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Students and staff watch inauguration; march across campus in commemoration

diversity on

Emily West C A M P U S N E W S EDITOR

O n Inauguration Day, Tuesday, Jan. 19, H o p e College Student Congress and the Office of Multicultural E d u c a t i o n p r e s e n t e d a panel discussion followed by t h e viewing of t h e Barrack Obama's p r e s i d e n t i a l inauguration. H o p e history professor Fred Johnson m o d e r a t e d t h e panel of D o n a l d Luidens of t h e Sociology D e p a r t m e n t , Jeffrey Polet of t h e Political ScienceDepartment a n d Philana G r e e n e CIO).

Luidens said, "It was a hard, h a r d service to attend." Race quickly became the focus of the panel. "I think it is t i m e to acknowledgethat he is t h e first biracial president," Philana G r e e n e said. Luidens said, "His selection has been seen in t e r m s of race... b u t he ran overtly as a c a n d i d a t e detached from race." According t o Polet, nearly onePHOTO BY KEVIN SOUBLY fifth of p e o p l e S T U D E N T S W A T C H I N A U G U R A T I O N I N P H E L P S - In c o l l a b o r a t i o n w i t h civil r i g h t s voted primarily w e e k , s t u d e n t s w e r e Invited t o w a t c h President B a r a c k Obama's I n a u g u r a t i o n In Phelps o n race. The m a j o r i t y of t h o s e d i n i n g hall.

D i rec t o r of Multicultural Education Vanessa Greene o p e n e d t h e event and said, "This is a great t i m e for us to look a r o u n d t h e world at what's happening." Luidens r e c a p t u r e d his o w n

experience as a H o p e s t u d e n t , 41 years ago, w h e n M a r t i n Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. "We e x p e r i e n c e d his assassination in a very real way," h e said. Some of the Holland

community gathered for a commemorative service following King's death. Still, p e o p l e d r o v e by h o n k i n g and yelling f r o m their cars, o u t r a g e d by a gathering in h o n o r of King.

people, voted for O b a m a . "The systems in w h i c h we classify are active residues of an active narrative that are still being worked out," said Polet. SEE CIVIL RIGHTS, PAGE 2

Last lecture; Learn truths, live with passion Rob Gulmond A R T S ASSISTANT EDITOR

The guru advocated living life fearlessly, learning f r o m t h e t r u t h s that are e v e r y w h e r e and acting with passion and c o m m i t m e n t in t h e latest lecture f r o m t h e H o p e College "The Last Lecture Series" p r o d u c e d by M o r t a r Board. Dr. Boyd Wilson, the guru, or C h a c h a , as he e n c o u r a g e s his s t u d e n t s to call him, gave an address deeply r o o t e d in faith Jan. 26 as h e e x p o u n d e d t h e lessons that h e had discovered t h r o u g h his studies in world religion. Wilson explained, however, t h a t t h o u g h this faith f o u n d its beginnings in Christianity, it now encompasses Hinduism, Buddhism, a n d Islam. "I still teach f r o m t h e perspective of what I have learned f r o m o t h e r religions," w r o t e Wilson in his lecture notes. The expansion of beliefs was a t h e m e t h r o u g h o u t t h e address. "I value t h e fact that he w a n t s to leave his s t u d e n t s with t h e

promise, a n d live in love." The t r u t h a r e everywhere. Eastern insight that h e h a s o n life," said second t r u t h was success, or t h e religions a s well as Christianity Alison W a t c h o r n ('09). "I'm necessity for a p e r s o n to, "Find all have t r u t h s t o offer. a senior trying to find s o m e that sense of success, find that He said, "I was not afraid t h a t happiness a n d successes off t h e joy that allows you to t h r o w your granting t r u t h to o t h e r religions b e a t e n path t h a t e v e r y o n e is h a n d s up at t h e end of each day was s o m e h o w denying t r u t h s taking. I w a n t e d to see if this and proclaim: "This is m y job! t o Christianity." The professor lecture could provide m e with This is what 1 do!" urged his audience to capitalize s o m e h i n t s t o what that might Krista M e h a r i ('09) gave o n t r u t h s regardless of their look like." her t h o u g h t s on t h e Last source. P r o f e s so r Lecture Series: "It is a fantastic The last W i l s o n o p p o r t u n i t y for s t u d e n t s to hear Zen moment encouraged his f r o m professors we respect a b o u t that Wilson Find that joy that audience to live i m p o r t a n t life issues—things related was, w i t h o u t fear. This allows you to throw that are bigger than w h e n t h e " W h a t e v e r it is idea was o n e of your hands up at the test is, or what t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s that you do, you his Z e n m o m e n t s end of each day and are for t h e next paper. It gives m u s t d o it with or "that p o i n t of fc t h e professors an o p p o r t u n i t y to proclaim: This is passion and instantaneous, share their personal insights a n d c o m m i t m e n t . " my job! This is what intuitive insight experiences with a large g r o u p He explained when you I do!' of students." that t o make suddenly know — D R . BOYD W I L S O N Mortar Board has two one's actions for t h e very first m o r e lectures s c h e d u l e d this 5 5 important to time that which year in t h e series. Bill Mayer, oneself and to you have always an art professor specializing o t h e r t h a t p e r s o n m u s t d o it k n o w n t o b e true." This Z e n in sculpture, is scheduled t o with passion and c o m m i t m e n t . m o m e n t c h a n g e d t h e way h e speak o n M a r c h 2. Donald Professor Wilson closed t h e studied, t a u g h t and lived. Cronkite, professor of biology, is lecture with two simple, p e r s o n a l Living w i t h o u t fear eventually s c h e d u l e d t o speak o n April 20. and e x p e r i e n c e d t r u t h s . The first led Wilson to his s e c o n d Z e n B o th lectures will be in t h e M a a s t r u t h was love, or t h e necessity M o m e n t : t h e realization that A u d i t o r i u m at 7 p.m. for a p e r s o n t o "find that s e n s e " T r u t h is t r u t h , and 1 can learn of c o m m i t m e n t , m a k e t h a t it!" He explained t h a t sources of

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Visiting Writers Series— Poet Lynne Thompson visits campus this month. Page 5 Got a story idea? Let us know at anchor@hope.edu, or call u s a t j 9 5 : 7 8 7 7 : _

campus Christine Hostetler SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

Although it not a popular fact, H o p e College is a generally homogeneous institution c o m p a r e d t o t h e p o p u l a t i o n that constitutes t h e United States today. M a n y s t u d e n t s and faculty alike would like to see H o p e c h a n g e a n d start to better reflect o u r country's p o p u l a t i o n and are striving to attract m o r e s t u d e n t s of racial and e t h n i c minority. The q u e s t i o n is: H o w can a small institution like H o p e College attract a larger n u m b e r of these s t u d e n t s ? According to Stacey G o e t z of t h e Office of Admissions, it takes "a b u n c h of initiatives t h a t we do with different p r o g r a m s all over campus." The recruiting staff in t h e A d m i s s i o n s Office are eager to contact minority students in an effort t o let t h e m k n o w a b o u t H o p e College, a n d there is a t e a m especially devoted t o multi-cultural r e c r u i t m e n t . T h e r e are c e r t a i n nights w h e n faculty m e m b e r s call these potential s t u d e n t s specifically. According to Brent Krueger, chair of t h e C o m m i t t e e o n A d m i s s i o n s and Financial Aid, Tuesday night of Jan. 26, is the "penultimate [faculty] calling night," as volunteer faculty members call prospective m i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s w h o "have expressed sincere interest in H o p e College, but have not yet applied." T h e r e are also t h e " S O C " (Students of Color) callers, a small g r o u p of s t u d e n t volunteers w h o have c h o s e n to reach o u t specifically to potential m i n o r i t y students. Robin Baker (TO), a f o r m e r S O C caller said, " O u r title s o u n d s weird, exclusive, but it is a b o u t trying t o get m o r e diversity at H o p e ... It's really cool b e c a u s e you get to keep calling the same kids all year and get to k n o w t h e m , develop a personal relationship with t h e m a n d t h e n you show t h e m a r o u n d c a m p u s w h e n they visit." Baker talked about the satisfaction s h e gets f r o m seeing s t u d e n t s a r o u n d c a m p u s t h a t she helped decide in the decisionm a k i n g process by calling. SEE RECRUIT, PAGE 2

Title I X - Hope club sports vie for varsity status. Page 1 1


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CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

Wednesday Feb. 4 Gender Power Politics and the Media in the 2 0 0 8 Presidential Election

FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

Hope focuses on civil rights • CIVIL RIGHTS, f r o m page 1

3 : 3 0 p . m . M a s s Auditorium. Guest s p e a k e r K a t h l e e n Hall Jamleson visits Hope.

Thursday Resume Lock-in

Feb. 5

8 : 0 0 - 1 1 : 0 0 p.m. M a r t h a Miller C o m p u t e r Lab. For all students w h o need to start, u p d a t e or improve their resume. Sponsored by t h e Office of Career Services.

Friday Wear Red Day

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Students a n d faculty are encoura g e d to w e a r red to work or class a n d d o n a t e $ 5 in e x c h a n g e for a Red Dress Pin. D o n a t i o n s will help t h e A m e r i c a n Heart Association raise a w a r e n e s s of cardiovascular disease.

Wednesday Feb. 1 1 Men's Basketball Game 7 : 3 0 p.m. Hope vs. Calvin. At Calvin College.

Friday Feb. 13 Great Performance Series: Aquila Theatre 7 : 3 0 p . m . Knickerbocker T h e a t r e . (Also Saturday. Feb. 1 4 )

Saturday Feb. 1 4 Women's Basketball Hosts Adrian DeVos Fieldhouse. 3 p.m.

Monday Feb. 16 Visting Writers Series Features GLCA N e w Writers Award winner. Lynne T h o m p s o n . Knickerbocker T h e a t r e . Jazz begins at 6 : 3 0 .

IN BRIEF

FIVE FACULTY A N N O U N C E RETIREMENT Judy Hillman, associate professor of art and design; Dr. Michael Silver, professor of biochemistry and chemistry; Raymond Smith, professor of kinesiology and director of athletics for men; Dr. John Stoughton, associate professor of mathematics; and Dr. Stephen Taylor, professor o f chemistry all announced that they plan to retire at the end of the school year. Hillman has been at Hope since 1989. She has been heavily involved with numerous community art projects. Silver has been at Hope since 1983. In 1997, he was awarded the Provost's Award for Excellence in Teaching. Smith has been at Hope since 1970. He has coached baseball, golf, wrestling and football at Hope. Stoughton has been at Hope since 1983. Here, he has mentored several students through facultystudent research. Taylor has been at Hope since 1985. In 1995, he received one of eight national "Camille and Henry Dreyfus Scholar/Fellow Awards for Undergraduate Institutions."

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"The bigger d a n g e r is that people will say we're all d o n e n o w and the civil rights battle is over," Polet said. Philana Greene agreed that t h e categorization s e e m s inevitable. "I t h i n k p e o p l e in t h e U n i t e d States have t o p u t p e o p l e in a certain g r o u p to u n d e r s t a n d them," said Philana G r e e n e . G r e e n e also a c k n o w l e d g e d t h a t t h e fight is not over. " W e are starting t o see things t h a t we never t h o u g h t w e would see...We n e e d t o c o n t i n u e t h e discussion a b o u t h o w p e o p l e of all races, g e n d e r s or sexual o r i e n t a t i o n s a r e still not c o n s i d e r e d equal," G r e e n e said. "People got so c a u g h t up in O b a m a versus M c C a i n . They almost forgot t h a t C l i n t o n almost beat o u t O b a m a , " said G r e e n e . "Now, a y o u n g A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n c o u p l e can tell their c h i l d r e n t h a t they could b e p r e s i d e n t . They can even tell t h e i r d a u g h t e r s that." Johnson wrapped up the debate a n d said, "The only thing t h a t we k n o w for s u r e is t h a t this is a day for celebration...The rest of us m u s t put our h a n d s t o t h e task to m a k e s u r e things get done." O n W e d n e s d a y , Jan. 21, t h e C o m m e m o r a t i v e Civil Rights M a r c h b r o u g h t a b o u t two d o z e n H o p e s t u d e n t s a n d faculty o u t t o r e m e m b e r , reflect a n d h o p e for f u r t h e r progress. The m a r c h began at t h e a n c h o r o u t s i d e of Graves Hall. Professor Chuck Green, director of t h e Phelps Scholar Program and professor of psychology, started t h e m a r c h

PHOTO BY HOLLY EVEN HOUSE

C O M M E M O R A T I N G C I V I L R I G H T S — Hope students and faculty gathered at the anchor

outside Graves hall and marched to the Martha Miller Center. c o u r t c a s e t h a t paved t h e way by h o n o r i n g Bob Zellner. Zellner for California t o b e c o m e t h e w a s t h e son and g r a n d s o n of first state to desegregate public Klu Klux Klan m e m b e r s , b u t schools. he c h o s e t o d e f y his u p b r i n g i n g " T h e and fight e q u a l i t y for social 6 6 they fought justice. A s domestic and global for extends He was b e y o n d this violations of h u m a n rights personally case and recruited continue, our c o m m u n i t y calls for by Dr. must courageously stand each of u s to M a r t i n against these injustices. recognize t h e L u t h e r — A Y A N F E OLONADE ( ' 1 0 ) achievements King, Jr. t o all g r o u p have join in t h e 5 5 attained in civil rights t h e n a m e of civil rights." H a g o o d movement. At t h e next stop, just outside said. Gay-Straight forum L u b b e r s Hall, J o n a t h a n H a g o o d representatives, Marissa G r o t t of t h e History D e p a r t m e n t s p o k e a b o u t t h e significance ('09) and Lindsay Sweet ('11), r e m e m b e r e d t h e tragic d e a t h of of t h e M e n d e z v. W e s t m i n s t e r

Matthew Shepard. Shepard was a s t u d e n t at t h e University of W y o m i n g w h o w a s b e a t e n a n d left for dead. The trial of t h e s u s p e c t e d attackers c o n f i r m e d t h a t t h e violence was targeted at Shepard b e c a u s e of his sexual orientation. The m a r c h e n d e d in t h e first floor r o t u n d a of t h e M a r t h a Miller Center. Ayanfe O l o n a d e ('10), of the International Relations Club, read a b o u t t h e crisis in Darfur. "As d o m e s t i c and global violations of h u m a n rights continue, o u r c o m m u n i t y m u s t courageously stand against these injustices," O l o n a d e said.

