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HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

"SPERA I N DEO'

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Disaster through digital photos

Secondhand styiing

Committed to service

"Solid State," a statement on culture, is the newest DePree exhibit by Calla Thompson.

Recycled style offers thrifty originality.

Hope's highly qualified and dedicated trainers stand out in their field.

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The bottom line

What do you think of Hope's new website?

HEI helps Hope students turn business ideas into reality Allison Barnes GUEST WRITER

The frosty weather did n o t stop the crowds f r o m attending the student-led seminar, "Entrepreneurial Leaders and Student Start-Up C o m p a n i e s at Hope", where students showcased the H o p e E n t r e p r e n e u r s h i p Initiative a n d their blossoming c o m p a n i e s on Saturday. HEI is led by Dr. Steven Vanderveen, director of the Center for Faithful Leadership at H o p e College a n d professor of m a n a g e m e n t . HEI fosters new ideas, creativity a n d the approach for a successful entrepreneurship. Vanderveen described the p r o g r a m by encouraging the audience to "imagine an education where you are at the center, the e d u c a t i o n is created a r o u n d you, and you are able t o p u r s u e y o u r own ideas." This was exemplified t h r o u g h the seminar's content— Hope's own student e n t r e p r e n e u r i s m .

The seminar and discussion w a s led by M a t t Rutter ('12) , w h o showcased his project, M i c r o W M I . o r g , a "web-based fundraising collaboration of West Michigan non-profits." "The H o p e E n t r e p r e n e u r s h i p Initiative allows student e n t r e p r e n e u r s to gain real world experience and develop a wide range of skills," Rutter said. "This is i m p o r t a n t because e n t r e p r e n e u r s change the way people think and act. Therefore, when Christians create businesses t o glorify the Lord, we get to p u r s u e a calling t o serve in God's redemptive work on earth." T h e s t u d e n t showcase w a s c o m p o s e d of Sam Wolffis ('12), Colleen Quick ('14), Kylen Blom ('12), A m y Hattori ('13) and Ziye Liu ('12). Wolffis is t h e f o u n d e r of T h u m b s U p Creations, which creates h o m e m a d e wool m i t t e n s recycled by old wool sweaters. Wolffis began making m i t t e n s as C h r i s t m a s gifts and it has

evolved into a growing company. Wolffis sells her creations online, in select stores, and t h r o u g h family and friends. T h u m b s U p Creations a n d Wolffis have b e e n featured in the N e w York Times. Q u i c k spoke a b o u t her nonprofit business, H o p e Grows, which teaches o r p h a n a g e s in Juarez, Mexico how to grow their own food t h r o u g h setting up sustainable gardens and teaches valuable life skills. Quick said, "Hope. Entrepreneurship Initiative helped m o v e m y idea for the kids into a reality." Twelve H o p e s t u d e n t s will be traveling t o Juarez, Mexico with H o p e G r o w s over s p r i n g break. Blom added, "Hope Entrepreneurship Initiative has b e e n super supportive (of his c o m p a n y My G r e a t Lake) a n d given m e a good network to get people involved a b o u t w h a t is going on." Blom's My Great Lake is a clothing c o m p a n y focused on c a p t u r i n g SEE

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It looks really nice. It's m o r e colorful than the old website, it looks m o r e inviting. —JENNIFER YERKS ( " 1 4 )

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66 It w a s about time, it looked very old and outdated. —JON HAYDEN ( ' 1 4 )

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Sacrificing sleep to serve others Blake Soulet GUEST W R I T E R

W o u l d you wake u p at 1:30 a.m. on a weekday t o walk O t t a w a County's frigid streets? If you're like me, you probably haven't even gone t o bed yet, b u t that's w h a t professor Melissa Villarreal and professor Pamela Koch from the Sociology D e p a r t m e n t , along with 20 H o p e students did Jan. 25 f r o m 2 a.m.-5 a.m. The event w a s the Pointin-Time homeless count, which the Sociology/Social W o r k Organization assists t h e C o m m u n i t y Action House with every year. Justin W a r r e n (13) has participated in the event the past three years, and this year he was o n e of the student leaders w h o helped r u n it. "I participate in the homeless c o u n t every year because it is really i m p o r t a n t to m e that the county be aware that t h e r e are indeed homeless people living not m o r e than a few blocks away f r o m H o p e College." Each year, counties in Michigan and across the nation W H A T ' S INSIDE

c o u n t homeless p o p u l a t i o n s in the "Point-in-Time" h o m e l e s s count. The Department of Housing and Urban Development collects that data, and uses the i n f o r m a t i o n to d e t e r m i n e how to distribute resources t o the county.

66 . . .It is really important to me that the county be aware that there are indeed homeless people living not more than a few blocks away from Hope College. —JUSTIN WARREN

99 Villarreal, w h o led the event, said the c o u n t h a p p e n s every year at the e n d of January, and that t h e r e are three types of c o u n t s c o n d u c t e d . O n e in t h e shelters, another in the health agencies like C o m m u n i t y of Mental Health, and the final o n e in the middle of the night.

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T h e last c o u n t takes place in the middle of the night b e c a u s e it's w h e n the homeless people are starting to settle down for t h e night, Villarreal said. "It w a s totally w o r t h waking u p at 2 a.m. and participating in the c o u n t because w e are helping o t h e r s a n d taking part in s o m e t h i n g that is far greater than ourselves or o n e night of sleep," W a r r e n said. W a r r e n said it w a s really i m p o r t a n t for him to advocate a n d bring awareness to an issue that n e e d s to b e addressed in t h e H o p e College c o m m u n i t y . W a r r e n said it was great participate in the event and that h e would d o it every m o r n i n g if h e could help s o m e o n e be able t o have the same life that he was blessed t o have received. W e can all learn f r o m the selflessness that professors Villarreal and Koch and everyone else that w a s involved that m o r n i n g displayed, and be t h a n k f u l that each of us is f o r t u n a t e t o have the life that we have.

It's m o r e m o d e m and it's m o r e userfriendly. —KATIE MARTIN ( ' 1 3 )

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66 It looks m o r e practical and m o r e up to date w i t h division one colleges. —KELLY LEPLEY ( ' 1 3 )

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Programs dedicated to diversifying Hope

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Friday Feb. 3 Annual Concerto/Aria Concert Four Hope music students. Caitlin McDougall ('12). Eve Panning ('15), Brent S m i t h ('12) a n d Nicholas VanderLaan ('13) will join the Hope College Orchestra at 7:30 in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel.

Claire Call CAMPUS CO-EDITOR

GR Opera features Hope students Three Hope vocal performance students. Katrina Baker ('15). Heather Benson ("12). and Jenna Buck ('12) are to be featured In the opera's production of T h e Magic Flute." Feb. 3 and 4 at 7 : 3 0 in the Devos Perform a n c e Hall in Grand Rapids.

Saturday Feb. 4 Hope to Host Intercollegiate Honors Band Concert

PHOTO BY ALEESA R I B B E N S

E A R L Y R I S E R S — A group of dedicated Hope students who woke up at 2 a.m. t o participate in the homeless count, sponsored by the Social Work Department.

Students f r o m several colleges and universities, including Hope, will p e r f o r m together in a concert by the Michigan Intercollegiate College Band at 7:00 in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel.

Robert Glasperto perform Feb. 4 at Knick The group has worked with the likes of Lupe Fiasco, Mos Def, Kanye West, and Beyonce. Glasper's musical style is described as mixture of both jazz and hip-hop. The group American Hybrid, featuring guitar player and 2011 H o p e graduate Nate Robert will open for Glasper.

The Hope College Concert Series will host musician Robert Glasper in his show "The Robert Glasper Experiment'Teb. 4 at the Knickerbocker Theatre. The performance will feature Glasper and other accomplished musicians known in the recording industry for their creativity and musicianship.

Tickets are $12 for the general public and $5 for Hope students and are now available at tickets. hope.edu/ticketing and at the ticket office in DeVos Fieldhouse. So far this year, the concert series has hosted artists such as S. Carey, Brooke Waggoner and Mat Kearney.

LOOKING FOR A ATMOSPHERE? O N E LUCKY GUEST W I L L HAVE A CHANCE TO W I N A N AUTHENTIC DETROIT TEAM FOOTBALL JERSEY D U R I N G THE BIG G A M E ! ' S E C O N D PRIZE: S P O R T S - T H E M E D P R E M I U M R E C Y C L I N G B I N FILLED W I T H B U F F A L O W I L D W I N G S M E R C H A N D I S E • A N D M O R E C O U R T E S Y OF C A S C A D E E N G I N E E R I N G

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• BUSINESS, f r o m page 1 the memories of the great lakes through their clothing, with some of their proceeds going towards the Alliance for the Great Lakes. Kyle Blom will be presenting My G r e a T l a k e at 5 by 5, a presentation event with a potential to win $5,000. Hattori and Liu finished the seminar with their presentation

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the Hope Entrepreneurial Initiative. Liu said, "I never thought I would start a business like this." Hattori remarked, "Class with Dr. Vanderveen has been very helpful and he has been a great mentor to us at TWAH." Attendee Amanda Porter ('15) commented, "It is an awesome thing that we get to

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connections" said Charles Green, director of the Phelps Scholars program. Phelps Scholars "provides an intensive experience in diversity" for those who are interested. Green said. This is accomplished by recruiting students from every background, by inviting any student on campus to their events, and by sponsoring campus-wide events. The program started with 39 students in 1999 and has grown to 91 students involved this year. In part because of this program, Hope is one of the few schools in the nation where minority students graduate at the same or higher percentage rate than white students. The Phelps Scholars Program is not the only program dedicated to diversifying our school. The Office of Multicultural Education and clubs such as Black Student S E E DIVERSITY, P A G E 10

PHOTO BY A N N M A R I E P A P A R E U I

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As Hope College upperclassmen may remember, it was around this time last year that Hope was forced to seriously reconsider attention that should be given to issues of diversity on our campus. After the posting of a racist flyer, students came together in events such as Stand Up to protest instances of racial insensitivity and aggression. Although hopefully H o p e s environment has changed for the better, it is important to remember the progress that has been made, not just over this one year, but over the past 30 years. Programs like Phelps Scholars, a unique multicultural program, have had much to do with this long-term progress. The Phelps Scholars Program was established "to give a place for students interested in diversity a way to make

