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H O P E COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

SPERA IN D E O

J A N U A R Y 3 0 . 2 0 0 8 • SINCE 1887

Pepsi pays annual visit to Dew Crew Without Mountain Dew, we'd just be...The Crew Laura Stritzke STAFF W R I T E R

On Jan. 19, Hope College played Adrian College at the DeVos Fieldhouse. Hope College fans, faculty and supporters were all present, and of course the D e w Crew had a large orange commanding presence. However, among the crowd there were a few guests not normally in attendance at Hope basketball games. Representatives f r o m Pepsi Co. came to the Hope vs. Adrian g a m e to evaluate its sponsorship of the f a m o u s " D e w Crew." The Dew Crew is a long-standing tradition for Hope College basketball. Not just your average student section, the D e w Crew averages about 300-400 in attendance and has an intimidating presence that causes visiting teams to dread playing at the DeVos. The Three-Man, stretching before games, substituting the referee, rowing and the orange shirts are all parts of the Dew Crew tradition. Mountain Dew has sponsored the D e w Crew since its founding 13 years ago by Assistant M e n ' s Basketball Coach Matt Neil. Representatives f r o m the c o m p a n y SEE DEW CREW, PAGE 6

PHOTO EDITOR D A V I D M O O R E

W I L D R I D E — Dew Crew l e a d e r s p u m p up t h e c r o w d t o s h o w Hope's b a s k e t b a l l t e a m some s u p p o r t . Pepsi t h o u g h t it w a s s w e e t , and M o u n t a i n Dew w i l l c o n t i n u e t o be a p a r t of t h e D u t c h m e n t r a d i t i o n .

Mildew concerns Dykstra Hall n u r s e s

Paige C a l a m a r l

a i c x r \ . i " e c t

• M a t t Oosterhouse SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

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As January nears an end, a portion of Hope College students anxiously await Friday, Feb. 1—some because it is one step closer to spring, and others because it is one step closer to their goal of becoming registered nurses since Feb. 1 is the deadline for applications into Hope's nursing program. However, for some, February may be a challenging . month as not all w h o apply to the proj gram will be admitted. With approximately 50 applications for the Feb. 1 deadline, and only 36 spots available per academic year, Hope's nursing program is one of the most competitive degree fields at the college. Since becoming a full-fledged program at Hope in 2002, after previ| ously being a joint program with Cal« v i n College, the nursing department * has graduated many students w h o have m gone onto highly sought positions in £ leading hospitals and top graduate nurs-

STAFF W R I T E R

As the temperature drops outside, the persistent problem of mildew increases inside Dykstra

ing programs in the U.S. Dr. Susan Dunn, chair of the nursing department, said this, as well as the numerous applications, is a result of the

Hall. Apparently caused by humidity and a lack of air circulation within the building, mildew is a source of trouble for many rooms throughout Dykstra. According to Sue Volkers, building service manager for the north side of Hope College's campus, residents in at least seven residential rooms in Dykstra have reported having the black substance on their . walls this

quality of Hope's program. "The H o p e College nursing program is gaining recognition as one of the best nursing programs available," Dunn said. " ( H o p e ' s nursing program offers) a challenging curriculum, exceptional nursing faculty, excellent clinical experiences and a unique focus on undergraduate nursing research." For the past two years, there have been m o r e applications than available spots to the Hope program as there has b e e n an increase in applicants, which follows a nationwide trend. Dunn a k tributes this to the availability of j o b prospects, as well as a shortage of RNs in the U.S. that has created a demand. "This shortage is expected to continue, if not worsen, in the future due in part to the aging of our population and the increased healthcare needs associSEE

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year. T h e r e has always been a

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ey said. To prevent future instances of mildew, the Hope College Physical Plant has placed S E E MILDEW, P A G E 6

Asian Perspective, and the La

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garding the issue. Upon discovering the mildew, Beverly N e w e y ( M l ) said, "I was kind of mad and surprised that it was there. Obviously stuff is going to happen, but it is not something you want in your room." For Newey, the mildew raised issues regarding her health. " I am allergic to (mildew), so that makes it even worse," New-

Faculty, students 'arrested' for a cause

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little (mildew), so it is not an unc o m m o n thing," Volkers said. Residents affected by the mildew have various concerns re-

Hope College hosted a series of events last week entitled the " H o p e 6." The program was sponsored by Hope's O f fice of Multicultural Education and Campus Ministries, along with assistance from various student organizations including the Black Student Union, Hope's

Spreading Peace — World famous pacifist and Hope Alumnus is honored this week. Page 3 Got a story idea? Let us know a t anchor@hope.edu, or call u s a t j g j ^ T g ?

