Issuu on Google+

DeWitt brothers give college $94,500 gift by Garrett DeGraff H o p e College has been presented a $ 9 4 , 5 0 0 gift by b r o t h e r s Dick and Jack DeWitt to help in e q u i p p i n g the DeWitt C u l t u r a l Center. AN EARLIER $ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 gift f r o m the DeWitt b r o t h e r s , f o u n ders and o w n e r s of Big D u t c h m a n of Z e e l a n d , Michigan, e n a b l e d the College to begin c o n s t r u c t i o n of t h e DCC. T h e new gift q u a l i f i e s H o p e f o r a U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of Heal t h, H d u c a t i o n and Welfare interest subsidy grant for borrowed m o n i e s totalling $ 5 9 4 , 0 0 0 for e q u i p p i n g and f u r n i s h i n g the stud e n t c e n t e r . T h e interest subsidy grant will be used t o pay all interest charges above three percent once the College has obtained the loan.

83rd A n n i v e r s a r y - 1 3

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

February 8, 1971

Committee meets

Presidential hunt begins by Gerald Swieringa T h e f o r m a l search for a president of H o p e College began with the c o n v o c a t i o n J a n u a r y 19, of the Presidential Search C o m m i t tee. IT IS THE c o m m i t t e e ' s responsibility t o suggest, discuss and r e c o m m e n d possible c a n d i d a t e s for t h e p r e s i d e n c y to t h e Board of T r u s t e e s , w h o will m a k e the final selection. Mrs. N o r m a n V i n c e n t Peale, c h a i r m a n of the c o m m i t t e e and a m e m b e r of the Board of T r u s t e e s s t a t e d , "We had a very splendid m e e t i n g r e c e n t l y . " She dicusssed the policy being f o l l o w e d by t h e c o m m i t t e e in its search: "We ask friends, a l u m n i , and associates t o m a k e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s , and we have several excellent recomm e n d a t i o n s at the present t i m e . " THOSE r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s had n u m b e r e d at least 50 prior t o T u e s d a y ' s m e e t i n g . At t h a t m e e t -

ing, t h e n u m b e r was cut to 15. T h e c o m m i t t e e , h o w e v e r , is still soliciting n a m e s and a m o r e complete list is e x p e c t e d . C u r r e n t l y , the list of c a n d i d a t e s i n c l u d e s university p r e s i d e n t s , deans, busin e s s m e n , and professors. N a m e s have not been divulged. While a d e f i n i t e d e a d l i n e has not been established, there is a s t r o n g feeling a m o n g m e m b e r s of the c o m m i t t e e that their search will p r o v i d e Hope College with a president by the fall term of 1971. Dr. Paul Fried, c h a i r m a n of H o p e ' s history d e p a r t m e n t and a m e m b e r of the search c o m m i t t e e , said he was "very e n c o u r a g e d " by the c o m m i t t e e ' s work so far. "WE HAVE A V E R Y solid and very b r o a d spread of c a n d i d a t e s , " he a d d e d , " a n d it is the feeling of the c o m m i t t e e that we will be able to d e c i d e on a p r e s i d e n t b e f o r e t h e next a c a d e m i c y e a r . " At its meeting, t h e c o m m i t t e e was p r e s e n t e d with a s t a t e m e n t

A gourmet's directory for local consumption by Dave Dustin N a t u r a l l y the first q u e s t i o n that c o m e s t o the m i n d s of H o p e frosh and t r a n s f e r s t u d e n t s concerns t h e g a s t r o n o m y of the Holland area. Since the lure of f o o d is c o m m o n l y an irresistable o n e , b e c k o n i n g strongly in t h e lives of most college s t u d e n t s , I feel t h a t it is a b o u t time that s o m e o n e took up the interest of H o p e ' s eating s t u d e n t b o d y and publicized t h e existence of various f o o d - p r e p a r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s especially suited t o their u n i q u e needs. TO GUIDE HOPE s t u d e n t s in their q u e s t for c u l i n a r y repast within the H o l l a n d - Z e e l a n d conu r b a t i o n , I have p r e p a r e d t h e following guide to s o m e of the m o r e n o t e w o r t h y c h o w houses. T h o s e a c c u s t o m e d to meals of m e d i o c r i t y , taken in m e d i o c r e s u r r o u n d i n g s , will u n d o u b t e d l y be satisfied with a meal at the Warm Friend C a f e t e r i a . D e c o r a t e d in stylish, n e o - D u t c h R o a d h o u s e , t h e dining r o o m has an a t m o s p h e r e in a class by itself which is only further e n h a n c e d by a prolificpresence of Bible tracts that leaves it u n s u r p a s s e d in t a s t e f u l elegance. THE CONT1NOUS e n t e r t a i n ment a f f o r d e d by a good view of the hotel desk, c o n t r i b u t e s greatly to an evening of dining l u x u r y that is well w o r t h the $ 1 . 5 9 all-you-can-eat price. Lunches, served in the same, inimitable style, are $ 1 . 1 9 , all-you-can-eat. Be f o r e w a r n e d a b o u t taking desserts or beverages o t h e r t h a n water, h o w e v e r . N e i t h e r is included in t h e price of a meal. F o r t h o s e p r e f e r r i n g the liquid diet, no list of H o l l a n d ' s eating spots w o u l d be c o m p l e t e w i t h o u t

m e n t i o n of Skiles' T a v e r n . While its e x t r e m e l y varied m e n u is almost e n o u g h t o send s h u d d e r s d o w n t h e spine of a Swedish s m o r g a s b o a r d e x p e r t , Skiles' c o n tinues t o be n o t e d for its imaginative " s w i m m i n g - p o o l " p e p p e r o n i pizza. MADE FROM D A V E Skiles' o w n original recipe, this dish is personally p r e p a r e d by one of his f a m o u s " p i z z a girls." Each perfectly r o u n d , p e p p e r o n i slice is c a r e f u l l y p r e p a r e d so that it will assume a form resembling a miniscule s w i m m i n g p o o l c o n t a i n ing d i r t y rain w a t e r d u r i n g the c o m p l e x baking process. Skiles' clientele has c h a r a c t e r istically r e m a i n e d intensely loyal, and H o p e s t u d e n t s c o n t i n u e to be a t t r a c t e d t o it by the c o n s i s t e n t l y high s t a n d a r d s of f o o d and service that have b e c o m e the T a v e r n ' s hallmark over the years. FOR QUICK SNACKS while on c a m p u s , the only place to go is the Phelps Hall f r a n c h i s e of t h e Saga F o o d s chain. R e t u r n i n g C P s will love t h e c h a r m i n g mess hall d e c o r , and the a u t h e n t i c i t y of it is d o u b l e d by the fact that Saga o f f e r s f o o d that is at least t h e equal of a n y ever put out by t h o s e s t a u n c h b a s t i o n s of culinary excellence. T h o s e t h i n k i n g of t a k i n g advantage of a Phelps Hall d i n n e r o p p o r t u n i t y for the first time, might d o well to t a k e along a pair of s o u n d i n h i b i t o r s of the t y p e worn by w o r k e r s at jet terminals. If t h e s e are not available, c o t t o n s o a k e d in w a t e r will also serve t h e p u r p o s e a d e q u a t e l y , t h o u g h for not as long. A B O V E ALL, HAVE patience w h e n e a t i n g at Phelps. As soon as (continued on page 2, column 4)

o u t l i n i n g the criteria with which the c a n d i d a t e s w o u l d be j u d g e d . A f t e r some discussion, it was d e c i d e d this s t a t e m e n t needed revision. THE REVISED S T A T E M E N T , which was not c o m p l e t e d b e f o r e the m e e t i n g a d j o u r n e d , will be sent t o the Board of T r u s t e e s for r a t i f i c a t i o n . Neither the revised criteria nor the original criteria are available at t h e present time. Dr. Paul B r o u w e r , an a l u m n i r e p r e s e n t a t i v e and p r e s i d e n t of Rohras, Hibler and Replogle, c o n s u l t i n g p s y c h o l o g i s t s , is assisting t h e c o m m i t t e e . B r o u w e r ' s firm will be available to t h e c o m m i t t e e for t h e screening of p o t e n t i a l c a n d i d a t e s w h e n a w o r k a b l e number has been r e a c h e d . A c c o r d i n g to F r i e d , the c o m m i t t e e will s u b m i t f o u r or five n a m e s t o the firm for c o n s i d e r a t i o n . N o deadline has been set for the presentation of names. R e g a r d i n g the c o n t i n u a t i o n of the search, Mrs. Peale c o m m e n t e d , "We are c u r r e n t l y in the investigative stage and are n o w delving m o r e deeply into t h e a p p l i c a n t s ' b a c k g r o u n d s . " No d a t e has been established for the c o m m i t t e e ' s next m e e t i n g .

UNDER THE TERMS of the loan subsidy all m o n e y b o r r o w e d with g o v e r n m e n t assistance m u s t be used in e q u i p p i n g i n s t r u c t i o n a l areas of the DCC. A c c o r d i n g to Clarence H a n d l o g t e n , T r e a s u r e r and Business Manager, instructional areas i n c l u d e the t h e a t r e and its ancillary r o o m s , t h e art gallery, c l a s s r o o m s and f a c u l t y offices.

Curry

resigns

Himebaugh

T h e gift and loan subsidy will enable t h e College t o begin the process of letting bids f o r p u c h a s e and installation of equipffient f o r the DCC H a n d l o g t e n said. Currently the bids s u b m i t t e d over a year ago are being revised. O n c e the prices have been u p d a t e d the Executive Committee of the Board of T r u s t e e s will meet t o d e c i d e which c o n t r a c t s can be let, H a n d l o g t e n said. HE A D D E D THAT IT "is t o o early' 1 t o k n o w if the College d o e s now have e n o u g h f u n d s t o f u r n i s h m o r e t h a n the i n s t r u c t i o n a l areas because of the f l u c t u a t i o n s in the stock m a r k e t . H a n d l o g t e n n o t e d t h e recent rise in the value of United S t a t e s I n d u s t r i e s Stock f r o m $11 to $ 2 2 per share. Both of the t w o large gifts f r o m t h e DeWitt b r o t h e r s were in United States I n d u s t r i e s s t o c k . When the first gift was m a d e the stock was valued at $ 3 6 per share. " S o m e of t h e c o n t r a c t s f o r e q u i p m e n t s h o u l d have been let by n o w . " H a n d l o g t e n said. " T h e building was s c h e d u l e d for c o m pletion the s u m m e r of 1971, so we may be a little late. 1 w o u l d guess we w o n ' t be ready to m o v e into all of the building in S e p t e m b e r , " he said.

admissions

post,

replaces Kleinheksel

Several a d m i n i s t r a t i v e c h a n g e s in the o f f i c e s of a d m i s s i o n s and financial were announced recently. Charles C u r r y has been relieved of t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i v e responsibilities of d i r e c t o r of a d m i s s i o n s . He will c o n t i n u e in t h e a d m i s s i o n s o f f i c e as H o p e ' s recruiter in the East at least u n t i l the end of the school year. Robert De Y o u n g , dean of s t u d e n t s , has a s s u m e d leadership of t h e a d m i s s i o n s ' p e r s o n n e l and p r o g r a m . Phillip T o p p e n , assistant d i r e c t o r of admissions, will assist Dean De Y o u n g . Paul Kleinheksel, f o r m e r director of financial aid, has r e t u r n e d to t h e a d m i s s i o n s o f f i c e as associate d i r e c t o r . Bruce H i m e b a u g h has replaced Kleinheksel as d i r e c t o r of financial aid. He has been at H o p e since A u g u s t , 1 9 7 0 , serving as an admissions counselor.

CHARLES CURRY

Succeeds Donia

Swieringa to edit anchor Gerald Swieringa has been a p p o i n t e d e d i t o r of the Hope College anchor for the spring semester, 1971. He s u c c e e d s T h o m a s Donia w h o s e resignation b e c a m e e f f e c t i v e F e b r u a r y 1.

sentative voice in the p a p e r . "I teel t h e anchor m a y be b o t h p r o f e s s i o n a l and p r o v a c a t i v e , " he said, " a n d to that end we will solicit an ever-widening range of s t u d e n t and f a c u l t y o p i n i o n . "

Swieringa, a s e n i o r English m a j o r , has b e e n active with the p a p e r as critiques e d i t o r t h r o u g h out t h e fall term. He is a m e m b e r of t h e Blue Key H o n o r F r a t e r n i t y and has served as a resident t u t o r in English. In a d d i t i o n t o these activities he has a c t e d in several theatre department productions and l e t t e r e d in f o o t b a l l each of his f o u r years at Hope.