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on T W A H (Today 1 Wore at Hope) a community-based blog that encourages an outgoing, interactive approach with its viewers. The blog showcases a collection of daily photos of Hope College students and faculty. Hattori and Liu hope this blog encourages positivity and creates connections within the Hope community. The seminar closed with an open round of questions and many positive remarks about

see everyday— there are so many facets of Hope College.' For additional information on these upcoming companies, visit the following: www.microwmi.org http://thumbsupcreations. com/ www.mygreatlakeonline. com or on Facebook http://today iworeathope. com/ or on Facebook


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State of the Union address 2012 Hope College Democrats and Republicans share reactions to President Obama's annual speech Chris Russ C o

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"Last m o n t h , 1 went to Andrews Air Force Base and welcomed h o m e some of our last troops to serve in Iraq. Together, we offered a final, proud salute to the colors u n d e r which m o r e than a million of our fellow citizens fought, and several thousand gave their lives." That was how President Barack O b a m a o p e n e d his 2012 State of the Union address, which he delivered on Jan. 24. That o p e n i n g tribute to American soldiers was shortly followed by a reference to the assassination of O s a m a bin Laden, a reference that was followed by a loud r o u n d of applause. From there the speech moved on to traditional talking points like the nation's energy plan, the state of the economy, healthcare, government reform and calls for bipartisan unity. "We can either settle for a c o u n t r y w h e r e a shrinking n u m b e r of people do really well, while a growing n u m b e r of Americans barely get by. O r we can restore an economy w h e r e everyone gets a fair shot, and everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same set of rules.

cans, reacted to the speech: "President O b a m a did what I expected him to do, he gave a campaign speech. President Obama's speech was not filled with his administration's accomplishments over the past year, or even the past three years. "There's a very simple reason for this," Elzinga said; "The past year exhibited a failure of presidential leadership and the past three years have b e e n filled with unpopular policy solutions f r o m the O b a m a W h i t e House... The president did not provide a state of the union, merely what he h o p e d its state would be in the next year." Lee M a r c u s (12), president of the Hope College D e m o I/ TJ 'I' 1M *1 'J-'il lliill crats, responded differently to the president's message: "I thought the President gave the State of the Union address with the proper urgency for action and bi-partisan t h e m e that was the reason I voted for him in the first place. "In a time where the partisan divide is continuing to deepen, he talked about what we all hoped he would and that was unity," M a r c u s said. "In some ways it was a rehash of Lincoln's a divided h o u s e can, not stand' speech, but the message was very appropriate for P H O T O COURTESY OF THE ASSOCIATED P R E S S this time and circumstance." A D D R E S S I N G T H E N A T I O N - - President Obama makes the rounds prior to his Jan. 2 4 State of t h e Union address. A m o n g the topics discussed was college affordablllty. the c o u n t r y tuned in for the speech. A m o n g them was a g r o u p of H o p e College stud e n t s w h o viewed the event at a State of the Union watch party in the Kletz. The event was or-

"What's at stake aren't Democratic values or Republican values, but Americ a n values. We have to reclaim them," O b a m a said. Millions of people across

ganized by m e m b e r s of H o p e College D e m o c r a t s a n d H o p e College Republicans groups. Stewart Elzinga ('12), w h o serves as president of the H o p e College Republi-

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EU imposes 'unprecedented' oil embargo on Iran Shubham Sapkota W O R L D CO-EDITOR

The European Union has agreed on the imposition of an indefinite ban on oil purchases f r o m Iran, making another attempt to halt Iran's nuclear program. This "unprecedented" ban, as stated by the Europ e a n Union foreign minister, is an effort to deal with the nuclear p r o g r a m controversy in Tehran via sanctions in place of any military actions. It is going to take time to see if this new sanction, along with all the o t h e r criticism that Iran has faced in the past several years, will cause anything to change. Following this decision m a d e by the European Union, Iran has yet to make any official reaction but has called the embargo a "mere propaganda gesture." British Prime Minister David C a m e r o n , French President Nicolas Sarkozy a n d G e r m a n Chancellor Angela Merkel have released a joint s t a t e m e n t criticizing Iran for having "failed to restore international confidence in the exclusively peaceful nature of its nuclear program." Furthermore, they have m a d e their stance on Iran's nuclear

program clear by saying that they shall not accept Iran developing nuclear w e a p o n s at all. The meeting, held on Jan. 23, c o n t i n u e d to c o n d e m n Iran a n d t h e nation's inability to be considerate of international obligations, as they are continuously threatening military

66 Iran h a s called the embargo a "mere propaganda gesture."

99 violence in t h e Middle-East. As the tension between Iran and the international community continues, the International Atomic Energy Agency has stated that it will send its nuclear watchdog t e a m into Tehran to try and settle any "substantive issues." Reports f r o m the IAEA from N o v e m b e r have s h o w n that Iran has carried out tests that are very relevant to the development of nuclear devices. However, officials in Iran have continued to insist that the nuclear program is solely for energy p u r p o s e s .

W h i l e oil i m p o r t s have b e e n blocked f r o m Europe, this decision will not stop t h e flow of oil into Asia. The m a i n destinations of Iran's oil exports have been China with 20 percent of exports, Japan with 17 percent, India with 16 percent, a n d South Korea with 9 percent. The biggest i m p o r t rate in Europe was Italy with only 10 percent. Political leaders f r o m a r o u n d the world have said that sanctions are the best way to avoid a military strike against Iran. O n e of the possible countries that could trigger military action against Iran is Israel. Their p r i m e minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has welcomed this sanction and said that it is "a step in the right direction." W h i l e most of the European nations agree with Israel, Russia has reacted to this decision with a great deal of skepticism. Moscow insists that this kind of pressure will not deter Iran and has refused to join in the sanctions.

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N E W E C O N O M I C S A N C T I O N S - On Jan. 2 3 , Euro pean foreign m i n i s t e r s m e t In Brussels to discuss and agree upon new economic s a n c t i o n s agalns Iran because of Its nuclear program. EU f o r e i g n policy chief Catherine Ashton spoke d u r i n g a media conference a f t e r the m e e t i n g .


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THE ANCHOR

THE NEWS IN QUOTES

" T h e v e r y c o r e of w h a t this c o u n t r y stands for is o n t h e line... The b a s i c p r o m i s e of n o m a t t e r w h o y o u are, w h e r e y o u c o m e f r o m , t h i s is a place t h a t y o u c a n m a k e it if y o u try. That's a t s t a k e in t h i s election." - President Barack O b a m a , s p e a k i n g at a c a m p a i g n s t o p at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Illinois a t C h i c a g o o n Jan. 11.

" R o m n e y is t h e clear favorite, a n d you'd h a v e to conclude h e even has a s h o t to w i n 50 p e r c e n t of t h e G O P vote... H i s m e d i a s a t u r a t i o n of t h e F l o r i d a a i r w a y s is clearly h a v i n g a n i m p a c t , and... h e is s t a y i n g o n m e s s a g e by talking a b o u t s p e n d ing a n d d e f i c i t s - t w o issues G O P v o t e r s c a r e about." - Voter Survey Service President Jim L e e o n t h e o u t l o o k f o r t h e Jan. 31 Florida presidential primary.

" W e feel t h a t c o d i f y ing (the N D A A ) into law is d e t r i m e n t a l to t h e f u t u r e of o u r c o u n t r y , a n d it g o e s a g a i n s t o u r C o n s t i t u t i o n . (People) are s u p p o r t i n g O b a m a for re-election, a n d the candidate they support basically s i g n e d away... habeas corpus, and I feel a lot of p e o p l e s u p port their Democratic or Republican candidate blindly, b e c a u s e t h e y a r e a m e m b e r of t h e p a r t y t h a t t h e y s u b s c r i b e to." M i c a h P h i l b r o o k , m e m b e r of t h e O c c u p y Chicago press relations committee, on President Barack O b a m a signing the National Defense Authorization Act, w h i c h m a k e s it l e g a l f o r t h e U.S. g o v e r n m e n t to indefinitely detain w i t h o u t c h a r g e o r call f o r trial anyone, including a U S . citizen, w h o is a s u s p e c t e d t e r r o r i s t .

"I h a v e s i g n e d t h i s bill despite having serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogat i o n a n d p r o s e c u t i o n of suspected terrorists... Moreover, I want to clarify that m y administ r a t i o n will n o t a u t h o r i z e the indefinite military d e t e n t i o n w i t h o u t trial of A m e r i c a n citizens." - President Barack O b a m a r e s p o n d i n g t o c r i t i c i s m of h i s s i g n i n g of t h e N D A A .

"In t h e m o d e r n w o r l d , stability is a n a s s e t w h i c h can only b e e a r n e d by hard work, by showing openness to change and r e a d i n e s s for t h o u g h t out, calculated reforms." - P r e s i d e n t V l a d i m i r P u t i n of R u s s i a , w r i t i n g in t h e p r o - g o v e r n m e n t daily I z v e s t i a o n Jan. 16.

Bird flu research halted M e g a n Stevens STAFF WRITER

The BBC r e p o r t s that research into bird flu has been temporarily halted following the d e v e l o p m e n t of a stronger strain of the virus. A g o v e r n m e n t advisory panel, a m o n g other groups, has expressed fears that the altered strain might fall into the h a n d s of bioterrorists. This n e w " H S N l " strain of avian influenza, or bird flu, w a s developed d u r i n g a joint study c o n d u c t e d by the University of W i s c o n s i n - M a d i s o n a n d Erasm u s University in the N e t h erlands. A n i m a l testing has proved that this version of the virus passes m o r e easily f r o m animal t o animal. The scientists c o n d u c t i n g the research att e m p t e d to publish their work a n d f o u n d t w o takers, b u t the U.S. g o v e r n m e n t intervened. Specifically, the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity in Bethesda, M. w a n t s to censor publication of t h e research involved and release the full d o c u m e n t s only t o c o u n t r i e s in which bird flu could be particularly deadly. "Not e v e r y o n e n e e d s t o k n o w h o w to m a k e a lethal virus," o n e health official said. The World Health O r g a n i z a tion, on the other hand, claims that this would " h a r m an agreem e n t b e t w e e n its members," according to the BBC, t h o u g h w h i c h a g r e e m e n t and which m e m b e r s the W H O m e a n t were n o t specified. It is w o r t h

noting that the NSABB c a n n o t forcibly censor the research. Both sets of scientists involved have released a s t a t e m e n t to N a t u r e and Science magazines. According to this statem e n t , they have agreed to stop research on this m o r e deadly strain for 60 days, but will continue to assess the risk that this strain could develop on its own in nature. This is an entirely plausible event, as a new strain of the virus w a s discovered in C h i n a and V i e t n a m this past August. T h e scientists' s t a t e m e n t also a t t e m p t e d t o assuage fears of the virus being released t h r o u g h h u m a n error. " W e would like t o assure the public that these exp e r i m e n t s have b e e n c o n d u c t e d with appropriate regulatory oversight... t o m i n i m i z e any risk of accidental release," they wrote. Since 2003 t h e r e have been 565 r e p o r t e d cases of h u m a n s contracting bird flu, m a n y in S o u t h e a s t Asia, w h e r e h u m a n s and birds are in close contact. 331 of t h e h u m a n cases resulted in death. By 2006 t h e r e had been m o r e t h a n 4,000 outbreaks of bird flu a r o u n d the world. According to the CDC's website, they have also researched bird flu using animal models, a n d w o r k e d with t h e W H O and the National Institutes of Health to m a k e a vaccine. Like the vaccine for c o m m o n influenza, however, the bird flu vaccine w a s based on scientists' b e s t guess of which strain

would

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Earthquake relapse? A perspective on Japan's future Samantha Poon GUEST WRITER

