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February 2003 XHree Paragraphs Hope College •

Holland, M i c h i g a n • A s t u d e n t - r u n n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g the Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 116 years

Campus Briefs New area code coming soon south of Holland T h e current 6 1 6 area code, which includes much of western Michigan, will split in t w o on February 15 ,h . Saugatuck, Hamilton, Allegan, and surrounding areas will b e c o m e the new 269 area code. T h e split w a s necessitated by rising d e m a n d for n e w fax and cell phone numbers.

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Clergy gather to learn and mix A one-day conference at Hope College designed for area clergy will focus on "Scripture and the Moral Life." T h e conference will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 18. T h e event will feature eight presentations by m e m b e r s of the H o p e religion faculty. It is designed as a continuing education opportunity f o r local clergy.

Faculty revise plagiarism code T h e A c a d e m i c Affairs Board proposed a revised plagiarism policy written last semester. T h e proposal will replace section A . 3 and revise section B of the A c a d e m i c Integrity statement. Section B . l . currently stipulates a meeting between student and professor after plagiarism. It m a y be changed to a meeting with another faculty member.

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A//CHOR P H O T O C O U R T E S Y O F J E R E M Y DAVIS Four of the forty Hope Democrats who traveled to Grand Rapids last Wednesday to protest President Bush's opinion that war may be necessary to disarm Iraq. Bush was in Grand Rapids delivering his first speech since his State of the Union Address. Four Hope Republicans attended the speech, m o r e WAR A N D P E A C E o n 2

Student Congress selects speakers Focus will be on the influence of violent video games in reality Kurt Koehler C A M P U S BEAT EDITOR

In choosing its annual speaker, student congress was looking to depart f r o m the recent trend of inviting famous and expensive speakers. While following recent high profile speakers Maya Angelou and Ben Stein has proved to be a challenge, student congress believes it has f o u n d quality, if lesser k n o w n speakers, in J a c k

T h o m p s o n and D a v i d Kushner. T h e t w o will debate the issue of w h e t h e r violent video g a m e s are to blame for real-life violent acts. T h o m p s o n , a M i a m i attorney w h o has represented families of the victims of the C o l u m b i n e and Pedukah school shootings, is currently suing the maker, of G r a n d T h e f t Auto III for Playstation 2, Rock Star G a m e s for a Wyoming, M i c h i g a n m u r d e r a l l e g e d l y inspired by that g a m e . Kushner, a contributing editor for Rolling Stone Magazine, will present the position that video game violence and marketing is not to b l a m e f o r

real-life violent actions. " T h o m p s o n and K u s h n e r will provide unique and professional perspectives into the topic of violent media and its effects on hum a n behavior," said Student Congress Comproller Jeremy Brieve ( ' 0 4 ) . ' T h e y will also allow students the opportunity to converse with leading experts in this important area of study. Both will be available to interact with students and believe that this is of paramount importance to their visit." Neither speaker is f a m o u s , but they will bring an interactive n e w debate format to the presentation.

Early plans call for the debate ending with an informal question and answer session with both speakers and a community breakfast the following morning T h e y will also be available to visit classes. " T h e d e b a t e f o r m a t will also present students with the opportunity to learn in a lively environment that presents both sides of an interesting issue," Brieve said. T h o m p s o n and Kushner have a long history of advocating their respective opinions on video g a m e violence. T h o m p s o n is involved in a class-action lawsuit

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New Peale expansion vandalized Jared Gall STAFF REPORTER

" W h e n I think of all the things done in the name of science," writes J a c k H a n d e y , a u t h o r of " D e e p T h o u g h t s , " "I have to cringe. No, wait. Not science, vandalism. And not cringe, laugh." T h i s time, no one is laughing. By the t i m e c o n s t r u c t i o n and renovation are completed on Peale S c i e n c e Center, the p r o j e c t will have been underway for over t w o years and will have cost Hope more than 36 million dollars. D u e to the actions of two Hope freshmen last week, the estimated bottom line has n o w increased by $15,000.

Early Wednesday morning last week, the two students broke into the construction site on the corner of 12th St. and College Ave. T h e y reportedly lore down some plastic covering a window and climbed to the third floor of the building. The students then allegedly took a length of pipe and smashed seven double-paned thermal windows, and caused extensive d a m a g e to other areas of the building. A nearby Holland resident telep h o n e d H o l l a n d P o l i c e and reported hearing glass breaking at the construction site. O f f i c e r s found the two students in the site and took them into c u s t o d y p e n d i n g bail.

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Both have been released and placed u n d e r s u m m a r y s u s p e n s i o n by Hope College, meaning they will be temporarily suspended while going through the judicial processes of Hope and Holland. F o l l o w i n g the i n c i d e n t , H o p e will be e x a m i n i n g p o s s i b l e i m provements to security at the Peale Science building. " W e ' r e a l w a y s trying to be vigilant," said Richard Frost, Dean of Students. "We make regular rounds of all the buildings. However, we are not a small campus. We appear small, but if a student makes a decision to do something, hopefully they'll use better j u d g m e n t than they did last w e e k . "

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GPS Arts, page 3 •••••••••

I Basketball Sports, page 8

Michael Card Arts, page 3

New TV shows Features, page 6


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February 5, 2003

Hillary Stone Elizabeth Van Houzoelingen Sarah Sturtevant Guest Columnists

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Douglas Komejan Guest Columnist

Iraq vs. U.S. Population: 24,001,816 vs. 280,562,489

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n J a n u a r y 2 9 t h t w o s e p a r a t e g r o u p s of H o p e s t u d e n t s t r a v e l e d to G r a n d R a p i d s . O n e g r o u p of f o u r H o p e R e p u b l i c a n s w e n t t o w a t c h P r e s i d e n t B u s h d e l i v e r his first s p e e c h since his S t a t e of t h e U n i o n a d d r e s s , w h i l e a g r o u p of H o p e D e m o c r a t s , s o m e f o r t y s t u d e n t s , p r o t e s t e d a g a i n s t B u s h ' s s t a n c e on a possible p r e e m p t i v e s t r i k e to d i s a r m a n d o u s t I r a q i d i c t a t o r S a d d a m H u s s e i n f r o m p o w e r . B e l o w a r e t w o c o l u m n s , w r i t t e n b y s t u d e n t s w h o w e r e t h e r e , e x p r e s s i n g t h e i r d i f f e r i n g o p i n i o n s on t h e issue.