Minority recruitment advances • RECRUIT, f r o m page 1 O n c e a semester, t h e Office of Multi-Cultural Education holds Taste 1 of Hope, a visitation w e e k e n d specifically for multicultural prospective s t u d e n t s . This s e m e s t e r ' s event took place f r o m Saturday Jan. 31 t o Sunday, Feb. 1. S t u d e n t s stayed in Scott Hall and l e a r n e d a b o u t the different multi-cultural p r o g r a m s H o p e offers, as well as doing t h e regular visitation, t o u r i n g t h e c a m p u s and visiting classes. G o e t z talked a b o u t H o p e College s t u d e n t s w h o a r e really interested in diversifying Hope's campus. Regarding t h e goal of Taste of H o p e , G o e t z said, " O u r s t u d e n t s really w a n t t o give an h o n e s t vision of H o p e — ( m u l t i cultural s t u d e n t s ) have a s u p p o r t n e t w o r k , but they are also getting a realistic vision of what H o p e is like." T h r o u g h calling and visiting, potential multicultural s t u d e n t s are told a b o u t o r g a n i z a t i o n s and n e t w o r k s o n c a m p u s that can

help t h e m feel at h o m e . G o e t z said, "I like to tell students about the Phelps Scholar P r o g r a m b e c a u s e that's an i m m e d i a t e s u p p o r t n e t w o r k , a great way to get plugged in with s t u d e n t s a n d profs... The biggest thing, t h o u g h , is to get t h e m c o n n e c t e d with o t h e r students." M a n y Phelps Scholars c h o o s e t o live in Scott Hall, a co-ed d o r m for first-year s t u d e n t s , w h e r e s t u d e n t s participate in a first-year seminar, b i - m o n t h l y meetings, field trips, c o m m u n i t y service and E n c o u n t e r with C u l t u r e s class. According to D ir e c to r Vanessa G r e e n e o n t h e Office of Multicultural Education's website, " O u r p r i m a r y objective is to develop collaborative partnerships with students, faculty, staff, a l u m n i and t h e greater Holland c o m m u n i t y to e m b r a c e and i n f u s e diversity into t h e c o r e fabric of t h e institution." T h e r e a r e also several s t u d e n t o r g a n i z a t i o n s o n c a m p u s aimed at affirming and e n c o u r a g i n g

t h e a w a r e n e s s and sharing of different cultures and ethnicities, including H A P A ( H o p e Asian Perspective), LaRU (La Raza Unida) and t h e Black S t u d e n t Union. S t u d e n t s can join these organizations regardless of "race, religion, g e n d e r or nationality" for events like d i n n e r s , food festivals, movie nights, speakers and discussions. Also, the Office of Multicultural Education and t h e C r o s s r o a d s Project is currently s p o n s o r i n g a Multicultural Essay c o n t e s t w h o s e e n t r y deadline is Monday, Feb. 25. A l t h o u g h it is still fairly low, t h e n u m b e r of multicultural s t u d e n t s at H o p e has slowly been o n t h e rise over t h e last several years, d u e largely in p a r t to stronger recruiting efforts. Garrett Knoth of the A d m i s s i o n s Office said, "This (increase in t h e n u m b e r of multi-cultural students) is not s o m e t h i n g that is growing by leaps and b o u n d s ; it h a s b e e n slowly increasing... The really key thing is t h e grassroots

m o v e m e n t s h e r e in Holland." Lately admissions representatives are targeting m o r e local high schools and youth o r g a n i z a t i o n s in t h e area, such as t h e Boys' and Girls' C l u b of Holland, U p w a r d Bound and t h e Reach Program, d r a w i n g in high school s t u d e n t s f r o m local communities. Admissions efforts c o n t i n u e to be far-reaching also, as there are admissions representatives recruiting in such diverse places as China, Turkey and N e w York. "We w e r e included recently in t h e book Colleges That C h a n g e Lives, and that has really helped us reach m o r e cultures," said Knoth. G o e t z said, "1 think our best r e c r u i t m e n t is having s t u d e n t s participate and help out. If s t u d e n t s are interested in helping out, t h e r e are jobs and volunteer o p p o r t u n i t i e s available. It is good for p e o p l e to know we are d o i n g things and are having s o m e success, but we'd love s o m e help. The starts we've m a d e are big for a little school."


FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

NATIONAL

THT ANCHOR

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Sudanese president sought for Darfur crimes

P ERSPECTIVES

Llndsey Bandy A S S T . NATIONAL N E W S EDITOR

PHOTO BY JOSEPH SEYMOUR

Hope students join 'Obamob' There were m o m e n t s when I was nervous for my safety; not f r o m terrorists, but f r o m the The darkness partially concealed the chaos of those early sheer size and mentality of the crowd. W h e n people would cut Inaugural hours. I departed my a p a r t m e n t at 5 a.m. with four the queue for the Silver line, we began to yell "No You Can't" at other silver ticket holders, and we naively believed we had left ear- t h e m in an ironic way. W h e n our line began ly enough. moving afCoincidenter idling for tally, many, three hours, many, many We ended up standing in a hordes of other peotunnel (beneath the Mall) angry and ple had the for three hours, moving a desperate insame idea. total of 300 yards. dividuals ran O u r specific f r o m across ticket line — A N D Y PALKOWSKI ( ' 1 0 ) the street, was already hoping to seven bodpenetrate ies wide our line. W e and several held the line in a phalanx-like thousand deep, streaming down Independence Street. W e settled determination and were not flanked. in at—what we perceived in the For all the concern over seteeming shadows—the end, only curity, I realized once inside the to later see the line extend blocks gate that my ticket had never behind us. It was 5:30 a.m., or been looked at or judged for three hours until the line was authenticity. I had received a scheduled to move. O n several occasions, se- brief pat down and t h e n ran for my life across the front mall to curity forces acted as a bariatget a prime spot. The four of us ric surgeon, streamlining the squeezed our way into the f r o n t throngs into smaller, m o r e manmall standing area, near the f r o n t ageable groups, all neatly on the sidewalk. However, the stitches reflecting pool. At that spot, we stood for roughly 1.5 hours, all would burst and people again igthe while praying that only short nored the line behind and swelled people would squeeze their way into the street. It m a d e me both sick and fascinated. In the vac- in front of us. Much to my chau u m of authority, a m a n in a red grin, the tallest m a n in all of D C decided to stand in my way with coat began to take the situation into his own hands. With only an obnoxiously large hat. I was a patient demeanor, he directed close to losing my sanity. And m o r e people towards the end of then it happened. Barack O b a m a has the unique the line than the 25,000 police potential to t r a n s f o r m this counofficers around the Mall.

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go home," Palkowski said. His try. To many he is the first poststory is identical to 4,000 purple racial and post-Vietnam presiand blue ticket holders, w h o acdent, a chance to split with the past. O n that awfully cold Tues- cording to the Senate sergeantat-arms, were victims of too day morning, the crowd picked many printed tickets and a lack up on Obama's message of h o p e and change. Not only did the of security personnel. Some argue that the best seat for the Incrowds break down racial barriers, but they broke down physi- auguration was in front of a T V on a coach, but Palkowski thinks cal o n e s as well. Maybe it was the severe cold o r lack of sleep. otherwise. My new standing spot was Maybe it was a highly contagious formofBarack-fever. Regardless, roughly 150 yards to the p o d i u m and 20 yards f r o m a j u m b o - t r o n . the m o b in my area destroyed the fences separating them f r o m As p r o m i n e n t politicians paradt h e handicapped sections, and I ed to their reserved chairs, s o m e received heckles while others witnessed a reverse Moses. We spilled over the trampled fences were met with applause. Colin and poured around the reflect- Powell was given praise. Sen. Joe ing pool without a single offi- Lieberman was violently booed, and Supreme C o u r t Justice Clarcer holding us back. I suppose that was t h e personification of ence Thomas was hissed at. The later action "Hope." confused me; A few 66 how could thousand I wasn't sure if the conan 'Obamticket holdstant tugging on my jacket ob' hate on ers, though, a Justice of weren't so was due to the suffocating all people? lucky. H o p e branched multitudes. This—as I junior Andy — J O S E P H SEYMOUR ( 4 0 9 ) was woefully Palkowski, unaware — an intern in was the most Rep. Camp's politically astute m o b that had office, t h o u g h t himself blessed to ever been assembled. I defendpossess a purple standing ticked Justice Thomas, but a short et. In an ideal world, he would have been in the inner circle of older black w o m a n countered me when she described him as the reserved area, close enough to hear O b a m a without amplifi- "arrogant." O u r a r g u m e n t didn't cation. W h a t actually followed last too long. At last, O b a m a took the j u m was deeply saddening. bled oath and stole the show. He "We ended up standing in a tunnel (beneath the Mall) spoke with an FDR-ish balance for three hours, moving a total of reality, optimism, aggresof 300 yards, never seeing the sion, renewal, and scripture. W e SEE OBAMOB, PAOC 1 0 light of day...until we t u r n e d to

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Tensions have been rising since July when the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal C o u r t began his quest for an arrest warrant against t h e c u r r e n t Sudanese President O m a r al-Bashir for his role in the events in the country's region of Darfur. The International C o u r t alleged that Bashir is the mastermind behind the operation of murder, rape and exile. As a result, the president is being charged with genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role in the events that have taken place in Darfur. The unrest began in 2003 when rebel groups began a rebellion in search of restoration f r o m social and economic injustices while d e m a n d i n g greater political powers The region of D a r f u r is a severely neglected and underdeveloped area by the government. W h e n the uprising began six years ago, the government saw it as a serious threat, fearing that other neglected areas would also rise in rebellion. Despite the continuous denial f r o m the Sudanese government, there are facts pointing to the government officials as the main coordinators of the violence, employing the Janjaweed along with troops to implement t h e mass extermination of men, w o m e n and children. The U.N. estimated that in the past six years over 300,000 people have died and up to 3 million others have been displaced in the region. It is expected that the World C o u r t will grant the warrantsometime in early February. It is feared, however, that this decision could have detrimental effects on the current aid efforts in Sudan as well as peace talks with the rebel forces. At a press conference in early October, Bashir said an indictment would not only disrupt peace talks with the rebel groups but will be catastrophic on the regions stability in the upcoming political elections. Several aid workers fear that a result of the indictment could be their removal f r o m the country leaving refugees exposed to hunger and vulnerable to even m o r e violence. John Holmes, the U N ' s emergency relief coordinator in an interview with Newsweek said in regard to possible effects of an indictment, "Ultimately, they could throw everyone out. It will leave t h e m with a terrible mess and they won't be able to feed their o w n people. We've told t h e m 'we expect you to leave our operation alone' SEE SUDAN, PAGE 1 0


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NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK IN NEWS

"This t o w n is being forced t p look at things they never w a n t e d to look at before" - Brenda Cherry, Paris, Texas, resident and cofounder of t h e C o n c e r n e d Citizens for Racial Equality, on the brutal death of Brandon McClelland

"I got that call that we were going to the Supreme Court, that was almost as good as a win, a n d I really felt that I had a really g o o d s h o t at getting this through." — Lilly Ledbetter, a f o r m e r m a n u f a c t u r i n g worker, on winning a 10- year battle for m e n a n d w o m e n recieving equal pay, having President O b a m a just sign t h e Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.