M a r c h 11, 2011. 2:46 p m . A m o m e n t that changed the lives of t h o u s a n d s of Japanese forever. A 9.0 e a r t h q u a k e hit Japan 70 kilometers off Tohoku. As s c r e a m i n g people ran into the streets and trembling buildings t u m b l e d down, a roaring t s u n a m i rushed inland, washing over the d e c i m a t e d country, wave a f t e r wave. O v e r 100,000 children were displaced f r o m their h o m e s . Over 15,000 people have b e e n r e p o r t e d dead. O v e r 900 have died f r o m harsh conditions following this disaster. However, arguably the largest disaster of all was t h e m e l t d o w n of the nuclear p o w e r p l a n t in Fukushima. The m a g n i t u d e of this nuclear crisis is challenged only by the Chernobyl incident in 1986. Media coverage relayed vastly u n d e r e s t i m a t e d levels of c o n t a m i n a t i o n as the Japanese government remained tight-lipped a b o u t the increasingly dangerous situation. As a result, anti-nuclear sent i m e n t has increased worldwide. Nuclear power, generated by nuclear fission, is extensively used by 31 countries. This nuclear episode has sparked the need for countries t o reexamine their nuclear assets. C h i n a , the world's fast-

est growing nuclear market, s u s p e n d e d plans for n u clear reactor construction. Germany has vowed to discontinue all 17 of its nuclear reactors by 2022. A previously valuable energy source is now seen as a taboo. In the midst of this calamity, the University of Tokoyo predicts that "there (is) a 75 percent probability that a m a g n i t u d e seven e a r t h q u a k e will strike the region in the next 4 years." A growing n u m b e r of t r e m ors signal t h e onset of a p o tentially large earthquake. According t o the university, "there has b e e n a fivefold increased of quakes in the Tokoyo metropolitan area since the March disaster." T h e BBC r e p o r t s that "the government says that the chances of such an event is 70 p e r c e n t in the next 30 years." This discrepancy m i r r o r s a similar discrepancy of statistics with nuclear radiation in the waters s u r r o u n d i n g Fukushima. The Japanese g o v e r n m e n t has been notorious for redtape p r o c e d u r e s that have h a m p e r e d foreign aid and the recovery a n d r e c o n s t r u c t i o n process. It is imperative that action is t a k e n t o begin the rehabilitation process for Japan. If a n o t h e r e a r t h q u a k e hits, t h e c o u n t r y m u s t be ready.

predominate.

Leaner future for U.S. military Cory Lakatos W O R L D CO-EDITOR

tary b r a n c h e s slighdy higher t h a n w h a t they were just before Sept. 11, 2001. O n the other h a n d . Special O p e r a t i o n s Forces like the Navy SEALs will be b o o s t e d a n d the U.S. will c o n t i n u e to p u r c h a s e F-35 stealth fighter jets, t h o u g h

T h e p u s h toward cutting gove r n m e n t spending has resulted in a new vision for the largest fighting force in the world. • O n Jan. 26, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta a n n o u n c e d a n e w budget plan that will cut half a trillion dollars in military s p e n d i n g increase over the next 10 years. Ass u m i n g that C o n g r e s s approves it, the plan would go into effect in October. According t o C N N , Panetta's plan is in accordance with Congress's m a n d a t e t o r e d u c e the Pentagon's spending by $487 billion in the next 10 years. Panetta said that he would request a b u d get that is $33 billion smaller t h a n the 2012 budget. In addition, the A r m y a n d M a r i n e s will be reduced by nearly 100,000 m e m b e r s , creating what Panetta called a "smaller, leaner" a n d "agile and flexible" military. M A I N T A I N I N G S E A P O W E R Specifically, in t h e next t a r y Leon Panetta spoke t o crew five years 92,000 active d u t y t h e nation's o l d e s t a i r c r a f t carrier soldiers will b e c u t and a not in such high quantities. n u m b e r of military bases closed. Of the four A r m y brigades The Army will eventustationed at p e r m a n e n t bases in ally b e reduced f r o m 556,000 Europe, two will be sent back t o active soldiers to 490,000, bases in the United States. The with the Marines shrinkNavy will be investing in new ing f r o m 200,000 to 182,000. ships with u p - t o - d a t e ballistic Overall, this will p u t the missile defense technology and s t r e n g t h s of these two mili-

n o w minimal, a greater e m p h a sis will be placed on the n a tion's military presence in Asia. The a d j u s t m e n t s c o m e alongside a shrinking budget for the U.S. g o v e r n m e n t : the total budget for the fiscal year of 2013 is expected t o be $525 billion. Responding to potential criticism, Panetta maintained in a s t a t e m e n t that the U.S. military w o u l d not b e w e a k e n e d by the changes. "Our approach w a s to use this as an o p p o r t u n i t y t o maintain the strongest military in the world, t o n o t hollow o u t t h e force," h e said. The Secretary of Defense also stated that this restructuring will n o t affect the U.S. military's ability to defeat "any e n e m y on land" and will m e a n "minimal risk to o u r d o m i n a n c e of the skies." The c h a i r m a n of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, G e n . M a r t i n Dempsey, has voiced his supp o r t for Panetta's p r o p o s als. "The p r i m a r y risks lie On Jan. 2 1 , U.S. Defense Secre- not in w h a t we can do, b u t m e m b e r s of t h e USS Enterprise, in how m u c h we can d o and h o w fast we can d o it," h e said. "I a m convinced we can pay raises for U.S. t r o o p s . This properly m a n a g e (the risks]." part of the plan is likely t o elicit At a m e e t i n g b e t w e e n Pam o r e criticism than any other. netta and t h e leaders of the These changes to the struccongressional A r m e d Services ture of the military will be acand Appropriations c o m m i t c o m p a n i e d by a refocusing of its tees, m e m b e r s of both parties resources. W i t h the U.S. c o m m i t m e n t in Iraq and Afghanistan spoke favorably of the proposal. scrapping older ships w i t h o u t it. A b o u t 12 ships are expected to be disposed of in this m a n n e r , and six Air Force tactical squadrons plus o n e training s q u a d r o n are likely t o m e e t the s a m e fate. Beginning in 2015, the plan would also result in smaller


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Digital montage photos examine contemporary culture ipsons 'Solid State" exhibit in DePree uses montage techniques to blend digital photography, drawing and installation to examine contemporary culture f r o m material greed to social power. Installation artt is a' 3-D genre that transforms opl^ is Thompson's the perception of a space. Not ofll)J art visually pleasing, she also c o m m e n t s on society through her artwork. I have never seen anything like t h e digital m o n t a g e photos in T h o m p s o n s "Solid Sfafe" series. Thompson imagined a future ice age covering N o r t h America and scrutinized our presentday culture with ice-encased images of everyday things like a W a l m a r t receipt, a coffee cup, botox bottles and pills. The idea for one of Thompson's series starts with a single image. "Conceptually, 1 think about rss, disasters, survival, as well as [raphy, and h u m o r both wry and lid. ideas, a series will begin I then sketch that imimages that

might work in conjunction with it. There is a lot of back and forth in my process, and many images that 1 work on never make the final cut for a senes. Thompson's mind is always focused on art. make my art because 1 don't know how not pson said. ' 1 movei t h r o u g h rpy day ating artwork in my mind. 1 als nge 2-dimensional images a I spaces in my mind. It is a creati urse, but it is also how I negotiate the world a r o i J S j t o e ^ T h o m p s o n 3 T^icebfergs and Ice appears to be a b l e f l f l b l t w e e n painti graphs. "Solid StatearTCr Nicebergs a are created in a similar way. "Each image begins as a series of separate appropriated photographs. I bring these images together in-computer and rework t h e m over an extended period of time," T h o m p s o n said. "This process most often involves radical modification, resulting in an end photograph that bears little resemblance to the source photographs. My process in-computer involves cutting and pasting, drawing, airbrushing, burning and dodging, distorting and so on to create the finished seamless

photograph. Although the original photographs are all but eliminated, they serve as 'inanimate collaborators' t hr oughout the process, influencing the work b o t h formally and conceptually." T h o m p s o n s work has been on displa;

J

e U.S. and Cana< and France. Bu lompson. She cr< loves to do. "The journey to id. "Recsome and longer fo ognition often co needs to recognized cannot be the desire, at an T h o m p s o n also and-coming artist te a b o u t "Make sure you what you do," Tho pends on creating to get that work into exhibitions^ ÂŤv tending openings and networking, forging a b o n d and recognizing curators for what they do, and luck." C o m e to Calla Thompson's artist talk Friday, Feb. 3 at 4:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome and admission is free.