Associate e d i t o r s will be Garrett D e G r a f f , David Dustin and Bob Roos, Swieringa a n n o u n c e d . B o t h DeGraff and Dustin have

previously served on the anchor e d i t o r i a l b o a r d while R o o s h a s b e e n an anchor r e p o r t e r . Also assisting in t h e p u b l i c a t i o n of t h e p a p e r will be f e a t u r e s edit o r Eileen V e r d u i n , s p o r t s e d i t o r Mark Van O o s t e n b e r g , and crit i q u e s e d i t o r Kay H u b b a r d . T o m Siderius h e a d s t h e p h o t o g r a p h y staff.

His a p p o i n t m e n t c l i m a x e s a m o n t h long search by the S t u d e n t Communications Media Comm i t t e e to d e t e r m i n e D o n i a ' s successor. T h e c o m m i t t e e m e t on several o c c a s i o n s t h r o u g h o u t that period as various c a n d i d a t e s were i n t e r v i e w e d and e v a l u a t e d . " O u r decision was not an easy o n e , " stated H o p k i n s , " b e c a u s e each of t h e c a n d i d a t e s f o r t h e p o s i t i o n o f f e r e d t h e anchor pot e n t i a l s for o u t s t a n d i n g leaders h i p . " He a d d e d t h a t the services of all those w h o applied w o u l d be e m p l o y e d t h r o u g h o u t the t e r m . Swieringa stated his i n t e n t i o n as e d i t o r w o u l d be to o f f e r the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y a m o r e repre-

CRACKING THE WHIP-Gerald Swieringa, new anchor editor, guides associate editors Garrett DeGraff and Dave Dustin in the pressing business of publication. The third associate editor is B o b Roos.


Page 2

February 8, 1971

Hope College anchor

Down 14 percent

Out-of-state applications drop by Martha Mulder F r e s h m a n a p p l i c a t i o n s f o r admission in the fall of 1971 are down 9-10 percent, according to H o p e ' s a d m i s s i o n s advisors. I N C R E A S E D COST OF t u i t i o n combined with the economicc o n d i t i o n of the c o u n t r y was cited as t h e primary reason for the decrease. Dean of s t u d e n t s and a c t i n g D i r e c t o r of Admissions, R o b e r t De Y o u n g , r e p o r t e d that f r e s h m a n applications from out-of-state high school seniors are d o w n by 14 p e r c e n t . A p p l i c a t i o n s received f r o m Michigan are a b o u t equal to those received at this t i m e last year. D E Y O U N G A D D E D that the n u m b e r of high school g r a d u a t e s is levelling off because the b o o m of war babies from World War II and the Korean War has now e n d e d . C o n s e q u e n t l y , universities and colleges all over the c o u n t r y suspect that they will e x p e r i e n c e a p r o b l e m in new s t u d e n t enrollment. A l t h o u g h all reasons now being presented are c o n j e c t u r e , c o n c e r n is increasing due to the p r o b l e m . D e Y o u n g m e n t i o n e d that a number of liberal arts colleges will be c o n d u c t i n g "a study as the year progresses to d e t e r m i n e w h y this p r o b l e m has o c c u r r e d and w h e r e we are we m e a n i n g colleges all over t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s . "

PHILLIP TOPPEN, Assistant D i r e c t o r of A d m i s s i o n s , suggested that t h e d r a f t may be a f f e c t i n g enrollment. Furthermore, he specified, "40-50 percent of H o p e ' s s t u d e n t s are m e m b e r s of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h of A m e r i c a , whose family m e m b e r s h i p being primarily moderately-incomed, would find it especially d i f f i c u l t to meet the d e m a n d s of a private school e d u c a t i o n . " F i n a l l y , both D e Y o u n g and T o p p e n agreed that m o r e s t u d e n t s are f i n d i n g it necessary to a t t e n d j u n i o r colleges, due to lack of f u n d s . T h e y were not sure, however, w h e t h e r or not the n u m b e r of t r a n s f e r s t u d e n t s c o m p e n s a t e s for t h e decrease in f r e s h m a n enrollment. THE ADMISSIONS O f f i c e has taken several steps t o c o u n t e r this

d r o p in a p p l i c a t i o n s , D e Y o u n g r e p o r t e d . He n o t e d the hiring of Dennis A l e x a n d e r , a 1969 H o p e g r a d u a t e , t o work full-time recruiting in t h e East, a n d the hiring of several new p a r t - t i m e recruiters. In a d d i t i o n , D e Y o u n g said, the r e o r g a n i z a t i o n of t h e A d m i s s i o n s O f f i c e has f r e e d Charles C u r r y , D i r e c t o r of Admissions, f r o m a d m i n i s t r a t i v e responsibilities so that he can d o active recruiting. The A d m i s s i o n s O f f i c e is also carrying o u t a " v i g o r o u s mailing campaign," DeYoung stated. T h e Dean of S t u d e n t s sa.d, " M y p r i m a r y responsibility is t o do what 1 can t o get m o r e e x p o s u r e for the college a r o u n d the c o u n t r y and to d e v e l o p a program to increase a p p l i c a t i o n s . "

Kennedy urges reform of Selective Service W A S H I N G T O N A P - S e n . Edward M. K e n n e d y , D-Mass., has urged Congress to impose a 1 5 0 , 0 0 0 man d r a f t ceiling and t o r e f o r m t h e Selective Service system t o insure that p o o r p e o p l e d o not fight a rich m a n ' s war. "I w o u l d s u p p o r t a v o l u n t e e r army in peace t i m e , " K e n n e d y

W e s t 8th W h a t a s e n s a t i o n a l bit of b o o t t h i s is

said. " B u t w h e n A m e r i c a n men are d y i n g in V i e t n a m , C a m b o d i a and p e r h a p s n o w in Laos, 1 believe a v o l u n t e e r army is b o t h unwise and i n e q u i t a b l e . " K e n n e d y criticized an administ r a t i o n p r o p o s a l t o give a $ 3 , 0 0 0 b o n u s t o m e n w h o enlisted in c o m b a t units. " I t is grossly i n e q u i t a b l e t o p e r m i t the risks of b a t t l e t o fall only o n t h o s e less a f f l u e n t Americans w h o are i n d u c e d to j o i n the army by t h e a t t r a c t i o n of higher military p a y , " he said. He also urged changes in the Selective Service law to abolish new s t u d e n t and all o c c u p a t i o n a l d e f e r m e n t s . He urged that m e n be d r a f t e d by t h e existing l o t t e r y o n a n a t i o n a l basis. K e n n e d y ' s legislative p r o p o s a l s b e f o r e the S e n a t e A r m e d Services C o m m i t t e e f o l l o w e d the administ r a t i o n ' s plea f o r a t w o - y e a r ext e n s i o n of t h e d r a f t and p a y hikes designed t o lead t o an all-volunteer a r m y b y m i d - 1 9 7 3 . Sen. Mark O. H a t f i e l d , R-Ore., claimed t h e d r a f t could be abolished n o w , and military life greatly e n h a n c e d , at a net savings of $1 billion per year.

G O U R G I N G GOURMET—Engrossed in the pursuit of culinary satisfaction, one earnest Hope student finds himself lost to the more worldly distractions surrounding him as he engages in his solitary act of mandibular mastication.

A student's to food

gourmet

and other

(continued from page I) o n e ' s lungs and vocal c o r d s a d j u s t to t h e increased strains i m p o s e d upon them by the d y n a m i c m e a l t i m e a t m o s p h e r e , it will be discovered t h a t c o n v e r s a t i o n is possible, even if not very easy. Up t o this p o i n t , 1 have b e e n c o n c e r n e d with t h e m o r e casual eating establishments around town-suitable mainly f o r imp r o m p t u s n a c k e r s and o t h e r such compulsive types. However, for those really big dining o c c a s i o n s and I m e a n t h o s e that c a n ' t be satisfied by a Saga meal, or even a Whopper-the f o l l o w i n g restaur a n t s should receive y o u r first and only c o n s i d e r a t i o n . C O N T R A R Y TO POPULAR belief, it is necessary to go t o

with g l o w - c o a t e d crinkles running knee h i g h ,

and d o w n t h e f r o n t a

r o w of lacing. rug in.

L o t s of heel to c u t

Brown

or

Black

the student chupch

uppers

w i l l

ifgronny could onlu see her boot

S u n d a y ,

W O R S l l i p

f e B R u a R y

u ,

1971

DIMNENT CHAPEL - 11:00 a.m. Rev,

Tom

Stark,

campus

minister

at

Michigan

State

University, w i l l preach,

$23.00

guide delights

Z e e l a n d for the best and c h e a p e s t f o o d in the area. Y o u r first s t o p should be F r a n k D i o n e s e ' s C o n f e c t i o n a r y for s o m e of his f a m o u s " e l e c t r i c c h i l e . " It would be e x t r e m e l y difficult f o r me t o u n d e r t a k e a d e s c r i p t i o n of this dish at this time, so let it s u f f i c e for me to say that F r a n k ' s chile c o n t a i n s a little bit of e v e r y t h i n g in t h e perfect p r o p o r t i o n s . You try it o n c e , and t h e n it sort of grows (literally) on y o u . After you have had your a p p e t i z e r at F r a n k ' s (or it has had y o u - o n e way or the o t h e r ) , y o u should d e f i n i t e l y m a k e an e f f o r t to m o v e on d o w n the street t o Van Raalte's H o m e of Fine F o o d s . Here y o u m a y o r d e r t h e best steak in t h e H o l l a n d - Z e e l a n d area ( $ 3 . 5 0 ) , an u n l i m i t e d pile of c o o k e d h a m b u r g with u n l i m i t e d trimmings ($2.25), unlimited Swiss steak or c h i c k e n ( $ 2 . 6 5 ) , or even l o b s t e r tails. N o w I'm not going to say t h a t their service is fast, but unless y o u s m o k e r s particularly e n j o y wasting cigarettes, d o n ' t light u p a f t e r y o u have given y o u r o r d e r . A n d above all, d o n ' t ask to see the w i n e list w h e n dining at Van Raalte's. A f t e r all, it's a family r e s t a u r a n t . . . Bon a p p e t i t e !

Ruth Oosterhof to present recital T h u r s d a y niÂŤ;ht

COFFEE GROUNDS - 7:00 p.m.

" T h a t you can't get away f r o m the facts is one of our modern fixations, A certain carpenter f r o m Galilee kept on doing it f r o m morning to night, disregarding them and getting away f r o m them, Simon, the hearer? No! Peter, the rock, Levi, the publican? No! Matthew, the saint. If a man has anything in him at all he knows that he is here to change the facts."

R u t h O o s t e r h o f will present her senior violin recital in Wichers A u d i t o r i u m , T h u r s d a y at 8 : 1 5 p.m. T h e program will consist of t h e Violin Concerto Number Two in E Major by J o h a n n S e b a s t i a n Bach, Trio Number Nine in E flat Major by L u d w i g von B e e t h o v e n , and Sonata Number One in A minor, Opus 105 by R o b e r t Schumann. Diana H o l t h i u s , a f r e s h m a n will a c c o m p a n y Miss O o s t e r h o f in all n u m b e r s . T h e y will be j o i n e d in the B e e t h o v e n trio by senior cellist Dawn Van Ark.

SKI SALE Save from 20% to 50% NOW!

'Reliable HONDA 254 River Ave -

You can RELI on us . . . we are ABLE to satisfy"

Sti Across from Centennial Park

HA US


February 8, 1 9 7 1

Page 3

Hope College anchor

Participants

speak out

Grenoble program criticized by Bob R o o s

O F F I C I A L REPRIEVE—Van Raalte Hail, c o n d e m n e d as unsafe for classroom use in D e c e m b e r , 1 9 6 9 , remains in use as a result of c o n c e s s i o n s made by state fire officials.