"And these kids are driving to the West Side of Chicago at 3 o'clock in the m o r n i n g to deal with gangbangers, for Christ's sake. It just s h o w s w h a t this d r u g d o e s to your thinking—it wipes o u t your logic, your morals, your ties to your family." - Vince Solano a lawyer in a reo p e n e d m u r d e r case in St. Charles 111., o n t h e inability to u n d e r s t a n d h o w so many privileged y o u n g people fall to heroin.

"He apologized for his inappropriate behavior. W e have n o reason to d o u b t his sincerity and his c o m m i t m e n t to c o n t i n u e to act as a role model." - The International Olympic C o m m i t t e e , on Michael Phelps being p h o t o g r a p h e d with marijuana.

"Great players s t e p u p in big-time g a m e s to make plays" - Santonio Holmes, t h e Super Bowl MVP, on t h e Steelers record- setting win.

"We've t h r o w n everything w e have at it. W e ' r e going to c o n t i n u e to d o t h a t until everyone is back in their h o m e s a n d back o n their feet." - Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, o n t h e response to t h e devastating ice s t o r m

"Put the chicken fingers d o w n and t u r n the television all the way up!" - Bruce Springsteen, Super Bowl halftime p e r f o r m e r talking to those watching t h e Super Bowl halftime show f r o m home.

Obama inauguration sets record cost Cotton Wright GRAPHIC BY KARIE LUIOENS

STAFF W R I T E R

Leading up to t h e inauguration, media reports f r o m both sides of the political spect r u m chastised t h e estimated $150 million cost of President Barack O b a m a s swearing in ceremonies. The reports f r o m Fox News all the way to M S N B C blasted .ffli t h e incoming presidency for nearly quadrupling the cost of the 2005 inauguration of George W. Bush. "The cost of O b a m a s inaugural will dwarf past celebrations and make those of President Bush's look like budget bashes," said Fox N e w s c o m m e n t a t o r Sean Hannity in his personal blog. M S N B C went a step f u r t h e r and suggested o n Jan. 14 that the $150'million tab only covered parties and activities. Did the new administration really spend that much o n "parties and activities?" Factcheck.org, a nonprofit and nonpartisan website, says no. According to the site, the $150 million estimated cost of Obama's inauguration included the security costs reported by the federal government, the District of Columbia, Virginia and Maryland and the cost of the celebration. The reported $42 million and $33 million cost of former Presidents Bush and Clinton, respectively, did not include security. In 2005, U.S. H o m e l a n d Security Secretary Tom Ridge said he could not estimate security costs for Bush's inauguration. In 2005, the N e w York Times reported that the federal government and t h e District of Columbia spent over $115 million mostly for security for Bush's inaguration. That figure did not include the costs reported by Maryland and Virginia. To date, O b a m a s inauguration marks the first time reported inauguration costs have

-Julie Size, director of the Envir o n m e n t a l Justice Project at t h e University of California, Davis, o n t h e scope of environmental injustice.

PHOTO BY JOE SEYMOUR

i n eluded security costs. Security was not taken lightly at t h e event. The District of Columbia doubled the size of its police force with the aid of 8,000 police officers f r o m around the U.S. Over 10,000 National Guard t r o o p s were also on duty as well as a t e a m of Secret Service countersnipers hidden across t h e area. Officials have not disclosed the entirety of security measures in respect of national security. However, spectators noted the abun-

dance of military h u m vees and other tactical vehicles. A stronger t h a n ever military and police presence was necessary for t h e event. Although no official c o u n t was tallied for attendance at the inauguration, the National Park Service stated that it would use the 1.8 million figure reported by the Washington Post in its records. In retrospect, only 400,000 spectators were estimated in attendance of George W. Bush's 2001 inauguration. SEE COST, PAGE 1 0

America prepares itself for a green revolution M o t o r s and Chrysler, w h o after p o o r sales and a credit freeze, were forced to ask t h e federal President O b a m a called o n Americans t o enter "a n e w age government for billions of dolof responsibility" during his in- lars in assistance. Francis Beinecke, president of auguration speech. During the first week of his presidency, he t h e Natural Resource's Defense Council, issued a statement redirected the Environmental Protection Agency to reconsider a acting to Obama's decision. "These are m o n u m e n t a l dewaiver requested by California cisions t h a t will and 13 other states have an i m m e (to set stricter standiate impact in dards o n emissions These are monureducing global than c u r r e n t fedw a r m i n g pollueral requirements mental decisions tion in the Unitdemand. that will have an ed States.Just Before leaving immeditate impact days into office, office. President in reducing global O b a m a is showBush signed legiswarming pollution. ing America and lation that would t h e world that raise the corporate — FRANCIS BEINECKE PRESIDENT OF N A T U R A L he will lead our average fuel econRESOURCES D E F E N S E c o u n t r y in a bold omy to 36 miles COUNCIL new direction to per gallon by the protect t h e enviyear 2020. Before r o n m e n t and fight entering office, global warming." O b a m a was an adBeinecke said. vocate for environmental issues, W h a t exactly is global w a r m arguing that America should ing? T h o m a s Friedman, the reraise its fuel economy standard n o w n e d author of "The Earth to 40 miles per gallon because is Flat" and New York Times many other nations have already columnist, defines global w a r m enacted that standard. ing as "the rise in global averThese new standards would age temperature." However, in c o m e at a bad time for the auto his new book, "Hot, Flat, and industry, especially for General Laura Strltzke STAFF W R I T E R

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"Globalization has really allowed injustice to really go global"

FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

states that "President O b a m a Crowded" Friedman makes several a r g u m e n t s as to why "going and Vice President Biden have a comprehengreen" is sive plan to imperative invest in alfor A m e r Going green...is now a naternative and ica's future tional security imperative." renewable as a world — T I H O M A S FRIEDMAN energy, end leader. N E W Y O R K T I M E S COLUMNIST our addiction He first to foreign oil, mentions address the America's global clidependenmate crisis and create millions cy o n foreign sources of oil as a national security issue, saying of new jobs." The College Sustainability that this dependency hinders Task Force is an initiative to enthe U.S. f r o m being able to be a strong, independent world courage conservation and sustainability on H o p e College's leader. "That is why going green is c a m p u s . They are sponsoring no longer simply a hobby for c a m p u s events such as lectures high-minded environmental- a b o u t conservation, and also the ists or s o m e 'personal virtue,' "Trayless Dining" and "No Drive Tuesdays" initiatives. They are as [former] Vice President Dick encouraging students to not use Cheney o n c e sneered. It is n o w a national security imperative," a tray in Phelps Dining Hall on Tuesdays in order to conserve Friedman said. t h e water that would be used to O b a m a has placed a high priority o n enacting conserva- wash the trays. Also CSTF has tionist policies, including imple- teamed up with Greek Life to promote "No Drive Tuesdays," menting "green" jobs f u n d e d by the American Recovery and Re- asking students to walk or ride their bikes to c a m p u s on Tuesinvestment Plan that has been passed in the House of Repre- days. These initiatives show the sentatives and is being deliberat- potential for a future green revoed in the Senate. The website of lution in America. the president, whitehouse.gov.

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THE ANCHOR

Guest poet 'begs no pardon'

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THIS WEEK IN ART

Wednesday Feb. 4 Coolbeans Entertainment

Lynne Thompson reflects on life, longing and serious self-knowledge for the Jack Ridl Visiting Writers Series

Josh Williams, 9 - 1 0 p.m.

Knickerbocker Film Series "Pray the Devil Back to Hell," 7 : 3 0 p m

Andrew Gehl GUEST W R I T E R

M u c h to t h e delight of aspiring a u t h o r s , q u e s t i o n i n g listeners and a p p r e c i a t o r s of t h e literary art everywhere, t h e Jack Ridl Visiting W r i t e r s Series is r e t u r n i n g t o H o p e College for t h e spring semester. Award-winning poet Lynne T h o m p s o n kicks off t h e s e m e s t e r with her p e r f o r m a n c e o n Monday, Feb. 16 at t h e Knickerbocker Theatre. She is an involved m e m b e r in t h e Los Angeles p o e t r y c o m m u n i t y and nationally renowned. A recent recipient of the Great Lakes College Association's N e w W r i t e r s Award, T h o m p s o n will be s h a r i n g f r o m h e r 2007 collection entitled "Beg N o Pardon." Perugia Press, a nonprofitorganizationdedicated t o establishing n e w female p o e t s in t h e allegedly male-favoring field, p u b l i s h e d T h o m p s o n s book in their continuing effort t o e n c o u r a g e skilled, female writing. Thompsons p o e m s s e e m to b e just t h a t . "The p o e m s h e r e s e d u c e a n d c o n f r o n t and r e f u s e t o be a n o n y m o u s — or they revel in

Lynne T h o m p s o n T H O U G H T

A N D

T H U N D E R

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Thompson now serves as director of employee and labor relations at the University of California, LA. t h e transgressions a n o n y m i t y affords. They really d o beg n o pardon," said o n e judge of t h e G L C A N e w W r i t e r s Award. T h o m p s o n adroitly writes p o e m s t h a t create m o o d a n d c o n j u r e images, but s h e never p u s h e s t o w a r d s t h e overly e m o t i o n a l or self-indulgent. She f r e q u e n t l y d r a w s f r o m

Have you Heard? Andrew Gehl reviews Animal Collective's "Merriweather Post Pavilion"

t r o u p : Animal Collective A l b u m : Merriweather Post Pavilion R e l e a s e d : 06 Jan, 2009 Calling "Merriweather Post Pavilion" Animal Collective's m o s t accessible a l b u m is like calling t h e G r e a t Wall of C h i n a o n e of t h e easier b a r r i c a d e s to climb over. Sure, classic p o p s t r u c t u r e s m a k e u p a good deal of M e r r i w e a t h e r ' s songs, and cycling samples and vocal h o o k s do a fantastic job of grabbing t h e listener m o r e quickly t h a n any previous a l b u m by t h e band, b u t A n i m a l Collective r e m a i n o n e of indie music's m o s t divisive acts. That being said, " M e r r i w e a t h e r Post Pavilion" is brilliant. This is Animal Collective playing t o all of their s t r e n g t h s . They've successfully t r i m m e d s o m e of t h e a b s t r a c t n e s s f r o m their previous work while retaining their bizarreness. Songs like

My Girls", " S u m m e r t i m e i Clothes", a n d "Brother S p o r t " a r e so catchy even t h e m o s t casual listener will forget they're h e a r i n g noises m o r e likely t o originate f r o m a prehistoric s w a m p t h a n a musical i n s t r u m e n t (if this album's any o n e adjective, it's squishy). At t h e s a m e time, n o a l b u m in r e c e n t m e m o r y h a s r e w a r d e d r e p e a t e d listens like this o n e . It takes d o z e n s of plays t o u n d e r s t a n d h o w layers of s a m p l e s flit in a n d o u t of p r o m i n e n c e . W h i l e they tend to use vocals as a n o t h e r sonic layer, t h e lyrics can't be ignored. Just as t h e music simultaneously lofts with oddities and invites with simplicity, lines touch on everything from simple r o m a n c e to existential conflict. The messages o n " M e r r i w e a t h e r " are as various a n d appealing as t h e songs. Even though Animal Collective remain "not for everyone," this a l b u m m a r k s t h e best j u m p i n g - i n p o i n t for t h o s e curious a b o u t the band. C o m i n g out in January, " M e r r i w e a t h e r Post Pavilion" h a s already set t h e bar for music in 2009. W h i l e the a l b u m doesn't quite reach perfection, it's h a r d to imagine anything even close to this good c o m i n g out in t h e next 12 m o n t h s .

h e r personal history in o r d e r t o c o m m e n t o n race, childhood, sex, birth and death. Raised in Los Angeles by adoptive p a r e n t s f r o m the W e s t Indies, T h o m p s o n m a n a g e s to bring a C a r i b b e a n m y s tiq u e t o her writing while r e m a i n i n g based in relatable s c e n e s of childhood. T h o m p s o n d o e s n o t stay in COVER COURTESY LYNNE THOMPSON this stage of her life for long; her A W A R D W I N N I N G LIT— p o e m s m a t u r e in timeline and 4 Beg No Pardon/ Thompson's c o n c e p t as s h e c o m m e n t s o n debut chapbook, Is a winner of t h e role of t h e poet, m o t h e r a n d the GLCA New Writers Award, t h e u n i q u e m e a n i n g t o every receiving rave reviews. c o m m o n event. Listeners t o T h o m p s o n at t h e u p c o m i n g r e a d i n g will b e community members are invited t o c o m e d r a w n in by t h e a n d enjoy this poet's effortless voice. She f r e e event. Early carefully guides arrivers will b e The p o e m s here her audience treated t o live seduce and conthrough her jazz m u s i c at f r o n t a n d r e f u s e to multidirectional 6:30 p.m.; t h e be anonymous... writing pieces, r e a d i n g begins helping to lead at 7 p.m. T h e y really d o b e g from mystical In addition, no pardon. to realistic, a Q & A session — G L C A JUDGE with t h e a u t h o r d e s p a i r i n g NEW WRITERS AWARD to hopeful, will be taking and abstract place in the Herrick R o o m to tangible. H o p e s t u d e n t s as well as of t h e DeWitt C e n t e r at 3 p.m.