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P H O T O S BY A N N M A R I E P A P A R E L L I

Where is Ryan Gosling? S a m Hirt ARTS CO-EDITOR

R y a n G o s l i n g is e v e r y w h e r e . He's b l o g g e d a b o u t , he's t w e e t e d a b o u t , a n d p i c t u r e s of h i m w i t h o u t a s h i r t o n a r e f r e q u e n t l y p o p p i n g u p o n m y F a c e b o o k a n d P i n t e r e s t . But w h i l e G o s l i n g g a t h e r s f a m e in t h e h e a r t s of b o r e d c o l l e g e p r o c r a s t i n a t o r s , t h e r e is o n e p l a c e t h a t he's n o t : t h e A c a d e m y A w a r d s n o m i n a t i o n s . A f t e r t w o s t r o n g p e r f o r m a n c e s in 2 0 1 0 w i t h "Blue V a l e n t i n e " a n d "All G o o d Things," G o s l i n g s t o r m e d t h r o u g h 2 0 1 1 w i t h t h e s u m m e r h i t " C r a z y S t u p i d Love," G e o r g e C l o o n e y ' s d i r e c t o r i a l p o l i t i c a l t h r i l l e r Ides of M a r c h , " a n d t h e o d d l y h e r o i c a n d v i o l e n t "Drive." A f t e r t h e A c a d e m y w r o n g l y o v e r l o o k e d G o s l i n g f o r a Best A c t o r n o m i n a t i o n for "Blue V a l e n t i n e " last year, I w a s s h o c k e d l a s t w e e k w h e n it h a p p e n e d a g a i n . N o n o m i n a t i o n f o r " I d e s of M a r c h , " a n d n o n o m i n a t i o n f o r " D r i v e " ( t h e b e s t m o v i e of 2 0 1 1 a c c o r d i n g t o R o l l i n g S t o n e ) . G o s l i n g , a m i d s t h i s i c o n i c p r e t t y b o y f a m e , is a m o n g t h e t o p shelf of a c t o r s t o d a y a n d w a s r o b b e d of a nomination. " D r i v e " w a s t h e r e a l v i c t i m of t h e G o s l i n g c o l d s h o u l d e r b y t h e A c a d e m y . D i r e c t e d b y F r e n c h m a n N i c o l a s W i n d i n g R e f n , " D r i v e " tells t h e s t o r y of G o s l i n g , H o l l y w o o d s t u n t d r i v e r b y day a n d g e t a w a y d r i v e r b y n i g h t , and his h e r o i s m t o w a r d s a w i d o w e d neighbor and her y o u n g son. Gosling's character has no n a m e and very little d i a l o g u e , b u t h i s i n t e r n a l i z e d , m y s t e r i o u s life is s h o w n o n t h e e x p r e s s i o n of h i s f a c e w h e n h e d r i v e s , a n d t h e l o o k in his e y e s w h e n h e kills. It is a p e r f o r m a n c e t h a t m a k e s v i e w e r s w i n c e a n d r o o t f o r h i m all a t o n c e . But t o t h e A c a d e m y , it w a s a p e r f o r m a n c e t h a t d i d n ' t q u i t e c u t it. R y a n G o s l i n g a n d " D r i v e a r e t h e b i g g e s t s n u b s P H O T O COURTESY OF F I L M D I S T R I C T

of t h i s year's a w a r d s s e a s o n a n d it's a s h a m e .


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Hope artist profile: poet and professor David Cho Sam Hlrt ARTS CO-EDITOR

W h y poetry? W h y gravitate toward p o e m s instead of other forms of ficrion or creative nonfiction? I think 1 got interested in creative writing and literary studies largely t h r o u g h Ernest Hemingway in high school. A n d from there I'd probably attribute it to three things: O n e is a good mentor in college that took me under her wing: Brigit Kelly. I r e m e m b e r the first poem I wrote was something about Meatball Stew or something like that. W h e n I look back it's laughable, but she seemed to find so m u c h stuff in it, and that hooked me. The two other things are: I think I fell in love with poetry because of the compressed form. Every word, every line break, every intonation, that all signify something. I feel like that's the heart of a lot creative writing in general. And I guess t h e third, I think, is probably s o m e sensibility from my m o m and dad. My m o m was an artist, an art teacher, and my dad was an architect, so 1 think s o m e of that artistic influence kind of passed its way down. And 1 f o u n d poetry to be the most intriguing form. A lot of your p o e m s in "Night Sessions" refer to cultural identity. Are you trying to

capture s o m e of the ethnic conflict of being AsianAmerican? Highlighting stereotypes? Are they autobiographical? Early on, I think for all creative writers, there is a sense you're carving something out of nothing. O n e of the m o d e r n i s t poets, I can't r e m e m b e r who, used to say it was like chipping away at what was already there. I think for me growing up, part of it was just experience, wanting to write that on the page. Part of it is, when 1 was in college, things like American ethnic studies and AsianAmerican studies were just absent, and I think my m e n t o r s knew that, particularly Brigit Kelly. A n d even she would give me examples of Korean p o e m s and say they seem similar to what I'm doing, which 1 found very heartening, but then I found a little disheartening as well, because I think there's a sensibility, but you're trying to carve a m o r e Korean-American one. I think there's a fine line between those two things, and also a larger Korean-American or Midwestern experience. The p o e m s sometimes teeter on identity; sometimes they teeter on explaining a little bit of history, but hopefully not too much where it b e c o m e s m o r e historical and sociological as opposed to a creative one. A n d s o m e teeter on experience, even if it's a purely fictional

way. A lot of t h e H a r r y Kim poems are based on me playing baseball with my brother, and this guy Nelson Ho, w h o lived up the street f r o m us. And when people saw the three of us, people flipped out, all the time. W h e t h e r we'd be playing basketball, volleyball, baseball... It just was weird. So there's some about that, about identity, but hopefully there's enough

literary or aesthetic concerns. Because then we're valuing it for historical or social reasons. That's always the constant worry. W h o is Harry Kim? Harry Kim, on paper, is a fictional character. I don't think I actually know a H a r r y Kim. I know a Harold Kim. Harry is a fictional character, a pastor's kid, growing up in Chicago, in the suburbs. It's modeling, of course, some of my experiences, but ones just recreated. I'm trying to recreate a whole world for this character. I'm trying to develop that now. That c a m e out of the first book, "Night Sessions," and now this one, a new manuscript that used to be called "Poems for Harry Kim," but I don't think publishers seemed to be too keen on that, so I decided to call it "Praise for Prozac." A n d then I'm trying to develop a novel out of that as well.

Courtesy of CavanKerry Press

there that's just a b o u t creativity; playing with lines, playing with word choices. Hopefully it has a good fusion of all three, all the time, but when I look at the poems n o w I can see it teeter one to the other, so it just depends. W h e n I put the literary critic hat on, I think the one literary criticism that has always been aimed at ethnic writers is that it seems like, that because they're focusing on identity, they don't have to meet up with the same

A novel? As in, yod're in the writing process? Yeah, I have the first chapter done. I've had it for a while. It's just been on my wall. W h a t is the writing process like for you? In a previous life it was actually like a full-tiiffe job. I'd treat it like a full-time job, get up, just work at it all day. Either writing, teaching creative

writing, or sending out for publication. Before that, and now, I'm just squeezing it in whenever I can. I feel a great kinship to Scott (Lubbers nightcustodian) because it feels like I'm writing as a third-shift job. Lots of editing? Well, people like William Stafford claimed he never revised any poem he ever wrote. I find that hard to believe. But I think it's the luxury of time, as well; if you have hours to labor over a poem, or days, or weeks. So I just write and then leave it alone, and get back to it, and get back to it. This second manuscript started about 15 years ago. I think you constantly have to go back at it. At a certain point you have to call it a day, because I think revisions can be endless. I think if you capture that m o m e n t , it is good enough, almost like a photo. I keep a notebook too. I always r e c o m m e n d that to writers. If you could r e c o m m e n d o n e or two p o e m s that students M U S T read in their lifetime, what would they be? Philip Levine's "What Work Is." Probably along with that, "A Walk with Tom Jefferson." Probably about any poem f r o m Li-Young Lee's first book, "Rose."

Local record store maintains vinyl tradition f r o m his former store and with albums given to him by the ownCO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF er of the Corner Record Store in Grandville. Having been in In a world that can access charge of invenmusic by way of Pandotory for his former ra, Spotify, iTunes and employer, he was illegal downloading, it able to retain a fair would seem unlikely n u m b e r of customthat vinyl records could ers and contacts compete as a viable alwhich helped to ternative. i p s c s s n s ease the transition. However, it appears His emphasis that vinyl is refusing to on vinyl records go the way of the caspaid off and today sette or the V H S as vithe vast majority of nyl record sales rose 39 his sales are in vinyl percent in 2011. That as opposed to CDs figure is remarkable not (he estimates that just because of the fact CDs only make up that vinyl is a comparaa quarter to a third tively archaic m e d i u m , of his sales). Most but also because of the bands today are iscrumbling state of the suing their music m o d e r n music industry. on vinyl with a digHolland residents P H O T O BY A N N M A R I E P A P A R E U I ital download card and visitors can examRESILIENT RECORD STOREâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Fuji Circle, opened In 2002, carries a wide included in the ine what makes this range of new and used vinyl records, CDs and DVDs. packaging, making industry tick by visitthe p r o d u c t aping The Full Circle repealing to m o d e r n listeners. scouting store locations. The lothat Steve describes as a "classic cord store on College Avenue in Being adjacent to a college cation on College Avenue where d o w n t o w n Holland. The store is hole-in-the-wall record store." c a m p u s full of hip young music the store is located today be"There were always' things owned and operated by Steve, listeners, you would think that c a m e available just as his search I wanted to change but I didn't who founded the store in Sepa majority of The Full Circle's began. have the authority at the time," t e m b e r 2003. customer base would Hope stu"I started out with $8,000 Steve, w h o prefers to go by Steve said. dents, but this is not the case. and 1 bought everything that I Holland Compact Disc hadn't his first n a m e only, is a veteran "The average customer skews thought a record store should embraced vinyl records or inof the Holland music market towards either high school age have," Steve said. die music, and when Steve had and managed Holland C o m p a c t or 30 and over, (college-aged He also initially filled his Disc, a music store that was lo- the opportunity to start his own store with some of the leftovers kids) just don't buy music anystore, he knew that those were cated on Eighth Street, prior to opening The Full Circle. The store was big, clean and well organized. In other words, not at all like The Full Circle, a store

Chris Russ

two things he would focus on. W h e n he learned that Holland C o m p a c t Disc was shutting down, he immediately began

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more," Steve said. He estimates that out of the over 3,000 H o p e students, only 20 different individuals will visit his store with any kind of regularity. And instead, his loyal clientele is m a d e up of m e m b e r s of the community. "You have to treat every cust o m e r like your last. I do appreciate every one of my customers. I m a d e a lot of friends here over the years," Steve said. Steve explained that a big part of his affinity for selling music comes from the interaction that he has with his customers. "I liked the customer base. I think there are people who know more about music than me, but I just found that I was good at selling things, and my customers know that I'll be honest with them," Steve said. He explained that business at this time of year is somewhat slow since the biggest selling alb u m s tend to come out in the s u m m e r or fall. He listed Wilco, The Black Keys, Youth Lagoon, Radiohead and M83 as being s o m e of his top sellers over the past year. "If and when this store ever closes, emotionally I'd have a hard time selling this store to anyone else," Steve said. Holland music fans should h o p e that day never comes.