Van Raalte to be used despite legal pressure by Mary Houting V a n Raalte Hall, a t t a c k e d by the S t a t e F i r e Marshall as u n s a f e for c l a s s r o o m use, will r e m a i n in use until the college can p r o v i d e a d e q u a t e c l a s s r o o m facilities elsew h e r e , r e p o r t e d College T r e a s u r e r and Business Manager C l a r e n c e Handlogten. S U C H F A C I L I T I E S will include the proposed academic science c e n t e r , w h i c h is now in the p l a n n i n g stages a n d w o u l d be c o m p l e t e d at the earliest in t h e fall of 1973. T h e DeWitt C u l t u r a l C e n t e r may also be utilized as classroom s p a c e u p o n its c o m p l e tion this fall. V a n R a a l t e Hall first came u n d e r a t t a c k by s t a t e fire o f f i c i a l s in 1 9 6 7 , f o r failure to c o m p l y with fire r e g u l a t i o n s . Since t h a t time t h e s t a t e has e x e r t e d pressure on t h e college to e i t h e r r e n o v a t e the building or evacuate it. T H E COST OF THE needed renovations would a m o u n t to nearly $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 . S u c h a figure is not only t o o high, but the r e n o v a t i o n s t h e m s e l v e s are impractical. H a n d l o g t e n said.

Chemistry

dept.

earns research grant from NSF T h e c h e m i s t r y d e p a r t m e n t has been a w a r d e d a $ 1 2 , 2 5 0 N a t i o n a l Science F o u n d a t i o n grant to support u n d e r g r a d u a t e research. Five H o p e s t u d e n t s will be c h o s e n a c c o r d i n g to their a c a d e m ic r e c o r d s and their c o m p e t e n c e in research and experimentation. Each s t u d e n t chosen by the f a c u l t y will select a field of interest and work u n d e r a chemistry p r o f e s s o r . A c c o r d i n g to P r o f e s s o r Irwin Brink, d i r e c t o r of the p r o g r a m , a new phase of u n d e r g r a d u a t e research will be i n s t i t u t e d . T h r e e a d d i t i o n a l s t u d e n t s will be c h o s e n f r o m o t h e r private liberal a r t s colleges in Michigan t h a t have not received f u n d s for r e s e a r c h . T h e grant will also pay f o r c h e m i c a l s and e q u i p m e n t n e e d e d in t h e research. T h i s is the seventh c o n s e c u t i v e year that such a g r a n t has been given to H o p e for u n d e r g r a d u a t e research. Over these years t h i r t y - o n e c h e m i s t r y m a j o r s have p a r t i c i p a t e d in the p r o g r a m .

s

a

O n e of the main o b j e c t i v e s of the f i r e d e p a r t m e n t is the basic design of Van R a a l t e , p a r t i c u l a r l y the large o p e n s t a i r w a y in t h e c e n t e r of the building, r e p o r t e d H a n d l o g t e n . " A n y w o r t h w h i l e imp r o v e m e n t s w o u l d be of such a n a t u r e that it hardly p a y s t o b e g i n , " he said. IN D E C E M B E R 1 9 6 9 , the Fire Marshall issued an a b a t e m e n t o r d e r to the college giving t h e m thirty d a y s t o c o m p l y with fire regulations. At the time the college asked f o r an e x t e n s i o n of the d e a d l i n e so that t h e Board of T r u s t e e s could c o n s i d e r possible action. According to Handlogten, " a n y decision a f f e c t i n g the life of t h e b u i l d i n g " m u s t be m a d e by the b o a r d . A t e a m of n e g o t i a t o r s , h e a d e d by Board secretary Willard Wichers, was a p p o i n t e d t o meet with s t a t e officials. T H E N E G O T I A T O R S and t h e fire o f f i c i a l s have met p e r i o d i c a l l y and a compromise has b e e n r e a c h e d . A c c o r d i n g t o the fire d e p a r t m e n t , t h e y are m e r e l y interested in e n f o r c i n g t h e law. " I t would be u n r e a s o n a b l e t o say t h a t the college m u s t c o m p l y within a few d a y s or m o n t h s , " s t a t e d an official of the fire d e p a r t m e n t . T h e college, stated H a n d l o g t e n , w o u l d like to c o m p l y w i t h the fire regulations, b u t f u n d s are unavailable. At the p r e s e n t time c o m p l e tion of the c u l t u r a l c e n t e r is considered more important than r e m o d e l i n g V a n Raalte. " W e have held t h e m off and told t h e m we had o t h e r t h i n g s , " H a n d l o g t e n said. THE ADMINISTRATIONS p r e s e n t plan is to c o n t i n u e to use Van Raalte Hall f o r c l a s s r o o m s until o t h e r a r r a n g e m e n t s can be made. Eventually, the building will be c o n v e r t e d i n t o o f f i c e space, as the r e g u l a t i o n s g o v e r n i n g o f f i c e s are n o t as d e m a n d i n g as those g o v e r n i n g c l a s s r o o m s . When a d e q u a t e space is available elsew h e r e , the b u i l d i n g w o u l d be razed. C o n c e r n i n g plans to utilize the DCC f o r c l a s s r o o m space, H a n d logten said, " W e have talked a b o u t it s o m e . It is nice t o have s o m e t h i n g in r e s e r v e . " T h e fire o f f i c i a l s may pressure t h e college to e v a c u a t e t h e third f l o o r of V a n Raalte, Handlogten added. The college could p r e f e r t o r e s p o n d t o the d e m a n d s of the fire d e p a r t m e n t r a t h e r t h a n use t h e C u l t u r a l C e n t e r f o r classes, he n o t e d .

I n t e r n a t i o n a l e d u c a t i o n is not merely a q u e s t i o n of u n d e r t a k i n g academic study in a f o r e i g n c o u n t r y ; it involves a d j u s t m e n t t o a c u l t u r e , a w a y of life, w h i c h d i f f e r s f r o m t h a t in the U n i t e d States. T H E P R O G R A M jointly sponsored by H o p e and A l b i o n at G r e n o b l e , F r a n c e , p r o v i d e s an e x a m p l e of s o m e of t h e p r o b l e m s w h i c h may arise in f o r e i g n s t u d y . A t o t a l 'A s e v e n t e e n H o p e s t u d e n t s spent the 1 9 7 0 fall s e m e s t e r at the University of Grenoble, studying the ,;rench language and c u l t u r e . N i n e ret u r n e d to H o l l a n d at t h e e n d of the s e m e s t e r , while eight rem a i n e d . Of the nine s t u d e n t s w h o c a m e b a c k , f o u r had originally p l a n n e d to s p e n d an e n t i r e year in G r e n o b l e , but had c h a n g e d their m i n d s at least p a r t l y b e c a u s e of dissatisfaction with their experience there. MOST OF THE students who recently returned have voiced criticism of o n e or m o r e a s p e c t s of t h e G r e n o b l e p r o g r a m . O n e of the most c o m m o n c o m p l a i n t s c o n c e r n e d the e x a m a n d g r a d i n g system. " T h e r e ' s a lot of ambiguity in the s e t u p of t h e e x a m s , " one student explained. " Y o u don't have a n y e x a m u n t i l the very e n d , and t h e q u e s t i o n s it c o n t a i n s are not really related to t h e c o u r s e material." She also i n d i c a t e d t h a t the lack of f e e d b a c k - the fact t h a t t h e r e were n o tests u n t i l the e n d of t h e s e m e s t e r - m a d e it d i f f i c u l t f o r s t u d e n t s to d e t e r m i n e w h e r e t h e y s t o o d or h o w t h e y were d o i n g . THE SYSTEM OF assignments and classwork d u r i n g t h e s e m e s t e r also c a m e in f o r m u c h criticism. " I t ' s t o o e a s y - y o u just d o n ' t d o a n y t h i n g , " o n e girl said, while a n o t h e r d e c l a r e d , "I did less w o r k in t h e F r e n c h c o u r s e s t h e r e t h a n I would here." They indicated that some of the p r o f e s s o r s " t r e a t e d t h e m like c h i l d r e n " by r e f u s i n g t h e m t o let t h e m a t t e m p t a n y t h i n g b u t t h e easiest w o r k . T h e r e was general dissatistaction with the fact t h a t the s t u d e n t s were graded largely o n class a t t e n d a n c e . " W e w e r e told that t h e university had reserved the right t o l a k e a w a y all o u r c r e d i t s if we failed t o a t t e n d class," o n e of t h e m c o m p l a i n e d . MOST OF T H E people who p a r t i c i p a t e d in the p r o g r a m received 16 h o u r s of c r e d i t , b u t they i n d i c a t e d t h a t it is credit of an a m b i g u o u s n a t u r e : t h e semest e r - h o u r s , instead of b e i n g divided u p a n d described u n d e r specific a c a d e m i c areas, a p p l y o n l y to a general s t u d y of F r e n c h c u l t u r e . M o r e t h a n o n e s t u d e n t said t h a t , because of this, t h e y d o n ' t k n o w h o w their c r e d i t s will be a p p l i e d here at H o p e . " N o b o d y actually k n o w s w h a t t h e c r e d i t s c o u n t f o r . 1 have to register, b u t I d o n ' t k n o w w h a t to t a k e , " o n e said. O T H E R F A C T O R S w h i c h , acc o r d i n g to the s t u d e n t s , c o n f r o n t e d them with a problem were the a t t i t u d e of t h e F r e n c h t o w a r d A m e r i c a n s and t h e relative isolation of the A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t s f r o m t h e F r e n c h p e o p l e . O n e girl s t a t e d t h a t the F r e n c h h a r b o r a general feeling of " d i s l i k e " t o w a r d A m e r i c a n s . " T h e t y p i c a l o p i n i o n is t h a t t h e y ' r e rich, i m p e r i a l i s t i c capi-

Ie

t a h s t s , " she said, and a d d e d that m a n y of the p r o f e s s o r s in the university " s h a r e d this f e e l i n g . " S o m e of the s t u d e n t s r e m a r k e d that t h e y did not have e n o u g h c o n t a c t with F r e n c h s t u d e n t s and with t h e F r e n c h p e o p l e in g e n e r a l , and that t h e F r e n c h a t t i t u d e toward A m e r i c a n s was p a r t l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r this. " 5 0 p e r - c e n t of the p e o p l e in o u r d o r m were A m e r i c a n s , " o n e said, while another commented, "We were practically o s t r a c i z e d f r o m the rest of the c a m p u s , a n d part of the reason f o r this was p o l i t i c a l . " THE P R O G R A M HAD one a s p e c t , h o w e v e r , that was praised by m o s t of the s t u d e n t s . F o r a period of t h r e e w e e k s in O c t o b e r and t w o at C h r i s t m a s t i m e , they were a l l o w e d t o travel in F r a n c e and in o t h e r p a r t s of E u r o p e . O n e girl s e e m e d t o s u m it u p w h e n she said, " T h e traveling o p p o r t u n i t i e s were f a n t a s t i c . " Mrs. Linda P a l m e r , assistant p r o f e s s o r in F r e n c h , c o m m e n t e d extensively o n the a c a d e m i c p r o b lems and c o n f l i c t s t h a t H o p e students have e n c o u n t e r e d at Grenoble. SHE E X P L A I N E D how the french department a t t e m p t s to prepare Grenoble students before they leave. " W e have an o r i e n t a tion s e m e s t e r in w h i c h we give t h e m all the i n f o r m a t i o n they need. " W e tell t h e m that it will seem as if t h e y have very little h o m e w o r k , b u t t h a t t h e y have t o k e e p w o r k i n g o n t h e i r o w n , " she said, and e l a b o r a t e d , " I f a s t u d e n t has t w o h o u r s in g r a m m a r , he s h o u l d s p e n d t h e rest of his time g o i n g to cultural events, reading French l i t e r a t u r e a n d n e w s s o u r c e s , and so f o r t h . " T h e s t u d e n t s h o u l d b e c o m e as f a m i l i a r as possible w i t h F r e n c h life a n d c u l t u r e in general, she i n d i c a t e d .