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Students weigh in on the Oscars M e g a n Harper GUEST WRITER

. - . i Ah, t h e Oscars: that t i m e of year w h e n p e o p l e e v e r y w h e r e pretend to care about obscure foreign films they've never h e a r d of ( n o r can they p r o n o u n c e ) , m o c k o u t r a g e o u s fashions of t h e stars, and act as if they really d o appreciate all those subtle n u a n c e s of t h e flaws of society and h u m a n destiny t h a t m a k e films truly timeless. W i t h t h a t being said, o n e h a s to w o n d e r - a r e t h e O s c a r s still POSTER COURTESY OSCAR.COM culturally relevant? D o e s anyone really c a r e a n y m o r e ? of p r e t e n t i o u s snobs, n o t t h o s e W h e n Hope students were of average moviegoers. Could those s t u d e n t s have a asked w h i c h films, actors and d i r e c t o r s they t h o u g h t would point? Have t h e O s c a r s lost their touch? Not according to other take h o m e an Oscar, it was r a t h e r discomfiting to see h o w m a n y of H o p e s t u d e n t s . True, t h e O s c a r s m a y not reflect t h e interests t h e m w e r e completely oblivious. of an everyday S o m e confessed individual; that they had they reflect never even 6 6 s o m e t h i n g more. heard of m a n y O s c a r movies have Paige Holthof of t h e movies ('12) said, "The with Oscar a timeless quality O s c a r s reflect a buzz, and s o m e rather than trendy. higher class of were unaware that t h e O s c a r s movies. These — A N N E JAMIESON ( ' 1 2 ) movies have a were about purpose and to take place. connect with As Juan Lopez ('12) stated, "I the audience in a real way b e c a u s e t h e really don't k n o w m u c h a b o u t any of t h e actors n o m i n a t e d , characters demonstrate real so I really couldn't m a k e a emotions." prediction a b o u t w h o will win." A n n e Jamieson agrees and said, "Oscar movies have a S o m e s t u d e n t s even claimed t h a t they m a k e it a point not to timeless quality r a t h e r t h a n a t r e n d y one. T h e y are not movies b e i n f o r m e d a b o u t t h e Oscars, that are purely for e n t e r t a i n m e n t since they either dislike t h e purposes." media, or they feel that t h e SEE O S C A R S , PAGE 1 0 O s c a r s only reflect t h e interests

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Friday Feb. 1 3 Great Performance Series Aquila T h e a t r e , t h e Knlck 7 : 3 0 p.m.

Monday Guest Piano Artist

Feb. 16

Yuklko T a n a k a , W l c h e r s 7 : 3 0 p.m.

Tuesday Feb. 17 Teaching Hope: -ROOTS" F r l e d - H e m e n w a y Auditorium, 8 p . m .

IN BRIEF

GPS FEATURES THE AQUILA THEATRE The H o p e College Great Perform a n c e Series will feature t h e Aquila Theatre with p e r f o r m a n c e s of "The Iliad" o n Friday, Feb. 13, and "The C o m e d y of Errors" o n Saturday, Feb. 14, at 7:30 p.m. at t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theatre in d o w n t o w n Holland. Aquila T h e a t r e h a s w o n international praise for its innovative p r e s e n t a t i o n s of classic d r a m a a n d r e t u r n s to H o p e College with t w o o u t s t a n d i n g p r o d u c tions. "The Iliad," H o m e r s epic story of t h e Trojan War, h a s had a p r o f o u n d influence o n every g e n e r a t i o n since first perf o r m e d by a n c i e n t Greek b a r d s in t h e M e d i t e r r a n e a n m o r e t h a n 2,500 years ago. D e s c r i b e d by The New York Times as "a perf o r m a n c e of staggering power," t h e Aquila Theatre C o m p a n y ' s p r o d u c t i o n of H o m e r ' s "Iliad," creates a "stunning, stirring, and m e m o r a b l e " theatrical experience. "Backstage" raved, "If you see only o n e piece of t h e a t r e this year - see Aquila's Tliadf Tickets are o n sale at t h e ticket office in t h e DeVos Fieldhouse, and for each evening cost $17 for regular admission, $12 for senior citizens, and $6 for children 18 a n d under. T h e ticket office is o p e n weekdays f r o m 10 a.m. t o 5 p.m. a n d can b e called at (616) 395-7890.

21 ST MUSICAL SHOWCASE TICKETS ON SALE Tickets are available for t h e 21st annual H o p e College Musical Showcase, a fast-paced c o n c e r t featuring H o p e College's m a j o r s t u d e n t m u s i c groups, and m a n y smaller ones, o n a single stage. Musical Showcase will be held o n Monday, M a r c h 9, at 8 p.m. in DeVos Hall in G r a n d Rapids. Featured will b e the C h a pel Choir, College C h o r u s , Jazz Ensemble, O r c h e s t r a , Symphonette, and W i n d Symphony, as well as soloists a n d c h a m b e r ensembles. Tickets are $10 each, and may be o r d e r e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e College Ticket Office located in t h e DeVos Fieldhouse o p e n weekdays 10 a.m. t o 5 p.m. and may be called at (616) 395-7890.


F I BRUARY 4 ,

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FEATURES

THE ANCHOR

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Uncommon concentrations: Pre-law, pre-dental, print and broadcast Christine Hostetier STAFF W R I T E R

H

opestudentsareambitious a n d h a r d - w o r k i n g . They attack their studies and get to k n o w their p r o f e s s o r s . S o m e are c h a n g i n g a r o u n d their fields of s t u d y as college c o n t i n u e s on; o t h e r s are set and d e t e r m i n e d o n a specific career. N o t m a n y p e o p l e m a y be aware of it, but t h e r e are small f a c t i o n s of s t u d e n t s h e a d e d t o w a r d s c a r e e r s t h a t are by no m e a n s u n i q u e , b u t t h a t are s o m e w h a t rare for H o p e College. A m o n g t h e s e c a r e e r p a t h s are pre-law, p r e - d e n t a l and j o u r n a l i s m .

Pre-Law

s o o n and w h o is i n t e r e s t e d in d o i n g i n t e r n a t i o n a l b u s i n e s s or family law, said, "Talking to a H o p e a l u m h e l p e d give m e a real p e r s p e c t i v e a b o u t t h e lifestyle m o s t lawyers lead a n d what kind of responsibilities they have."

Pre-Dental fi For t h o s e s t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in the p r e - d e n t a l a r e n a , H o p e o f f e r s key p r e r e q u i s i t e classes for p o s t - g r a d u a t e s c h o o l s . These are listed o n t h e predental website o n t h e k n o w h o p e website. A m o n g t h e basic classes are: general biology and c h e m i s t r y with labs, organic c h e m i s t r y with a lab, physics w i t h a lab and finally English. S t u d e n t s can also find links to sites with i n f o r m a t i o n about dental schools and requirements for specific schools.

The d e p a r t m e n t for H o p e College s t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in law or p u r s u i n g a legal c a r e e r to utilize for r e s o u r c e s is t h e Political S c i e n c e D e p a r l m e n l . T h e r e is a pre-law website t h a t they can c h e c k S t u d e n t s l o o k i n g for a n e t w o r k a n d a o u t , l i n k e d o n k n o w h o p e to t h e C a r e e r m o r e p e r s o n a l e n v i r o n m e n t can join t h e Services site. They can find c o n t a c t P r e - D e n t a l Club. The c l u b was s t a r t e d i n f o r m a t i o n listed for pre-law advisors, a last year by D o u g Fujawa ('09), M a t t listing of law-related classes available to Ellison ('09) and | a m i e Richards ('09). t h e m at H o p e College, and i n f o r m a t i o n M e e t i n g s a r e held m o n t h l y to plan p r e a b o u t legal i n t e r n s h i p o p p o r t u n i t i e s . d e n t activities. The club b r i n g s in o n e to For t h o s e i n t e r e s t e d in g e t t i n g off- t w o s p e a k e r s e a c h semester, raises m o n e y c a i n p u s and gaining experitrnctr in our as p a r t of a D a n c e M a r a t h o n t e a m , and nation's capitol, t h e Poli-Sci D e p a r t m e n t o r g a n i z e s e v e n t s like t h e C A S A P r o g r a m has a p r o g r a m called t h e W a s h i n g t o n dental hygiene d e m o n s t r a t i o n . D.C. H o n o r s Semester. S t u d e n t s have Vice P r e s i d e n t of t h e D e n t a l C l u b Gina held i n t e r n s h i p s with t h e U.S. A t t o r n e y V a n d e r V e e n ('10) said she was excited t o a n d t h e A m e r i c a n Bar A s s o c i a t i o n see t h e flyers a r o u n d among many last year for t h e n e w o t h e r incredible club, as a specifically opportunities. pre-dent-focused Other offWc host dilTerent speakers, o r g a n i z a t i o n had not c a m p u s asTTrelinKTirtiTTtrcK'tohcippreviously existed on p r o g r a m s sUidents understand what \s Hope's campus. are available c-xf>ec : ted -1 i-fHVr 4hefv>-k>'get Said VanderVeen, locally and in into law school and becomi "The w h o l e p u r p o s e is Philadelphia and lo u n i f y t h e p r e - d e n t Chicago. attomcvsv"-" s t u d e n t s so they can ABIGAIL G O W M A N ( " 1 0 ) The b e s t w a y talk, s h a r e and give o : .' P R E - L A W C L U B to further a a c a d e m i c advice... It's s t u d e n t ' s pursuit b r o u g h t p e o p l e out of of a legal c a r e e r t h e w o o d w o r k you d i d n ' t realize w e r e is t o join t h e Pre-Law C l u b , o p e n to pre-dent." s t u d e n t s of all ages a n d m a j o r s . PreVanderVeen talked about two Law C l u b organizes d i f f e r e n t e v e n t s initiatives of t h e P r e - D e n t a l Club: a geared t o w a r d i n f o r m i n g s t u d e n t s a b o u t Kaplan class and t h e C A S A p r e s e n t a t i o n . such t h i n g s as law schools, taking t h e LSATs, a n d life as a lawyer. S t u d e n t s Last year, s t u d e n t s raised m o n e y t o b r i n g have t h e c h a n c e to h e a r and i n t e r a c t a Kaplan class for t h e D e n t a l e n t r a n c e with p r a c t i c i n g lawyers and o t h e r legal e x a m s t o H o p e College. This w a s a feat e x p e r t s t h r o u g h panel d i s c u s s i o n s and as H o p e d o e s not have t h e f i n a n c e s as a small school to b r i n g a class here. The events. Abigail G o w m a n CIO) said. " W e h o s t a d i f f e r e n t speakers, as well as activities to help s t u d e n t s u n d e r s t a n d w h a t is e x p e c t e d f r o m t h e m to get into law school and b e c o m e attorneys." The Pre-Law C l u b is h e a d e d by a s t e e r i n g c o m m i t t e e of f o u r s t u d e n t s : Abigail G o w m a n , N a t e Bult ('11), D u s t i n Miller ('10) a n d Rylee H a r t u n g ('11). Their advisor is Dr. David Ryden of t h e Poli-Sci D e p a r t m e n t . The club recently t o o k a trip to a law school f o r u m in Chicago. After the f o r u m , they m e t with a H o p e a l u m w h o w o r k s in a law firm. G o w m a n , w h o is taking t h e LSATs

class are -older s t u d e n t s w h o t o o k ^ n o w a c t i n g as m e n t o r s to t h e y o u n g e r pre-dent students.

"They c a m e to o u r first m e e t i n g and gaveustheirbooksandtoldusstrategies... W e c a n ask a b o u t t h e interview a n d application p r o c e s s e s . It h a s b e e n really helpful!" said V a n d e r V e e n . The C A S A p r e s e n t a t i o n is a t w o day commitment where pre-dent s t u d e n t s give c h i l d r e n in t h e p r o g r a m a p r e s e n t a t i o n o n d e n t a l hygiene. T h e c l u b is h o l d i n g a p l a n n i n g session o n Feb. 19 a n d p r e s e n t i n g o n Feb. 2 3 a n d 24. If p r e - d e n t s t u d e n t s are i n t e r e s t e d , t h e y c a n s e n d an e - m a i l to: p r e d e n t a l 速 hope.edu.