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^econdh Becca Hawkins VOICES EDITOR

In the college environment, the otion of being hrifty is c o m m o n . Some students pinch pennies with PB&Js, by clipping coupons, or by H

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buying in bulk. I've even heard of s t u d e n t s borrowing coffee a n d amenities f r o m H a w o r t h on occasion. However, being thrifty is m o r e than just scraping by on food or other college necessities. In fact, being thrifty is arguably most c o m m o n in fashion. Thrift and secondhand stores offer a recycled style that c a n n o t be duplicated or w o r n by the rest of the c a m p u s (that's right, it's not a N o r t h Face jacket or Ugg boots). Anna Kort ('13i gives her reasons for thrifting: "I love looking f o r d i f f e r e n t .

eater-

Bethany Schmall ('14) models an outfit compiled of c l o t h i n g found at various t h r i f t stores.

p i e c e s

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make an o u t f i t or space unique a n d elegant."

While she was growing up, her m o m thrifted old f u r n i t u r e a n d fixed it up. For m a n y thrifters, the fun of it is to recreate a piece into their own — a technique k n o w n as "upcycling." Websites like Etsy and Pinterest have fueled the upcycling fad by publicizing do-it-yourself efforts and, in Etsy's case, p u t t i n g t h e m u p for sale. Pinterest f u n c t i o n s similar to Stumble U p o n but focuses on craft and fashion. It is

£6 B e i n g thrifty is m o r e than j u s t s c r a p i n g by on f o o d or other college necessities. — BECCA HAWKINS VOICES EDITOR

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essentially a virtual pinboard that can be shared with followers. Etsy takes this concept and adds shops for users to sell their o w n creations. The idea of both lies in the creation of n e w fashion and craft concepts, often out of recycled materials. However, many college students (my housemates and myself included) fall victim to the laziness of searching for thrifty items like the ones f o u n d on Etsy and Pinterest. W e can pin DIY fashion tips a n d upcycled style for h o u r s on end, but fall short on getting off the couch to try anything out. Meredith Morgan ('13) agrees, "It's so fun to see what

people can do with fashion, but 1 rarely do anything to try it myself." It's a shame m o r e Hope College s t u d e n t s aren't proactive in the thrifting and upcycling trend, because we have great resources for it in the Holland area — Bibles for Mexico, Ditto, W o o d e n Shoe Antiques, Second C h a n c e Design, Salvation A r m y and Goodwill are all within five minutes of H o p e and offer everything from rare antique pieces for the h o m e to endless flannel and other current fashion trends. What's more, these stores are all within the college budget. Some even offer college student discounts. So why don't students thrift m o r e often? These stores get picked over around Halloween time and get forgotten about for the remainder of t h e year. Too often, thrift and s e c o n d h a n d stores get the label of being dirty or "cheap-looking." However, I encourage you to test it out. M a n y of Hope's most fashionable s t u d e n t s thrift for their" clothes. W i t h the current vintage trend in fashion, thrift stores offer a truer look to the style than most brand n a m e s c What's m o r e vintage and a better deal: a $60 replica fringe vest from Urban Outfitters, or an $8 period piece f r o m a local thrift store? W h e t h e r or not fringe vests are your thing, thrifting can be beneficial for your closet and your wallet — a n d might even give you enough extra cash to afford Lemonjello's rather than Haworth coffee.

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Bitles for Hexico Bibles for Missions Thrift C e n t e r is a national chain with 14 locations t h r o u g h o u t the Midwest. Collectively, Bibles for Missions f u n d s the Bible League mission and provides Bibles for countries around the world. Each store uses its profit to purchase Bibles which are in turn sent to countries such as the Phillipines, Columbia, Haiti, Romania, Mexico, Ukraine, Kenya, Bulgaria, Ecuador and China. Holland boasts two Bibles for Missions Thrift Centers (Douglas Avenue & Lincoln Avenue) which both provide Bibles for Mexico.

A hop, skip a n d a j u m p will bring you to FOUND, a vintage store located on eighth street. F O U N D specializes in r e - p u r p o s ing f u r n i t u r e and accessories by giving t h e m a retro flair. For more information, foundon8th.blogspot.com 616-39FOUND.

visit or

www. call

Second C h a n c e Design is a furniture store unlike any other. According to its website, "Everything needs a second chance. Second C h a n c e Design brings n e w life into neglected and overlooked items." Located on Chicago Drive, Seco n d C h a n c e Design sells refurbished accents and furniture. Its selection includes a mixture of moder, midcentury, retro, lakeside and vintage furniture. For more information, ondchance design.net.

visit www.sec-

W h e n Ditto first o p e n e d its d o o r s in the early 2000s, it was a small shop located off of US 31. Since then. Ditto has expanded and moved over to eighth street. Ditto's main p u r p o s e is to financially assist families whose children attend both Holland Christian a n d Zeeland Christian schools. According to their website, "100 percent of proceeds go straight to students tuition. W h e t h e r you need clothing, dishes or furniture. Ditto has what you are looking for. P H O T O S COURTESY OF A N N M A R I E P A P A R E L U


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FEBRUARY 1, 2 0 1 2

A list of lists

2) Sandwiches 1) Pasta

A college student favorite

This list is a good example of a couple of critical c o m p o n e n t s of listmaking. First, any good list should be presented in countdown form so that the t o p choice is revealed last. My friend and fellow listmaking scholar Mike Debowski deserves credit for convincing m e of the importance of this idea. Second, the setting of parameters is extremely important. The above list ranks foods that I keep in my kitchen based on price, taste, convenience and health.

C h r i s t o p h e r Russ Co-Editor-in-Chief

Novels, speeches, d o c u m e n t a r i e s and p o e m s are all perfectly acceptable forms of delivering information. But the best form that the language can be shaped into is The List. Listmaking is one of the most underrated forms of c o m m u n i c a t i o n within academia, and institutions of higher learning are really doing a disservice to their students by failing to teach them this valuable skill. The value of The List can be seen in almost any form of entertainment in this country. Music magazines and websites publish "albums of the year" lists that gener-

2) C o m m u n i c a t i o n Since lists are basically Sparknotes for your brain, the exchange of those Sparknotes can be a decently effective way of getting to know someone. Obviously I'm not suggesting that you should pick your friends based on what foods they keep in their kitchen, but lists can be a f u n way to cross-reference c o m m o n interests like Favorite Albums of All-Time: 5) Kanye West - "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy" 4) Kanye West - "Graduation" 3) T V o n t h e Radio - "Dear Science" 2) The Hold Steady - "Boys and Girls in America" 1) The Gaslight A n t h e m - "The '59 Sound"

ate massive readership. Sports publications thrive o n lists. Right now ESPN is r u n n i n g a story on the top 20 NFL players w h o would thrive in any era of football. Cable T V is full of lists. Turn on Animal Planet and you'll be sure to see a list a b o u t deadly or disgusting animals. A properly f o r m e d list can serve as a sort of Sparknotes for u n d e r s t a n d i n g your own brain. For the average over-committed college student, t h e to-do list can be an invaluable way to keep track of all of the deadlines, meetings and a p p o i n t m e n t s b o u n c i n g around in your head. But outside of keeping track of school c o m m i t m e n t s , lists can serve three entertaining purposes.

3) C o m p e t i t i o n As shown in the movie "High Fidelity" (and the book it was based on), lists can be a way to compete over pop culture knowledge, and it can be a challenge to think of t h e five best sitcoms that were cancelled before they completed their third seasons. My favorite lists in this category are o n e s with complicated parameters, like Albums I Love with Cover Art 1 Hate:

1) Self-Analysis This type of list can quickly tell you h o w well you know your o w n opinions. Sometimes this can serve a valuable purpose like ranking your top presidential candidates, but it's m o r e f u n to meticulously analyze m o r e trivial things like Favorite

5) Arcade Fire - "Funeral" 4) The Hold Steady - "Boys and Girls in America" 3) Yeah Yeah Yeahs - "Fever to Tell" 2) Rain M a c h i n e - "Rain Machine" 1) Kanye West - "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy"

College Kitchen Foods: 5) Eggs 4) Steak 3) C a n n e d soup

Chris recentlty f o u n d out that it takes eggs eight m o n t h s to go bad - maybe he will have to reevaluate his Favorite College Kitchen Foods in light of this discovery.

my good friends at Hope. Although we didn't see each other all that often, the few times we did was amazingly refreshing. Most people aren't that lucky to share parts

Friends in far places

of their experience with a H o p e friend. I want to encourage you to invest in your friends while they are abroad. W e have the resources to c o m m u n i c a t e across the globe. Don't fall into the trap of out of sight, out of mind." A short email or video goes a long way. If you don't know what perience, have your friend to ask about their exventure, t h e city or the tell you about an ad-

The abroad experience M a r c Tori Columnist

a

Studying abroad allows a student to see another part of the world and immerse him o r herself in a n o t h e r culture. It's a fantastic experience, and I think everyone should go for a semester if they can. There are a million things to learn f r o m a n o t h e r culture. 1 could go o n for days about the benefits of traveling and studying. Last s u m m e r I spent 10 weeks in Argentina and Uruguay. 1 m a d e s o m e decent friends with the other "norteamericanos" in my program but it's my host families w h o I miss most. 1 miss h o w I would c o m e h o m e f r o m class, light a fire in the fireplace to heat the house, and then my host m o m and I would cook chicken patties over the coals. I miss t h e Argentine beef and t h e d u k e de leche ice cream. Sometimes, when I reminisce about my time abroad, 1 feel like it was a n o t h e r life. I didn't feel that way when I was down in South America though. There were days when I was lonely and I missed my family and H o p e friends. There were other days when I wanted to share the cool things I saw with all those back home. I tried keeping up with friends via emails and Facebook, and I was overjoyed to hear back f r o m a few. Studying abroad is challenging. If you have a friend abroad right now, think about h o w they might be feeling as they start a new life in a n e w place. Don't let the H o p e c o m m u n i t y only be present at Hope. I was in Argentina at the same time as two of

people they live with. H o p e isn't always easy back to / Coming Don't let the Hope s o m e o n e w h o recently either. If you know you can guess they probreturned f r o m abroad, community only be ence. It m a y feel like that ably miss that experipresent at Hope. ripped away. You can be p a r t of their life was ing questions about their a great friend by askexperience. questions like "How was Avoid general Argentina?" because it's impossible to sum up m o n t h s in a short answer. Show you care by asking meaningful questions. My friends that have c o m e back f r o m abroad often say they miss being able to share the experience and that people expect them to be the same as w h e n they left. I would wholeheartedly agree. G o d has given us many w o n d e r f u l great relationships at Hope. We are blessed to be part of a w o n d e r f u l community. Help spread the love we feel on c a m p u s to those friends w h o aren't here with us. You can really make a difference in their experience

V

right now. M a r c would give his left leg to be sun tanning on the beaches of Punta del Este. Uruguay with his brothers and friends.