She went o n to say t h a t the e m p h a s i s o n broad f a m i l i a r i t y with F r e n c h c u l t u r e is the reason for t h e t y p e of final e x a m that is included in t h e G r e n o b l e p r o g r a m . " S o m e s a m p l e q u e s t i o n s f r o m the tost w o u l d be, 'Talk a b o u t Paris', 'Discuss a living F r e n c h m a n ' , and o t h e r s s i m i l a r , " she said. MRS. C A R O L I N E C h a r n i n , a Hope graduate who spent the 1 9 6 9 - 7 0 a c a d e m i c year in G r e n o b l e , also c o m m e n t e d o n t h e p r o g r a m and s o m e of the criticisms t h a t have been raised against it. In regard t o the c o m p l a i n t s a b o u t t h e class a s s i g n m e n t s and the final e x a m , she said, " A basic u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the E u r o p e a n system a s s u m e s individual initiative. T h e p r o f s tell the s t u d e n t s t h a t t h e y ' l l be going a b o u t most work t h e m s e l v e s . " She said t h a t it is a m i s t a k e f o r s t u d e n t s to go to G r e n o b l e with the idea t h a t they will be w o r k i n g in an A m e r i c a n t y p e of e d u c a tional s y s t e m . ON T H E BASIS O F her o w n e x p e r i e n c e , Mrs. C h a r n i n also c o m m e n t e d on the allegation t h a t s o m e of t h e c o u r s e s o f f e r e d at G r e n o b l e are t o o easy and pose n o challenge. She i n d i c a t e d t h a t t h e p r o g r a m is f l e x i b l e ; t h a t " c o u r s e s are available at all levels." She a d m i t t e d that t h e impression of h o s t i l i t y w h i c h A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t s have received f r o m t h e F r e n c h can be a p r o b l e m . However, she stressed her belief t h a t it is a political s e n t i m e n t w h i c h s h o u l d be u n d e r s t o o d as s u c h , a n d not t a k e n p e r s o n a l l y She d e n i e d that t h e r e is any real e x c u s e f o r G r e n o b l e s t u d e n t s ' c o m p l a i n t s of isolation f r o m t h e F r e n c h . " T h e d o r m is less t h a n a b l o c k - a n d - a half f r o m t h e r e s t a u r a n t w h e r e s t u d e n t s eat or c o n g r e g a t e f o r a f t e r - d i n n e r c o f f e e , " she said.

Dance group to include Hopeites in performance Meredith Monk and her d a n c e c o m p a n y , T h e H o u s e , will p r o v i d e six d a y s of d a n c e activities as Art ists-in-Residence, February 15-20. Highlighting t h e w e e k ' s activities will be a d a n c e p r o g r a m including 24 H o p e s t u d e n t s F e b ruary 18, at 8 : 1 5 p . m . in t h e Civic Center. D u r i n g her w e e k ' s stay at H o p e , Miss Monk will c o n d u c t beginning classes w h i c h will be o p e n to all i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s . Miss M o n k , a g r a d u a t e of Sarah L a w r e n c e College, began in the spring of 1969 a performing group. The House, which consists of a c t o r s , film m a k e r s , p a i n t e r s , dancers, scientists and m u s i c i a n s ,

p e o p l e w h o m Miss M o n k s a y s "believe in t h e a t r e as a m e a n s of personal a n d social e v o l u t i o n . " A b o u t The H o u s e she says: " O u r u l t i m a t e goal is to e l i m i n a t e c a t e g o r i z a t i o n and m e n t a l prec e p t s in the a u d i e n c e . We w a n t t o o p e n p e o p l e u p to p u r e experience." Prior to o r g a n i z i n g the g r o u p . Miss M o n k ' s d a n c e style w a s especially designed f o r s p e c i f i c a r c h i t e c t u r a l spaces. A m o n g o t h e r places, she has p e r f o r m e d at t h e Smithsonian Institute, the National N a t u r a l History M u s e u m , Chicago M u s e u m of C o n t e m p o r ary A r t , N a z a r e t h Art C e n t e r , Guggenheim Museum and t h e Whitney M u s e u m .

THE B E A T GOES ON A T

Coral Gables SAUGATUCK

Dancing

Every Saturday

Night

at the Crow Bar 860 -

Slacks (flares a n d straight) were S7 t o $ 1 6 . . . Now $ 4 . 8 0

mfcfcr those who know...,

150 — Shirts were $ 1 0 to $ 1 4 . . . Now $ 3 . 9 8

\

go to the 'CROW'..

Large g r o u p of S w e a t e r s were $ 1 2 t o $ 2 5 . . . Now $ 5 TELEPHONE 3 9 6 3 6 4 7


Page 4

February 8, 1971

Hope College anchor

Cautions and suggestions

DICK NO, Just CH6CK

anticipated that every excellent candidate will f i n d w i t h i n that community an environment in which his own growth may be advanced. Therefore the committee must familiarize the candidate w i t h the College, and to this end engage the candidate in the dialogue and debate of the student body. It is unfair to both the committee and the candidates to demand the names of those being considered, but when several select candidates have been determined, they should be given a fair preview of their potential home. Finally the committee's refusal to publicize the criteria whereby their decisions are based reflects a breach of honesty that cannot go uncriticized. Unless such criteria is made known, the committee is defenseless in its autocratic posture. Of even greater import are the candidates dismissed from consideration prior to the rewriting of the criteria. There college president may lead toward being no general criteria, these candiseveral unforeseen and undesired con- dates should not have been dismissed sequences. The values accepted by so lightly. such a firm may not be commensuTo facilitiate the committee in the rate w i t h those subscribed to by a formulation of its criteria, the folcollege administrator whose re- lowing suggestions may be helpful. ponsibilities extend far beyond the The president of Hope college realm of finances. should be a man removed f r o m the Furthermore, the judgments of extremes of political thought. His such a firm, while they may be moderation in an age of polarization psychologically sound, are not neces- will be an effective instrument in the sarily accurate barometers of a candi- college's continued growth. date's leadership potential. The comHe should be a man possessing mittee should not be prejudiced intense personal convictions, strong against hiring an otherwise excellent in his own beliefs and tolerant of the candidate because of some minor beliefs of others. psychological or personal flaw. If the He should be a man w h o apservices of the firm are retained, proaches his position w i t h questions their decisions should not be bind- rather than answers. His methodoling, as the committee must remain ogy will be of more service to him free t o exercise its own qualifie.^d than his dogmas. judgment. In summation, he should be a man Secondly the committee has a re- of honesty, a frank leader w i t h the sponsibility to the candidates to ex- fortitude to persevere when he is pose them to the nature of the Hope right, and the courage to admit when community. No candidate should be he is wrong. forced to make a decision w i t h o u t It is the task and the responsibility full knowledge of the type of com- of the search committee to find such munity Hope is. It is not to be a man.

The Presidential Search Committee is to be commended for its service and diligence in the quest for a new president. Such a search, if it is to be honorably concluded, is deserving of the patience and trust of the student body. The committee has upheld that trust, and the students should maintain it. There exist, however, several potentially dangerous developments which may hamper the successful conclusion of the search. The first of these is the retention of the services of the Rohras, Hibler and Replogle consulting firm. The employment of professional business psychologists in the selection of a

anchor editorial

Readers speak out

Thank you Hope students Being one of the d i r e c t o r s of the Holland E n v i r o n m e n t a l Action Council p r o m p t s me to thank those s t u d e n t s w h o have o p t e d to take an interest in the c o n d i t i o n of the local e n v i r o n m e n t and to express that enlightened interest through the time and a t t e n t i o n that they have given to the KAC. T o o o f t e n s t u d e n t s tend to think of themselves as birds of passage on a plane too elevated to be c o n c e r n e d with the area in which they find themselves to be

dear editor temporarily detained. I think it is the mark of the truly educated person that he can exercise the ability to make w h a t e v e r place chance p u t s him more brightly illuminated by intelligence. It can only have escaped the a t t e n t i o n of the dullest t h a t the environs of the College are steadily headed t o w a r d s that condition of permanent decrepitude k n o w n as urban blight, with all the concomitant despairs of social and emotional frustration. The p e r m a n e n t challenge to those w h o lay claim to being civilized is to rise above their e n v i r o n m e n t and to d o m i n a t e it, rather t h a n to be d o m i n a t e d by that e n v i r o n m e n t . How foolish it would be to think t h a t a sort of collegiate ivory t o w e r could survive in the midst of an e c o n o m i cally blasted and socially neglected area. May I suggest as a p e r m a n e n t project towards t h e restoration of a civilized

environm ent the challenge that the neighb o r h o o d ol the College poses to the creative intellect of the s t u d e n t b o d y and to the faculty of Hope? K e n n e t h O'Meara Holland, Mich.

a.NY

David Wolf Muskegon Heights, Mich.

J This o U

\\

WW-.

I t couloh^T a c<)uu

^

i.'lijil

tfollAK

art buchwaid

The sperm bank by Art Buchwaid Science is now fiddling with animal sperm b a n k s . It is already possible t h r o u g h deep-freeze m e t h o d s to save the r e p r o d u c tive i n g r e d i e n t s of a great bull for several years, and t h e n , by artificial i n s e m i n a t i o n , to p r o d u c e a calf w h o s e f a t h e r may have long g o n e o n to that great cow pasture in the sky. LUCY KAVALER IN THE New York Times has suggested that if there are n o w banks f o r animals, we s h o u l d start t h i n k i n g in t e r m s of h u m a n beings. She suggestes that the r e p r o d u c t i v e cells of great men could be f r o z e n and b a n k e d for f u t u r e generations. Miss Kavaler foresees a t i m e , in the not too distant f u t u r e , w h e n a man and wife would be able to go d o w n to their local test t u b e b a n k and select the child of their dreams. So d o we. IT IS THE YEAR 2 0 0 1 and a couple walks into the First N a t i o n a l Test T u b e Bank of New Y o r k . T h e y are ushered into an icebox where the vice p r e s i d e n t , bundled u p in a sheepskin c o a t , asks t h e m to state their business. The wife says, "I w o u l d like either a n o t h e r A r t h u r R u b i n s t e i n or a Jasha Heifetz." " B u t , " says the h u s b a n d , ' ' h e should be able to t h r o w a f o o t b a l l like J o e N a m a t h . " T h e vice president says, " W e ' r e all out of A r t h u r R u b i n s t e i n s , Jasha Heifitzes and Joe N a m a t h s . T h e last of them went in 1996. Could I interest y o u in a N o r m a n Mailer or an Erich Segal?" THE H U S B A N D SAYS, " I f y o u d o n ' t have a J o e N a m a t h , what about a good linebacker?" T h e wife says, "I want my son to be a professional m a n . Maybe a d o c t o r . You d o n ' t have a J o n a s Salk sample a r o u n d , d o you?" " N o , I'm s o r r y , " the vice president replies. " T h e last genes of J o n a s Salk went in 1987."

Bloodless Heaven O n e can at times hear f r o m ministers that in Heaven there will be positively no national or racial s e p a r a t i o n , no discrimination and no sexual d i f f e r e n c e s . Religion will be the religion of the Angels and that is all; so your religion today may be rejected or not needed in Heaven. But it seems to me that there may not be a n y nationality or race in Heaven because there will be n o b l o o d . Flesh and blood c a n n o t inherit Heaven so t h a t would eliminate national and racial blood. Man will not be raised on the terms of n a t u r e . However, I believe t h a t if God desires to have races live b e f o r e Him that there will be an order for t h a t . O r d e r seems to be a big thing with G o d in t e r m s of everything a f t e r its own k i n d , and with its own k i n d , for its own k i n d , all for G o d . T h e international and interracial mix in the world t o d a y is the work of man not G o d . Christianity t o d a y w a n t s to m a k e one race, one religion and one r e s t r o o m in Christ's name and all for the Devil! But, the decisive f a c t o r is T h e Lord Is Coming!!