Raza Unida. The event kicked o f f on Monday, Jan. 21, when six Hope volunteers were "arrested" (three students and three staff members) and assigned to collect donations toward their "bail." with all proceeds benefiting Holland's Core City LEAP, a program that SEE A R R E S T E D ,

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Heart of Holland - A look at Hope basketball from the eyes of students, faculty and community members. Page 12


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T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday 1/30 Web Cast: "The 2 percent solution"

Hope College aligns sexual harassment policy with state law Kevin Soubly SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

Thursday 1/31 Interactive workshop: "What's my ecological footprint?" 1 : 3 0 p.m. Science Center 3 0 4 6 . Led by Dr. Greg Murray as p a r t of Focus t h e Nation.

Panel Discussion: "Reality and Potential in the Holland Area" 7 p.m. VanderWerf 1 0 2 . Part of Focus t h e Nation.

Friday 2/1 Off c a m p u s and parent commuter application deadline

Saturday 2/2 A J . Muste Memorial Peace Lecture 2 p . m . D i m n e n t Chapel. Dr. D o n a l d Cronkite will present "1 Cannot Love: Variations on a T h e m e by A J . M u s t e "

Sunday 2/3 The Gathering: "Songs and Witness"

2 0 0 8

Intoxication Invalidates Consent:

8 p.m. Science Center 1 0 0 0 . Part of Focus t h e Nation.

JANUARY 3 0 ,

Leigh W e n d t l a n d - O X o n n o r CONTRIBUTING W R I T E R

" F r i e n d s don't lei friends hook u p d r u n k " d o e s not have quite the s a m e ring as the m o r e familiar slogan. It m a y be less catchy, but it is just as important to slaying safe. Hope College's Administrative A f f a i r s Board recently a m e n d e d the college's sexual harassment policy, placing it in line with Michigan's state law. Although Hope College's Sexual Harassment Policy has always maintained that explicit verbal consent is needed to avoid harassment and assault, the policy now states that intoxication invalidates consent. According to the policy, a person w h o is impaired cannot

ment and assault," said Dr. Leigh Wendlland-O'Connor, Hope's sexual harassment pol icy educator. W e n d l l a n d - O ' C o n n o r helps first-year students "become familiar with H o p e ' s policy by giving class presentations in all Health Dynamics courses. "It is important for all students, faculty and staff to understand that Hope has a policy, and that understanding the policy helps protect everyone from making poor choices," W e n d l l a n d - O ' C o n n o r said. " T h e responsibility to slop sexual assault and harassment is everyone's, not only potential victims. Students, faculty and staff at Hope need to understand that no o n e should lake advantage of s o m e o n e else's intoxication." " T h e r e is little that would be

be relied upon to understand to what he or she is saying " y e s . " Subjecting s o m e o n e to inappropriate sexual conduct that w o u l d be unwanted, should the person be sober, is assault. Additionally, being intoxicated oneself cannot be used as an excuse for failing to obtam valid consent. According to the a m e n d ed policy, while a person cannot give valid consent when intoxicated, being intoxicated does not e x e m p t the pursuer from the responsibility of obtaining consent. T h e change, which b e c a m e official in October 2007, was made in an attempt to better fulfill the polic y ' s purpose to "protect the dignity, safely and self-respect of all." "Education is a vital part of H o p e ' s policy in sexual harass-

more disrespeclftil of another's dignity than engaging in sexual activities which, once sobered up, would be seen as assault," said Carol Simon, professor of a sexual ethics course in H o p e ' s Philosophy Department. "Drunken sex is dangerous — both for those w h o initiate it and open themselves to complaints of assault and for those w h o m a y lower their ability to make valid j u d g m e n t s about consent." T h e updated Hope College sexual harassment policy can be found in its entirety online, as Well as additional information including a list of w h o m to contact should issues arise. Visit www.hope.edu/about/policies.

Faculty, students 'arrested' for civil rights cause

8 p.m. D i m n e n t Chapel.

• ARRESTED, f r o m page 1 Wednesday Soul Food Festival

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4 : 3 0 - 6 : 3 0 p.m. Phelps and Cook D i n i n g Halls.