Upcoming Offices of C events and opportuni

r Services

3

W e d n e s d a y , Feb. 4 H e a l t h C a r e e r s Fair 10:30 a . m . - l p . m . in t h e A. Pai^l S c h a a p Science Center Atrium Thursday, Feb. 5 Resume polishing 8 - 1 1 p.m. in the u p s t a i r s c o m p i t er lab in t h e M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r Thursday, Feb. 12 Job P u r s u i t e v e n t 8:45 a . m . - 4 p.m. ( m u s t block tHe w h o l e day) at the Lansing C o n v e n t i o n C e n t c in Lansing. Thursday, Feb. 19 Job search w o r k s h o p 11-11:50 a.m. in the Offices of Career Services Conference Room Friday. Feb. 20 Resume prep 11-11:50 a.m. in t h e Offices of Career Services Conference Room Tuesday, Feb. 24 West Michigan Career Connections a id Career Expo 2 - 6 p.m. at DeVos Place in Gra i d Rapids Thursday, Feb. 26 Interviewing workshop 11 a.m. in the M a a s C o n f e r e n c e R o o m Monday, March 2 O u t - o f - S t a t e T e a c h e r Fair 3:30-6:30 p.m. at t h e G r a n d V a l ey State University Fieldhouse in Allegan. W e d n e s d a y , .March 4 R e s u m e polishing 8 - 1 1 p.m. i n t h e u p s t a i r s M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r Tuesday, April 28 W e s t M i c h i g a n Teacher Search 9 a m - 3 p.m. at t h e G r a n d Val ey State University Fieldhouse in Allegan. At


7

FEATURES

THE ANCHOR

FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

All Thompson GUEST WRITER

S

d

tudents often spend hours browsing through the pages of the H o p e College C o u r s e Catalog trying to d e c i d e what courses to take and w h a t m a j o r to declare, b u t what should they do if their i n t e n d e d m a j o r isn't listed? W h a t r e s o u r c e s do s t u d e n t s interested in u n c o m m o n m a j o r s have to help t h e m with their studies? Within the Communication D e p a r t m e n t only a h a n d f u l of s t u d e n t s p u r s u e j o u r n a l i s m studies u n d e r t h e radar. Traditionally speaking, j o u r n a l i s m c o m e s in t w o forms; print and broadcast. M o r e recently, w i t h today's major news sources c o n v e r t i n g to o n l i n e f o r m a t s and the exponential n u m b e r of blogs created every day, m e d i a professionals are n o w i n t r o d u c i n g Web j o u r n a l i s m as t h e latest addition to t h e n e w s f r o n t .

3

S t u d e n t s interested in a c a r e e r in j o u r n a l i s m o f t e n n a r r o w t h e i r interests into smaller subsets like magazines, radio, publishing, television, and multimedia. C o m p a r e d to large public universities, however, t h e o p p o r t u n i t i e s for specializing in any particular field of j o u r n a l i s m are m u c h m o r e limited at small liberal arts colleges. Because journalism isn't a s e p a r a t e m a j o r at H o p e , s t u d e n t s have to improvise. T h e y typically declare a c o m m u n i c a t i o n m a j o r o r c o m b i n e it with English and do their best to register for related classes. Fortunately, t h e j o u r n a l i s m c o u r s e s at H o p e are evolving to keep up with the media. Dr. T e r e s a H o u s e l h a s b e e n t e a c h i n g journalism

and

communication

classes a t H o p e since t h e fall of 2 0 0 5 .

"There's always b e e n s t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in j o u r n a l i s m here" s h e said. "I'm trying to get t h e word out t h a t we have a j o u r n a l i s m program."

d

Since joining t h e C o m m u n i c a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t faculty, she h a s helped build up t h e j o u r n a l i s m p r o g r a m a t Hope. "Before I got here t h e r e was very little continuity^' Housel said. Her m o s t r e c e n t a c c o m p l i s h m e n t this year was redesigning t h e Print M e d i a 11 c o u r s e w h i c h is o f f e r e d every spring. T h e c o u r s e previously e x a m i n e d m e d i a e t h i c s and public relations b u t now focuses o n m a g a z i n e f e a t u r e s w r i t i n g and layout design. "It's a m o r e direct c o n t i n u a t i o n of Print M e d i a I," Housel said. S t u d e n t s in t h e class pitch story ideas, write articles and design a collective m a g a z i n e as their final project. H o u s e l e n c o u r a g e s her

s t u d e n t s to experience all a s p e c t s of print journalism. "I w a n t t h e m to have o w n e r s h i p of it," she said. T h e b r o a d c a s t j o u r n a l i s m track is also e x p a n d i n g with t h e addition of part-time communications professor Jim Korf to t h e d e p a r t m e n t . W i t h his b a c k g r o u n d in b r o a d c a s t , he launched a new studio production c o u r s e this spring. Korf h o p e s to b r i n g inspiration and creativity to his p r o d u c t i o n s t u d e n t s with t h e recently built s t u d i o set design. "My h o p e is to create m o r e activity in it, give it b e t t e r visibility," Korf said in t h e l a n u a r y e d i t i o n of the Communication Department newsletter. Journalism s t u d e n t s can also gain experience t h r o u g h p r o g r a m s outside t h e classroom. I n t e r n s h i p s , networking and study abroad opportunities are available to s t u d e n t s in a wide range of j o u r n a l i s m positions. S t u d e n t s w h o register to take i n t e r n s h i p s for credit, either while o n c a m p u s o r abroad, can land p l a c e m e n t s t h r o u g h a n u m b e r of media organizations. O r g a n i z a t i o n s like "Saturday Night Live," Seventeen Magazine, G r a n d Rapids Press, G r o u p Tour Media and C h a n n e l 8 N e w s have o f f e r e d i n t e r n s h i p s to H o p e j o u r n a l i s m s t u d e n t s in t h e past. T h e O f f i c e of C a r e e r Services helps e q u i p s t u d e n t s w i t h e m p l o y m e n t and furthering educational resources. Dale Austin, t h e d i r e c t o r of C a r e e r Services, r e m i n d s s t u d e n t s to look into at all their o p t i o n s . "People aren't clued into professional associations, and it can be a very helpful resource," he said.

M o r e resources for journalism s t u d e n t s Career Reference Tools: Encyclopedia of Associations (VanWylen Library) Associations indexed in a variety of ways Provides career information, job openings and national conventions Spotlight on Careers W e b site (www.spotlightoncareers.org) T h r o u g h C a r e e r Services h o m e p a g e O v e r 4 million organizations indexed by topic and location Provides contacts, descriptions, c o m p e t i t o r s and g r a d u a t e fellowships Vault O n l i n e C a r e e r Library (www.vault.com/index) T h r o u g h C a r e e r Services h o m e p a g e D o w n l o a d over 70 c o m p r e h e n s i v e i n d u s t r y guides (free for students) Take o c c u p a t i o n surveys and search for internships

The Office of Career Services is located in the 8th Street Building Get help with resumes, mock interviews, finding an internship or even a job!

For j o u r n a l i s m s t u d e n t s , t h e American Society of M a g a z i n e Editors is a p o p u l a r professional organization. Different m a g a z i n e s a r o u n d t h e c o u n t r y a r e m e m b e r s , but s t u d e n t m e m b e r s h i p is considered only d u r i n g t h e fall of junior year. S t u d e n t s w h o get accepted into this highly c o m p e t i t i v e association are placed as paid i n t e r n s at n a t i o n a l m a g a z i n e s , typically serving as editorial assistants. Austin e n c o u r a g e s s t u d e n t s f r o m all m a j o r to visit with s o m e o n e in C a r e e r Services. He w a n t s p e o p l e to feel w e l c o m e asking questions. " S t u d e n t s feel like they have t o have e v e r y t h i n g in a nice tiny bundle," Austin said. "But all you have to do is c o m e in and say, 'I need help.'"

Drop in hours from 3-4:45 p.m.


8

VOICES

T H E ANCHOR

FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

Mvths. tricks and train wrecks

Change for tradition's sake

Erika English

Katie Bennett

Do you speak Mozart?

Co Editor-in-chief

M u s i c is not a universal language. This is o n e thing I've c o m e t o u n d e r s t a n d in m y four years as a m u s i c m a j o r at H o p e . Ironically, I used t o think it was and 1 w e n t into m u s i c originally believing t h a t I w a s speaking t h e lang u a g e t h a t w e n t b e y o n d language, t h e language that everyone could understand. But it w a s m u s i c h i s t o r y classes t h a t c h a n g e d m y m i n d a b o u t this. We used t o listen to H a y d n s y m p h o n i e s as p a r t of o u r a s s i g n m e n t s (You k n o w Haydn. Kind of u p b e a t and happy. P r e - M o z a r t A u s t r i a n c o u r t music. People w e r e probably w e a r i n g pastels a n d lace.) T h e n we'd read c o n t e m p o r a r y reviews of his c o n c e r t s . O f t e n , t h e reviews would express shock o r alarm o r sadness at Haydn's m u s i c t h a t m y class just did not hear. Within Haydn's culture, his music said s o m e t h i n g o t h e r t h a n "listen t o that nice little p i a n o piece." W e simply don't speak his language well e n o u g h t o hear what his audiences heard: his daring newness, his excitement, his grief. O n an i n t e r n a t i o n a l scale, differe n t c u l t u r e s don't even a g r e e o n w h i c h s o u n d s are p r e t t y a n d w h i c h s o u n d s are d i s c o r d a n t . T e r t i a n h a r m o n i e s , t h e 12n o t e scale, m a j o r and m i n o r arpeggios, these a r e all inventions of t h e W e s t . In medieval times, m o n k s h a r m o n i z e d only in f o u r t h s . This m a k e s m o s t m e dieval c h a n t s o u n d a little creepy t o m o d e r n ears. In s o m e cultures, t h e t h r o b b i n g swell t h a t w e h e a r w h e n two n o t e s clash is beautiful. To o u r ears, it just s o u n d s w r o n g . It strikes m e t h a t a l t h o u g h m u s i c m a y n o t b e t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l language, it certainly is a language of s o r t s . A f t e r

Columnist

What do you have to say for yourself?

all, music, like o t h e r languages is a vehicle t o express h u m a n e m o t i o n . W e sing, rap, play, d r u m a b o u t t h e s a m e things n o m a t t e r w h o o r w h e r e or w h e n we are: love, d e a t h , celebration, love, f r u s t r a t i o n , did I m e n t i o n love? These t h i n g s are t h e great equalizers, t h e things we all have in c o m m o n . W h e n we say we don't "like" s o m e g e n r e of music, aren't we simply saying we don't speak t h a t language? That we don't express e m o t i o n t h a t way? If we t h i n k M o z a r t ' s m u s i c is boring, it's b e c a u s e w e don't get it e n o u g h t o k n o w w h a t h e was really saying. If we h a t e rap, it's bec a u s e we prefer a different expression of t h e s a m e feelings. The fact is: n o n e of it is bad. I supposed we can argue that some music is harder to produce than other music, or that some music expresses m o r e of the things we're feeling at t h e m o m e n t . But ultimately, all music does the same thing. I think we s h o u l d value bilingualism in m u s i c like w e d o in o t h e r languages. N o o n e ever says " O h I d o n ' t like Japanese," s o w h y s h o u l d any of u s say, "I don't like c o u n t r y " ? T h e bias a m o u n t s t o t h e s a m e thing: a willingness t o b e s h u t o u t of t h a t culture. F r o m n o w o n I'll a n s w e r t r u t h f u l l y w h e n s o m e o n e asks me: "To be h o n e s t , I don't speak country. But I'm willing t o l e a r n " Katie has just discovered the sauna in the Dow. Why don't more people do this? What better way to get warm?