F i n d

OM

"I tell you w h a t , " says the h u s b a n d , "if you have a g o o d golfer like Arnold Palmer, we'll take i t . " "NOT SO FAST," THE wife says. " G o l f e r s are a d i m e a d o z e n . 1 would like p e r h a p s a little artistic genius. M a y b e a Pablo Picasso or a Chagall." "Wait a m i n u t e , " the h u s b a n d says. " T h e M a r t o n s got a Picasso 20 years ago, but instead of him painting pictures, he b e c a m e a C o m m u n i s t and got married three t i m e s . " " W e l l , " says t h e vice president, " t h e r e is no g u a r a n t e e t h a t y o u r o f f s p r i n g will not inherit a// the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s of the p e r s o n you c h o o s e . " " D o n ' t I k n o w i t , " the wife says. " T h e Kaisers had a Dr. E d w a r d Teller o f f s p r i n g and he married a d a u g h t e r who came f r o m a G e n . P a t t o n strain, and n o w all t h e y want to d o is m a k e war instead of love." THE VICE P R E S I D E N T studies a list. " W o u l d y o u c o n s i d e r a politician f o r a son? We're having a sale on J o h n L i n d s a y . " " N o t on y o u r life," the h u s b a n d says. " A n y o n e w h o w a n t s his son to be m a y o r of New York has to be c r a z y . " "1 w o u l d n ' t be adverse to an Onassist y p e c h i l d , " t h e wife says. " A t least we w o u l d n ' t have to w o r r y a b o u t security in our old a g e . " T h e vice p r e s i d e n t says, " W e ' v e been sold o u t of Onassis for 2 0 years. Why d o you t h i n k t h e r e ' s such a glut in oil t a n k e r s these d a y s ? " THE H U S B A N D SAYS, " M a y b e we should try f o r a b a s k e t b a l l p l a y e r . " T h e wife says angrily, " I ' m not going to p r o d u c e a 7 - f o o t giant just so y o u can go to Madison S q u a r e G a r d e n three nights a week." T h e vice president says, " Y o u people are going t o have to m a k e up y o u r m i n d s . " T h e wife says, "All right, give us a Ralph N a d e r . He m a y not get rich, but at least he'll a l w a y s tell us the t r u t h . "

COLLEGE

anchor OLLAND, M I C H I G A N

PRESS

Published weekly d u r i n g the college year e x c e p t v a c a t i o n , h o l i d a y and e x a m i n a t i o n periods by and for the s t u d e n t s of H o p e College, H o l l a n d , Michigan, u n d e r the a u t h o r i t y o f the S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t t e e . S u b s c r i p t i o n price: S5 per year. Printed by the C o m p o s i n g R o o m , G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. M e m b e r , Associated Collegiate Press, U n i t e d S t a t e s S t u d e n t Press Association and the Associated Press. O f f i c e l o c a t e d on g r o u n d floor of Graves Hall. T e l e p h o n e 392-51 11, E x t e n s i o n 2 3 0 1 and 2 2 8 5 . The o p i n i o n s on this page are not necessarily those o f the s t u d e n t b o d y , faculty or a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of H o p e College. editor Gerald Swieringa Associate Editors . . . . Garrett DeGraff, Dave Dustin, Bob Roos Features Editor Eileen Verduin Sports Editor . . Mark Van Oostenberg Critiques Editor Kay Hubbard Advertising Tim DeVoogd Business Manager Ned junor Columnis

t

Cartoonist Subscriptions

BobBlanton, Wayne Vander By! Mark Vande Brake Clarke Borgeson

Reporters . . Maggie Beretz, Dave Dillon, Molly Gates, Gary Grey, Mary Houting, Ken Janda, Lynn Jones, Jim Mattison, Paula Nichols, Robin Pearce, Gail Werka, Susan Witka, Merlin Whiteman

Photographers

Tom Siderius,

Rob Benchley, Lynn Dennis, Carlos Donascimento, Dave Huang, Don Larsen, Louis Schakel, Barry Schreiber


February 8, 1971

Page 5

Hope College anchor

anchor review

Dr. Reuben gives \s —x' honest, amusing treatment Editor's Note: This week's a^c^or review is written by Critiques Editor Kay Hubbard. She reviews Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) (Bantam Books, $1.95).

than willing t o laugh at o u r h u m a n follies and c o n f u s i o n s in the realm of sex. His dry comments, careful understatements and cheery f r a n k n e s s keep the book f r o m b e c o m i n g a n o t h e r dull a t t e m p t t o e n l i g h t e n the unenlightened.

by Kay Hubbard

THERE IS NOTHING that R e u b e n feels is sacred e n o u g h t o treat with kid gloves. He moves right t o the c r u x of t h e issue; and mincing no w o r d s , gives his i n f o r m e d o p i n i o n , or relays biological fact.

J |

F v e n in this age of " n e w r o m a n t i c i s m " w h e n Eric Segal's Love Story (which d o e s not include a single b e d r o o m scene) tops t h e best seller list for m o n t h s , sex is still a m a j o r selling . point in A m e r i c a . Love Story is ( just part of t h e e n t i r e p i c t u r e . THE OTHER BEST sellers include The Sensuous Woman which is so explicit that the author p r e f e r s t o be k n o w n . simply as " J . " and Dr. David | R e u b e n ' s p o p u l a r Everything You . Always Wanted to Know About Sex (Hut Were Afraid to Ask). Yes, sex is here t o stay, and R e u b e n p r o p o s e s that we learn t o live with the realities of o u r sexual existences. '

T h e best th in g a b o u t Everything You Always Wanted lo Know About Sex is R e u b e n ' s sense of h u m o r . He is always m o r e

T h e book is filled with interesting little hits of k n o w l e d g e like: Coca-Cola is the best d o u c h e available; m a r i j u a n a is o n e of the most e f f e c t i v e a p h r o d i s i a c s k n o w n to m a n ( R e u b e n d o e s n o t , however, r e c o m m e n d its use); t h e average sex act c o n s u m e s 150 calories; and p r e g n a n c y is possible without penetration. THIS IS NOT A book for beginners. T h e r e are no c h a r t s e x p l a i n i n g what is w h a t . R e u b e n p r e s u m e s a c e r t a i n a m o u n t of k n o w l e d g e . T h e main t h r u s t of his b o o k is to e l i m i n a t e m u c h of the a b y s m a l i g n o r a n c e that a b o u n d s in this s u p p o s e d l y sexually enlightened era.

W S / ? 5 peeopd pewiew

R e u b e n f i n d s it incredible t h a t so m a n y m i s c o n c e p t i o n s are held with such d e t e r m i n a t i o n in o u r c u l t u r e . Just in case y o u ' r e w o n dering, m a s t u r b a t i o n d o e s not cause p i m p l e s . It is in an a t t e m p t to deal with the k i n d s of p r o b l e m s caused by m i s c o n c e p t i o n s and h a l f - t r u t h s that R e u b e n has written this b o o k . HE BELIEVES THAT there is one m a j o r c h a n g e thai will have t o take place b e f o r e A m e r i c a n s really learn to e n j o y their sex-lives k n o w l e d g e . T h e way we teach o u r children a b o u t t h e " b i r d s and the b e e s " is not at all a d e q u a t e . O n e of t h e q u e s t i o n s in Everything is, " W h e r e do p e o p l e in o t h e r societies learn a b o u t s e x ? " Reuben answers it like this: " M a n y o t h e r c u l t u r e s have o n - t h e j o b training. At p u b e r t y the older w o m e n of c e r t a i n tribes take the y o u n g b o y s individually and introd u c e t h e m t o sexual i n t e r c o u r s e with all its v a r i a t i o n s and implication. Older m e n d o the same f o r the y o u n g girls. ''IMPARTING EXTENSIVE k n o w l e d g e a b o u t this m o s t vital of h u m a n f u n c t i o n s is c o n s i d e r e d a serious r e s p o n s i b i l i t y and is t r e a t e d in a s o l e m n f a s h i o n . T h e teachers are t h e wisest and most respected m e m b e r s of t h e tribe. T h e only e q u i v a l e n t in o u r society

7

KAY H U B B A R D is t h e f a t h e r w h o takes his teen-age son to visit his f a v o r i t e p r o s t i t u t e . It is not quite t h e same." R e u b e n c o n d e m n s c u r r e n t att e m p t s at " s e x - e d u c a t i o n " because he feels t h a t , for the m o s t part, s t u d e n t s are not being dealt with h o n e s t l y . More actual k n o w l edge results f r o m o n e night in t h e back seat of a car t h a n in an e n t i r e semester of " T h e Art of Personal Living" or s o m e o t h e r insipid

c o u r s e title which c a r e f u l l y disguises the m a i n c o n c e r n of the c o u r s e , or at least the main c o n c e r n of t h e s t u d e n t s in the course. REUBEN IS NOT THE last w o r d on sex. Certainly he would be the first to a d m i t that answers lead to m o r e q u e s t i o n s ; a n d , even if this b o o k t e m p o r a r i l y tells y o u e v e r y t h i n g y o u always w a n t e d t o k n o w a b o u t sex - t o m o r r o w is a n o t h e r day with m o r e q u e s t i o n s than ever. The book deals with frigidity, impotence, homos e x u a l i t y , p r o s t i t u t i o n and sexual p e r v e r s i o n , but it is not an e x h a u s t i v e s t u d y of a n y one of these areas. R e u b e n simply o p e n s a few d o o r s that s o m e p e o p l e w o u l d r a t h e r p r e t e n d did not exist. In the i n t r o d u c t i o n to t h e b o o k R e u b e n says, " l i v e r y one of us has m a d e that seven-inch j o u r n e y t h r o u g h the penis i n t o t h e vagina to meet t h e o t h e r half of o u r f u t u r e p r o t o p l a s m , and has t h e n s e t t l e d in the u t e r u s for the 2 8 0 - d a y wait. T h e r e is no reason n o w to be a s h a m e d of how we traveled and w h e r e we grew there is n o m o r e suitable p l a c e . " He is c e r t a i n l y c o r r e c t . His b o o k , if not the u l t i m a t e s o l u t i o n to t h e p r o b l e m of ignorance in sexual m a t t e r s , is a s t e p in t h e right d i r e c t i o n . His h o n e s t y is refreshing.

overlooking by Lee De Y o u n g Very few rock g r o u p s , or musical g r o u p s of any kind,- w o u l d possess the a u d a c i t y to n ame themselves a f t e r a c i t y , particularly the d o m a i n of Richard J. Daley. Chicago, alias C T A , has not only d o n e so, but has impressively challenged C r e e d e n c e C l e a r w a t e r Revival as the successor to the rock t h r o n e a b d i c a t e d by the Beatles. LIKE THE BEATLES, Chicago's w o r k has gained e n t h u s i a s t i c acceptance among audiences both y o u n g and o l d , progressive and m i d d l e - o f - t h e - r o a d , and even the readership of Playboy magazine, who elected t h e m t o Playboy's 1971 Band of All-Stars. Unlike t h e Beatles, C C R , or most o t h e r musical g r o u p s , Chicago has w i t h o u t e x c e p t i o n dedicated its music to t h e m o l d i n g of the social-political w o r l d , as well as the artistic realm. Chicago III c o n t i n u e s this p r a c t i c e : ( f r o m I Don't Want Your Money) 1 d o n ' t need y o u r social stand^ ing, 'Cause 1 got my p r i d e I don't want y o u r social standing I'd r a t h e r s t a n d o u t s i d e . ( f r o m Mother) Mama E a r t h is n o w h e r e G o n e from your eyes. H i d d e n in t h e crust Of m a n ' s scientific d r e a m s She is g o n e . ( f r o m Lowdown) Oh m y , Life has passed me by T h e c o u n t r y 1 was b r o u g h t up in Fell apart and died. Oh n o . Love's no longer there Cold wind blew a w a y the sun T h a t used t o w a r m t h e air. IN A D D I T I O N TO t h e political c o m m e n t a r y prevalent in the first t w o LP's, Chicago III gets i n t o the

i

areas of e c o l o g y and social criticism in general. T h e most eloq u e n t c o m m e n t a r y is highly unusual, c o n t a i n i n g no w o r d s at all, save an i n t r o d u c t o r y p o e m by K e n d r e w Lascelles of S m o t h e r s Brothers Fame. T h e cut is e n t i t l e d Elegy, and begins with a brass c a n o n , followed by a h a u n t i n g l y delicate m e l o d i c passage, e x p e r t l y h a n d l e d by Walter Parazaider on flute. Midway through the cut the c h o r d s gradually b e c o m e diss o n a n t , with u r b a n s o u n d e f f e c t s mixed in with ever-increasing intensity, denoting m a n ' s "progress." THE S O U N D S OF progress gradually c r e s c e n d o lo an unbearable din until the listener is m e r c i f u l l y relieved by t h e end of it all; a s o u n d easily r e c o g n i z a b l e to a n y o n e familiar with i n d o o r plumbing! Chicago's trademark, clean, bold brass w o r k , is b e t t e r than ever in Chicago III. F a n s will n o t e , h o w e v e r , that the h o r n s do not o c c u p y nearly so m u c h of the musical spotlight here as in p r e v i o u s e f f o r t s . In their place are s o m e of the best heavy guitar riffs ever put u p o n plastic. Prime e x a m p l e s a p p e a r in Sing a Mean Tune Kid and Lowdown, which is p r o b a b l y the m o s t varied cut on the a l b u m . ON FIRST H E A R I N G , the increased diversity of Chicago III might possibly d i s a p p o i n t some f a n s e x p e c t i n g a c o n t i n u a t i o n of a l b u m s o n e and t w o . But given a c h a n c e , o n e will q u i c k l y discover that t h e o t h e r things Chicago is into are every bit as g o o d as the g r o u p ' s m o r e familiar t r a d e m a r k s . In fact, Elight 602 s o u n d s so m u c h like C r o s b y , Stills, Nash and Young that Atlantic Records might request a share of the p r o f i t s , which should be enormous!