Territorial Area: 4 3 7 . 0 7 2 vs. 9,629,091 sq. km

Life Expectancy: 67.38 vs. 77.4 years

America cannot risk inaction

War is not the a n s w e r

T h e United States of America citizens. President Bush has indifaces a number of challenges, both cated on n u m e r o u s occasions that at h o m e and abroad, as we enter war with Iraq is the last o p t i o n . 2003. Domestically, the e c o n o m y However, the time has c o m e to for continues to recover following a Iraq and its leader to disarm.. A f t e r t h e G uu l f oW Waarr Iri 1991, mild r e c e s s i o n and terrorist atjin aagjfeed g r e e to e n d tacks. Abroad, the United States."-"Sa33anr4WsSein

side would argue the opposite; Iraq "I d i d n ' t vote f o r Star Wars; I is the aggressor because it supposdidn't vote f o r fear; I ' m not g o i n g edly controls weapons of mass deto support this war so Bush get out struction. S o then w h y are w e not of here." We [shouted this chant preemptively attacking North Kowhile marching i n support of our rea, or f o r that matter any nation t h s l a s l e T o j President B u s h ' s posthat holds W M D ? Kim Jong II and sible war'ipp Iraq':-Bush appeared his countless human rights violain G r a n d Rapids to.ipeak on health tions are just as evil as S a d d a m ' s , care issues, but quickly turned his so why is the US providing aid and f o c u s to the unnecessary c o n f r o n time to the former and not the lattation with Iraq—a counJty that has t e r — w h o m a y or m a y not h a v e p o s e d no o f f e n s i v e thrept to the nuclear w e a p o n s ? W h y can dipU.S. Bush c a m e to seek approval in a p r e d o m i n a t e l y c o n s e r v a l w e - ^ ' - k j m a t i c relations be used in rearea, however, he w a s greeted by.'""'gards to North Korea and not Iraq? concerned protesters; over forty or. What about the e c o n o m y ? If we which were Hope College students. \ b o m b Iraq, m o n e y that could be We were there because we are c o n . - . J u s e d to s t i m u l a t e o u r e c o n o m y c e r n e d with B u s h ' s imperialistic would instead f u n d the production of F-17s and smart bombs. We style of leadership. have the choice between eliminatBush's approach to fighting-aAvar ing u n e m p l o y m e n t o r b o m b i n g in I r a q is o n e of u n i l a t e r a l i s m Iraqis. Which w o u l d you choose? grounded in hegemonic principles. A s w e chanted on Michigan AvFour years ago w e c a m e \o Hope enue, our message rang loud and w i t h o u r ears p e r k e d to t&ke in c l e a r — w a r is not the answer. It is k n o w l e d g e f r o m o u r profesSQn easy to say that no one wants to m o u t h s . T o d a y w e are senioi go to war, but the difficulty lies in well-informed student Democrats,

prepares for a conflict in I r ^ q l b a t Iraq's program of g a t i n g nuclear h o p e f u l l y , x a n i ) ^ a v e i r f e d . Presi- w e a p o n s and to jet United Nations dent Bush addressed both of these inspectoi;6-info~the country. T h o s e issues in great length during his inspectors were kicked out in 1998. State of the Union address, and For 12 vears Iraq has been deceivduring his visit the following day ing the Ignited States and the world. Prior to September 11, 2001 not to G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. m u c h attention w a s paid to Iraq. Most A m e r i c a n s are concerned with the health of the economy, But, orv'that day our vulnerability and rightfully so. T h e President became' evident. We are no longer has proposed a n u m b e r of items in a pdsition to view Iraq as a mithat are i n t e n d e d to m o v e o u r nor prqblem. W h a t if Iraq has or is e c o n o m y in the right direction. in t h e A r o c e s s of giving nerve gas T h e first is his tax cut proposal. or apthrax to A l - Q a e d a ? T h e U N It is a simple matter of e c o n o m - inspectors have recently stated that ics: The more money people h a v ^ - " I r a q is not c o o p e r a t i n g , a n d has the m o r e likely they wilL-be to been less than truthful about weapspend that money q a - g ^ o d s and o n s p r o g r a m s . I r a q s a y s t h e y s e r v i c e s . T h i s ^ n i o n e y w i l l be should be trusted. Can w e trust a p u m p e d b&ek^into the e c o n o m y man who murders his o w n people and h e l p ^ o create m o r e growth a n d d e c e i v e d t h e w o r l d f o r 12 a n d jobs, ^ v e r y o n e will see his years? President Bush has consulted or her t a x ^ lowered under this with the United Nations and with plan. 'i It is also essential that Congress Congress. It is time for the United m a k e s perrfyan^ent the tax c u t s Nations to do the j o b it w a s created President B u s ^ S i g n e d into law in for, to protect the world f r o m evil. 2001. Se.veral portions o f t h a U a x Would another m o n t h of inspec^ u T a f e not scheduled to take e f - X t f o n s really solve anything? Most f e e t until 2005 and 2 0 0 6 . T h e lifeely not. President Bush has alPresident believes that if those tax l o w e d ' f h ^ p r o c e s s to run its course. cuts are good enough for people Time has nearly, run out. Is doing two or three years f r o m now, they nothing about Iraq'a-nsk worth takshould be good e n o u g h for you and me today. Giving people m o r e m o n e y to spend will i m prove the e c o n o m y ' s growth rate and create more jobs. T h e second major issue facing the United States today is Sadaam Hussein and the nation of Iraq. Most people can agree that Iraq is a threat. But, is Iraq a threat to the United Slates and our allies? A majority of Americans, including myself, believe that Iraq is a threat to the United States and our

ing? Saddam Hussein must be taken out of p o w e r before he causesT>arm to the United States and our allies-.-. L e t ' s solve this problem while w e still can. September 11, 2001 w a s a horrific day in the life of our country. We should do everything in our p o w e r to prevent a similar event f r o m taking place again, even if that m e a n s p r e e m p t i v e w a r against a nation that poses a serious threat. Ask yourself, can w e risk not taking action?

and w e are unclear as to when Iraq / doing something to prevent it with p o p p e d u p as the number one threat ' m o r e effective solutions. B u s h to American security. On SeptemcameYo seek approval for his plans for an attack on Iraq, but we would ber 11, we were nestled in our beds, not give it to hirt}. s n u g and warm, when the greatest While our President tries to perterrorist attack on A m e r i c a n soil suade us that a w a r with Iraq ripped N Y C and Washington D.C. w o u l d f o s t e r p e a c e f u l relations to pieces. A1 Qaeda and O s a m a bin b e t w e e n Iraq and tlje U.S., w e Ladin were to blame. T h e correlamust ask ourselves is this truly the tion between Saddam Hussein and way to seek peace? Martin Luther bin Laden appears to be nonexistKing Jr. once said, r O n e day w e ent, w h y then after twelve years of must c o m e to see that pe^ce is not no war with Iraq are w e going after merely a distant goal w e j>eek, but Iraq? A s students of international that it is a means by whifch we arrelations w e are unclear as to what rive at that goal. We must pursue the answer could be. peaceful end^Ohrough ^eac^ful We have been taught to consume m e a n s . " W£ say to the 'PrfcSadcflT^ knovyledge with g r e a t v o r a c i t y . if it is pea^e you are purMjinfc, do Specifically, we h a v e c o m e to unnot jeopardize the innricerif lives derstand politics on a global scale. of son)i to g u a r a n t ^ t h ^ special T h u s , let us explore International law. I n t e r n a t i o n a n a w - 4 « - v e i ^ d ^ _ ^ r ^ e K j t s ^ o f others. A s a'prophet on the subject of preemption. T h e for the g r e a t e s f f ^ c i f i s t of k \ time, U.N. charter explicitly slates preJ e s u s C h r i s t , o n c e said, 4 sjeek ventative war is illegal. In this war, peace and pursue it" (Psalms the US is the aggressor. T h e other

34:14).

GNP (per capita): $ 2 , 5 0 0 vs. $ 3 6 , 3 0 0

Literacy: 58 percent vs. 97 percent

Inflation: 6 0 percent vs. 2.8 percent

Telephones in use: 6 7 5 , 0 0 0 vs. 194 million

Military Budget: $1.3 billion vs. $276.7 billion

Military Manpower (fit for service): 3,430.819 vs. 53,111,250

Exports: $21.8 billion vs. $776 billion

External Debt: $ 1 3 9 billion vs. $862 billion

Infant Mortality: 57.61 vs. 6.69/ t h o u s a n d b i r t h s

DEBATE from 1 against the manufacturers of violent v i d e o g a m e s like " G r a n d T h e f t Auto." He also had an influential role in the obscenity case against Ice-T for his " C o p Killer" lyrics and has spoken at over 170 colleges and universities. Kushner is the author of " M a s t e r s of D o o m " , to be released in April, which chronicles how the creators of " D o o m " were sued for the Columbine shootings. Details of the events should be finalized within a few weeks.