T h e c o n c e p t of reusable p r o d u c t s is n o t n e w in o u r culture, or in o u r relationships. W e o f t e n leave o n e relationship a n d e n t e r a n o t h e r feeling a bit m o r e used, with a little less carb o n a t i o n , a little emptier. But is t h e r e ever a p o i n t w h e r e we just n e e d t o stop o p e n i n g up? W h e n d o you call it quits? Like b r e a k i n g a habit, it's a process, b u t is t h e r e ever a point w h e n it's practical t o go cold turkey with a relationship? C a n you quit a p e r s o n ? The telltale signs of a s o u r relationship o f t e n m i r r o r that of an o p e n gallon of milk. T h e d a t e is expired. T h e a r o m a is less sweet, s o m e t h i n g just isn't right. T h e c u r d l e d e l e m e n t s aren't s m o o t h anymore, but b u m p y a n d g u t - w r e n c h ing. W e d u m p o u t t h e c o n t e n t s , stare as they flow d o w n t h e drain, a n d hold o u r b r e a t h s trying to r e m e m b e r h o w it got t o be t h e r e in t h e first place. A n d even if it's t h e only t h i n g in our e m p t y refrigerators, it's so easy t o r u n to m o r e c o n v e n i e n t excuses for why we fall into a p a t t e r n of neglect. I had a high school t e a c h e r o n c e tell m e t h a t excuses a r e like butts, eve r y o n e has o n e and they all stink. But really, don't we all m a k e excuses for o u r behavior? A n d are excuses always a bad thing? They always say t o walk a mile in a n o t h e r person's shoes, but if w e can't d o t h a t shouldn't s o m e o n e explain th e ir behavior t o us? Explain their situation, m o t i v a t i o n , even history? W h a t ' s t h a t subtle difference between explaining and excusing? A n d h o w m u c h are we willing t o accept

f r o m t h o s e we a r e in relationship with? As children we make excuses for late h o m e w o r k a s s i g n m e n t s , or w h y t h e c o o k i e jar is empty. As adults, we m a k e t h e s a m e excuses for w h y t h e business plan w a s n ' t typed up o n time, why we b r o k e a h e a r t , and even why t h e cookie jar is still empty. M a y b e t h e worst excuses of all aren't t h o s e w e use t o cover o u r tracks or explain ourselves to o t h e r people, b u t those we m a k e t o ourselves. H o w o f t e n w e find ourselves w r a p p e d in our o w n red t a p e only to insist we have a legitim a t e excuse. You see, we like to k e e p o u r excuses close t o h e a r t — t h a t ' s w h y t h e m o s t d a n g e r o u s excuses a r e those p e r t a i n i n g t o m a t t e r s of t h e heart. Bett e r yet, w h e n we realize we are t h e only o n e s w h o got us to t h a t p o i n t in r o t t e n relationships, all we have left to d o is blame. A n d s o we blame o u r relations h i p s — t h e expired milk t h a t left us sour. We b l a m e t h e m for t h e fact we've lost a piece of ourselves. W e blame t h e m for r u i n i n g o u r f u t u r e s . W e s t o p o p e n i n g u p b e c a u s e we've let ourselves b e d r a i n e d before. A n d t h e m o m e n t w e start t o pin t h e fault o n t h e donkey, t h e f u n n y t h i n g is we b e c o m e t h e ass. Erika English would like to thank Lake Country Lutheran High School's staff and students (past and present) for all their inspirations. Congratulations on the new building!

Hope College Kool-Aid Lisa King Columnist

Dear God, I've drunk the Kool-Aid... H o p e College is a college of categories. You have your jocks, your techs, your outsiders, loners, socials, semi-socials, newbies, geeks, cool geeks, geeks with a hobby, geeks w i t h o u t a hobby, geeks with b o y f r i e n d s and girlfriends, s h o o t e r gamers, RPG gamers, frats, sororities, seniors, f r e s h m a n , cults, W O W - e r s , D and D-ers. Let's not forget a b o u t your music majors, c h e m i s t r y majors, d a n c e majors, English majors, Japanese majors, Japan Club, u n i o n s , associations, t h e Anchor, t h e floaters, t h e totally oblivious, The Pull, Nykerk, The D e w Crew. To all you transfer students out there

w h o feel as I did; lost, confused, and that you s o m e h o w missed out on the KoolAid being passed around; Y O U ARE N O T ALONE. There are others like you in t h e same position; others who are just as mystified by this bizarre society k n o w n as H o p e College and just pray that it gets easier. I have yet to learn all the guidelines surrounding t h e how and whys of t h e Hope cliques; however, I have been gathering information concerning t h e interactions of these groups. I wanted to know: how do they operate? W h o pulls the strings above t h e dangling puppet that resides so well and ambiguous a m o n g the other non-descripts of the school? Unfortunately, I recently experienced such interaction. A few months ago, Japan G u b deliberated. It was the start of the year; attendance was low. We did not receive the influx of freshmen the club had anticipated for its survival. Funds were becoming non-existent. To some, it looked as though the bigger sister-organizations would swoop in and swallow us whole until our existence as a club was nothing more than a portion of our remaining m e m -

'"'ANCHOR Taylor Hughes Robert Guimond

A s h l e y D e V e c h t Eniioi\-i\-Cniff Emily West Amy Soukup Aimee Barigian

MASACISG

Brittany A d a m s

EDITOR

CiurUS N£IIN CO-EDIII'R Cturns Afens Co-EinrnR NATIOSM

Lindsey B a n d y . A s w .

far do I take this? Will I have to join t h e cult, b e c o m e s o m e kind of mage, elf, or s w o r d s m a n just t o get m y p o i n t across t h a t w e need t h e m ? H o w d o I balance my club duties with t h e total exploitation of an entirely different clique?! I a m at an e n d . I a m b e c o m i n g t h e thing I fear most at this school—a clique leader. I a m d o i n g what should not be done; trying to overtake a precious c o m m o d i t y to Hope. W i t h o u t strange oddities such as Role-Players, g a m e r s and geeks, H o p e College w o u l d cease t o b e bearable. N o r m a l i t y would r u n r a m p a n t and individuality would disperse into n o t h i n g ness. I find myself done, alone, w o r n out, spent. They can d o what they w a n t now; I will pressure t h e m no longer. I a m n o t a p u p p e t master. I a m just an outsider, a geek, a dancer, p i a n o player, s o n g girl, Japanese major. My only p a r t i n g w o r d s to this c o l u m n . "Dear G o d , I d r a n k t h e kool aid..." Lisa King is a business management and Japanese major; She fights crime in the cover of darkness.

2 0 0 9 SPRING SEMESTER STAFF

K a t i e B e n n e t t EniWR-is-Cmif Samuel Ogles

bers sitting in a d o r m room, watching anime. •shivers' We went from one week of having an average of 20 attendees to only five. There had to be a reason for the drastic decrease in membership... It was then that I discovered the source of our problem. Japan C l u b relies heavily o n t h e supp o r t of c e r t a i n cliques—most notably, Role-Players. T h o s e o f t e n deeply r o o t e d into t h e RPG aspect of life, typically relish in all things Japanese. However, as luck w o u l d have it, their gatherings are t h e s a m e day and t i m e as Japan Club. Every week, they m e e t , they play, they do strange things with dice. I'm n o t entirely sure, yet I k n e w o u r path t o survival had s o m e t h i n g to d o with these u n i q u e individuals a n d their g a m i n g ways. I find myself w o n d e r i n g h o w I b e c a m e a servant t o these people. I s p e n t t h e first t h r e e weeks of t h e s e m e s t e r lobbying for t h e m t o c h a n g e their m e e t i n g date, offering r e w a r d s for their participation, begging their girlfriends to put in good w o r d s for me. W h e n did I b e c o m e this pathetic? 1 a m n o m a s t e r m a n i p u l a t o r here! H o w

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FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

9

From the inside out

Leftttv to the EcUtor Respect the space, respect the staff To the Editors: Every week Phelps staff work o n the bowls that hold t h e napkins and salt & pepper shakers, but by M o n d a y there is only the pepper shakers left. W h e r e did the salt shakers go? O n e theory is that gremlins came and took them, or maybe they have feet and walked off o n their own. If there were a way to put signs on them to keep t h e m in the bowls, I would make them, but sometimes t h e bowls are even missing. I'm beginning to think there must be rabbits running around o n the lower level because we find so many carrots on the floor when we go to clean tables. Maybe the students assume we are their wait staff because of all the dirty glasses and trays

THE ANCHOR

Brittany Adams ,

When words are enough

that are left o n the tables along with the bottles of hot sauce that students use on their food. Would these students expect, their mom's to pick up for t h e m if they were at h o m e ? W e try to keep the dining hall as clean as possible, but need your help. O n several occasions I have had to pick up wadded napkins and baby carrots off the floor before the students can vacuum. The flowers are another matter. Please r e m e m b e r that it takes our time to put all this stuff on t h e tables for you to enjoy, and I don't feel that they should end up on the floor or be taken. Your Hostess, Rosemary B a n n e r m a n

Features Editor

Words are to language what ato m s are to matter; one could not exist without t h e other. As an English and French double-major, words are forever on my mind. Words are my tools, my gift, my currency. Yet I'm amazed by h o w 1 spend my words. I would imagine that at least 99 percent of the words 1 utter daily are useless. I've been thinking about the times when my words have really m e a n t something. Not surprisingly, I can't recall

LASZLO TOKES AWARD "The Bible says that when you become a Christian your mind is renewed, and so with that renewing of your mind comes a new view of the world in which you live." Laszlo Tokes

t o o many of them. O n e time that cames to mind was over two years ago in October. I was a chatting with a friend o n the phone when she mentioned that she had h e a r d that a friend of mine had died that day.in a car accident. I r e m e m b e r my brain going n u m b , unable to process the reality that my friend was gone. Suddenly my appetite for conversation was gone, and I didn't know what to do with myself. I wandered around, sporadically bursting into tears at the thought of it. The existentialist panic that strikes at m o m e n t s like these forced m e to face my o w n mortality—and the mortality of those I love. Realizing that I might not get a n o t h e r opportunity, I decided to use the m o m e n t to tell s o m e o n e h o w much I cared about him. I'm sure my experience isn't unique; probably most people have experienced something traumatic that led them to slow down and take some time to h o n o r the people that make their life w o r t h living. But by and large, this isn't a n everyday affair. The link between tragedy and sentiments of significance is a tragedy in itself. I honestly think a lot of it links back to fear. Even right now, as I write this, there are people I would love to tell h o w much they m e a n to me, but I a m scared either of sounding creepy or overly sentimental or finding that they simply mean m o r e to m e than I do to them. I can't help but wonder how many other people there are out there with the same

Laszlo Tokes has written that Christianity involves a renewing of our minds that leads us to view the world in which we live f r o m a n e w perspective, informed by our Christian faith and convictions. This essay offers you t h e opportunity to explore how your Christian faith impacts and i n f o r m s your view of an issue in this world. It asks you to apply a biblical Christian worldview to the issue or topic that you choose to address. This award includes two scholarships of $750 and will be awarded to the two rising seniors who write the best essays addressing a current issue or world situation f r o m a Christian perspective. If you are currently a junior, you are invited to write an essay for this award.

hidden fears. W o r d s are frightening because they have t h e power to change things. As little kids we learn that obnoxious rhyme, "Sticks and stones can break my b o n e s but words can never h u r t m e " I honestly don't know why people teach this to children; it's a complete lie (much like Santa Claus, although the effects of this o n e last much longer). W o r d s hurt; words hurt tons. They wound us in arguments, in lies, in rejection, in diagnoses, in insincerity. But the real strength in words is that they aren't fatal; they simply leave w o u n d s . But words can also be a source of great strength. Think about M a r t i n Luther King, Jr.s "I Have a Dream" speech or Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty, or give m e death"; those words had the power to change t h e course of American history. But even on a smaller scale, the power of words is incredible. Two Christmases ago, I spent some time before the holiday writing letters to let t h e m know how m u c h I loved t h e m and was grateful for their love and supp o r t in my life. C h r i s t m a s m o r n i n g I handed them out, but most of my family either couldn't or wouldn't read t h e m — t h o s e letters made t h e m cry. My sister said to me, "Way to go, Brittany. You m a d e everyone cry on Christmas." W h e n I think a b o u t it, it's kind of crazy that those letters caused such a reaction. I love those people every day, and that doesn't make t h e m cry. Putting that love into words, however, overwhelmed them. There's something undeniable a b o u t words that really resonates with people;

• •• Section of previous winning essay: f r o m Nicole Brace ('07), whose essay title was "The Body and the Bread: Toward a Christian Theology and Ethic of Eating" : "For if Christians are united in Jesus Christ, who is t h e "Bread of Life" (John 6), the "fullness of G o d in bodily form" and the one about w h o m the Apostle Paul says "in H i m all things hold together" (Colossians 1), could not we seek to live a collective theology that is m o r e connected to this wholeness which is present in Christ? Could we live a life that is m o r e in keeping with our identity as people w h o eat t h e Lord's Supper and invite others to the table? Perhaps then God would use such people to take physical and spiritual bread to others in need."

sometimes, actions aren't enough. Brittany

Nicole's words of wisdom for future entrants: Writing an essay like this gives you a chance to hold a hard question or issue up to the light and examine it— with God, yourself, a n d o t h e r s in mind. There is no o n e "right" topic, so wrestle with something that matters to you personally. If it troubles, compels, delights, or intrigues you, you're probably onto something rich.

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Brandon Smith ('09), who wrote on family, says: Throughout the writing process, G o d has encouraged me to hope once again in good news. In a time when all creation is groaning—marriages failing, kids rebelling, churches dividing, forgiveness lacking—I still dare to hope that God is at work putting to right all that is wrong. I now truly believe that a Christ-centered family can bring hope to t h e larger community that oneness, reconciliation, and mutual

TaKePHOios.DraworDesi8N? Anchor meetings are always open to all Hope students!

love is possible.