-

^

Just another school by Wayne Vander Byl Back in 1967 w h e n 1 was a f r e s h m a n , hardly a day w e n t by during which y o u d i d n ' t hear someone speaking about the " H o p e College C o m m u n i t y . " In those d a y s most of us, i n c l u d i n g most of t h e s t u d e n t s , t h o u g h t that there was s o m e t h i n g very special a b o u t the " H o p e E x p e r i e n c e . " WE WERE E V E N naive e n o u g h to think that H o p e College as a whole had s o m e goals, s o m e ideals, which u n i f i e d s t u d e n t s , facu l t y , a l u m n i , a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and the Board in a c o m m o n service t o G o d and m a n . H o p e was a Liberal- A r t s - C o l l e g e - i n - t he-ChristianT r a d i t i o n , and a l t h o u g h we were not q u i t e sure w h a t that m e a n t , we were sure we w e r e it. T h i s past s e m e s t e r , however, I d o n ' t think 1 have seen or heard the t e r m " H o p e College C o m m u n i t y " half a d o z e n times. Suddenly I realized t h a t the " c o m m u n i t y " we used t o call H o p e College no longer exists. WHAT MAKES A g r o u p of people a c o m m u n i t y and what leads to its d e c l i n e ? C o m m u n i t i e s recognize comm o n s y m b o l s . F o r H o p e there were b o t h religious and a c a d e m i c symbols. The religious s y m b o l s were m a n y : C h a p e l services, the C h a p lain, the Old and N e w T e s t a m e n t courses, t h e s e n i o r Bible requirem e n t , the S t u d e n t C h u r c h . U n f o r tunately the only two symbols shared by t h e e n t i r e c o m m u n i t y were shared by compulsion: C h a p e l services and the Old and New T e s t a m e n t r e q u i r e m e n t s .

WE REALIZED however, t h a t religious c o n s c i o u s n e s s could n o t be f o s t e r e d by c o m p u l s o r y p r o grams. If we were only free t o express o u r g e n u i n e religious c o n cerns! As it t u r n e d o u t , h o w e v e r , most of us had no religious c o n c e r n s - e x c e p t pride in o u r personal p i e t y . T h e n there was the m y t h of t h e liberally e d u c a t e d m a n ; the m a n who k n e w a lot a b o u t one t h i n g plus a little a b o u t e v e r y t h i n g else, and w h o u n d e r s t o o d and res p e c t e d i nt el l ect ual curiosity in w h a t e v e r f o r m it a p p e a r e d . We were t o b e c o m e t h a t m a n , b u t there were no m o d e l s in either t h e f a c u l t y or a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . We f e l t a s u d d e n e m p t i n e s s in o u r lives. The m a n we idolized, the man we were t o e m u l a t e , did not e x i s t , except in the tales we were t o l d . SO WE ALSO began to question t h e w i s d o m of the core req u i r e m e n t s . If we could only be free t o p u r s u e g e n u i n e intellectual concerns! T h e present p r o p o s a l to c h a n g e the core r e q u i r e m e n t s represent a step t o w a r d t h a t f r e e d o m . T h e a t m o s p h e r e in w h i c h it is being discussed, h o w e v e r , f o r b o d e s t h e tragedy that w o u l d s o o n follow its adoption. T h e r e are f a c u l t y m e m b e r s w h o trust s t u d e n t s to m a k e the best decisions a b o u t their o w n e d u c a tion, and those w h o d o n ' t . U n f o r tunately, among those who trust the s t u d e n t s t h e r e are m a n y w h o d o n ' t care e n o u g h a b o u t them t o even try t o look o u t for their best interests. A m o n g t h o s e w h o d o n ' t

trust s t u d e n t s are m a n y w h o really d o n ' t t r u s t themselves t o give s t u d e n t s t h e kind of e d u c a tion they deserve at H o p e Collegg w i t h o u t t h e h e l p of college requirements. WHAT IS HAPPENING to H o p e College? Have we lost all self-respect? Have we lost all selfdiscipline? Will we a b a n d o n t h e ideals of L i b e r a l - E d u c a t i o n - i n - t h e Christian-Tradition b e c a u s e we have failed t o a t t a i n t h e m in t h e past? It we t h i n k we are j u s t letting the individual d o his o w n thing, we are k i d d i n g ourselves. It is because individuals do not care e n o u g h a b o u t individuals that t h e c o m m u n i t y no longer exists. H o p e - a C h r i s t i a n liberal arts college. R i d i c u l o u s ! A college isn't a c h u r c h . H o p e - a liberal arts college. R i d i c u l o u s ! With all t h o s e r e q u i r e m e n t s it's a conservative arts college. H o p e College - d o y o u r o w n t h i n g while we all look the o t h e r w a y . WE S H O U L D NOT go back t o c o m p u l s o r y C h a p e l and Old and New T e s t a m e n t , or k e e p all the present requirements. That would be a step b a c k w a r d . We s h o u l d , however, think about what Hope College o u g h t t o be. H o p e is n o t a Christian liberal arts college a n y m o r e . T h e way we are h e a d e d it s o o n w o n ' t be a liberal arts college e i t h e r . T h e n H o p e College will just be a n o t h e r place to go to s c h o o l . A n d if y o u just w a n t t o go t o school, - well - t h e r e are a lot of o t h e r places just t o go t o s c h o o l .

The Best of Peanuts

(

PEANUTS

LL NEVER 6ET THIS 5ECONP PROBLEM

JUST PUT DOWN 11 ELEVEN, FRANKLIN, AMP DON'T WORW ABOUT IT.,. THAT'S WHAT I DIP,, //

" X 15 ALMOST ALLOAVS ELEVEN, AND ' V 15 ALMOST ALUJAVS NINE,,.

1 C" I?

I I'

I? l/> 2

p a;

ONE TMING I'VE LEARNEP ABOUT AL6EBRA „ CON'T TAKE IT TOO SERIOUSLY,,.


Page 6

H o p e College a n c h o r

February 8, 1 9 7 1

Premiered at Hope

NSF gives $9,800 for biology research

Hallelujah enters competition T h e H o p e College T h e a t r e p r o d u c t i o n of Hallelujah was pres e n t e d J a n u a r y 1 1, in t h e r e g i o n a l c o m p e t i t i o n of the A m e r i c a n College T h e a t r e festival in A t h e n s , Ohio. Hallelujah, under the direction of J o h n T a m m i , was o n e of six p l a y s p r e s e n t e d in t h e t h r e e - d a y festival. H o p e ' s p r o d u c t i o n repres e n t e d t h e o n l y college division play s e l e c t e d by the r e g i o n a l c o m m i t t e e f o r p r e s e n t a t i o n in A t h e n s . T h e play w a s first p r o d u c e d o n H o p e ' s c a m p u s last O c t o b e r . Written by D j o r d j e L e b o v i c h and t r a n s l a t e d by Nicola K o l e v i c h ,

Hallelujah deals with t h e e x p e r i e n c e s of seven m e n released f r o m a c o n c e n t r a t i o n c a m p at t h e e n d of World War II a n d their att e m p t s t o r e a d j u s t to civilian life. T h e H o p e p r o d u c t i o n was t h e A m e r i c a n p r e m i e r of t h e a w a r d winning Yugoslav drama. H o p e was o n e of 2 3 9 colleges a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s c o m p e t i n g in t h e festival. Of t h e s e , 10 will be selected f o r p r e s e n t a t i o n at t h e J o h n F. Kennedy Center for the P e r f o r m i n g A r t s in W a s h i n g t o n , D.C., M a r c h 31 t h r o u g h April 6 . T h e festival, p r e s e n t e d j o i n t l y by t h e K e n n e d y C e n t e r a n d t h e

MORGASBORD

Smithsonian Institute and sponsored by American Airlines, American Express and S t a n d a r d Oil, w a s i n i t i a t e d t o e n c o u r a g e high q u a l i t y college a n d u n i v e r s i t y theatre p r o d u c t i o n and training. T h i s y e a r ' s festival, a c c o r d i n g t o William Mac Blair, Jr., G e n e r a l D i r e c t o r of the K e n n e d y C e n t e r , r e p r e s e n t s " t h e largest a n d m o s t c o m p r e h e n s i v e i n v o l v e m e n t in t h e p e r f o r m i n g arts ever u n d e r t a k e n o n t h e college c a m p u s e s of o u r nation by American business."

Hope presented $12,000 ^rant

at

from D u P o n t

ihlnuL (JillaqsL

H o p e College h a s b e e n pres e n t e d a $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 g r a n t by t h e D u P o n t C o m p a n y of W i l m i n g t o n , Delaware. The grant includes $ 10,000 for the department of chemistry and $ 2 , 0 0 0 t o be used at t h e d i s c r e t i o n of the college.

RESTAURANT ALL

J O

] 0 1

CAN EAT WEEK D A Y S - 5

ADULTS

*

lo 8 P.M.

C H I L P R t N

I

^•

Seven H o p e College biology s t u d e n t s will be a f f o r d e d an o p p o r t u n i t y t o d o i n d i v i d u a l research next summer under a $9,800 Undergraduate Research P a r t i c i p a t i o n grant f r o m t h e National Science F o u n d a t i o n . T H E G R A N T W H I C H will be a d m i n i s t e r e d by Dr. R a l p h O c k e r see, a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of b i o l o g y , will be used p r i m a r i l y t o aid stud e n t s . T h e r e m a i n d e r of t h e f u n d s will b e e x p e n d e d f o r s u p p l i e s a n d facilities. U n d e r the grant, a student works with a faculty colleague. " T h e f a c u l t y m e m b e r s m a y have m o r e e x p e r i e n c e t h a n t h e stud e n t s , b u t t h e s t u d e n t s are t r e a t e d w i t h t h e s a m e level of s o p h i s t i c a tion as a n y o t h e r c o l l e a g u e w o u l d b e , " said Dr. O c k e r s e e . T H E FIELDS O F organismal biology, developmental biology, g e n e t i c s , e c o l o g y , cell b i o l o g y a n d e v o l u t i o n a r y b i o l o g y are o p e n t o the s t u d e n t s applying for the grant p o s i t i o n s . H o p e ' s n i n e - m a n b i o l o g y staff will assist t h e stud e n t s as c o l l e a g u e s a n d r e s o u r c e people.

l 0

ARMY ROTC 2 Years to 2nd Lt Bars

SOUTH WASHINGTON AT 34TM - HOLLA

Do You Know Your Rights?

Smith awarded NSF fellowship

ATTENTION: Transfer students to WMU, MSU, U of M, EMUf CMU# NMU. For additional information complete form and mail to PMS at selected university.

to do research Dr. Dwight S m i t h , p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , has b e e n a w a r d e d a National Science Foundation F a c u l t y F e l l o w s h i p t o s t u d y at t h e S c r i p p s I n s t i t u t e in C a l i f o r n i a for the year 1971-72. This highly c o v e t e d f e l l o w s h i p

H O L L A N D D R A F T IN F O R M ATI O N C E N T E R

NAME DIMNENT 1 2 T M

CHAPEL

ST.

AND

H O L L A N D ,

BASEMENT

C O L L E Q E M l .

M O N . - FRI. 4

A v e .

4 9 4 2 3

Phonc 24

- B

ADDRESS

P.M.

392-5425

CITY

HB. BCRVICC; 3 9 2 - 5 7 7 2

will e n a b l e S m i t h to e n g a g e in w o r k in t h e Division of G r a d u a t e Education and Science and to p u r s u e research at S c r i p p s d u r i n g his y e a r of s a b b a t i c a l leave.