Heavy personnel turn over expected among Housing staff Residential Life cottages coordinator Stacy Kemper departs while more changes loom for fall 2003 Nick Denis EonOR-IN-CHIEF

Despite the fact that her career at Hope College has ended after a year and a half of service, Stacy Kemper, Residential Life Coordinator (RLC), remains positive about her

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Hope experience. "I love Hope College and everything here," Kemper said. Kemper is not the only m e m b e r of the Residenlial Life staff to be leaving this year. Ellen Awad, Residential Life Coordinator, and Sean Fochtman, Residential Life Coordinator, and three R D ' s are also leaving at the end of this year. With the exception of Kemper, all of the departing staff will end their duties after the end of Ihe school year. K e m p e r ' s two-year contract has expired, and the college has de-

cided to not renew it for the optional third year. With the knowledge that her contract will not be renewed, Kemper has taken the choice given to her, and opted to leave Hope now. T h e Residential Life Department does not have a replacement for Kemper as of yet. "We h a v e not c o m e to an immediate decision, but w e are hoping to arrive at one in one w e e k , " said Kelly Burris Wesener, Assistant Dean f o r Housing and Residential Life. While Kemper is not serving, and a n e w staff m e m b e r has not been hired, her

duties are being filled by the three remaining R L C ' s . T h e n u m b e r of leaving staff means that n e w people will fill almost half of the positions in the Residential Life Department next year. In the face of such a massive change in the department, Wesener remains optimistic for the u p c o m i n g school year. " N e w people bring in new perspectives and new energy. It will be great. There are people returning w h o k n o w their jobs, and they will help to push us forward," Wesener said.


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Michael Card is third CMS musician Christian singer performs February 14 Katie Taylor STAFF REPORTER

F r o m the people w h o brought Hope students Jennifer K n a p p and Jars of Clay comes another concert by a Christian performer. At 8 p.m. on Valentine's Day. the Christian Music Series presents Michael Card in Dimnent Chapel. Card is an accomplished musician who has released 20 albums in the duration of his 20-year career. Nineteen of his songs have been number-one. O n e track, titled "El Shaddai," was the only Christian song on the R1AA list of 365 songs for the 20 , h century. Card's music has w o n five Dove Music awards and seven nominations. Besides being a singer. Card is also an a c c o m p l i s h e d a u t h o r of Christian works. The musician has b e e n an E C P A G o l d M e d a l l i o n Book nominee five times. He has written !3 books, selling over 4 0 0 , 0 0 0 copies. "Scribbling in the Sand" is the

title of both Card's newest book and album. The C D is a compilation of C a r d ' s greatest hits featuring some of his musical colleagues such as S t e v e G r e e n , S a r a G r o v e s , Phil Keaggy and Kirk Whalum. On the n e w a l b u m Card also premieres t w o brand new songs, including the title track, "Scribbling in the S a n d , " the story of J e s u s scribbling in the sand while d e e p in thought w a s the inspiration for this song. T h e overall theme of the C D , however, is creativity. Derek Emerson, Arts Coordinator, is enthusiastic about bringing Card to Hope. Emerson feels that Card's music will be enjoyable, in part, because of h o w long he has been perfecting his work. "Michael brings a m o r e intelligent approach to his m u s i c , " Emerson said. Emerson also noted that the show would be s o m e w h a t different f r o m those that the Christian Music Series has done earlier this year, like Jars of Clay. "The best word I can think of to describe the s h o w w o u l d be 'mel-

l o w ' , " Emerson said. Card will be performing solo in a simple setting without the bright lights. He will sing about half of the concert while playing the piano, and the other half with his guitar. Though Card's approach to m u sic m a y be more passive, his Christian message is strong. "He takes time to focus his work within the Christian f a i t h , " Emerson said. Card plans to share his message not only through this music Friday night, but also earlier that morning. He will be leading the chapel service at 10:30 a.m. Tickets f o r the concert will be available at the DeWitt Center Box O f f i c e T h u r s d a y t h r o u g h Friday this week and Wednesday through Friday next w e e k , f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. They are $7 for students and $ 1 0 for the general public. Tickets are going fast. Emerson has already had calls f r o m several out-of-state Michael Card fans that plan to see his show. Because of this, the concert was m o v e d f r o m Knickerbocker into Dimnent.

Christian singer Michael Card performs as part of the Christian Music Series at 8 p.m. on February 14 in Dimnent Chapel.

LAGQ performs 'Laramie Project' presented Guitar Quartet plays at Dimnent for GPS Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

Called "one of the finest guitar quartets in the w o r l d " by "Guitar P l a y e r M a g a z i n e , " the r e c e n t l y G r a m m y nominated L o s Angeles Guitar Quartet ( L A G Q ) c o m e s to Dimnent Chapel as part of the Great P e r f o r m a n c e Series. T h e p e r f o r m a n c e t a k e s p l a c e at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 18, just days before the G r a m m y w i n n e r s are announced. L A G Q is m a d e u p of already accomplished soloists Andrew York, William Kanengiser, Scott Tennant, and John D e a r m a n . ' T h e y are four outstanding guitarists with great individual careers w h o c o m b i n e to c r e a t e a s t u n n i n g q u a r t e t , " said Derek Emerson, Hope Arts Coordinator. " A n y o n e of these guitarists would be worth their o w n G P S p e r f o r m a n c e — t o have four at once will be incredible." T h e music of L A G Q has made its w a y across the continent. T h e y

have recently been heard on radio stations and featured on television p r o g r a m s t h r o u g h o u t the U n i t e d States. "I booked this knowing it would be one of the most well attended concerts of the year," Emerson said. "They have a devoted following, and guitar players will c o m e m a n y hours to hear this group play." Although they are best k n o w n as a classical guitar group, they play a w i d e range of different musical styles. In fact, their G r a m m y nomin a t i o n is f o r the B e s t C l a s s i c a l Crossover Album for their 2 0 0 2 release " L A G Q Latin." " M o s t p e o p l e a p p r e c i a t e great guitar playing, whether it is classical, blues or rock," Emerson said. "On the other hand, they are not a strictly classical group, and I like h e a r i n g their range-I think other people will as well." Tickets to see L A G Q go on sale beginning Feb. 12 and through Feb. 18. T h e y cost $ 1 4 f o r adults, $ 1 2 f o r senior citizens, and $5 f o r students and children. The DeWitt ticket office is open weekdays f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Nick Denis EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

In 1998, a young m a n n a m e d Matthew Sheppard was beaten to death in Laramie, W y o m i n g because he w a s homosexual. This a n t i - g a y hate c r i m e p r o d u c e d many reactions f r o m people all across the nation, and now, some of those reactions are going to be voiced at H o p e College. In p a r t n e r s h i p w i t h t h e Taskforce on Issues of Sexuality, the H o p e C o l l e g e T h e a t r e Department will be presenting ' T h e Laramie Project," February 1415 and 19-22. In the wake of this crime, M o i s e s K a u f m a n and m e m b e r s of the Tectonic Theater P r o j e c t w r o t e this p r o d u c t i o n . T h e play c o m p r i s e s transcriptions of interviews of the people of L a r a m i e , c o n d u c t e d b y K a u f m a n and m e m b e r s of the Tectonic Theater Project. In his author's note, K a u f m a n explains the writing process: " D u r i n g the y e a r - a n d - a - h a l f development of the play, m e m bers of the company and I traveled to Laramie six times to conduct interviews with the people of the town. We transcribed and edited the interviews, then cond u c t e d s e v e r a l w o r k s h o p s in which the m e m b e r s of the company presented material and acted as dramaturges in the creation of the play."