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VOICES

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THE ANCHOR

9

The blooper real, DC style : the abroadcolumn updated on what I'm doing in D.C. We will just say that I said some not so flattering things and disagreed with what our interviewee had said. With tact and class of course. By 9 a.m. the next day, the organization had found my blog post, called my professor and ordered me to take it down. Somehow I had seriously offended the organization. I'm just a 20-year-old college junior with absolutely no money or power whose blog ticked off one of the most powerful places in Washington. N o

W h e n I talk to other people about their study abroad experiences, they often rant and rave about the places they visited. They recount their favorite sites, restaurants, and moments of their trip. People hardly ever tell you the number of mishaps to expect. I was very confident that upon my arrival to Washington, D.C. I would have no trouble navigating the Metro system, figuring out the layout of the city or grocery shopping without a car. I never expected that my first month here would bring some interesting situations.

big deal.

1. O n my first night in town, 1 decided to take a walk and find something to eat. I had absolutely no food; 1 had flown in early that morning and did not have enough energy to grocery shop. There were several restaurants nearby my apartment complex, but I decided to go into what looked like a little diner called Crystal City Restaurant next to a 7-11 and a Chinese restaurant. It had dinner specials on the outside and looked perfecdy normal. W h e n I opened the door, a half naked woman stood in front of me. Quickly, I did a 180 and ran into 7-11. I come to find out that I had stepped foot into a strip club. Whoops. 2. Every Wednesday we attended interviews with members of different organizations around Washington such as lobbies, government agencies, non-profits and think tanks. These interviews are run like a questionand-answer session, and as students we are expected to ask intelligent questions. After interviews, we are expected to journal about our experience. My friends and family can attest: I am a very critical person. Not having a political science background (I'm an English major), I am even more skeptical of the people we talk to, often wanting to find the flaws in their arguments simply because I don't necessary revere the governmental process. A few weeks ago, we visited a certain very powerful organization that I found to be extremely disagreeable. Journaling about it like a good student, I posted the journal entry on my blog, which my friends and family read to keep

"Ina ewhen Sueretha" I am Christian Monica Hanna Columnist

their family and friends' churches were b o m b e d . Recently, my mother's childhood church and the priests of that church fell victim to a vicious b o m b -

That "thing" is actually called a hijab which is a head dress that is w o r n by Islamic w o m e n after they have started their menstrual cycle to symbolize their w o m a n h o o d and modesty. Most w o m e n can decide to wear it, and for others it is d e p e n d e n t on t h e country they live in.

You see, another reason my parents came to this country was for religious freedom. Being Catholic is o n e of traits that I hold so strongly, and I couldn't imagine my life without my religious views. They define me as a person and the way I act in everyday

The reason this question is so h u r t f u l is because of my religious standing. I was b o r n and raised into a Catholic family. My parents were part of t h e two percent of Christianity that was left in Iraq. Chaldeans were slowly leaving Iraq due to the disrespect that their dictator had of their religious views and churches. I r e m e m b e r t h e sorrowful stories that my parents would tell me a b o u t h o w

W h e n people ask this question without even thinking twice, it c o n f u s e s me. 1 unde rs ta nd I have dark skin, eyes and hair but that doesn't need to stamp my religious views o n my forehead. Imagine if s o m e o n e assumed you were Jewish or atheist without even getting a chance to understand who you are or where you c o m e from.

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I love America and I h o p e that in generations to come, citizens can b e c o m e m o r e aware of others and t h e great, culture-rich tossed salad that we, American citizens, are together.

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"Chaldean Americans are descendants of people f r o m t h e n o r t h e r n Tigris-Euphrates Valley, presently located in the Middle Eastern nation of Iraq.... As a result of their religious and linguistic differences f r o m other Iraqi immigrants, Chaldeans tend not to identify themselves either with Iraq or the Arab world, but prefer being called Chaldean Americans." -Everyculture.com

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by 5 p . m . M o n d a y , prior t o W e d n e s d a y d i s t r i b u t i o n .

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a n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u by M o n d a y a t 5 p . m . t o a p p e a r in W e d n e s d a y ' s i s s u e .

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a b l e j u d g m e n t , t h e a d h a s b e e n r e n d e r e d v a l u e l e s s by t h e m i s t a k e .

M a i l l e t t e r s t o The Anchor

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may c a n c e l its c h a r g e s for t h e p o r t i o n of t h e a d if. in t h e p u b l i s h e r ' s reason-

A d v e r t i s e m e n t Deadlines: All ad a n d classified r e q u e s t s m u s t be s u b m i t t e d

t h e H o p e College S t u d e n t A c t i v i t i e s Fund. T h e o p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d o n t h e

a r e a v a i l a b l e for $ 4 0 . The

a n d t y p o g r a p h i c a l e r r o r s . However, if s u c h m i s t a k e s occur, t h i s n e w s p a p e r

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c h o r o f f i c e ( l o c a t e d in t h e M a r t h a

One-year s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o The Anchor

Follow Madalyn and her adventures at washingtonwonders.wordpress.com.

life.

serves

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Metro. Another day, another student and 1 were carrying shakes and food down the escalator at night. The Metro wasn't busy, but we were moving quite fast. Gracefully, 1 slipped and my shake spilled all over the stairs. Food is a big no-no on the Metro. Oops. It's only been a month and I've seen some great museums, sat in the same theater as President Obama, and eaten at Georgetown Cupcake. I can only imagine what lies ahead in the next three months, as well as the interesting situations I'll manage to get myself into.

I wish people would think twice before speaking and also not assume that all stereotypes are correct. This is where my culture has its downs but I also think it's because of t h e culture America has supported.

Throughout high school and in t h e beginning of my college career I would constantly be asked the most closed-minded question: "Why don't you wear that 'thing' on your head?"

Our Mission: The Anchor

3. Washington D.C. operates by public transportation. Though the people are much ruder than I had imagined and the amount of time it takes to go five miles seems ridiculous (sometimes 40 minutes), I use it to commute to work every morning, along with the rest of the D.C. Metro area. Every Metro stop has a plethora of escalators to take you in and out of the tunnels. People hardly ever stand on the escalator during rush hour. Everyone is always moving fast, trying to catch the train or get h o m e or whatever. Now I'm not coordinated. One could call me a klutz, easy. I slip, spill and trip all the time. This klutziness is multiplied when I am rushing along with the hoards of commuters here in D.C. One day I was essentially running down the stairs with some new shoes on and I slipped. The lady next to me caught my arm before I could fall. I thanked her; she was probably one of the few nice people who ride the

The Anchor

C o n t a c t Information: To s u b m i t a n a d or a classified, or t o r e q u e s t a b r o c h u r e or other i n f o r m a t i o n , c o n t a c t o u r Ads R e p r e s e n t a t i v e a t a n c h o r a d s 速 h o p e . e d u . To c o n t a c t our office, call our o f f i c e at ( 6 1 6 ) 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

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Programs dedicated to diversifying Hope

ADMISSIONS

ABOUT

HOPF

FEBRUARY 3 . 2 0 1 2

ACADEMICS

-

THE ARTS

ATHLETICS

ACUMNI

PARENTS

GIVING

TO MOPE

Q •htrtTbli

• DIVERSITY, from page 2

All-Amencan College Town

It is an u n f o r t u n a t e t r u t h that Union, Hope's Asian Perspective most Hope students come from Association, La Raza Unida a n d very h o m o g e n o u s b a c k g r o u n d s , t h e m o r e recently established n o t only ethnically but also multicultural sorority Theta religiously and Gamma Pi all e conomically. have a similar O nce students goal. c o me to Hope The efforts W e n e e d to k e e p they may c h o o s e seem to be doing what we're to immerse working. W h i l e d o i n g , b u t w e a l s o t h e m s elves last year's . in cultural freshman class n e e d to do m o r e . diversity or they w a s a b o u t 4% — DR. GREEN may c h o o s e to Hispanic and 9 5 stay within their 3% African known comfort A m e r i c a n ,

npvnf.'-haWn.i rJwripowgr'! i !e No wofici*>r msiuers know 7/esie"« wihis*.') 3 report

REQUEST INFO »

Admissions

Apply f o r A d m i s s i o n

N E W D I G I T A L F A C E O F H O P E C O L L E G E — The Hope College Admissions page was t h e f i r s t t o be revamped a n d now t h e m a j o r i t y of Hope's w e b s i t e has f o l l o w e d suit.

Revamped Hope Website

zone. this f r e s h m a n class is a r o u n d "1 don't think we have yet 5% Hispanic a n d 5% A f r i c a n succeeded in" shaping the A m e r i c a n . A l t h o u g h this d o e s _ not s e e m like a drastic increase, b r o a d e r climate (of H o p e ] as a progress is being m a d e . whole," s a i d . G r e e m .if a s t u d e n t To s o m e s t u d e n t s at H o p e , can go t h r o u g h f o u r years at diversity is not an issue t h a t . H o p e w i t h o u t ever having t o s e e m s to affect t h e m personally, e n c o u n t e r e f h n i c or cultural diversity d i e n t h e r e is still w o r k In this day a n d age, however, t o be d o n e . t h e ability and t h e e x p e r i e n c e of Although H o p e h a s c o m e a w o r k i n g with p e o p l e of diverse long way in the past 30 years, ethnic and cultural b a c k g r o u n d s t h e r e is still m u c h m o r e to strive are necessary for almost any f o r w h e n it c o m e s to diversity. career. " W e n e e d to m a k e s u r e " W e n e e d to keep d o i n g w h a t that everybody u n d e r s t a n d s t h a t we're doing, b u t we also need to diversity affects t h e things they d o more," said G r e e n . c a r e about," G r e e n said.