CLIP m

r

RIGHT GUARD SPRAY DEODORANT $1.59 - Sug. Retail

250 ON ANY FILM PROCESSING

GENERAL ELECTRIC FLASH CUBES

SUDDEN BEAUTY HAIR SPRAY I 12.5 oz. Was .95

J

L

r

Limit 2 per coupon

JERGENS LOTION 4% oz.

39c Limit 2 per coupon

r

J|

EXTRA STRENGTH MICRIN MOUTHWASH

12 oz. $1.29 value

ALCOHOL IS0PR0PAL

5 oz. $1.35 - Sug. Retail

16 oz.

79c

" 1

19C Jl_

nr

9C

Limit 2

J

DIAL SOAP REG. SIZE

1

9c

per bar

1

with coupon Limit 2 per coupon

|

SOFT & DRI SPRAY DEODORANT

PLASTIC LAUNDRY BAG WITH DRAW STRINGS

53C

MAYBALLENE 1 AUTOMATIC EYEBROW PENCIL i MAGIC MASCARA $1.00 Sug. Retail •

59C

1 —J

|

99c Limit 2

7 oz.

990

J L

Pkg. of 3

L

SAVE

n 0^

P

D u r i n g t h e past t h r e e y e a r s N S F g r a n t s have e n a b l e d 17 H o p e College s t u d e n t s t o p u r s u e res e a r c h in b i o l o g y . W o r k i n g with faculty colleagues, Hope students have p r o d u c e d s u c h s i g n i f i c a n t results that data f r o m their efforts have b e e n p r e s e n t e d at n a t i o n a l a n d s t a t e m e e t i n g s of t h e American Institute of Biological S c i e n c e s , the G e o l o g i c a l S o c i e t y of A m e r i c a a n d t h e Michigan A c a d e m y of S c i e n c e , Arts and Letters. ALTHOUGH THE contrib u t i o n s of H o p e u n d e r g r a d u a t e s t o t h e s t o c k p i l e of i n f o r m a t i o n have b e e n s u b s t a n t i a l . Dr. N o r m a n N o r t o n , c h a i r m a n of H o p e ' s biology d e p a r t m e n t , notes, " S t u d e n t r e s e a r c h is not d o n e f o r the sake of r e s e a r c h - w e ' r e not ivory t o w e r r e s e a r c h e r s . We c o n s i d e r s t u d e n t r e s e a r c h a t e a c h i n g t o o l and feel t h e best way t o learn b i o l o g y is t o do biology." In a d d i t i o n t o the seven stud e n t s selected f o r i n d i v i d u a l research g r a n t s t h i s s u m m e r , a n u m ber of o t h e r b i o l o g y s t u d e n t s part i c i p a t e in f u n d e d r e s e a r c h by serving as a s s i s t a n t s t o f a c u l t y m e m b e r s w h o receive g r a n t s f r o m the NSF' a n d o t h e r c o m m e r c i a l sources.

| |

1

Limit 2

ALL FRUIT OF THE LOOM PANTY HOSE

69c

J n

Limit 6 per coupon

BARNES HAND S0QUETTE

99C

Reg. Retail Price

Limit 1

j

Limit 3 pairs per coupon -

1

j

L

.

Limit 2 per coupon

_ j

~i

DOWNTOWN DISCOUNT 4 3 EAST EIGHTH STREET A L L COUPONS EXPIRE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1971

J

f

{


i

February 8, 1971

Page 7

Hope College anchor

i

Karl Borsai; Hope's Austrian additive by Lynn Jones A p r o d u c t of the i n t e r n a t i o n a l e d u c a t i o n with which he works, Karl Borsai, a native Austrian, is a vital link b e t w e e n H o p e College, Holland, Mich., and Vienna, Austria. IN ADDITION TO w o r k i n g as an assistant t o Dr. Paul Fried, Director of I n t e r n a t i o n a l Lducation, Borsai is an i n s t r u c t o r in G e r m a n and assistant d i r e c t o r of the Hope College Vienna S u m m e r School p r o g r a m . It is difficult to locate a h o m e t o w n for Borsai, f o r he, like the gypsies, has lived in m a n y localities. He refers to his hometown as B u r g e n l a n d , an Austrian state on the Hungarian border. He has, however, spent nine years in Vienna, m o r e time than in any other l o c a t i o n , t w o as a y o u n g boy and seven when he studied at the I n s t i t u t e of T e c h n o l o g y in Vienna. BORSAI'S EDUCATION is totally i n t e r n a t i o n a l , fully qualifying him f o r his position with the Office of I n t e r n a t i o n a l F d u c a t i o n . He a t t e n d e d high s c h o o l in Austria until he was 16, and then received a scholarship to study in the United Stales for a year. This he did in Minneapolis, Minn., graduating that same year f r o m the A m e r i c a n school. When he r e t u r n e d to Austria, however, he was required to c o m p l e t e an a d d i t i o n a l year in order to g r a d u a t e in Austria in I 9 6 0 . At this time he moved to Vienna for his s t u d y at the technical institute. WHILE IN VIENNA he met Fried w h o was on a sabbatical f r o m H o p e . T h r o u g h Fried, Borsai received a full tuition grant to Hope College. He also was awarded a Fulbright Travel G r a n t . With his g y m n a s i u m e d u c a t i o n and his seven years of technical school, Borsai was granted enough credits t o g r a d u a t e f r o m Hope a f t e r o n e year, in the spring of 1968. He then was awarded a teaching assistantship in G e r m a n at the University of Kansas where he received his M.A. in 1970. Borsai first met Fried when he was w o r k i n g his way through school in Vienna as a waiter in a student r e s t a u r a n t . T h r o u g h their daily c o n t a c t in the restaurant they b e c a m e good friends, Borsai r e c o m m e n d i n g interesting places to visit in the city and the b e t t e r things to eat. Q u i t e by accident, the two discovered that they were also n e x t - d o o r - n e i g h b o r s in the Studentenheim in Vienna. Fried was in need at this time of an Austrian s t u d e n t to serve as a guide to the city and asked Borsai if he would be interested in a j o b with the Vienna S u m m e r School. T h e wages being significantly higher t h a n a n y o t h e r s o f f e r e d him, Borsai a c c e p t e d the position as t o u r guide on the

Western S t u d y T o u r and administrative assistant to Fried in the s u m m e r of 1962. Borsai has been with the program every s u m m e r since, and has advanced f r o m t o u r guide, to i n s t r u c t o r of G e r m a n in 1963 when he taught one h o u r of G e r m a n c o n v e r s a t i o n . In 1968 he was a p p o i n t e d as the assistant d i r e c t o r for the 1969 program u n d e r the direction of Dr. F. F. G e a r h a r t , t e m p o r a r y d i r e c t o r of the p r o g r a m . ASKED WHY HE HAS continued with Vienna Summer School for nine years, Borsai replied that the program was 4l a c o n s t a n t l y growing f o n d n e s s and I c o u l d n ' t shake i t . " In the past sessions, Borsai has c o m e in c o n t a c t with over 5 0 0 s t u d e n t s and feels that these m e a n i n g f u l relationships have made the whole effort worthwhile. Borsai's reward for his work with the program seems to be the positive reactions of the Vienna a l u m n i and their a p p a r e n t g r o w t h through the program. Borsai stated that very few of the s t u d e n t s w h o have participated in the program have been dissatisfied with it. T h o s e w h o were dissatisfied when they left F u r o p e , seem always to have a change of heart later when the small, insignificant dissatisfactions fade and the real, meaningful experiences emerge. ''OUR G E N E R A L e x p e r i e n c e with o u r s t u d e n t s have b e e n , " said Borsai, " t h a t a f t e r c o m i n g back, because of the e x p e r i e n c e s they have h a d , they have developed into m u c h more m a t u r e y o u n g men and w o m e n . O n e of our alumni told me o n c e that he had d e t e c t e d abilities and characteristics within himself that he had never k n o w n to be there b e f o r e . " T h e s u m m e r school program is set up to work with s t u d e n t s and to fulfill their needs. According to Borsai, the s t u d e n t of t o d a y does not have the same ideas of e x c i t e m e n t and reward a s t u d e n t did five years ago. By J a n u a r y , 1968, t h e directors had noticed a change in the s t u d e n t s through reading t h e applications f o r that s u m m e r . Their academic level is still the same, Borsai said, " b u t it's b e c o m i n g a little bit easier to travel to F u r o p e , and the s t u d e n t of t o d a y isn't as f o n d of having an a c a d e m i c session along with his travel." WITH THIS IN MIND the program has changed. It has m o d i f i e d its goals and a p p r o a c h by a d d i n g more i n d e p e n d e n t and free time for the s t u d e n t to replace organized excursions and field trips. A m a j o r change in the program is that the boat trip to F u r o p e has been replaced with a jet trip to L u x u m b o u r g due to the cancellation of the chartered ship.

' Vet)

Insidious

to Push

/

I N T E R N A T I O N A L FLARE—Austrian Karl Borsai makes plans for this summer's Vienna Summer School program. Borsai, an instructor of German, is assistant director of the program. Borsai felt that this was a severe d e t r i m e n t t o the p r o g r a m because it was during this long trip that the s t u d e n t s b e c a m e a c q u a i n t e d with each o t h e r and developed an esprit de corps which enabled them to live together and work together during t h e s o m e t i m e s hectic days of the travel and academic sessions. TO FILL THIS GAP, a twoday stop-over in Iceland to see the sights and to allow the s t u d e n t s to get a c q u a i n t e d with each other is being a d d e d . According to Borsai the goals of the VSS program involve the " m a g i c c o m b i n a t i o n of meeting local y o u t h and s t u d e n t s , finding time to explore and discover on o n e ' s own, and receiving knowledge f r o m i m p o r t a n t p e o p l e . " IT WOULD BE impossible to fulfill these goals if it were not for the personal c o n t a c t s m a d e by Fried and o t h e r m e m b e r s of the Vienna f a c u l t y , Borsai emphasized. Of nearly equal i m p o r t a n c e , he a d d e d , are the c o n t a c t s the program directors have taken up with f o r m e r faculty and alumni at Hope. G. B o n n o Van Dijk, f o r m e r visiting professor of history, has

Plan

arranged for s t u d e n t s to stay in Dutch h o m e s f o r their stay in the N e t h e r l a n d s d u r i n g t h e Western S t u d y tour. In B o n n , the s t u d e n t s will meet the a m b a s s a d o r of Jordan to the Federal Republic of G e r m a n y , and Bruce Van V o o r s t , the t o p r e p o r t e r for Newsweek in central E u r o p e . In L y o n , F r a n c e , the VSS s t u d e n t s will be the guests of the consul of the United States, an a l u m n u s of the Vienna program. T h e Western t o u r precedes the academic session which will begin July 5 and will c o n t i n u e through August 13. Borsai said that the

r f f r / r >J •f

ft u.

goal ol the a c a d e m i c session m Vienna is to take advantage of all the historical, cultural and artistic o p p o r t u n i t i e s that Vienna and its i m m e d i a t e area have to offer. FOLLOWING THE academic session, s t u d e n t s are tree to c h o o s e b e t w e e n three travel opp o r t u n i t i e s . T h e y may travel ind e p e n d e n t l y and plan on returning on either the S e p t e m b e r 2 or 9 flight f r o m L u x u m b o u r g or they may participate in a more structured program such as the boat cruise d o w n the D a n u b e River on a Russian s t e a m b o a t . This trip will also include a flight to Kiev and a return flight to Vienna. T h r e e d a y s will remain f o r free travel b e f o r e d e p a r t u r e f r o m Luxumbourg. Why does Borsai work with this particular program'. , " I t ' s u n i q u e because of its c o m b i n a t i o n of all the aspects and e v e n t s , " he replied, " a n d because of the type of life o f f e r e d by the way our program is put' t o g e t h e r . " He added that the fact that the Vienna S u m m e r S c h o o l program is one of the oldest existing s u m m e r school p r o g r a m s of American colleges proves t h e point that " w e must have d o n e s o m e t h i n g right." BORSAI SEES international e d u c a t i o n as a f u n d a m e n t a l part of a " c o m p l e t e e d u c a t i o n . " For this t y p e of e d u c a t i o n , he believes that o n e has to have had exposures and e x p e r i e n c e s in o t h e r areas, geographical or academic, to o t h e r people, to a n o t h e r line of thinking, and to o t h e r traditions and c u s t o m s . He referred specifically to the traditions and c u s t o m s with which one is very familiar in o n e ' s own h o m e c o u n t r y . One must also get to k n o w o t h e r people other t h a n o n e ' s o w n friends. "By being in a c o m p l e t e l y new e n v i r o n m e n t with c o m p l e t e l y different o u t l o o k s and c o m p l e t e l y d i f f e r e n t people with d i f f e r e n t objectives and p r e j u d i c e s , " Borsai stated, " o n e can grow to such a degree that it t a k e s m o n t h s , as our e x p e r i e n c e s with f o r m e r s u m m e r school s t u d e n t s have shown, to digest all and u n d e r s t a n d ail that one has been e x p o s e d to, experienced and l e a r n e d . "

CAMPUS REP. NEEDED Write to: Jack Green International Tent Retreats 350 East 84th Street New York, New York 10028

12 W. 8TH ST., HOLLAND, MICH.

v

VALENTINES

Pizza>

HOLLAND

r

STATIONERS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN S E R V I N G WESTERN M I C H I G A N SINCE 1 9 0 0

d J

DOWNTOWN NEXT TO PENNEYS

II R

Ml I 11 PARI

(.i i nir. pi//a

ror .i time tins tuning, ilrop In Village Inn wherv \ou luu- .i ihoitc nt nc.irlv two ilo/cn dilfcrcnt cliluious kinds, (.li.uucs arc, you haven't trial them .ill yet. It you have, well, ionic invwav.

ior

voi r

I L L AGE MV

GIFTS

go-go-go!...