ANCHOFf PHOTO BY NICK DENI

Rachel Carrozziere ('03) in "The Laramie Project," which opens February 14 in the DeWitt Main Theatre. E a c h p e r f o r m a n c e of the play will be f o l l o w e d by a panel discussion that all are invited to participate in. T h e discussions will be lead by a 3 to 4 person panel of faculty, staff, and students representing a broad spectrum of the Hope community. Daina Robins, Associate Professor of T h e a t r e , d i r e c t s the play. Robins thinks that the play has the potential to seriously impact the lives of all those in attendance. "I think, I hope, the performance will give students the opportunity to b e c o m e more clear about h o w they think and feel about an impor-

tant issue of our times. It will give them the chance to hear, to consider more than o n e perspective and to investigate their own response to the life and death of M a t t h e w S h e p p a r d , its a f t e r math, and what it reveals about each one of us, w h o we are, who w e want to be," Robins said. T i c k e t s are on sale, at the DeWitt Center ticket office. Admission prices are $7 general admission, $5 for faculty and staff, and $4 for students. T h e ticket office extension is x 7 8 9 0 and its office hours are w e e k d a y s f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

What's Hangin'?

AMCHOff P H O T O

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The 2003 Grammy nominated Los Angeles Guitar Quartet comes to Hope at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18.

Cool Beans Coffee House Byron Keith Tonight, 7-9:30 p.m. "Myth a n d the Creative Process: T h e Kletz M i c h a e l A y r t o n a n d t h e M y t h of D a e d a l u s ' Continues through Friday DePree Gallery Free Admission

" R a b b i t Proof Fence" 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat., Feb 3-8 Mon.-Thurs., Feb. 10-18 Knickerbocker Theatre $5 Regular Admission


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D a n c e M a r a t h o n is q u i c k l y a p p r o a c h i n g , a n d w i t h il a c h a n c e t o d o n a t e t o c h a r i t y . M a n y s t u d e n t s will s t a y o n t h e i r f e e t f o r 2 4 h o u r s t o solicit p l e d g e s t h a t w i l l b e d o n a t e d to t h e All o f t h i s m a k e s m e a s k o n e

question: W h y must people wait for this even to donate to a good cause? I am not against fundraising events or Dance Marathon, b u t t h e c o n c e p t b e h i n d t h e m d o e s s e e m s o m e w h a t f l a w e d . In

Your voice

Turmjuux voiL Y o f l r v p i c e

nnirv

There is no time like now to donate to charity

DeVos Children's Hospital.

ur

February 5/ 2003

Your voice

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Ynur

DeVos Children's Hospital, and other

c h a r i t a b l e o r g a n i z a t i o n s a r e w i l l i n g t o a c c e p t d o n a t i o n s all y e a r . If y o u w a n t t o m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e w i t h a d o n a t i o n to a non-profit organization, then d o n ' t wait f o r a college student to f u r t h e r p e r s u a d e y o u b y s t a y i n g a w a k e a n d o n t h e i r f e e t f o r 24 hours.

Educational events are a good start, but not enough

To the Editor: We are writing to express our outrage at the unattribuled advertisement on page 7 in the January 2 9 issue of T h e Anchor. T h i s larger than one-quarter page ad is a photograph of young black w o m a n with the word R E J E C T printed across her image. Taken with or without the small print ( 4 i

s t a n d . W i t h t h i s in m i n d , w e m u s t t h i n k o f e v e n t s l i k e " T h e O t h e r S h o e " a n d t h e H a b i t a t f o r H u m a n i t y s l e e p - o u t in t h e Pine G r o v e as w h a t they really are. These events can promote diversity and understanding

view of the accompanying image was in order. W h y picture the face of a minority in this " p r o m o ad"? We probably s h o u l d n ' t have, especially since w e had in hand another, similar ad with a Caucasian w o m a n in the photo. So, thanks for pointing out something that w e should have been m o r e careful about f r o m the start. — N i c k Denis, A n c h o r editor-in-chief; M a r k Lewison, advisor.

I am very angry that you are still running those offensive abstinence ads in T h e Anchor. I am referring to the o n e that has a picture of a

young w o m a n with the word "reject" written across her. People have c o m p l a i n e d about this ad before, and you have ignored them. T h e s e ads are blatantly sexist and inappropriate, and I shouldn't h a v e to ex-

T h e m o s t difficult part of

b e i n g b l i n d is t h a t y o u w i l l n e v e r s e e a g a i n ; o f b e i n g h o m e less that you n e v e r k n o w w h e r e y o u r bed will b e t o m o r r o w n i g h t . W h e n w e t a k e p a r t in t h e s e e v e n t s , w e o n l y g e t a s m a l l s a m p l e o f w h a t t h e l i f e s t y l e is a c t u a l l y l i k e ; t h i n k i n g a n y thing else only trivializes the p r o b l e m s that w e are trying to experience. W h i l e w e m a y never be able to truly understand viewp o i n t s t h a t a r e n o t o u r o w n , t h e s e e v e n t s c a n s e r v e as a s t a r t i n g p o i n t , b u t o u r w o r k is n o t c o m p l e t e j u s t f r o m a t t e n d i n g a f e w events a n d pretending to b e s o m e o n e that w e are not.

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

A n c h o r

Staff

S t a f f

Anchor Staff

editor-in-chief Nick Denis production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Anjey Dykhuis Kurt Koehler arts editor Maureen Yonovitz sports editors Dave Yetter photo editor Roh Ondra business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants ad manager Ana Santibanez Zamora production asisstant Jason Johnson advisor Mark A, Lewison

plain why. I am sick of w o m e n alw a y s being b l a m e d when it comes to unexpected pregnancies.

Danielle Grammerstorf ( ' 0 3 )

Dean of students should give an explanation

as they are i n t e n d e d to, but the u n d e r s t a n d i n g that a particip a n t g e t s is o n l y a l i m i t e d o n e .

Carl a Vissers, professor of English; Priscilla Atkins, Van Wylen Library; Karima Jeffery, Teaching Fellow; David Klooster, professor of English; Barbara Mezeske, professor of English; and Jack Ridl, professor of English.

Advertisement from Feb. 5 is sexist To the Editor:

b e c a r e f u l t o n o t f u r t h e r a l i e n a t e t h o s e w h o w e w i s h to u n d e r -

hinr V

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had sex so my boyfriend w o u l d n ' t R E J E C T me. N o w I h a v e a baby. And no boyfriend."), this advertisement is an abhorrent example of the stereotyping and racism that poison not only our society at large, but, unfortunately, the Hope College c a m p u s as well. That this ad appeared in our student newspaper is shameful, sad, and horrific.