IN BRIEF

RUSH GETS GOING

Greek life is .growing as rush season begins. Fraternity rush started on Jan. 14, and the sororities followed six days later. "Formal rush," according to H o p e Greek L i f e ' s website, is defined as "(an) opportunity for students to acquaint themselves with the m e m b e r s and the programs of the 15 Greek organizations." Fraternity and sorority rushes conclude on Feb. 2 and Feb. 5, respectively. SHUTTLE VAN S H U T D O W N

assists struggling middle school students. T h e " H o p e 6 " referred to the recent, racially charged events of the Jena 6, and "aimed at confronting and combating issues of hatred, and to build awareness of recent acts of racism," according to the H o p e O f f i c e of Public Relations. Events were scattered throughout the w e e k , and included events such as a chapel service dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther K i n g ' s vision of Christian responses to acts of hatred, a panel discussion on local and national issues o f racism and scheduled prayer sessions, ending with Friday's fundraiser and karaoke contest. Overall, the fundraiser was a great success, raising more than SI 166 for L E A P in just under

a week and spurring discussions of race relations throughout the w e e k both at and a w a y from the events. "It's really easy for us to look at an event 1500 miles a w a y and say to ourselves that such things w o u l d never happen here, but I've been here at Hope long enough to know that it does, unfortunately," said Dr. Charles G r e e n , director of the Phelps Scholars Program. "It's very important to have issues like racial harassment discussed. You can debate the situation of the Jena 6, and whether everyone was treated fairly or not, but rather than arguing over the specific events, H o p e College can use it as an opportunity to reflect on our times, and to examine what w e w o u l d do in a similar situation. And w e did," Green said. T h e Jena Six w a s a group of six black teenagers w h o w e r e

accused of beating a white teenager at a high school in Jena, La., in December 2006. T h e beating followed a n u m b e r of racially charged incidents in the t o w n , including the hanging of nooses from a tree at the high school. T h e accusations sparked protests as s o m e believed the charges to be excessive and racially discriminatory. In September 2007, between 10,000 and 20,000 protestors marched in Jena in what has been described as one of the largest civil rights demonstrations in years. T h e monies raised through the Hope 6 program w e r e to originally go toward the legal d e f e n s e of the incarcerated Jena 6, but d u e to complications, it w a s decided to keep the money local and it w a s thus donated to C o r e City LEAP.

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CHECK OUT THESE M U G S H O T S ! - Martin Luther On Tuesday, Jan. 29, a call to Shuttle Van (x 7177) was answered with a dismal announcement: "The Shuttle Vans are shut d o w n tonight d u e to the roads." According to a Shuttle Van representative, low visibility and slippery conditions led to the cancellation of the Shuttle Van's services for the remainder of the night. "It's f o r the safety of the students," the Shuttle Van phone

K i n g Jr.'s t h e o r y of c i v i l d i s o b e d i e n c e m a n i f e s t s i t s e l f a t Hope as s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y s t r i v e t o m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e w i t h i n t h e c o m m u n i t y . Last w e e k , s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y s t e p p e d up in response t o t h e Jena 6. Posters f e a t u r i n g t h e s e m u g s h o t s a p p e a r e d a r o u n d c a m p u s as they h a d t o c o l l e c t bail. In t h e e n d , they c o l l e c t e d over $ 1 , 0 0 0 t o d o n a t e t o a local c h a r i t y . Core City LEAP.

Nurses wanted: program is booming at Hope

dispatcher said. • NURSES, from page 1 H O P E A T O P S C H O O L FOR PEACE C O R P S VOLUNTEERS

Hope is ranked 24th nationally among small colleges and universities, with 14 alumni serving as Peace Corps Volunteers, up from 13 the year before. Since the Peace C o r p s ' inception in 1961, a total of 153 Hope alumni have joined the ranks, making Hope the 283rd producer of volunteers of all lime. T h e entire " P e a c e Corps Top C o l l e g e s " list can be found on the Peace Corps Website at hltp://www. peacecorps.gov/news/resources/ slals/pdf/schools2008.pdf

in part to the aging of our population and the increased healthcare needs associated with aging, and the anticipated retirement of one-third of our existing nurses over the next 10-15 years," Dunn said. "This translates to a wide-open j o b market for college graduates w h o have pursued a nursing d e g r e e . . . T h e r e is a position available for any college graduate w h o is licensed as. a Registered N u r s e . " Additionally, flexibility and pay have created an increase in interest in nursing. According to Dunn, there is often flexibility

in hours, work settings and location, and an average salary for a registered nurse is approximately $45,000. A nurse with a graduate-level education can expect to receive a higher salary. With an abundance of applicants to the nursing program and the nursing job market showing great promise, Dunn said that there are plans in place to grow the nursing department. A proposal for expansion will be given to Hope in 2009, and from there it will need to be approved by the Michigan State Board of Nursing and Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. For those students w h o do not gain admittance to the nursijig de-

partment in February, there is another chance for application in October, and they are encouraged to reapply to the program. However, for those students w h o are fortunate enough to gain acceptance to H o p e ' s competitive nursing program, the effort is worth it. "Most practicing nurses will tell you that they are part of the best profession in the world," Dunn said. "I have loved every role I have had as a'nurse, which has included j o b s in critical care nursing, rehabilitation, research and teaching. In what other career are you assured that you will always have a job, and a job.that you love?"