Hope PR H o p e College is pleased to i n t r o d u c e t h e b e g i n n i n g of a r e v a m p e d website that we h o p e will provide an even m o r e enjoyable and informative virtual visit. We v e n t u r e d into cyberspace with the introduction of h o p e . e d u in 1995. Last year o u r p r i m a r y w e b address was visited an e s t i m a t e d 1.2 million times, a figure t h a t doesn't include t h e h u n d r e d s

of t h o u s a n d s of o t h e r visits directly to special-interest a r e a s such as admissions, alumni, athletics, t h e arts, etc. This is t h e f o u r t h m a j o r and m o s t extensive r e m a k e of t h e H o p e College website since its inception. It c o n t i n u e s to be a work i n progress, so you will find a blend of old a n d new. Our goal t h r o u g h this n e w design is to m o r e clearly express Hope's u n i q u e position

in the higher education c o m m u n i t y as an institution that provides s t u d e n t s with rigorous a c a d e m i c and cocurricular " p r o g r a m s in a v i b r a n t Christian e n v i r o n m e n t . Thank you for y o u r interest in H o p e College. W e value your i n p u t as w e c o n t i n u e this j o u r n e y together. C o m m e n t s m a y b e - sent t o m a r k e t i n g ® hope.edu.

WTHS programming for Spring 2012 At t h e start of t h e 2011-12 school year, W T H S decided t o c o m m i t to i m p r o v i n g t h e quality of its p r o g r a m m i n g by refining the training process for aspiring DJ's. The

program

has

resulted

in a lineup that t h e station feels is b o t h professional and entertaining. T h e r e are DJ's w h o are o n t h e air for t h e first t i m e this year, like T o m Zahari {'15), M e e s h a N o l e n ( 1 2 ) and C a r t e r Jones Monday

2 pm

('14). O t h e r s have e n t e r t a i n e d Holland audiences for years like C h r i s Russ ('12) and C a i d i n Klask ('12). In addition, W T H S has taken to establishing shows t h a t can b e c o n t i n u e d f r o m year t o year by

Tuesday

1

different DJ's so t h a t t h e station doesn't m e e d to reinventr itself every few years. Examples of these types of s h o w s include " N e w M u s i c at Nine," "Local Music Show," and "The H i p - H o p ( e ) Hour." Thursday

Wednesday

The Kurt & Forrest Show

(NOON) 80s Big Hair Reunion

Kurt C u n n i n g h a m & F o r r e s t D o d s o n (2-3)

Ellen A w a d & M a r i e B u r k h o l d e r (12-1)

A n y o n e interested in joining t h e W T H S on-air t e a m can c o n t a c t t h e station by emailing wths@hope.edu.

Friday

Hip Hop(e) Hour 3 pm

C h r i s R u s s (2-3)

4 i-p m 5 pm

N e w s and Sports

N e w s and Sports

Tom Zahari & M e e s h a N o l e n (5:30-6)

Tom Zahari & M e e s h a N o l e n (5:30-6)

Local Music S h o w Jake Kalmink & F o r r e s t D o d s o n (6-7)

6.

Talk is Cheap, Music is Rich Jake Kalmink & A l l v s o n H o f f m a n (7-8)

7

8

Squirrel Chatter

The Bro S h o w

Aaron Haecker & M e g h a n S t a g l (8-9)

Kevin Watson & J o s h W a t s o n (8-9)

N e w Music at 9 9

W T H S Music Directors (9-10)

The Speaking Voice C a r t e r J o n e s (6:30-7)

The Essential Guillermo Flores G u i l l e r m o Flores (7-8)

Adventures in Melody More C o w b e l l M a t t C o s t e l l o (8-10)

Freeze Frame W i l l D e B o e r (9-10)

A n a W e a v e r (8-9)

T h e Stick Forrest Dodson & Christopher Rodriguez (9-10)

Carolyn's Mixtape 10

11

Playing Aces M a r i e t t a J o n e s (10-11)

Get to the Chopper

Noshin' to Moshin'

C h r i s R u s s (10-12)

C a i t l i n Klask (10-12)

Carolyn W e r m u t h (10-11)

Beatz & Lyfe CB M a l l a r d (8-9)


F E B R U A R Y 1. 2 0 1 2

SPORTS

THE

Dutchmen extend win streak to 14

ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Saturday Women's basketball

Katherine Magulre

11

Feb. 4

GUEST W R I T E R

iH

vs. Calvin at 3 p.m.

Hockey The H o p e College men's basketball t e a m defeated Alma 104-77 preserving its 7-0 M I A A season record Jan. 28. This is the Flying D u t c h m e n ' s second triple-digit defeat of the Scots this season. In a striking coincidence, H o p e w o n its first m a t c h - u p against Alma, 103-78. The Flying D u t c h m e n started with a s t r o n g lead over the Scots that they m a i n t a i n e d t h r o u g h o u t the game. "I think today was a situation w h e r e we h a d a great size advantage," h e a d coach M a t t Neil said. " W e really w e n t at t h e m inside." H o p e shot 56 p e r c e n t in t h e first half making 78 percent of their f r e e throws, 7-9. H o p e finished the first half leading Alma 47-34. " W e have a great team," Nate Snuggerud ('13) said. "And w e have a lot w e w a n t to accomplish." The coaches also a d d e d s o m e energy to the game. In h o n o r of National Coaches vs. Cancer, Suits a n d Sneakers Day, b o t h teams' coaches s p o r t e d their athletic kicks w i t h their formal g a m e attire. The Flying Dutchmen c o n t i n u e d t o play s t r o n g in the second half. At o n e point they led t h e Scots by as m a n y as 32 points. "That w a s the main t h i n g for us," Neil said. "We h a d to maintain that f o c u s t h r o u g h o u t the entire game." Hope's usual lead player, David K r o m b e e n (*12) was benched after playing 11 m i n u t e s a n d racking u p four personal fouls. " W e had a n u m b e r of players

vs. Davenport at 8 : 1 5 p.m. at Edge Ice Arena

IN BRIEF

I

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL SURVIVES SAINT MARY'S

PHOTO BY A N N M A R I E PAPARELLI

P R I M E P E R F O R M A N C E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nate VanArendonk ('14) scored a season-high 2 0 points on 9-10 s h o o t i n g on Saturday In Hope's 1 0 4 - 7 7 w i n over Alma. He also grabbed five rebounds. step up," Neil said. " W e faced s o m e foul trouble with Dave b u t it is a great indication of w h a t this team can accomplish." Hope's t o u g h defense limited Alma t o s h o o t i n g only 35 p e r c e n t in the second half. The Flying D u t c h m a n won the g a m e with the final score 104-77. " O u r defense was solid for the m o s t part," Chris Ray (13) said. " W e were able t o impose o u r will a n d get t h e shots we w a n t e d t o get." H o p e totaled 28 assists, four

blocks and 11 steals for the game. "We got out r e b o u n d e d so w e will have t o work on that for next week," Ray said. "But, overall it w a s a good effort." Snuggerud led the Flying Dutchmen scoring a new personal high of 31 total points. "It was a great team accomplishment, I didn't do it alone," Snuggerud said. "Everyone w h o w a s on the floor and on the b e n c h helped m e have such a spectacular game."

O t h e r g a m e leaders were Nate V a n A r e n d o n k ('14) with 20 total p o i n t s and Colton O v e r w a y ('13) with seven assists. "It w a s unbelievable t o see all of t h e local s u p p o r t that our t e a m receives f r o m the community," Ray said. "It's truly a blessing t o play for Hope." The D u t c h m e n will travel t o A d r i a n to take on the Bulldogs at 8 p.m. on Feb. 1. Adrian is o n e of Hope's t o u g h e s t c o m p e t i t o r s . A d r i a n is tied with Trine for second place in t h e M I A A .

Track participates at Calvin, has two more indoor meets left Bethany Stripp S P O R T S EDITGR

H o p e College men's and women's track and field teams began their season o n Jan. 20, a n d after a Jan. 27 m e e t at Calvin, they are halfway t h r o u g h their 2012 indoor season. T h o u g h track is a spring sport, the team has the o p p o r t u n i t y to prepare for its o u t d o o r season d u r i n g the winter at area schools with indoor tracks. The general c o n c e p t of the m e e t s are similar, though certain limitations a n d the timing make it slightly different f r o m a normal o u t d o o r track meet. "The indoor season is a bit m o r e limited," men's co-captain Travis M a r t i n ('12) said. " W e run fewer athletes because people are still getting in shape and we are training for later in the season." Indoor tracks are also smaller t h a n o u t d o o r tracks. Two of

Hope's i n d o o r m e e t s o c c u r at G r a n d Valley, where they have a 300 m e t e r track while the other two are h o s t e d by Calvin on their 200 m e t e r track. These smaller tracks have tighter corners, which t e n d s t o slow sprinters down, M a r t i n said. Space restrictions also change the throwing portion of t h e field c o m p e t i t i o n . While o u t d o o r m e e t s allow for shot put, h a m m e r throw, discus, a n d javelin, indoor m e e t s only include the s h o t put a n d weight throw. On Jan. 20, the teams c o m p e t e d in the Mike Lints A l u m n i O p e n at G r a n d Valley. H o p e h a d eight top 10 finishers b e t w e e n the men's and women's t e a m in this m e e t that featured 900 athletes f r o m all collegiate divisions. Sam Pederson ('14) h a d t h e highest finish of any H o p e athlete at the event, c o m i n g in f o u r t h place in the 5,000 m e t e r with a t i m e of 15:25.41.

Hope's m o s t recent i n d o o r m e e t took place at Calvin on Jan. 27, where the t e a m c o m p e t e d against Aquinas, Alma and Calvin in the Calvin Invitational. Hope's m e n finished the m e e t with 102 p o i n t s for third place while the w o m e n picked u p 60 p o i n t s for f o u r t h . Kristen Reschke ('12) w o n the high j u m p with a height of 1.55 meters, w h i c h is just over five feet, and Christian Calyore ('12) won the men's 6 0 - m e t e r h u r d l e s with a time of 8.84 seconds. "Friday's (meet) w a s kind of a half m e e t for us as only the sprinters, j u m p e r s a n d hurdlers competed," David Dolfin ('14) said. "The meet w e n t pretty well considering quite a few people are w o r k i n g on the technique required for their events early in the season. It is difficult to judge s o m e of the m o r e complex events such as pole vault and high j u m p w h e n w e have only been practicing for t h r e e weeks now."