E d i t o r ' s n o t e : With the crystal-clear vision of hindsight, w e at T h e A n c h o r see n o w that the public-service announcement laid out on a n e w s page during the heat of deadline production was far f r o m the best choice of images. T h e fight-teen-pregnancy message was a strong one (sorry the www.teenpregnancy.org credit line w a s cropped off the p h o t o during layout!), but a m o r e thoughtful re-

In o u r o n g o i n g a t t e m p t t o u n d e r s t a n d e a c h o t h e r , w h i c h h a s f o u n d its w a y to the s u r f a c e o n c a m p u s this year, we m u s t

your voicc

"Reject" shown in Anchor is offensive

m y mind, this impetus should b e necessary for a donation to be m a d e to charity.

Your Voice

To the Editor:

indefensible, was so unexpected that those responsible have no clue h o w to make up f o r the dearth of

1 love this College, and I believe I h a v e the responsibility to do w h a t ' s best f o r it w h e n I can. In the past f e w months, a series of events has led to our loss of a dedicated, hardworking, and w o n d e r f u l Residential Life member, Stacy Kemper. Stacy has responsibility f o r the cottages and f o r the Student/Faculty Judicial Board. S h e has touched m a n y students' lives and earned friendships and trust outside of her formal

service she leaves in her wake. Il has not been suggested that Stacy has done anything wrong or been lacking in her duties and dedication to our College. T h e r e are no answers to be found in the administration—not f r o m her supervisor Kelly Burris-Wesener or f r o m the Dean. I challenge you, the student body, to elicit f r o m our D e a n of Students o n e good reason w h y Stacy was pressured to resign f r o m a j o b and a College she loved so much. Or go to Kelly, Assistant D e a n f o r Housing and Residential Life (wesener@hope.edu), or D e a n Frost (frost@hope.edu) and ask th e m what they envision f o r the future of Hope College. Ask th e m h o w they are fulfilling the Christian mission statement of Hope College and Res. Life. If their vision is not in line with Stacy's, I ' m not sure I can c o n d o n e where Res. Life is taking this College. I do not intend to sit idly while the College dismisses those who, in their dedication to excellence, make their supervisors look unproductive and the Dean look like a puppet of departmental politics. Please join m e in making the Dean of Students and the Assistant Dean for Housing and Residential Life accountable to the best interests of the College, not their own.

roles. However, it is as a m e m b e r of Judicial Board that I can foresee the greatest loss to the College and its community. She selected and trained each of the students w h o s e r v e — a n d f r o m all reports, w e h a v e a done a c o m m e n d a b l e j o b upholding the judicial process that the school has in place. Stacy has always been present at hearings and offers advice to help ensure fairness, consistency, and a positive educational environment f o r everyone involved in the process. I have spoken with each m e m b e r of Judicial Board, and we are all sad to lose Stacy and very concerned about h o w the College can make such a mistake by the students. There is no w a y to adequately replace Stacy, as there is no o n e w h o understands what her j o b entailed. Il is possible that there are other faculty m e m b e r s w h o will be as committed to fairness and consistency as Stacy has been, but I find it difficult to expect these qualities in w h o e v e r tries to fill her shoes. Rest assured that her dismissal, in addition to being premature and

Nicolas Grzegorczyk ( ' 0 4 )

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e w i t h i n t h e college a n d r e l a t e d c o m m u n i t i e s

Staff Reporters: OHmAHmov, Jared Gall, Erin RHey, Katie Taylor, Erin Wickens

T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t to e d i t d u e t o s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s N o p e r s o n a l a t t a c k s , p o o r t a s t e o r a n y t h i n g p o t e n t i a l l y libelous L e t t e r s c h o s e n o n a f i r s t c o m e first s e r v e b a s i s , o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n

Photo Assisstant: Anneke Meeter

No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y v e r i f y i d e n t i t y of w r i t e r T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t to r e f u s e p u b l i c a t i o n of a n y l e t t e r s u b m i t t e d

The Anc hor is a product of sliideni effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding w hich comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the Anchor 2003 spring semester, Issue #17 of 25

L e t t e r s o v e r 5 0 0 w o r d s in l e n g t h will n o t b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n

Mail letters to t h e A n c h o r do

Hope College, drop them

off at t h e A n c h o r office ( l o c a t e d in t h e c e n t e r of Dewitt, b e h i n d W T H S ) , or e - m a i l A n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u


% \ r i c W o r 5 CLASSIFIEDS &c M O R E A w a r with Iraq is not properly justified, must m a k e stronger connection to bin Laden February 5, 2003

b e e n l o o k i n g at this hard f o r m o r e

risky w a r on the p r e s u m p t i o n that

w a r r i o r s " — a n d not s e c u l a r ty-

than a y e a r a n d you k n o w what, w e just d o n ' t think it's t h e r e . " F o u r -

r a n t s — c a n effectively resist the as-

President B u s h h a s been telling

link is all-important. If S a d d a m had s o m e t h i n g t o d o with the 9/11 at-

S a d d a m w o u l d h a n d over his m o s t d a n g e r o u s w e a p o n s — a n d therefore

us for m o n t h s and m o n t h s that there are "clear links" b e t w e e n S a d d a m

tacks, most Americans would rightly s u p p o r t a w a r of s e l f - d e -

his m o s t v a l u a b l e p o s s e s s i o n s — t o a religious f a n a t i c w h o is c o m m i t -

Hussein and O s a m a bin Laden, say-

f e n s e against Iraq, a s w a s the c a s e w i t h A f g h a n i s t a n . But if O s a m a

f i f t h s of A m e r i c a n s , h o w e v e r , according to polls and thanks no doubt to Bush's assertions, believe that

establishing the O s a m a - S a d d a m

To the Editor:

ing at one point that "You c a n ' t distinguish b e t w e e n al-Qaeda and Saddam w h e n you talk a b o u t the w a r on terror." T h e o n l y p r o b l e m with this picture is that the administration has provided

and S a d d a m are in fact not conspiring, then a U . S . - l e d w a r a g a i n s t Iraq w o u l d a p p e a r to b e one of aggression, one that m a n y patriotic Americans w o u l d feel a duty to

ted to the o v e r t h r o w of S a d d a m and all o t h e r secular M u s l i m leaders. W h a t w e c a n b e sure of is that

A m e r i c a n s rely u p o n t h e i r easily

bin L a d e n , f a r f r o m b e i n g intimi-

f a n n e d fears, t h i n k i n g , s o m e w h a t naturally, that O s a m a a n d S a d d a m

dated, eagerly w e l c o m e s the recruitm e n t and public relations b o n a n z a

m i g h t w o r k t o g e t h e r b e c a u s e they a r e b o t h e n e m i e s of t h e U n i t e d

t h a t an a g g r e s s i v e U . S . w a r a n d

derestimate that enemy. Instead of striking a fatal b l o w against terrori s m , a t t a c k i n g Iraq w i t h o u t e v i d e n c e of an O s a m a - S a d d a m c o n spiracy a m o u n t s to the taking of bin

oppose. Analysts at the C I A and FBI n o w

States. B u t the f a c t is that the t w o

o c c u p a t i o n of a M u s l i m nation in the heart of the M i d d l e East w o u l d

e x p e c t S e c r e t a r y of State P o w e l l to

are telling u s that e v i d e n c e of the s u p p o s e d a l - Q a e d a - S a d d a m link is

are adversaries, one religious and o n e secular, in a d e e p l y tragic c o m -

provide. In the e y e s of far too m a n y in the region, the w a r will s e r v e to

being exaggerated. The Sunday

petition f o r p a n - A r a b l e a d e r s h i p . President B u s h is asking the A m e r i -

p r o v e his p o i n t : t h a t t h e U n i t e d

cil on W e d n e s d a y . In the struggle to "sell" the war,

N e w York T i m e s q u o t e s a g o v e r n ment official w h o says, " W e ' v e

can p e o p l e t o w a g e this incredibly

Classified

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mention his n a m e in the State of the Union address (while using

S a d d a m has ties to a l - Q a e d a . In the f a c e of a lack of e v i d e n c e ,

absolutely n o solid evidence of such a l i n k — a n d there is little r e a s o n to offer much new on the question w h e n h e g o e s to the Security C o u n -

sault. Despite B u s h ' s not d a r i n g to

States is on a c r u s a d e t o d o m i n a t e the M i d d l e East and that only "holy

S a d d a m ' s n a m e 19 times). O s a m a bin Laden is the principal e n e m y in the w a r on terrorism. It would be the height of f o o l i s h n e s s t o un-

L a d e n ' s bait. Joel Toppen, Associate Professor of Political S c i e n c e

Recycle T h e Anchor!