THE VOICE OF HOPE COLLEGE

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NATIONAL THE ANCHOR JANUARY 3 0 ,

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Candidates take states Laura S t r l t z k e STAFF W R I T E R

T h e 2008 primary elections are underway, and the Republican and Democratic parties in every state are deciding which candidate they want to send to the general election. Michigan has already had its primary, but are the primary elections still important to Hope College students? "I think it's really interesting to keep up with w h o is winning in all the different states, because the results will affect all of us," Nicole Tyner ( M l ) said. H o p e students seem to be very interested in the HAMPSHIRE campaign and its progress. R E P U B L I C A N S Lucas Whitman ( ' 1 0 ) expressed the importance 37% McCain I of being aware of the 32% Romney election n%Huckabee "It's important to pay attention so you know w h o the candidates are and what they stand for," Whitman said.

Iowa kicks off

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On Jan. 3, Iowa b e c a m e the first state to weigh in the Presidential race. Historically Iowa's cauA R O L I N A cus is the first in the whole R E P U B L I C A N S primary 33% McCain election. A 30% Huckabee record n u m 16% Thompson ber of voters turned out 16% Romney to participate in Iowa's caucuses. A caucus is different from a primary because the voting district assembles in a town-hall meeting style and people separate into groups based on the candidates they are supporting. State

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38% Obama 29.75% Edwards 29.47% Clinton

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34% Huckabee 25% Romney 13% Thompson

delegates are then awarded to each of the candidates depending on the proportion of people w h o support them. In a primary, however, the party m e m b e r s (or voters outside of the party in

"open primaries") simply c o m e to the polls and cast their vote in a booth, and the state delegates are awarded according to the percentage of people who voted for them. Here is a quick recap of the

results (according to C N N . c o m ) for the various states that have had their primaries so far: • O n Jan. 3 in Iowa, Barack O b a m a won the Democratic caucus, followed closely by J o h n Edw a r d s and Hillary Clinton in second and third respectively. Bill Richardson got 2 percent, and Joe Biden got one. O t h e r candidates r u n n i n g that d i d n ' t gain a percenta g e of the vote were Christopher Dodd, M i k e Gravel and D e n n i s Kucinich. Iowa R e p u b l i c a n s voted f o r M i k e H u c k a b e e most, then Mitt Romney, and then Fred T h o m p son. 13 percent went to John M c Cain, 10 percent to R o n Paul, 3 percent to R u d y Giuliani, and half a percent to D u n c a n Hunter. • O n Jan. 5 W y o m i n g held its Republican caucuses (the D e m o cratic caucuses are scheduled for M a r c h 8). R o m n e y c a m e in first, T h o m p s o n second, and Hunter third. • O n Jan. 8 N e w H a m p s h i r e held both D e m o c r a t i c and Republican primaries. Clinton, O b a m a , and Edwards placed first, second, and third respectively. 5 percent of D e m o c r a t s voted for Richardson, and 1 percent for Kucinich. Republicans voted for McCain, Romney, and H u c k a b e e as the top three. N i n e percent voted for Giuliani, 8 percent for Paul and 1 percent for T h o m p s o n .

Michigan weighs in • O n Jan. 15, Michigan held it's Republican and D e m o c r a t primaries, h o w e v e r Michigan lost all of its Democratic delegates and 30 of it's 6 0 Republican delegates due to m o v i n g the primaries outside of approved dates set by the national parlies. Again Republicans voted in large n u m b e r s for Romney, McCain, and Huckabee, followed by 6 percent for Paul, 4 percent for T h o m p s o n and 3 percent for Giuliani. M a n y D e m o c r a t s still chose to vote despite the fa9t that there were n o delegates at stake. Hillary Clinton was the only frontrunner w h o d i d n ' t w i t h d r a w from the race, and s h e w o n a majority of the vote. H o w e v e r O b a m a and E d w a r d s supporters w h o did not c h o o s e to vote Republican voted " u n c o m m i t t e d " on the Democrat ballot. • On Jan. 19, N e v a d a held its Democrat and Republican caucuses. R o m n e y w o n the R e p u b lican c a u c u s followed by Paul, then McCain, then Huckabee, and T h o m p s o n with 8 percent and