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FEBRUARY 4 . 2 0 0 9

Obama causes millions to gather; 'Obamob' creates unique experience •

OBAMOB,

from

page 3

clapped. It w a s beautiful. O p r a h cried o n m y shoulder. H o p e Republican Jordan Fuller l a m e n t e d t h e cold, yet expressed his excitem e n t . "1 stood for ten h o u r s , it was extremely c r o w d e d , b u t it w a s o n e of t h e best experiences of m y life," he said. This c o m i n g f r o m a conservative. Traveling h o m e resembled scenes f r o m I A M L E G E N D or Cloverfield, depending o n o n e s taste of disaster films. Streets and intersections surrounding the Mall w e r e packed sidewalk t o sidewalk. Trash bec a m e a n o t h e r layer of pavement. Standing a t o p t h e L'Efant M e t r o Station escalators (a central h u b for i n a u g u r a t i o n travel), unif o r m e d soldiers yelled t o t h e angry and w e a r y crowds, e x h o r t i n g t h e m to practice patience. In t h a t m o m e n t , I wasn't s u r e if t h e c o n s t a n t tugging o n my jacket was d u e t o t h e suffocatingly b u n c h e d multit u d e s or t h e unraveling fabric of social order. M y g r o u p and I successfully b o a r d e d t h e first available m e t r o and miraculously m a d e it h o m e . O t h e r s t o o k advantage of t h e closed-to-traffic bridges and walked

v PRESIDENT DBRNfl: THANK YOU THANK YOU. it h o m e themselves. For m o s t everyone, t h e day was over, but m i n e w a s getting its s e c o n d wind. T h e r e are n u m e r o u s benefits of i n t e r n ing o n Capitol Hill; n e t w o r k i n g , r e s u m e c o n t e n t , f r e e f o o d . I n a u g u r a t i o n tickets, a n d Inaugural Ball tickets, too. I arrived at t h e Michigan State Society Ball (in t h e striking A m e r i c a n H i s t o r y M u s e u m ) in a t h r e e piece suit a n d an a p p e t i t e for t h e o p e n bar and buffet. By agreeing to

v o l u n t e e r d u r i n g t h e Ball, I had avoided p u r c h a s i n g a $200-ticket. However, acc o r d i n g t o o n e a t t e n d e e f r o m Florida, t h e M i c h i g a n Ball w a s lacking. "This is t h e c h e a p e s t ticket in town," he said, "last night at t h e Florida Ball, they had t h e Four Tops...it was like $400 a person." The d e c i m a t i o n of traditional s p o n s o r s G M and Ford m e a n t that Ball organizers had t o d o m o r e with less, b u t o n e could hardly notice.

Although Obama didn't s h o w (he wasn't expected to), Michigan political heavyweights m a d e their p r e s e n c e k n o w n . Rep. U p t o n and Sen. S t a b e n o w j u m p e d o n stage, o n e b r a n d i s h ing rocker h o r n s while the other bumped. Ethan Morrical, a H o p e Junior, d a n c e d with Gov. G r a n h o l m . "She can hold a beat well enough," M o r r i c a l said, " b u t she t e n d s to lead to her left t o o much." Congressional staffers s c h m o o z e d with politicians and citizens alike, and my C o n g r e s s m a n jested that I b e t t e r " n o t enjoy myself t o o much." The n u m b e r s f r o m I n a u g u r a t i o n day are staggering. 1.5 million travelers r o d e t h e city's subway, 1.8 million p e o p l e braved the 30F cold, and t h e State of PHOTO BY JOE SEYMOUR Virginia is s u b m i t t i n g D C a $7 million receipt for i n a u g u r a t i o n related expenses. V e n d o r s have exhausted their supplies of O b a m a - s t a m p e d hats, Ts, books, tags, b u t t o n s , calendars, a n d c o n d o m s . T h e city is b r e a t h i n g a well-deserved sigh of relief. O n e question, t h o u g h , r e m a i n s in t h e back of m a n y politico m i n d s . W o u l d M c C a i n s p a r t y have b e e n this big?

inauguration costs high, driven Sudan president could be charged with genocide by price of security * COSTS, from page 4 Regardless of what r e c e n t m e d i a r e p o r t s have stated, it will not be until April w h e n t h e full costs of t h e i n a u g u r a t i o n are realized and disclosed by t h e Federal Election C o m m i t t e e . For now, H o p e College hist o r y professor Fred Johnson urges A m e r i c a n s t o reflect o n t h e m o n u m e n t a l event. "America's never had a day like it," said J o h n s o n . "For this m a n t o b e s t a n d i n g at t h e t o p of

this building, built by slaves, is astonishing. Things have c o m e full circle." J o h n s o n was d i s h e a r t e n e d by t h e media r e p o r t s claiming O b a m a ' s i n a u g u r a t i o n w a s over celebrated and financed. "There's ideology, and there's nation. You can disagree with t h e ideology, but this was a great day for t h e nation," J o h n s o n said. "They ( D e m o c r a t s and Republicans) all could celebrate."

• SUDAN, from page 3 but I honestly don't k n o w what they will do. They will feel obliged to lash o u t in s o m e way. S o m e of t h e m are saying 'give t h e b a s t a r d s a good kicking."' There have already been several t h r e a t s m a d e against U.N. officials a n d aid- agencies in t h e Sud a n by t h o s e w h o r e m a i n faithful

t o t h e g o v e r n m e n t . According to H o l m e s , t h e r e are c o n t i n g e n c y plans set in plac for t h e r e m o v a l of aid w o r k e r s o n c e t h e decision is m a d e in t h e next m o n t h . The d i l e m m a at h a n d is weighing t h e o p t i o n s b e t w e e n justice and peace. O n e is left p o n d e r i n g w h i c h will result in t h e least a m o u n t of b l o o d s h e d .

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The Oscars get a Hope review; students give mixed reactions • OSCARS, from page 5 Many students seemed to a g r e e t h a t O s c a r movies d o n o t always evoke a positive e m o t i o n within t h e viewer; rather, they m a k e t h e audience feel passionate a b o u t t h e fate of t h e c h a r a c t e r s and feel lost in a world utterly unlike t h e i r own. T h e m o v i e and actors m u s t work side by side in o r d e r t o create a relatable story a n d s y m p a t h e t i c characters. While many Hope students a d m i t to n o t keeping up with t h e O s c a r s , m a n y of t h e m d o

still believe t h a t they r e m a i n culturally relevant. They reflect t h e e v e r - c h a n g i n g feel of film over t h e years, and since movies are still a very big p a r t of p o p culture, they deserve to have an award to recognize o n e s t h a t a r e genuinely notable. W h i l e they m a y only reflect t h e in te r e s ts of those with m o r e refined taste in movies, H o p e s e e m s t o agree, overall, t h a t t h e O s c a r s remain an i m p o r t a n t p a r t of o u r culture, and interest in t h e O s c a r s is, as with O s c a r movies, truly timeless.

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T H E ANCHOR

TITLE

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS

Wednesday Women's basketball

CO-SPORTS EDITOR

Chris (TBrlen GUEST WRITER

An i m a g i n a r y line was all t h a t separated t h e o r a n g e and blue f r o m t h e m a r o o n and gold. The two sides w e r e s c r e a m i n g and even banging o n t h e glass, like caged a n i m a l s trying t o escape o n t o t h e ice. T h e hockey g a m e had e n d e d in a tie a f t e r regulation and w a s n o w h e a d e d into a s h o o t out. The ice arena w a s packed with fans, primarily H o p e s t u d e n t s , all of w h o m had s e e m e d t o have f o r g o t t e n a b o u t t h e tragic loss in basketball just h o u r s ago. H e r e they all w e r e c h e e r i n g o n their hockey team, h a n g i n g o n t o every s e c o n d t h a t Ryan Kelly ('09) skated t o w a r d s t h e goal. Kelly m a d e his m o v e , fired t h e puck past t h e goalie a n d into t h e goal. T h e c r o w d e r u p t e d in cheers, banging o n t h e glass even louder. T h e hockey t e a m celebrated t o g e t h e r and t h e basketball loss f r o m earlier had n o w b e e n erased f r o m everyone's m e m o r y . H o p e College hockey may be a club s p o r t by n a m e , b u t this evening had every feeling of a big- t i m e varsity game. Club Sports C l u b s p o r t s eft H o p e a r e well k n o w n by those w h o participate, b u t m u c h of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y is u n a w a r e of their existence, or k n o w s little a b o u t t h e m . At H o p e club s p o r t s are run and organized with t h e college's s u p p o r t . W h i l e t h e m o s t wellk n o w n are t h e men's hockey t e a m and t h e men's and women's

lacrosse teams,

stay active in their sport. However, club sports are not an offshoot of t h e varsity p r o g r a m s . They fall u n d e r the umbrella of Student Development, m u c h like SAC or Greek Life. The school provides a budget to each team, but there are also m a n y outside costs t h a t are n o t covered u n d e r t h e budget. Similar to varsity s p o r t s , t h o u g h , each s p o r t h a s a national or regional governing b o d y of s o m e kind. In t h e s a m e way t h a t varsity c o a c h e s have national c o n v e n t i o n s to go over scheduling, rule changes, and general policy, these governing b o d i e s d o t h e s a m e for club s p o r t s . They also h o s t a c h a m p i o n s h i p t o u r n a m e n t at t h e end of each season, giving t h e players extra incentive t o p e r f o r m t h e i r best. Players in high school are even r e c r u i t e d to play these n o n varsity s p o r t s at H o p e College. Hockey coach Chris Van T i m m e r e n said h e h a s actively r e c r u i t e d m o s t of t h e 27 players on the team. "If you talked to t h e players o n t h e t e a m right now, you would get an answer f r o m e v e r y o n e of t h e m that hockey was a very big r e a s o n why t h e y c a m e to Hope," Van T i m m e r e n said. T h e r e have actually b e e n very f e w cases w h e r e players have decided t o go play varsity s o m e place else r a t h e r than c o m e play o n a club t e a m at H o p e . "I'm sure t h a t t h e r e have been players w h o a r e good e n o u g h t o play varsity t h a t may have said, 'you know, I would r a t h e r try m y angles with a varsity p r o g r a m b e f o r e I went to a non-varsity program,'" Van Timmeren said, "but I would say those cases are small."

t h e school also boasts a sailing c r e w and an ultimate frisbee s q u a d ? Club sports are not unique t o H o p e , however. Across the nation t h e r e are an e s t i m a t e d 2 million college s t u d e n t s participating in club sports compared to the 430,000 t h a t play o n a varsity athletic t e a m governed by t h e N C A A . O n e reason for t h e rise in club s p o r t s has been t h e increase in America's youth s p o r t s culture. Millions of high school s t u d e n t s across t h e c o u n t r y play o n first-rate travel t e a m s in high schools but fewer t h a n 5 p e r c e n t are able t o play a varsity s p o r t in college. Club s p o r t s b e c o m e a way for these s t u d e n t s with extensive knowledge and skill t o

V a n Timmeren reinforces t h e issue to t h e players he r e c r u i t s t h a t they need to c h o o s e H o p e not solely b e c a u s e of t h e hockey t e a m . "They need to k n o w t h a t the most important reason they're c o m i n g t o H o p e is t h e education," Van T i m m e r e n said. "If t h e y can play hockey as well, t h e n that's a bonus." Title IX While m a n y students who attended high school and college since 1972 have heard t h e words "Tide IX" before, m o s t could not tell you what it is, m u c h less h o w it has indirecdy i m p a c t e d their lives. Title IX was put into place

to help prevent t h e discrimination on the basis of sex in e d u c a t i o n programs receiving federal f u n d i n g . Since athletics are considered to be an i m p o r t a n t part of a schools e d u c a t i o n program, they fall u n d e r this law. In a c c o r d a n c e t o t h e law, t h e athletic interests and abilities of m a l e and female s t u d e n t s m u s t be equally and effectively a c c o m m o d a t e d . This includes looking at t h e selection of s p o r t s t h a t are offered as well as t h e level of c o m p e t i t i o n and o p p o r t u n i t y for each t e a m . Another key component to Title IX is that the u n d e r r e p r e s e n t e d sex o n a campuscannotbedisadvantaged. Also, schools are r e q u i r e d to r e s p o n d accordingly to t h e in te r e s ts of s t u d e n t s capable of intercollegiate c o m p e t i t i o n w h o belong t o t h e u n d e r r e p r e s e n t e d sex. At a glance it would s e e m that H o p e is breaking t h e rules of Title IX by delaying t h e hockey t e a m f r o m b e c o m i n g a varsity s p o r t . Hope's e n r o l l m e n t is roughly 6040, f e m a l e t o male; however, t h e football t e a m carries roughly 140 players, p u t t i n g t h e balance of male athletes to female athletes approximately 350 to 200. "If you w e r e t o take away t h e football program, it would make things fairly equal," men's athletic director Ray Smith said. "Any small school t h a t h a s a football t e a m is going t o have d i s p r o p o r t i o n a t e n u m b e r s of m e n t o women." Between all t h e fine p r i n t and regulations, t h o u g h , t h e school is m o v i n g t o w a r d s adding b o t h hockey and lacrosse to its list of varsity sports. "Last spring we had a meeting with all t h e athletic directors and presidents in t h e league and it was proposed that the M I A A begin league play in 2010 or 2011," Smith continued. "Six m o n t h s later things have changed. W i t h t h e e c o n o m y t h e way it is, that's not going to happen." Smith added that lacrosse has been put back on the table, but the start up cost for either lacrosse teams or hockey is roughly $250,000, a hefty chunk of change during an economic crunch. "All of a sudden what seemed plausible last spring seems almost impossible right now," Smith said. Lacrosse It would s e e m in s o m e ways that lacrosse is o n t h e fast track t o b e c o m i n g a varsity sport, s o m e t h i n g that b o t h c o a c h e s are eager for. For t h e w o m e n , it would m e a n t h e addition of a head coach, s o m e t h i n g t h a t acting-coach and president

Feb. 4

vs. R o c h e s t e r 7 : 3 0 p . m .