T h o u g h it is still early in the season, M a r t i n p o i n t e d to triple j u m p e r s Aaron C h e w ('12) a n d Jonas Lawson ('13) as two individuals that have improved f r o m last season. M a r t i n also said M a r c Soisson ('13) and Elliot Barney ('13) look as t h o u g h they will stand o u t this year. M a r t i n a n d Dolfin both agreed that C a m Holicki ('14) has shown a lot of p r o m i s e in the first few weeks of the season. "(Holicki) has looked very good early and will b e an integral part of replacing s o m e of the great seniors we lost to graduation last year in the springs," Dolfin said. The track t e a m s have a few weeks t o p r e p a r e for their next indoor m e e t , which will take place at G r a n d Valley on Feb. 17. O n e m o r e m e e t at Calvin on Feb. 25 will w r a p up the indoor season.

Trailing by nine at halftime, the w o m e n ' s basketball team stepped u p in the second half at Saint Mary's on Jan. 28 t o b e a t the Belles 77-73. Saint Mary's never led by less t h a n five for the last six a n d a half m i n u t e s of the first half and took a 47-38 lead into halftime. A t h r e e - p o i n t e r by M a d d i e B u r n e t t ('12) a b o u t t h r e e m i n u t e s into the second half gave H o p e the lead, and the Flying D u t c h never trailed for the rest of the game. Hope's women had a balanced offensive effort in the game, with four players scoring m o r e t h a n 10 points. C o u r t n e y Kust ('13) led the Flying D u t c h with 18 points, while Burnett a n d Allie C e r o n e ('12) a d d e d 16 and 11, respectively. F r e s h m a n Rebekah Llorens had h e r fourth d o u b l e - d o u b l e of t h e season, scoring 12 p o i n t s and pulling d o w n 11 r e b o u n d s . The Flying D u t c h have a brief break until they take on Calvin, currently ranked f o u r t h in the country, in DeVos Fieldhouse on Feb. 3 at 3 p.m.

MIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK Men's Basketball Nate Snuggerud ('13) Forward Women's Swimming Kyleigh Sheldon (MS) Diver

SWIMMING TEAMS SWEEP ALMA The men's and women's swimming and dive t e a m s w r a p p e d up their dual m e e t s for the season on Jan. 28 with b o t h t e a m s defeating Alma. The men's team w o n 145-112 t o finish with a 3-4 record in dual meets, and the w o m e n beat the Scots 147-122 and e n d e d the season 5-3 in dual meets. Jeff Shade ('12), Chris W a e c h ter ('15), Gregg Elhart ('13), M a t t G r e g o r y ('12), Jake H u n t ('14), Nick H a z e k a m p ('13) a n d Alex Perkins ('14) all h a d first place finishes for the men's team. Erin Hoisted ('13), Chelsea Wiese ('12), Kyleigh Sheldon ('13), Maria Kieft ('14) a n d Bethany Schmall ('14) finished in first for the w o m e n . The M I A A C h a m p i o n s h i p m e e t is Feb. 15-18 at the Holland Aquatic Center.


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Student athletic trainers: gifted and grateful Athletic training majors make huge gains working side-by-side with varsity teams and veteran trainers James R o g e r s ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Student athletic trainers are busy, grateful and dedicated individuals. They can be spotted at one of three o n - c a m p u s facilities: the Dow Center, DeVos Fieldhouse or Lugers Fieldhouse. They roam sidelines, treat athletes with delicate care a n d put n u m e r o u s h o u r s into learning and making lives healthier. t h e y are enrolled in the first liberal arts college in Michigan to offer an accredited athletic training major. H o p e students involved in one of the nation's finest Athletic Training Education P r o g r a m s play a p r o m i n e n t role in athletics a n d possess great aspirations. Becoming a m e m b e r of Hope's ATEP makes chances of gaining success p o s t - H o p e relatively high. Preparing ice baths, taping ankles and preventing soreness is what usually c o m e s to m i n d when thinking of athletic trainers, but there is m u c h m o r e to the occupation that o f t e n is concealed. They need to learn f r o m those w h o have accumulated success and k n o w h o w to p e r f o r m the work. Dr. Kirk Brumels r u n s the show. He has served as the director of Hope's ATEP since

2001. H e graduated from Hope's ATEP in 1988 a n d has over 20 years of athletic training experience. An amiable m e n t o r to the ATEP students, Brumels is certainly one to learn from. H e e a r n e d his master's and doctorate from Western Michigan University and f r o m 1990-2001 worked as an athletic trainer for the NFL's N e w England Patriots. Brian Dykhuizen has b e e n Hope's head athletic trainer since 2009. Dykhuizen also h a d extensive experience with the NFL, being employed as an assistant athletic trainer for the Cincinnati Bengals f r o m 20002009. Meg Frens and Tonia G r u p p e n also play key parts in teaching the ATEP students. G r a d u a t e s of Hope's ATEP, both w o r k as assistant athletic trainers and assistant professors of kinesiology. Together these four accredited individuals provide an unforgettable experience for the s t u d e n t s aspiring to walk in their shoes someday. Two students currently enrolled in Hope's ATEP, Colin Drinkard ('14) and Jordan A s h d o w n ('13), are grateful for their o p p o r t u n i t y to work hands-on with collegiate athletes and learn f r o m quality veteran athletic trainers.

Drinkard b e c a m e interested in pursuing athletic training in his junior year of high school. He spent h o u r s in the training r o o m and enjoyed watching the work being d o n e on athletes in need. " W h e n I finally began looking at colleges, Hope's educational p r o g r a m was appealing because it is set u p so that as s o o n as you step on c a m p u s your f r e s h m a n year you are i m m e r s e d in clinical experiences, something the vast majority of athletic training educational p r o g r a m s lack," Drinkard said. W h i l e it is difficult to find a college that provides firstyear clinical experience, it is also a challenge to apply and be accepted into the school's ATEP. The application process is PHOTO BY A N N M A R I E PAPARELU arduous. Hope's ATEP consists COLIN DRINKARD ( ' 1 4 ) of fewer than 25 students, a n d an NFL internship after his evaluation begins." a m e r e q u a r t e r of applicants are junior year, but in t h e m e a n t i m e "You always have to be accepted. he plans on serving as an prepared and ready to help out "The application process athletic trainer for the u p c o m i n g an athlete, w h e t h e r it's taking includes a completely separate s u m m e r c a m p s hosted at Hope. care of a cut application f r o m As for graduate school, or assessing a Hope's standard b o t h s t u d e n t s desire to attend, sprained ankle," application," W h e n I finally began knowing the benefits they can A s h d o w n said. Drinkard said. "It looking at colleges, receive f r o m accomplishing a T h e s e consists of two H o p e ' s educational m a s t e r s or a doctorate. Over students are essays: one o n program w a s appeal70 percent of ATC (certified devoted to your b a c k g r o u n d athletic trainer) students a t t e n d their work, ing because it is set in the athletic grad school. a c c u m u l a t i n g training field, u p so that as soon as "There is n o d o u b t that h o u r s of service and a n o t h e r on you step on c a m p u s going to grad school f u r t h e r s a n d clinical what m a k e s you your f r e s h m a n year your competitiveness in the job experience. competitive as you are immersed in m a r k e t or helps you gain more " L a s t an applicant, semester 1 connections," Drinkard said. clinical experiences. including your "Grad school makes you compiled almost f u t u r e aspirations â&#x20AC;&#x201D;COLIN DRINKARDm o r e marketable and improves 300 clinical for athletic STUDENT ATHLETIC your credentials, hopefully TRAINER ^ experience training." allowing you to attain a better hours, and For A s h d o w n , job," A s h d o w n said. this varies goals of being H o p e ATEP s t u d e n t s have depending on the sport you're accepted into Hope's ATEP gone to grad school for athletic covering," Drinkard said. didn't e m e r g e until his second training, physical therapy, A s h d o w n is putting in 10semester at Hope. occupational therapy and 15 h o u r s per week with men's " W h e n I first c a m e to H o p e I kinesiology. basketball but n o t e s that the did not k n o w what I was going Ashdown is going to attend s t u d e n t s w h o w o r k with football to m a j o r in," A s h d o w n said. grad school on the road to total about 20-30 h o u r s per " D u r i n g my second semester a health care career, but t h e week. I was looking into the AT specifics aren't clear for him Considering the a m o u n t of p r o g r a m and decided to apply." yet. He would love to work as experience the s t u d e n t s receive A s h d o w n was impressed by an ATC for an N C A A Division 1 in the p r o g r a m , internships how h a n d s - o n the p r o g r a m is football squad. a n d graduate and the capability As a s o p h o m o r e , Drinkard school aren't of learning and has constructed goals for his necessary practicing skills Last s u m m e r 1 spent f u t u r e beyond Hope. for ATEP that will be used about two m o n t h s "My f u t u r e plans are to go students, but in an everyday to graduate school for athletic both are highly with the M S U setting. training, b e c o m e a certified looked upon Drinkard has football team and athletic trainer that teaches for a n d are m e a n s worked handshad a great time and an ATEP similar to Hope's and to additional on with both learned a lot of n e w hopefully someday b e c o m e a c o n n e c t i o n s the men's and things. director of an ATER" Drinkard and s u p p o r t . women's cross said. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JORDAN ASHDOWNA s h d o w n country teams STUDENT ATHLETIC To the busy, grateful and landed an and also with TRAINER dedicated student athletic i n t e r n s h i p the women's trainers at Hope, you are 5 5 with Michigan basketball team, infinitely appreciated a nd State University last year and while A s h d o w n is currently respected, and you have b e en has recently applied to every aiding the men's basketball team. blessed to be a part of Hope's NFL t e a m for an internship at a Relationships are established nationally r e n o w n e d ATEP. s u m m e r training camp. with the athletes to develop Healing is needed. "Last s u m m e r 1 spent a b o u t trust a n d friendships.

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"While working on the sidelines you watch games a lot differently," Drinkard said, "and w h e n any athlete appears to have been injured it generally helps to have a g o o d background with the athlete before acute injury

two m o n t h s with the MSU football t e a m and had a great time and learned a lot of new things," A s h d o w n said. "I am still waiting to hear back from the NFL." Drinkard plans to apply for


02-01-2012