Giuliani with 4 percent. Clinton won the Democratic c a u c u s with a F L O slight majority. D E M O C R A T S O b a m a followed with 50% Clinton a close second, and Edwards trailed with 33% Obama four percent. 14% Edwards Also on the Jan. 19, South Carolina held its Republican primary. H e most votes w e n t to M c C a i n , then H u c k a b e e , then T h o m p s o n , then R o m n e y at 16 percent, Paul w i t h 4 percent and Giuliani w i t h 2 percent. • O n Jan. 2 6 South Carolina held its D e m o c r a t i c primary. O b a m a won a majority, followed by Clinton and E d w a r d s respec- - 1

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36% McCain 31 % Romney ,15% Giuliani

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tively. O n Tuesday, Jan. 29, the Republicans held their primary in Florida. T h e candidates from most to least votes were M c C a i n , Romney, Guiliani, Huckabee, Paul, T h o m p s o n , and Hunter. The Democrats from N E V m o s t to least votes D E M O C R A T S were Clinton, O b a m a , Edwards, 51% Clinton and Kucinich. 45% Obama Since the be4% Edwards ginning of the campaigns many candidates have dropped out due to poor perform a n c e in the primaries/ caucuses.

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51% Romney 14% Paul 13% McCain

Delegates add up O n the Republican side, R o m n e y has 73 delegates, John M c C a i n w h o h a s 38 delegates, M i k e Huckabee who has 29 delegates, Ron Paul w h o has six delegates and Rudy Giuliani w h o has t w o delegates. T h e remaining Democratic candidates are Clinton w h o has 2 3 0 delegates, M I C H O b a m a w h o has 152 delegates, Edwards D E M O C R A T S w h o has 61 del55% Clinton egates and M i k e 40% Uncommitted Gravel w h o has zero delegates. O n Feb. 5, is k n o w n as " S u p e r Tuesday." Twenty-two states held their primaries, and the results will narrow down borh the D e m o cratic and Republican races.

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IN BRIEF

PROBLEMS PERSIST IN PALESTINIAN GAZA CRISIS G A Z A (AP) - The chaotic scenes on the Gaza-Egypt border are forcing the international community to rethink the policy of trying to weaken Hamas rulers by keeping the territory sealed.

The Hamas-engineered border breach; in which hundreds of thousands of Palestinians broke out of blockaded Gaza this week, highlights the movement's resilience. It also reminds the world that 1.5 million Gazans, cannot remain locked

up indefinitely. Yet, a more relaxed Gaza border regime could entice Hamas to hall rockct fire, and this in turn could buy the necessary calm to make progress on a U.S.-backed peace deal.

BUSH SPEAKS OPENLY OF ADDICTION BALTIMORE (AP) - President Bush is talking more openly lately about his old drinking habit, saying plainly that the term "addiction" had applied to him. "Addiction is hard to overcome. As you might remember, I drank too much at one time in my life,"

said Bush, adding, "First is to recognize that there is a higher power... It helped m e quit drinking." The president decided to quit drinking in 1986. He now hasnonalcoholic beers the only indulgence he says he allows.


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Ethnic conflict in Kenya continues Presidential elections spark ethnic tensions; ethnic cleansing plagues the country and get back to the h o u s e . " Most s h o p s in the city had closed, and in those that w e r e open, c r o w d s f o u g h t to get crucial supplies, like sugar, with prices often h a v i n g doubled or tripled. M e a n w h i l e Kikaya has had to a d j u s t to f o l l o w i n g e v e n t s in K e n y a f r o m here in the U.S. E v e n t h o u g h he reads the n e w s online every day, he still feels close to the events. " ( F o r the first few w e e k s ) I called h o m e almost every day, every m o r n i n g w h e n I w o k e up. W h e n 1 w a s told s o m e of my f r i e n d s had been displaced because their houses had been burned d o w n , 1 k n e w this w a s h a p p e n i n g right at m y doorstep."

Karie Luidens GUEST W R I T E R

A m o n t h has passed n o w since c o n t r o v e r s y o v e r K e n y a ' s presidential elections sparked an e r u p t i o n ' o f v i o l e n c e a c r o s s the nation, but the political and tribal conflicts are c o n t i n u i n g to boil. T h e i m m e d i a t e s o u r c e of the current v i o l e n c e w a s the a p p a r e n t r i g g i n g of the D e c . 27 election by i n c u m b e n t M w a i Kibaki. Vote c o u n t s w e r e g i v i n g o p p o s i t i o n leader Raila O d i n g a a substantial lead w h e n the Kenyatta International Conference Center was stormed by p a r a m i l i t a r y p o l i c e . M i n u t e s later, the election w a s d e c l a r e d in f a v o r o f K i b a k i , w h o w a s hastily s w o r n in later that day. Violence quickly erupted in cities a c r o s s the n a t i o n ; b u r n i n g a n d looting b e c a m e a r e g u l a r f e a t u r e in K e n y a n cities, and rallies b r o u g h t out p o l i c e forces that have switched from tear-gas to live a m m u n i t i o n . B e t w e e n such c l a s h e s a n d active neighbor-on-neighbor violence, many of whom are o f t e n e x e c u t e d w i t h m a c h e t e s , clubs, poison a r r o w s , a n d s t o n i n g , the death toll a p p r o a c h e d 6 0 0 w i t h i n the first t w o w e e k s . M o r e than a q u a r t e r o f a m i l l i o n h a v e fled their h o m e s , c o n g r e g a t i n g a l o n g tribal lines or s e e k i n g r e f u g e in neighboring countries.