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WANTED! Avon Reps. $ 10.00 t o get started. Free brochures for first month. 4 0 % off first 2 m o n t h s . P r o d u c t s s h i p p e d to y o u r door, s h i p p i n g is free. Call A n n i e W i l e y 3 9 9 - 3 4 2 9 or e mail a n n i e w i l e y @ c h a r t e r m i . n e t

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to take a b r e a k f r o m m e n , I really m e a n t that I w a n t e d t o take a b r e a k

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f r o m you. - T e r a h

The End

The Sexuality Roundtable: A Forum for G a y a n d Straight Students.

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T

Wnchor

FEATURES

February 5, 2003

Two new shows added to Hope television lineup Music themed shows produced by students will begin this Friday Erin Wickens STAFF REPORTER

T h e Lakeshore Report, ihe Hope College television station, is planning to bring t w o n e w shows about music into rotation starting Friday. H o p e students Ryan Wert ('04), A n d r e w Volk ( ' 0 5 ) a n d J a m e s Pierce ( ' 0 3 ) are producing the prog r a m s — " C o l Spirito", and ' T r a c k N i n e . " T h e f o r m e r will f e a t u r e Hope events such as orchestra, jazz band concerts and the latter will feature local bands and individuals ou t s i d e the c o l l e g e s c e n e . E a c h show will run o n c e a week, a halfhour each. Wert said the "Col Spirito" s h o w will follow a format that includes clips f r o m a concert and brief int e r v i e w s with m u s i c i a n s . " T r a c k Nine," however, w o n ' t have a set format. " O n e day w e could just do a DJ set and you would have a little rave on your television...other d a y s it could be video footage of bands and interviews. It could take any f o r m , depending on what w e are featuring for the day," Wert said. ' T r a c k N i n e " also is considering bringing bands into the studio to p e r f o r m especially f o r the viewing audience. At this point, though, it is uncertain what is g o i n g to hap-

J N F O C U S r / A /' T T ' / O r 1

pen with ' T r a c k Nine," but it promises to be f u n for viewers. First u p for ' T r a c k N i n e " is a recent concert held in the Voorhees Hall b a s e m e n t f e a t u r i n g V o l k ' s band. Hope f o r August, and James Pierce's band, Lyle!. Future s h o w s will play clips of and interviews with The Fashion Club, Isaiah Kallman f r o m the G r a n d Rapidsbased band Joust, Launch of the Ultra Spider, Tara Leigh Cobble and Just Plain Ann. "We are taking it w e e k by w e e k , " said Wert w h e n asked what they plan to do with the s h o w in the future. " W e are open to ideas, and we don't want strictly rock and roll." Right now, he said, they are playing with the idea of featuring Grand Rapids bands once a month to bring interest f r o m a wide demographic. "The only problem would be finding the time and money to drive out to G r a n d Rapids. But it would be great if w e can do it because David Schock, professor of c o m m u n i c a tion, has even talked about eventually putting the show on W G V U , a public television station that airs to all of West Michigan.

4

...these shows will be the ones people will want to watch. -Sarah S t e r l i n g ('06) I N F O

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Schock has spoken to the G r a n d Rapids Communication Media Center and says that they are very interested in a show that features new music. "This is what they are supposed to be d o i n g . I a m very proud of Ryan and his crew. You have people that love music and use technology to bring a passion in front of an audience. I think this is what they are called to do. T h e y are answering that call. Hope College student Sarah Sterling ( ' 0 6 ) said the shows will be a great addition to the television station. " I ' m not as interested in 'Col Spirito' as I am in 'Track Nine.' I think 1 would watch that show regularly. I ' m interested in k n o w i n g about local bands," she said. "It w o u l d also be i n t e r e s t i n g if the s h o w is interactive by saying 4 send us a tape! Let us k n o w about upc o m i n g s h o w s . " ' P e o p l e would feel like they were a part of the s h o w and i n v o l v e d with the m u s i c . It w o u l d n ' t be like other music shows w h e r e they talk about and play the top 5 0 songs in the n a t i o n . . . it's applicable to this town and county." Emily A d a m s ('06), a music fan a g r e e d " P e o p l e are interested in knowing other music. If they do get into G r a n d Rapids shows, they will be able to interest other people besides Holland residents." If things work out as planned the s h o w s could be quite a hit, even "Col S p i r i t o " Sterling p r e d i c t e d .

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ERIN W I C K E N S

Isaiah Kallman of Joust performs at Lemonjello's helping produce them in some way, contact Ryan Wert at ryan.wert@hope.edu. According to Wert, it takes more than 24 hours filming and editing for each television show, and he is interested in hearing ideas f o r the shows as well as interest in helping with production.

"That would be the type of show even parents and senior citizens in the community would be interested in watching," she said. " N o matter what, I think these shows will be ones people will want to w a t c h . " M a n y student volunteers will be needed to help make the shows a success, so if you are interested in

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Health Clinic offers free limited medical care Students can save up to $1000 with Hopehealth benefit plan in effect Anjey Dykhuis CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

'Tis the season to be...sniffly, achy, and all around under the weather. Unfortunately, the milder pre-winter of West Michigan is past and " d e e p cold," as s o m e o l d e r M i c h i g a n d e r s call it, has assaulted us yet again. T h e up side to this winter's deep cold is the n e w and improved Health Clinic. Unbeknownst to many students, this year's tuition f o r full time students added $130, which covers all services the Health Clinic offers, plus anything they refer students to f o r up to $1000. Students received H o p e Health Benefit cards f r o m Student Development this fall. If they were not received, they can be signed out with ID f r o m the Student Development O f f i c e in DeWitt Center. T h e s e cards must be presented at time of service in the Health Clinic to receive the Hope Health Benefit. "The Health Benefit is primarily to be used here in the Health Clinic f o r things like strep throat, p n e u m o n i a s , colds, sprains, things like that. If s o m e b o d y c o m e s in and there is some service we cannot provide or we feel they do need to see a specialist, as long as w e refer them, it also can c o m e under that $ 1 0 0 0 . It also c o v e r s most p r e s c r i p t i o n m e d i c i n e s at one h u n d r e d p e r c e n t , " said

