (including A r m y personnel.") Van Dyke Pvt. Harold Van J y k e , in the Engineering I nit at N.V.U. He likes New York a lot since the lights " a r e on a g a i n ! " He thinks the Army is " t h e N u t z , " because he doesn't have to get up until 7:50, and because they live on the tenth floor, and use elevators, instead of marching to classes. He finds Chemistry ' a snap, especially when you've had it two y e a r s . " Danny Yntema, SI/cA.R.M., is itationed at Jacksonville. " F l o r i d a isn't what they say it is, by the way. It's not so w a r m . I could be much w a r m e r in some spots in M i c h i g a n . The w e a t h e r is very changeable. One day it's hot and the next cold. One day it's foggy and the next it rains. I don't like it. 1 just had a flight this morning and it really is a lot of fun. but very h i r i n g , and the f u n n y thing is. whatever I eat. 1 eat twice, and I think you know what I mean. I'm g e t t i n g my radio work much more now. It's really not so easy either, but it's coming, and when I get it, I II really be good. 1 'hope,' 1 'hope,' I 'hope.' "

f u r t h e r orders. Then on our w a y norch, we passed a n i g h t a t f a m o u s Guadalcanal — and then on to Baaika, Russell Islands, in the Solomon g r o u p . We s t a y e d here to become acclimated—and then, a short time ago, moved on up here. ' H e r e ' is an entirely different island t h a n the cocoanut plantation at Banika. This is a typical South Sea ls!e. All j u n g l e — coral, and more j u n gle. Roots — t r e e s — vines — lizards — mud — etc. — a r e g u l a r T a r z a n P a r a d i s e ! Clearing an a r e a for a c a m p site — roads, etc., was really a tough job — but t h a n k s to our allies — the Sea Bees — life has become quite c o m f o rt a b l e a t our new site. Once again we have a swell chow hall — chapel — laundry — t h e a t r e — small stores. Most of our t e n t s have our own showers, right behind our tent — and plenty of f r e s h w a t e r . You'd be surprised how h a r d it is to find f r e s h w a t e r in abundance on most of these islands, so we're fairly lucky. This is the middle of the rainy season — and now I know what they mean when tney say 'rainy season!' In the past week 1 doubt if we've had two consecutive hours in which t h e r e wasn't some precipitation. Our clothes never m a n a g e to dry — once we get them washed — and mud is everywhere. F u n n y how one can learn to disregard little inconveniences like t h a t though. Chow is f a i r — but being a bit f u r t h e r 'up the line,' we're not e a t i n g as well as we were in the Russells . . . rain — it's a blessing in one way. When t h e r e ' s very nearly a full moon!! We've had a couple raids since coming here — and now every time we even hear a plane fly over at night — we dive for our fox holes. None of this waiting until the siren blows. So we've had our baptism under fire . . . I'm once again doing weather work out here — this time with our Army unit. So now I've worked with them all. b u n n y how all the units seem to work with us, and even out here — ' e v e r y t h i n g stops for tea' . . . Delightful habit . . . Darn good tea. too! And so life goes, out here. Up at 5:50 or 6 every morning — duty f r o m six hours to eight hours a day — a movie at night — a letter or two to write — a few c h a p t e r s of some book — and so to bed."

Make Friends Galore In

'44

VALENTINES

with a

and Comic Cards for

FRIENDSHIP Sterling Ring

Valentine Greetings

Several different

Dykstra Phil D y k s t r a , Aer M3/C, has "moved to a n o t h e r island. Still a r e n ' t allowed to tell you where we are — but 1 can tell you where we've been. Our first port of call on reaching the S o u t h w e s t Pacific was Noumea. New Caledonia. We didn t even disembark here — but merely sat in the h a r b o r — w a i t i n g

V a l e n t i n e ' s Day — it's come a long w a y — f r o m Adam and Eve to Scarlet and Rhett — T h e r e ' s always been a cupid, but the way a r r o w s ily a r o u n d Hope's c a m p u s we m i g h t weii g i e c - mm witn, Good Evening, i.ir. Zip ^.ip. in o t h e r countries t h e n a m e is d i u e r e n t , but yet, as t i m e goes by, it s s t i u the same old s t o r y — there's someone — s o m e w h e r e — t h i n k i n g of you, only you beneath the moon and under the sun — and to think the whole idea was s t a r t e d by a little bird. I think, as the story goes, 6 t Valentine w a s imprisoned and made f r i e n d s with a little bird, who a? a token of his love, b r o u g h t t o his f r i e n d a h e a r t - s h a p e d leaf. Because of t h a t , F e b r u a r y N t h has been set aside a s a day when sweet i ostalgic n o t h i n g s are conveyed by g i l t s . In t h e olden days, the gentleman m i g h t give the lady a bunch of blue ribbons t o tie up her bonnie brown hair or maybe to m a t c h her sweet little Alive-blue gown. A few y e a r s ago, p e r h a p s while strolling t h r o u g h the p a r k one day he m i g h t have bought her violets for her f u r . Or would it b r i n g back more memories to say t h a t on the evening of F e b r u a r y 14, a f t e r giving a nickel to her freckle-faced brother, you'd sit down and s h a r e t h a t h e a r t shaped box of sweets. Those days seem to have been a million d r e a m s ago. J i m j u s t can't send you p r e t t y flowers. T h e r e ' s a m a t t e r of no time on his hands or p e r h a p s the distance is much too g r e a t . T h i s year — Valentine's Day, lt.>44 — instead of s t a y i n g home to read your magazine, you can get t h a t scrap book out . . . Sure enough, you did p r e s s one of the violets — and t h e r e ' s the ribbon from the candy he g a v e you last year. All his l e t t e r s are your valentines, now, but t h a t ' s almost all you have this year — so, guess you'll have to dream the rest, and until the lights :ome on again all over the world, what could be s w e e t e r than dreams?