Tribalism and poverty The election controversy was m e r e l y the spark t h a t ignited preexisting tribal tensions. T h o u g h 4 2 tribes c o e x i s t in K e n y a , the K i k u y u t r i b e has d o m i n a t e d the p o w e r and w e a l t h e s s e n t i a l l y s i n c e the nation

A P P H O T O / B E N CURTIS

E T H N I C C L E A N S I N G — A Kenyan m a n s i t s i n t h e c a b of a d e s t r o y e d t r u c k u s e d as a m a k e s h i f t r o a d b l o c k w h i l e a t i r e burns on t h e roof as he a n d o t h e r s e n f o r c e t h e r o a d b l o c k In K i s u m u Kenya on Tuesday Jan. 2 9 , 2 0 0 8 . The t o w n of K i s u m u n o w a l m o s t c o m p l e t e l y e t h n i c a l l y c l e a n s e d of K i k u y u s , a n d m o b s a r m e d w i t h m a k e s h i f t w e a p o n s e r e c t b u r n i n g r o a d b l o c k s a n d s e a r c h for the few Kikuyu targets remaining. a c h i e v e d i n d e p e n d e n c e in 1963, c r e a t i n g a h i s t o r y o f hostility in the r e m a i n i n g tribes. Anabay Mamo ('10), a Hope College student who originally hails f r o m northern K e n y a , said, 4 4 When y o u ' r e g r o w i n g up, y o u ' r e t a u g h t that y o u are y o u r tribe. You p u t y o u r tribe b e f o r e y o u r s e l f , and w h e n things like this c o m e up, p e o p l e go b a c k to that w a y o f t h i n k i n g . E v e r y p r e s i d e n t h e l p s his tribe a n d his h o m e t o w n first, w h i c h a l w a y s c r e a t e s tension.!' Felix K i k a y a ( M l ) , f r o m N a i r o b i , said, " T h i s e l e c t i o n j u s t ignited the f e e l i n g s that were already there between tribes. N e i g h b o r s h a v e lived p e a c e f u l l y together, ( b u t ) n o w

o n e n e i g h b o r can j u s t g o to his n e i g h b o r ' s h o u s e and hack him

Close to home

to d e a t h . " And, Kikaya notes, the conflict has the g r e a t e s t i m p a c t on the p o o r e s t of the p o p u l a t i o n . In t h e d e n s e l y - p o p u l a t e d s l u m s , w h e r e m o s t are f o r c e d to live h a n d - t o - m o u t h on a dollar a day, p e o p l e o f t e n feel they h a v e n o t h i n g to lose by f i g h t i n g . T h e s e n s e of d e s p e r a t i o n is q u i c k l y e x p l o i t e d by politiciaris: M a m o s u g g e s t s that K i b a k i is u s i n g the police, w h e r e a s O d i n g a is inciting the p e n t - u p r e s e n t m e n t s of the general p o p u l a t i o n in o r d e r to rile u p r e s i s t a n c e to a g o v e r n m e n t ( a n d a tribe) that is b l o c k i n g his p e r s o n a l rise to

Eunjee Choi ('11) was s p e n d i n g C h r i s t m a s with her family in N a i r o b i w h e n the violence b r o k e out. Daily life immediately b e c a m e confined to their h o m e , w h e r e they w a t c h e d the n e w s continuously until the g o v e r n m e n t cut o f f all m e d i a a f t e r a f e w days. N o t having prepared any stocks, o b t a i n i n g food b e c a m e a concern. " ( W e left the safety of o u r h o m e ) o n c e a w e e k m a y b e , if it w a s quiet. If they say there will be a riot on this a f t e r n o o n , w e go in the m o r n i n g , w h i l e it's quiet b e c a u s e t h e y ' r e getting ready," C h o i said. " W e w o u l d divide u p j o b s ( a n d ) get what ( w e ) needed

power.