C i n d y Sabo, Registered Nurse. Prescription drugs are filled through the Apothecary and M o d e l D r u g Store on E i g h t h Street and River, with presentation of the Hope Health Benefit card. Model Drug is the only drug store that will submit to the particular c o m pany Hope uses. T h i s is not the s a m e as major medical insurance, which students are required to have to be enrolled. " O n e thing w e don't want is f o r students to c o n f u s e this with major medical insurance. Their m a j o r medical insurance should kick in for costly operations," Sabo said. Hope offers m a j o r medical insurance f o r purchase through an agency that works with college students. T h i s differs f r o m the $ 1000 dollar benefit because it covers everything, not just the incidentals that occur during the year. M a j o r medical insurance is what students w o u l d use if they were seriously injured, in need of surgery, or any other serious medical care. T h e H o p e Health Benefit, on the other hand, covers everything else, f r o m sprains and fractures to sniffles and most vaccinations. "This is to provide immediate care f o r acute s y m p t o m s , " Sabo said. " T h e other thing that c o m e s out of there is anything preventative. S o m e (travel) vaccines can run u p to t w o hundred, three hundred dollars." S a b o admits that s o m e problems have occurred in the o n e semester the benefit has been active. O n e m a j o r glitch H o p e Health has run into is the routine of submitting claim f o r m s at the time of service. W h e n a student has lab or referral work done, the Health

?i3Srw A N O H O f l GRAPHIC BY C H A D S A M P S O N

Clinic must bill the insurance c o m p a n y directly for the student verifying that it is covered under the policy and will be paid for. Last semester, they ran into problems with the f o r m s arriving at the insurance company after the student had already been billed, and they had to do it over again to fix the problem. " S o m e t i m e s they don't meet up together. We may refer it, w e may let the insurance c o m p a n y know, but by the time they get the claim f o r m , the hospital has already billed them, so they deny it, and the student gets the bill," said Sabo. T h i s semester has seen fewer glitches since the Clinic has isolated the problem and dealt with it.

This program will continue next year and hopefully all later years. "We had a very good response, not only f r o m students, but also f r o m parents," Sabo said. T h e Health Clinic always has a doctor on call, from Dr. Stid's family practice on Washington Ave.; they also have a nurse practitioner on duty every day, a physician c o m e s in one morning a week, and there are always f o u r R N s present. For any student with any health related need, the Health Clinic is on the main floor of the D o w Center on Thirteenth Street and Columbia — and with the benefit that went into action fall semester last year, it is free with presentation of the card.


Hope swimmers ready for MIAA meet D e s p i t e t w o l o s s e s to Calvin thus far this season, there are members of Hope's team that believe they will finish ahead of Calvin at the M I A A meet two weeks away. At the M I A A meet, there are 2 , 0 1 5 p o s s i b l e p o i n t s . Calvin's two dual meet victories have been by scores of 119-109 and 117-105. Every event except the 1,000 yard freestyle will be swam, in addition to every relay. Each swimmer is allowed to compete in up to three individual events and relays, but no more than seven different events. Chris Hamstra ('04), school record holder and six time All-American, said, "We w o n ' t let t h e m b e a t u s . C a l v i n ' s top-end s w i m m e r s are very strong; they even rival our top swimmers. But when you get down to the fifth and sixth guys, all the way down through number 18, we are c o n s i d e r a b l y s t r o n g e r . T h e y just can't compete with that." Each team is returning three All-MIAA swimmers from last year and five swimmers who achieved All-American status a year ago. "Calvin has no shot at beating u s . We h a v e s u p e r i o r depth, superior tradition, sup e r i o r c o a c h i n g " said D a n Bouwens ('03), team captain.

" A n c h o r

S P O R T S

February 5, 2003

Intramurals offer fun for students Hope athletes find friendly competition outside of varsity sports Dave Yetter S P O R T S EDITOR

Be fair. Play nice. H a v e f u n . These are rules that we have all been taught to obey since a very young age. These rules not only apply to us in ,our everyday lives, they are also the motto for the Hope intramurals. The schedules for the fourth intramural season are now available. They are a great place to get together with friends or meet new people. Teams compete in a number of different sports, including everything f r o m bowling to racquetball to water polo. "Intramurals are a blast," said Justin Blazek ('06), who was on a d o d g e ball t e a m last s e m e s t e r . ' T h e r e is nothing more fun that a bunch of people firing dodge balls at each other's faces." A number of sports are starting very soon. Coed volleyball, m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s r a c q u e t b a l l , a n d m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s basketball all start on Feb. 15 and it is never too late to join a team. Although it is hard to imagine in this weather, a number of outdoor sports will be starting up sooner than you might think. Frisbee golf, ultimate Frisbee, and m e n ' s softball will all be starting in March. Make sure to get a team together and sign up early for any of the events that interest you this semester.

ANCHOR

PHOTO BY DAVE Y E T T E R

Members of "Air Force One" Barry Rice ('03) Pat Irish ('03) fight for the rebound during practice.

OUR CO-OP/INTERN PROGRAM O u r p r o g r a m p r o d u i e s s o m e o t t r t E best-trained e n l r y - l w ^ professionals In t h e aerospace Industry. TTie experience w i l l gfi'G y o u hands-on exposure a n d a l l c w y a j t o w o r k i n y o u r chosen neld, alongside seasoned proTesslorals. V t e e m p o y c o o p and i n t e r n students t r o m a variety oT technical dfecipllnes. Fksclble scredules i r c l u d e s u m m e r semester a n d y e a r - r o u n d p a i d o p p o r t u n l t l s .

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Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering and Computer Science majors are encouraged t o stop by our b o o t h s at these local career fairs: West Michigan Career Connections Tuesday, February 25 • 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Grand Valley State University - Grand Rapids Campus Eberhard Center, 2nd Floor Grand Rapids Job Fair Wednesday, February 5, 2003 • 11:00 am to 4:00 p m Calvin College • Prince Conference Center Also, be sure t o attend our Information Session Monday, February 17 • 5:30 p.m. Loosemore Auditorium • DeVos Center Downtown Grand Raptds campus It y o u are una H e t o a t t e n d these events, please e-maII y o u r resume In a .doc f o r m a t t o :

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Lady Dutch win on historic day Senior Amanda Kerkstra sets record Olim Alimov STAFF REPORTER

On Saturday, the f a n s of the Flying D u t c h traveled to A d r i a n in hopes of seeing another victory and a record-setting performance. T h e y