Saturday Men's basketball

Club sports look to move up to varsity status, but finances and laws may stand in the way Karen Patterson

11

Feb. 7

vs. K a l a m a z o o 3 p . m .

Hockey GRAPHICS BY GWEN MACIVER

vs. Davenport 9 : 1 0 p.m.

Wednesday Women's Basketball

Feb. 1 1

vs. Trine 7 : 3 0 p . m .

Saturday Feb. 1 4 Women's Basketball vs. A d r i a n 3 p . m .

Tracy B e n j a m i n ('09) would love to see h a p p e n . " W o m e n ' s lacrosse is really in a t r a n s i t i o n stage right now. W e don't have a coach and we've never had one, so being varsity would be great b e c a u s e it would be t h e school's responsibility to find a coach and t a k e care of all t h e details," B e n j a m i n said. W i t h n o head coach for t h e w o m e n , B e n j a m i n acts as t h e president for t h e w o m e n ' s team, serving as a liaison t o t h e school, acting in a similar m a n n e r as t h e Pull representatives or Nykerk Chair do. "Coaches a t t e n d c o n v e n t i o n s a n d learn n e w skills and drills. Also, it's hard being t h e president b e c a u s e 1 have to plan a n d r u n practices b u t I'm also a player," B e n j a m i n said. For t h e m e n , b e c o m i n g varsity would help t o s t r e n g t h e n the program. " W e o p e r a t e u n d e r a virtual varsity system right n o w w h e r e we abide by all t h e N C A A rules, b o t h in and out of season," head men's lacrosse coach Mike Schanhals said. Within the MLCA are both Division 11 schools as well as Division III. If the men's team were to have N C A A Division III status, the largest impact would be on the teams played. "The competitive aspect would be similar to the top teams in our conference now, but we wouldn't hdvte to play schools that can offer scholarships anymore," Schanhals said. Another perk to both teams would be the cutback on personal costs to the players. Each m e m b e r of the teams has to pay dues (roughly $600 for the men and $60 for the women), as well as equipment costs, which can run all the way up to $500. W h e r e d o we go f r o m here? All in all, both lacrosse teams as well as the hockey team are eager to gain varsity status. While there are some bumps that need to be smoothed out—Tide IX regulations and funding—the school is working hard to try and meet the student body's interests and needs. " W h e n you have kids on campus that want to play right now, two years seems like a long time," Smith concluded. "But we'd rather wait and do this the right way than rush into something."

IN BRIEF S M I T H TO RETIRE

Ray Smith a n n o u n c e d Jan. 22 t h a t h e will be retiring as t h e men's athletic director at the e n d of t h e c u r r e n t school year. Smith first c a m e to H o p e in 1970 as t h e football coach and has s p e n t his t i m e at t h e school b o t h coaching, teaching and serving at t h e men's athletic director. H e has earned numerous awards and recognitions in his t i m e at H o p e , including being i n d u c t e d to t h e College Football Hall of Fame.

MEN'S BASKETBALL MOVES FORWARD The Flying D u t c h m e n have put together an impressive w i n streak, winning t h r e e g a m e s in t h e last two weeks. Victories over Adrian, Trine, and Olivet have kept t h e t e a m at t h e t o p of t h e race for t h e M I A A with rival Calvin. Jesse Reimink ('09) led t h e t e a m with a total of 65 points over t h e t h r e e g a m e s . H e h a s led t h e Flying D u t c h m e n in scoring for 19 straight games. The t e a m will battle for t h e t o p spot in t h e M I A A at and against rival Calvin College o n W e d n e s d a y Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m.

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL REMAINS STRONG The Flying Dutch have p o w e r e d ahead t o take hold of sole possession of t h e M I A A conference rankings after toppling St. Mary's. T h e 84-59 win marked the 41st consecutive victory at DeVos Fieldhouse. O v e r t h e last four games, Carrie Snikkers ( 1 1 ) has led t h e team, scoring 62 points.

MIAA PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Carrie Snikkers ('11) is being h o n o r e d this week by t h e M I A A as t h e Player of the Week. Snikkers scored 31 points in two g a m e s last week to help t h e Flying D u t c h claim two victories and t h e top spot in t h e M I A A standings. This is her s e c o n d t i m e being h o n o r e d this season.


12

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

FEBRUARY 4 , 2 0 0 9

SWIMMING & DIVING

Teams aim for the top as busy season concludes Kat Mojzak

Valley. The highlight had t o be s w i m m i n g in Calvin's just finished pool, w h i c h is part of The H o p e men's and w o m e n ' s t h e n e w 360,000 square foot s w i m m i n g and diving t e a m s have had a busy two weeks. It Spoelhof Field h o u s e . " S w i m m i n g at Calvin's n e w started with t h e back-to-back p o o l w a s great! dual m e e t s versus It's got p r e t t y Grand Valley mucheverything a n d rival Calvin We're going to have you look for in a College, a n d then to be able to swim fast pool, and 1 the h o m e meet think that was versus Olivet took fast back-to-back-toreflected p r e t t y place o n Saturday. back days. well in our times This busy - M A T T ROSE ( ' 1 0 ) o n Saturday. It's s c h e d u l e is good preparation for 5 5 fitting of c o u r s e for Calvin t o t h e league m e e t , hold their first dual m e e t in t h e w h i c h is t h r e e days of prelims n e w p o o l against us a n d I'm glad and finals. we were t h e o n e s t o 'break it in,'" "In o r d e r to succeed at t h e Rose said. end of t h e season we're going Unfortunately, the Flying t o have t o be able to s w i m fast D u t c h didn't fare as well going 1back-to-back-to-back days. 2 in this t h r e e m e e t r u n . Taking a This past w e e k e n d gave c o a c h e s h e a r t b r e a k i n g loss to m a i n rival a n d captains a lot of c o n f i d e n c e that it is possible for everyone," for t h e M I A A title, Calvin. "It was a b u m m e r to lose t h e ' c a p t a i n M a t t Rose ('10) said. meet, but o u r t e a m h a n d l e d it The Flying D u t c h m e n c a m e really well." c a p t a i n Brittaney o u t this series of m e e t s 2-1; Reest-Delo ('09) said. "Overall, losing t o division 2 t e a m . G r a n d GRAPHICS EDITOR

we had a lot of great swims and dives, and w e had a lot of f u n competing." Both t h e m e n and the w o m e n are n o w focusing their a t t e n t i o n o n t h e rest of t h e season. " O u r m a i n goal for t h e rest of t h e season is to give it all we've got a n d to have a ton of f u n while doing it. The m o s t i m p o r t a n t thing is t h e team, and as long as we are s u p p o r t i n g each o t h e r and doing w h a t we love, we will have had a successful season," Reest-Delo said. The m e n are c o m i n g into t h e league m e e t as t h e M I A A c h a m p i o n s and are ready to d e f e n d t h a t title. "For t h e m o s t p a r t t h e t e a m h a s been right o n track t h e last c o u p l e of weeks, a n d I wouldn't be s u r p r i s e d at all t o see a few school records a n d MIAA records fall at t h e league meet," Rose said. The MIAA Championship m e e t will t a k e place Feb. 19-21 h o s t e d by Saint Mary's at N o t r e Dame.

The Scorebox Flying D u t c h m e n : Grand Valley 148.5 H o p e 171

Flying Dutch G r a n d Valley 156.5 Calvin 173 H o p e 168

These long Holland winters c a n get a n n o y i n g , b u t t h e y d o not distract the UnderArmour clad r u n n e r s . It is j u s t an i n t e n s i t y b o o s t e r for t h e m . W h e t h e r it is on. s n o w covered streets and sidewalks for the distance runners, the t i g h t c o n f i n e s of t h e D o w for t h e t h r o w e r s , or a c o m b i n a t i o n of t h e Dow, D e v o s , c l e a r e d s t r e e t s and t h e t e n n i s c e n t e r for t h e s p r i n t e r s a n d j u m p e r s , t h e Flying D u t c h t r a c k a n d field t e a m s a r e finding a way to train. " W e l e a r n t o be flexible with r e g a r d s to facilities," said Jeff M i n k u s ('10), c o - c a p t a i n a n d jumper. M i n k u s n o t e d his t e a m m a t e ' s p a t i e n c e as key t o d e a l i n g w i t h t h e c a l a m i t i e s of winter. T h e y are too focused on preparing f o r their t w o c o n f e r e n c e m e e t s in April a n d M a y to c a r e a b o u t t h e slushy s n o w and facef r e e z i n g w i n d s of winter. "We normally just train

o u t s i d e with l o n g r u n s and hill -repeats," d i s t a n c e c a p t a i n Sarah M u l t e r ('09) said. " W e h a v e also s t a r t e d d o i n g p i y o ( m e t r i c s ) in t h e g y m t o c h a n g e t h i n g s u p once a week. We train right n o w in o r d e r t o build u p a b a s e t h a t will t r a n s f e r t o t h e o u t d o o r season." Until t h e i r official N C A A t r a c k and field s e a s o n s t a r t s , the team continues to monitor t h e i r level of r e a d i n e s s with f o u r i n d o o r invitationals d u r i n g t h e winter. " W e use t h e i n d o o r m e e t s a s an i n t e n s e w o r k o u t a n d t o h e l p u s a d j u s t to c o m p e t i t i o n situations," M i n k u s said. "Every o p p o r t u n i t y t o c o m p e t e is going t o h e l p us, so w e value t h e opportunities and experiences t h a t t h e s e i n d o o r m e e t s give us." If last S a t u r d a y ' s e x p e r i e n c e at t h e i r first i n d o o r i n v i t a t i o n a l w a s any f o r e s h a d o w i n g of t h e c o m i n g s e a s o n , Calvin n e e d s t o t a k e note. W i t h j u s t a p a r t i a l t e a m of s p r i n t e r s a n d j u m p e r s , H o p e t o o k t h i r d in t h e 1 7 - t e a m Ted M e t z g e r Invitational held

at C a r t h a g e College. M a n y of t h e c o m p e t i n g t e a m s had b e e n p r a c t i c i n g for a m o n t h l o n g e r t h a n t h e Flying D u t c h a n d had even c o m p e t e d in m u l t i p l e meets. That did n o t m a t t e r especially to sprinting co-captain Nora K u i p e r ('09). Kuiper b r o k e t h e m e e t "record in t h e 5 5 m with a t i m e of 7.13 s e c o n d s and w o n t h e 2 0 0 m . N o b o d y c a m e close t o Kuiper's p e r f o r m a n c e . Her preliminary 55m time would h a v e even b e a t e n t h e s e c o n d place finisher. Her t i m e w a s also t h e s e c o n d fastest for a Division III a t h l e t e in 2009. "No one can overlook Nora Kuiper's p e r f o r m a n c e , " said s p r i n t e r C h a z S h e l t o n ('09). "She w a s absolutely stellar, a n d I have n e v e r s e e n her s t a r t a s e a s o n so strong." O t h e r notable performances i n c l u d e d James Colten's ('11) p e r s o n a l r e c o r d at 13 feet in t h e pole vault, Nick Rinck's ('11) s e c o n d place finish in t h e 5 5 m h u r d l e s , a n d Jeff M i n k u s ' s e c o n d place finish in t h e triple jump.

Hope 77.5

H o p e 127 Olivet 125

:

First indoor meet shows promise GUEST W R I T E R

Calvin 95

H o p e 159 Olivet 129

T R A C K & FIELD -

Colton Wright

Hope 76.5

PHOTO BY ALISON GARZA

L O V I N G IT— Track d i s t a n c e runners (L t o R) Carl Dunker ('11), Nate Love ('12), Lucas W o l t h u l s ('10), Susan Savasky ('11) and Sarah M u l t e r ('09) push t h r o u g h t h e cold w i t h smiles on t he ir faces in p r e p a r a t i o n for u p c o m i n g meets.

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