WRITING INSTRUMENTS

P L A Y I N G CARDS

CHESS

PHOTO ALBUMS

STATIONERY

POSTERS

SCRAP B O O K S

w h c r G ? R o o i m ^ lor ihc l o n g gainer^ I h c r c s ,i w . u lo set up vour o w n b r c a k a w a y - a sound lite i n s u r a n t c p r o g r a m The sooner sou start, the lower \i»ur p r e m i u m s . . . and the longer \ our ( ash \ alue builds. I l u d d l e n o w . Cheer later.

NOKTHWLSURN MUIUAI lilt MIIWAUKFE

NML

ETC.

T h e r e is a d i f f e r e n c e . . . and the difference grows

PARLOR

COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND . . . WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE WE CASH YOUR CHECKS

G A R Y C . HOLVICK

392-2454

i\'


1

Page 8

Hope College anchor

F e b r u a r y 8, 1971

Take Alma, 85â&#x20AC;&#x201D;79

Dutch vie for MIAA title by Terry Reen H o p e ' s basketball team s h o t its way i n t o Michigan intercollegiate Athletic Association title c o m p e t i tion with a crucial victory Saturday over the Alma Scots, 85-79. HOPE, 5-2 IN league p l a y , is just one-half game behind Olivet and Calvin w h o each have 5-1 records. Alma, pre-season MIAA favorite, now 2-5, is virtually out of the race. in a see-saw battle that saw the lead c h a n g e 13 times in A l m a ' s new f i e l d h o u s e , Hope t o o k the lead for g o o d , 51-49, on a hookshot by T o m Wolters. H o p e widened that lead to 7 7 - 6 7 , and using a stall with t w o and a half m i n u t e s remaining, were able to hold off a d e s p e r a t e Alma rally. IN THE FIRST half Hope shot a blistering 68 percent f r o m the floor, hitting 17 of 25. This was overshadowed by the fact that Hope p r o d u c e d m o r e t u r n o v e r s than Betty C r o c k e r ever d r e a m e d of. With t w o m i n u t e s left and Alma leading 39-33, the D u t c h -

men t o o k c o n t r o l and scored the final seven p o i n t s to take the lead at intermission, 40-39. Dan Shinabarger, with 18 points in the second half, led Hope scorers with 24, followed by T o m Wolters with 20, and Rick Scott with 16. Charles H u d s o n , Alma's high-scoring f o r w a r d led all scorers with 27. Ik'* Nesting had 16 f o r Alma. THE JUNIOR varsity lost the preliminary game 86-81. Hope has fared well since the first of the year, winning eight of eleven and six of their last seven games. U n o f f i c i a l l y , Hope was the winner of the J a n u a r y 1-2 opp o n e n t e x c h a n g e with Calvin, beating O h i o D o m i n i c a n 86-76, and then F l m h u r s t College, 85-69. Calvin got by F l m h u r s t , but lost to O h i o to tie for second place. T h e next week Hope traveled to Calvin but came out on the

Dutch grapplers

Phys ed prof

Grand

for wrestling test (ieorge K r a f t , assistant professor of physical e d u c a t i o n , has been awarded his d o c t o r a t e by Indiana University. Kraft c o n d u c t e d his dissertation on the c o n s t r u c t i o n and standardization of a wrestling k n o w l edge test for college men m a j o r i n g in physical e d u c a t i o n . Kraft received his B.A. degree f r o m W h e a t o n College in 1 9 6 2 , and his M.S. degree f r o m I n d i a n a University in 1965. In a d d i t i o n to his l e a c h i n g responsibilities, he is head wrestling coach and an assistant f o o t ball coach. oonad jo; ^jom

The Hope College wrestling team t o o k f i f t h place in the Grand Valley Invitational T o u r n a m e n t , S a t u r d a y at G r a n d Valley. POWERFUL Grand Rapids Junior College swept to an impressive first place finish, ' c a p t u r i n g eight of ten firsts. T h e o t h e r two firsts went to G r a n d Valley in the 142 and 177-pound weight divisions. Olivet finished second in the t o u r n a m e n t and G r a n d Valley third. H o p e ' s best individual performance of the day was t u r n e d in by Rick V a n d e r Lind w h o t o o k a second in the 142-pound weight class. Rick Hine, t o o k third in the I 5 8 - p o u n d division. CHARLES Willard and Jerry Lauver t o o k f o u r t h s in the 177 and 1 2 6 - p o u n d weight classes. Karl N o d a l s k y , wrestling in the 167-pound weight division, scored a point f o r a d v a n c e m e n t a l t h o u g h he did not take a place. V a n d e r Lind and Hine also scored p o i n t s for a d v a n c e m e n t . H o p e ' s overall season record in dual m e e t s is 4-6. T w o of the f o u r losses have c o m e in Michigan In-

EXTRA SPECIAL "Great Shape" Fruit of the Loom PANTY HOSE Reg. $1.99

NOW ONLY $1.39 at

BLUE KEY BOOKSTORE

THE DUTCHMEN won the next f o u r games, all at h o m e , edging K a l a m a z o o 84-77, crushing Adrian 100-76, d o w n i n g Alma 75-58, and b o m b i n g Lake Forest, 97-60. During semester break Hope traveled to Wisconsin-Parkside and lost, 91-82. H o p e then met and d e f e a t e d Lake Forest for a second time. H o p e ' s overall record is now 10-6, with five of those losses c o m i n g on the road. H o p e now has f o u r big home games c o m i n g up. Wednesday will be A l b i o n , and Saturday T r i n i t y Christian. Next week are the big o n e s with Calvin and Olivet.

land fifth place

Valley Invitational

by Mark Van Oostenberg

earns doctorate

short end of a 82-72 score, due to a t o u g h second-half z o n e defense that H o p e c o u l d n ' t crack. T h r e e days later H o p e traveled to Olivet and was s o u n d l y b e a t e n , 102-65.

tercollegiate Athletic Association c o m p e t i t i o n . Albion t r i u m p h e d over H o p e on J a n u a r y 8, and Adrian bested the D u t c h five days later. In the last f o u r years of league c o m p e t i t i o n Adrian and Albion have finished o n e - t w o each year. A D R I A N IS c u r r e n t l y 3-0 in MIAA dual m e e t s . Albion is 3-1. Olivet is also e x p e c t e d to finish ahead of H o p e in the final standings. Hope College will wrestle against Ferris S t a t e College in Big Rapids Wednesday. H o p e will also participate in t w o i m p o r t a n t tourn a m e n t s in the near f u t u r e . This S a t u r d a y the Dutch will be at Albion f o r the Great Lakes Colleges Association m e e t . T h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t will be held at Adrian F e b r u a r y 26.

Hope receives grant of stock from foundation A gift of 7 5 0 shares of stock in Smith, Kline and F r e n c h Laboratories has been received by Hope College f r o m the Matthew J. and Anne C. Wilson F o u n d a t i o n . This most recent gift, valued at a p p r o x i m a t e l y $ 3 7 , 0 0 0 , will be added to o t h e r Wilson F o u n d a t i o n gifts and will be held as e n d o w ment. T h e interest f r o m the investment will be used for faculty development and advanced s t u d y , a c c o r d i n g to the terms of the trust f u n d . The principal sum of the trust f u n d totals a p p r o x i m a t e l y $100,000 with this most recent gift.

I N T R A M U R A L A C T I O N - K n i c k Mike Wiersma (left) attempts to evade the defensive efforts of Cosmo Gene Haulenbeek during a fraternity league game Saturday morning. The Knicks won, 44-33.

Intramural basketball approaches season's end by Merlin Whiteman T h e i n t r a m u r a l basketball season is rapidly drawing to a close with one league title already decided. IN THE T U E S D A Y night fraternity league the Arkies have clinched the c h a m p i o n s h i p . T h e y won the title when they d e f e a t e d the Fraters, 59 to 47, b e f o r e a standing-room-only crowd at Carnegie-Schouten gymnasium. Craig S c h r o t e n b o e r led the Arkies with 2 2 points, while Lee Brandsma d u m p e d in 22 for the Fraters. Brandsma is now playing for the Hope varsity. G o i n g into the last game of the season, the Arkies have clinched first, with the Fraters in a second place tie with the C o s m o s and I n d e p e n d e n t s . T h e y are followed in o r d e r by Crispell Cottage, the K n i c k e r b o c k e r s , the E m m i e s and the winless f a c u l t y .

THE KOLLEN HALL league, e x p a n d e d this year with several wings having more t h a n one team, is still u n d e c i d e d . Kollen 2A team one and Z w e m e r are u n d e f e a t e d , while 3B team t w o and IB team three have lost only o n c e . These f o u r teams are the t o p c o n t e n d e r s for the title. Two of this season's games have been s t a n d o u t s . In a mism a t c h , 2A team one scored 106 p o i n t s on r o u t e to victory, with Milo Buikema scoring 3 0 points, the high for all leagues this year. In a n o t h e r game, 2A team one p u m p e d in 94 p o i n t s to their o p p o n e n t s 1 1. THE S A T U R D A Y MORNING f r a t e r n i t y league is boiling d o w n to a n o t h e r Arkie-Frater c o n f r o n t ation. T h e Arkies and Fraters are b o t h u n d e f e a t e d in f o u r games. Their nearest rival, the Seminary, has three wins and t w o losses. With two games remaining, the Arkies and Fraters are in first place, with the S e m i n a r y a distant

second.

with a little help fRom

They

are

followed by the K n i c k e r b o c k e r s , E m m i e s and C o s m o s w h o are tied for f o u r t h place, a n d , in last place, Alpha Phi O m e g a . Points toward the all-sports t r o p h i e s for the f r a t e r n i t y and Kollen Hall league c o m p e t i t o r s will be awarded according to the final league standings. Points also will be scored on the basis of each teams finish in its own league's year-end t o u r n a m e n t .

Theatre ^

1

?

tryouts

commence tonight

; A V : " '<

T h e Hope College T h e a t r e will hold t r y o u t s f o r its first production of the second semester, Joe Egg, today at 4 : 3 0 and 7 : 3 0 p.m., and t o m o r r o w at 7 : 3 0 p.m. in the Little T h e a t r e .

^occ^S/

!

CLIP AND SAVE

I

LOW COST, SAFE, LEGAL

I

OUR fRien^s... ABORTION IN NEW YORK

SCHEDULED IMMEDIATELY

(212) 490-3600 Join the a n c h o r .

PROFESSIONAL SCHEDULING SERVICE, Inc. 545 f i f t h Ave., New York City 10017 T h e r e is a f e e for our s c r v i c e .

I


02-08-1971