Daane Griffeth ( 05) puts up a

witnessed both. T h e Flying Dutch c a m e into the g a m e with a perfect 8-0 record in the M I A A (18-0 overall) to play a struggling Adrian squad. A m a n d a K e r k s t r a ( ' 0 3 ) of Grandville, M I c a m e into the g a m e just 6 points shy of the all-time Hope women's scoring record. A N C H O R P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A Kerkstra scored 13 points, grabbed 8 r e b o u n d s and blocked 3 shots, shot during Hope's 83-67 victory over Adrian on Saturday b e c o m i n g H o p e ' s all-time points leader with 1,376. C o a c h M o r e h o u s e is proud of A m a n d a ' s achievements. H o p e ' s only threat c o m e s f r o m " A m a n d a ' s record is a great acCarlson explained. "They defiA l b i o n C o l l e g e , a t e a m t h a t has c o m p l i s h m e n t . T h e n u m b e r of nitely give us energy." posted a 16p o i n t s she h a s s c o r e d is r e a l l y H o p e shot 4 overall amazing, but she would be the first 5 4 % f r o m the r e c o r d and to praise her team f o r their part in field coma mark of 5the record. A s a post player, she pared to 2 in t h e depends on th e m to get her the ball A d r i a n ' s M I A A . at the right time in the right place." 37%. Greg b \ i > H o p e b e a t A m a n d a a g r e e d . It t o o k f o u r Immink ('05) A l b i o n o n years f o r her to get to that mark, scored 11 January 22. but as she p o i n t e d out, n o t h i n g points and D o n c o u l d b e possible without her D o n O v e r b e e k friends and fellow players. Overbeek ( ' 0 3 ) w a s "I play with great players like ('03) added named the Kathi Grotenhuis ('03), Amy 10 p o i n t s , 6 A N C H O R P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A M I A A B a l t m a n i s ( ' 0 3 ) , Katie N i e n h u i s b l o c k s and 4 Both teams battle for a rebound. m e n ' s b a s - ( ' 0 3 ) and other amazing girls. The steals. M i k e ketball player of the w e e k f o r the reason that w e play so well is beVanHekken ( ' 0 3 ) shot 2 of 3 f r o m second time this season and the fifth cause w e have so m u c h f u n off the behind the three-point line and fintime in his career. court," said Kerkstra. ished the game with 9 points. There Don had two big games in the last She also said that the whole team w e r e 4 9 fouls in the game, w h i c h is very close and are friends off the w e e k . H e had 2 1 p o i n t s , 6 reresulted in 55 f r e e throws f o r the court. After games they like to hang b o u n d s , a n d 4 b l o c k s a g a i n s t teams c o m b i n e d . out together, pull practical j o k e s on K a l a m a z o o and had 10 points, 6 T h e Flying Dutch m o v e d up to blocks, 4 steals and 4 rebounds on each other, and do " f u n and stupid tenth place in the nation a m o n g Dithings that make us very effective Saturday against Adrian. vision III teams. T h e D u t c h m e n ' s

Dutchmen top Bulldogs Hope keeps #1 rank, beats Adrian on Sat. Olim Alimov STAFF REPORTER

A sellout c r o w d of 2 , 7 0 0 f a n s c a m e to see the Flying D u t c h m e n move to 6-1 in the M1AA after beating the Adrian Bulldogs by a score of 83-67. H o p e set the tone early on and took a quick 11 - 0 advantage, holding the Bulldogs scoreless f o r the first seven minutes. T h e score w a s very low in the first half and the D u t c h m e n took a 33-19 lead into the intermission. " O u r d e f e n s e w a s the key to the g a m e , " said C h a d C arlson ( ' 0 3 ) , who scored 13 points and grabbed 8 rebounds. "We were looking to set the tone early by shutting the Bulldogs d o w n . " T h e low scoring first half w a s suddenly forgotten in the second when both teams went on a shooting rampage. Hope w a s inspired by its loyal " D e w C r e w " fans and outscored Adrian 50-48. "Playing at h o m e in front of the D e w C r e w is definitely exciting,"

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n u m b e r one priority is still to win the league and then the championship. Hope is currently #1 in the M l A A and stand strong with a 163 overall record.

There are still five games remaining on the schedule, including tough back-to-back games against C a l v i n and A l b i o n . H o p e p l a y s A l m a at 3 p.m. on Saturday.

Track teams compete at Carthage David Yetter S P O R T S EDITOR

T h e F l y i n g D u t c h track t e a m kicked off their new season over the weekend, competing in a meet at Carthage College on Friday. T h e m e n e n d e d u p in s e v e n t h place a m o n g sixteen teams in the m e e t w h i l e the w o m e n f i n i s h e d eighth in a twelve-team field. Carthage, the host of the tournam e n t , f i n i s h e d first in b o t h the m e n ' s (143.5 points) and w o m e n ' s (177 points) competition. T h e H o p e m e n ' s team finished the meet with 37 points. Their highest finish in a single event came in the i n t e r m e d i a t e hurdles. Ben Troost ( ' 0 6 ) finished third in the 200-meter race with a lime of 26.95 seconds. Other top finishes for H o p e c a m e in the pole vault. A1 Chimoski ( ' 0 5 ) finished fourth and

Tony G a w r o n (*04) ended up fifth in the pole vault. T h e D u t c h m e n also had s o m e sixth-place finishes. Freshman Tyson Warner in the 3,000 meters (9:06.26), senior Ed Perez in the 6 0 0 meters (1:26.19), and sophom o r e P e t e r D e r b y in t h e 1 0 0 0 m e t e r s ( 4 : 0 7 . 4 9 ) all f i n i s h e d in sixth place in their respective races. F o r the L a d y D u t c h , C h r i s t y Watkin ( ' 0 4 ) w a s the only winner, with a long j u m p of 17'6". She also finished fifth in the 400-meters with a time of 1:04.70. T h e w o m e n ' s team also got notable p e r f o r m a n c e s f r o m Kara Van A s s e n ( ' 0 3 ) in the t r i p l e j u m p , Laura Borovsky ( ' 0 6 ) in the pole vault, and Brooke Oosting ( ' 0 3 ) in the 600-meters. All three w o m e n finished in third place in their respective events.

Derek Chavis, head track coach f o r both teams, thinks that the team performed very well for their first meet. " O u r first meet helps us to evaluate everyone and see where we are as a team-1 think that we performed to our e x p e c t a t i o n s and s o m e people exceeded our expectations." C h a v i s is hoping that the team will continue to get better and hopes to p e r f o r m well at the next meet in a couple of weeks. ' T h i s meet s h o w e d us where our conditioning is. We also do a lot of v i d e o t a p i n g so w e c a n s e e o u r progress. We hope to keep doing better." Both teams will h a v e their next meet on Saturday, February 2 2 at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of W i s c o n s i n Oshkosh. T h e time f o r the meet has yet to be announced.

on the court." Kerkstra comes from a large family where she is the second of seven

" M y older brother grew up playing ball, so I lagged a l o n g , " she said. S h e a t t e n d e d Calvin Christian High School and played under coach John Richard before coming to H o p e . On Saturday, A m a n d a a c h i e v e d s o m e t h i n g that h a s n ' t been done for 17 years. "It feels good to have a scoring record but nothing really changed except for a name. T h e good thing is our team record, which hopefully will stay for a long lime. Nothing stops because 1 w o n an award. We are still going strong and we have a National Championship to win," she said. Amanda surpassed previous record holder Karen GinrasHoekstra's, who scored 1,369 points while playing for Hope f r o m 1982-85. Kerkstra recalls one meeting with the p r e v i o u s c h a m p i o n where Gingras-Hoekstra explained that in the '80s, the g a m e was a lot different because the starters had to play the whole g a m e and did not get m u c h help from the other players. " N o w w e have a great recruiting class and we have a lot of talented girls on the team," Kerkstra said. On Saturday, they certainly played as a team. T h e game against A d r i a n b r o u g h t the D u t c h their n i n e t e e n t h victory. T h e y started strong with an 11-3 lead and never l o o k e d b a c k . By h a l f t i m e , t h e Dutch led 4 1 - 2 4 and the w o m e n were shooting near 6 0 percent. Jennifer Layne ( ' 0 6 ) led the Flying Dutch with 14 points, including 4 of 6 f r o m three-point range, while A m y Baltmanis dished out 6 assists. Katie Nienhuis also added 10 points off the bench. T h e Dutch shot 51 percent overall and out-rebounded Adrian 41-32.. Hope is ranked first in the M I A A . Their next game will be at Saint M a r y ' s College (1-7) on Wednesday.

children.

Upcoming Women's Games Feb. 8 Feb. 12 Feb. 15

at Alma, 3 p.m. Home vs. Calvin, 7:30 p.m Home vs. Albion, 3 p.m.

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR 141 E 12TH S T PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID H o p e College

02-05-2003