What now? S o h o w will the situation be r e s o l v e d ? Kikaya b e l i e v e s that a resolution is not easily attainable. "1 a m sorry that so m a n y p e o p l e are d y i n g about this, (but it w o n ' t e n d ) until Kibaki is out of power. If (Odinga) d e c i d e s to share p o w e r with the president, it m e a n s he has betrayed the people. If he gives up, w h a t w o u l d m a k e the voters go and get cards next time to vote in 2012, if a president can j u s t rig things and k e e p his p o w e r ? " At this point, M a m o , K i k a y a and Choi s e e m to agree that no o n e leader is likely to be able to bring the Kenyan p e o p l e u n d e r control. " B y the get w o r s e said, " a n d things will

day, things s e e m to and w o r s e , " K i k a y a I don't know how be in the m o n t h s to

come."

Pioneering journalist Frances Lewine dies Female journalist spent career fighting prejudices, championing equality and feminism Chris Lewis SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

F o r m e r White House correspondent f o r the Associated Press, Frances Lewine, died on Jan. 19. According to the W a s h ! ington Post, Lewine w a s k n o w n for fighting against the discrimination of w o m e n in the world of j o u r n a l i s m while also reporting during the administrations of six presidents, beginning with Eisenh o w e r and e n d i n g with Carter. Lewine also worked for Cable N e w s N e t w o r k as an assignment editor and field producer since 1981. In 1978, Lewine, along with six other w o m e n , filed a class-action lawsuit against the AP, which resulted in a $2 million settlement. Soon after the settlement, the A P began to change its policies in several areas, including pensions, salaries and hiring of employees.

w a s well respected by both people inside and outside of the field of journalism. Linda = = = = = ' Deutsch is currently a legal affairs re"She was a largely porter for the A P and worked with Lewine unsung pioneer for in the past. women in journal"All the politiism and role model cians w h o w o u l d n ' t stop for anyone else for myself and would stop for her thousands of other because they k n e w women who tried to her," said Deutsch to the Washington Post. follow in her foot" S h e would ask the steps"" toughest questions, — Edie Lederer, AP but with a smile on

' Edie Lederer is currently the A P ' s chief correspondent at the United tions

Naand

views Lewine as a trailblazer. "She was a largely uns u n g pioneer for women in journalism and role model for myself and thousands of other w o m e n w h o tried to follow in her footsteps," said Lederer

chief correspondent = = = = = =

to the Washington Post. Lewine w a s also known for sharing her wisdom with y o u n g and u p c o m i n g journalists and

=

her face." Lewine b e c a m e the first w o m a n to

be a full-time White House reporter f o r the A P and was also a leader of w o m e n ' s e f f o r t s to obtain admission to the National Press C l u b ' s lun-

cheon where newsmakers gave s p e e c h e s in a r o o m full of m a l e journalists. In 1971, largely d u e to the efforts of L e w i n e , f e m a l e s were finally allowed to attend the luncheon with their male counterparts. Lewine also campaigned against the Gridiron Club, which is an exclusive group of journalists and politicians. T h e club excluded w o m e n from its annual event until Lewine stood u p for her and other w o m e n ' s rights to be included in the event. Lewine soon became the second female m e m b e r of the club. Lewine was never afraid to stand u p against the authority of the government and share her views. "In times (of war) like these, w h e n the credibility of our nation and o u r president often comes into question, it is the reporter on the scene that can raise issues

and put the spotlight on problems so the nation can address them," Lewine said in the Washington Post report. "Reporters should understand that they have an obligation to search f o r the truth and to stand in the front line in holding governments and officials accountable for their actions." Hope College communication p r o f e s s o r Dr. Teresa Housel views Lewine as a pioneer for w o m e n journalists. " L e w i n e helped open d o o r s for w o m e n to # go into j o u r n a l i s m and she s p o k e out against w o m en reporters being routinely relegated to the society or lifestyle sections," Housel said. " S h e advocated for the right of w o m e n to report hard n e w s , which is, unfortunately, still m a l e - d o m i nated even t h o u g h j o u r n a l i s m p r o g r a m s today are predominantly c o m p r i s e d o f f e m a l e students."