We have beauliful Cards

Patterns

Heart Boxes of Candy $1.10 t o $ 3 . 7 5

by O w e n Koeppe

Collegiate basketball rolls into its final month. Western S t a t e has three failures on its report card so the national spotlight has turned in other directions. In the East, Army looks tops with St. Johns running a close second. In the Midwest, the Big Ten race has been very close. Northwestern looked hard to beat until Wisconsin upset them last Friday. Friday also saw Purdue trounce the Ohio S t a t e giants. Iowa has a chance but we will pick Purdue as Big Ten champs. A year ago Hope was in its glory. The "Blitz Kids" had lost just one basketball game. Remember the Flu at Western. They were crushing all M.I.A.A. competition. (Hope 64-Alma 39.) Yes, but this year Hope's athletes ( ? ) have turned to a more quiet sport. You guessed it; they're all playing pool. The object of pool is of course to shoot the pockets in the balls. On first sight the game seems to be one where skill is of 100 per cent importance. Anyway that's the impression you g e t when you watch a table where beginners are vainly banging things around. But at the next table we find Hine and O. K. engaged in one of their unfriendly bouts. Here skill still dominates but that higher quality, luck, is beginning to show its inspiring effects. But let's move on into the more select circles of pool. Here we find those three or four inspired men from the Senior Chem Lab. They have really progressed a long way. They have actually removed 75 per cent of the skill. Yes, folks, 75 per cent of their shots are unplanned! Last but not least, down at the end table we find Sultan of Slop, Bill Westrate, and his top competitor for the position, Carl Herman Koning. Yes, here we have the real champs. Bill is so good that he doesn't even know what skill is. A great game, isn't it?

"Cherchez La Femme"

Sawitsky M . C.'s

For W . A . L . Party

11:30 Dorm Spread

W.A.L. is p l a n n i n g an all-girls'

S a t u r d a y n i g h t at t h e s t r o k e of

p a r t y to be held at the Woman's

11:30 when all the g o o d - n i g h t s had L i t e r a r y Club, F r i d a y evening, Feb- been said, all the Voorhees- dorm r u a r y 25. F r e s h m e n and sopho- g i r l s t r o u p e d d o w n s t a i r s and the more girls are g o i n g to c a t e the Van Vleckites c h a r g e d t h r o u g h the junior and senior girls and a prize door f o r a dorm-wide s p r e a d . Spike S a w i t s k y , as M.C., led some will be given for the best-dressed g r o u p s i n g i n g to w a r m t h e girls boy. The women m e m b e r s of the up and then everyone w a s put in faculty a r e going to be available t h e groove by Bettie C h r i s t i e singfor dating, too, so there'' will be ing " C h l o e " and "My H e a r t Tells d a t e s for all. 1 Me." Along with a very fine p r o g r a m i Bunny Goff then took o v e r with Lhat has been a r r a n g e d , t h e r e will i a side-splitting rendition of a , m o n be dancing. R e f r e s h m e n t s will cli- ! ologue a b o u t w h a t goes on when I " t h e boy f r i e n d " comes to call. This max the evening's f u n . selection was dedicated to the girl Be sure to get your d a t e s early who recently received a S t e r l i n g and come, one and all. Libby Roring or r a t h e r a ring f r o m S t e r l i n g maine, c h a i r m a n of the p a r t y , M.C. S a w i t s k y led s o m e more promises a good t i m e and lots of s i n g i n g in the f o r m of rounds. fun for all. Last but not least c a m e the -ocrowning event of any s p r e a d . Re"The Bird On Nellie's f r e s h m e n t s carried in by t h e f r e s h H a t " Given at P. and M . men. T h e s e proved to be doughn u t s and hot c h o A ^ ' ^ — plenty Pallette and Masque met Monday f o r everyone. VW ' night, F e b r u a r y 7, in the Commons The s p r e a d was"" considered a Room. The g r o u p was e n t e r t a i n e d by the p r e s e n t a t i o n of The Bird on h u g e success by everyone and the Nellie's H a t . T h i s gay comedy tells u n a n i m o u s cry is " W e o u g h t to of a woman who w a s thrilled over have more of 'em."

J

her new hat t h a t w a s t r i m m e d with a f e a t h e r bird. Because of the influence of her f r i e n d s , who considered t r i m m i n g h a t s with bird f e a t h ers the s a m e as being cruel to animals, she didn't d a r e w e a r her newhat. The play was presented by Rosanna Atkins, Helen Bleeker, B a r b a r a Bilkert, Mitzi Bode, and Phyllis Barense. It was the first in a series of one-act plays to be presented by the various g r o u p s of the club a t f u t u r e P. and M. meetings.

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02-09-1944