ARTS JANUARY 3 0 ,

THE

2 0 0 8

Orchestra to feature soloists in night to remember Rachel Syens GUEST W R I T E R

According lo Webster's Ninth N e w Collegiate Dictionary, a concerto is " a piece for one or more soloists and orchestra with three contrasting m o v e m e n t s , " and an aria is "a striking solo p e r f o r m a n c e . " Put these together, and you have an orchestra a c c o m p a n y i n g s o m e a m a z i n g soloists in a concert not easily forgotten. T h e Concerto/Aria concert on Feb. 7 features six H o p e C o l l e g e soloists chosen from twenty-five students w h o auditioned in N o v e m b e r 2007. Dr. Robert Southard, interim c o n d u c t o r of the H o p e College Orchesfra, will be a c c o m p a n y i n g the soloists. "All of the students w h o played were very talented and prepared, but the six winners displayed an extremely high level of musicianship and technical ability," Southard said. John Donkersloot ( M l ) , o n e of the soloists, will play " P i a n o Concerto in A rpinor. O p . 16" c o m p o s e d by Edvard Grieg. " F o r the audition process, the musician prepares or m e m o r i z e s a piece of m u s i c for

soloist in orchestra," Donkersloot said. " T h e n on a Saturday in N o v e m b e r the soloists plays (or sings) their piece for a panel o f three judges." The soloists w h o are chosen play their piece with the orchestra in the February concert. Donkersloot describes his piece as a romantic piano concerto with a flashy beginning, brooding t h e m e and great cadenza. H e said that he picked his piece because he really liked the s o u n d . M a n y of the soloists have also been w o r k i n g on their pieces for quite s o m e time; Donkersloot has been w o r k i n g seriously on his piece since the fall semester. Hillary Byker ( ' 0 8 ) is another soloist in the concert, representing a different kind of music than Donkersloot. Byker is a s o p r a n o and will b e singing "Elle a fui, la tourterelle" from the opera, " L e s C o n t e s d ' h o f f m a n n " , written by J a c q u e s O f f e n b a c h in the R o m a n t i c period. Byker said that a character in the • opera, A n t o n i a , sings this particular aria about lost love. T h e H o p e C o l l e g e Orchestra has also been spending time w o r k i n g on these pieces in

order to a c c o m p a n y the soloists. " T h e m e m b e r s of the orchestra have w o r k e d quite Jiard on s o m e very challenging pieces and it would b e great for people on c a m p u s to c o m e support them as well," Southard said. Both Southard and Donkersloot agree that the soloists are extremely talented and have been w o r k i n g very hard on their pieces. " H o p e students should attend the concert to see what others have been putting a lot of time and effort into," Donkersloot said. Byker also sees the hard work of both the soloists and the orchestra, and said that students should attend this concert. "The musicianship of the participants in this concert is stellar, and rarely d o you get to hear solo instrumentalists and vocalists perform with the orchestra on Hope's c a m p u s , " Byker said. T h e Co n cer t o /A r i a concert features the f o l l o w i n g soloists: Hillary Byker, soprano; Rachel Daley, flute; John Donkersloot, piano; J o e Stodola, viola; Kay Gillette, soprano and Alexandru H a m z e a , violin. T h e concert will take place on Thursday, Feb. 7 at 7:30 p . m . in D i m n e n t Chapel.

ANCHOR

5

THIS WEEK IN ART Wednesday 1/30 Cool Beans Coffeehouse Entertainment 9 - 1 1 p.m. The Kletz.

Thursday 1/31 A J . Muste M e m o r i a l Concert 7:30 p.m. D i m n e n t Chapel.

Friday Arts and Humanities Coffee Break

2/1

3 : 3 0 - 4 : 3 0 p.m. M a r t h a Miller Rotunda. Open t o all c a m p u s faculty and staff. A d m i s s i o n is free.

Campus Movie "Music Within" 7 p.m., 9 : 3 0 p.m. 1 2 a.m. VanderWerf 1 0 2 . $2.

Rachael Price, jazz vocalist 7:30 p.m. Knickerbocker Theatre. $ 6 for students.

Saturday 2/2 Sarah Brown, piano and flute 4 p.m. Wlchers A u d i t o r i u m .

C a m p u s Movie 7 p.m., 9 : 3 0 p.m. 1 2 a.m. VanderWerf 102. $2.

Opus Soup showcases student work

Sunday Campus Movie

2/3

3 p.m. VanderWerf 1 0 2 . $ 2 .

Katie Bennett A R T S EDITOR

T h i s week, students can flip through the pages of the new Opus, H o p e ' s biannual literary

i

magazine. O n c e a semester. O p u s features p o e m s , prose and visual art by H o p e students. Last Wednesday, Jan.. 23, an event entitled O p u s S o u p celebrated the arrival of the fall 2 0 0 7 issue with readings and explanations of the pieces of art by the students. " W e thought it would be cool to hear the stories behind the poems directly from the writers," said M i k e Bertrand ( ' 1 0 ) , co-edi-

•w ®

i

PHOTO BY A M A N D A ANDERSON

O P U S S O U P — Susan Krueger ( ' 0 8 ) reads her w o r k " H o w t o Fish" t o t h e Opus Soup a u d i e n c e on Jan. 2 3 . " H o w t o F i s h " and o t h e r s t u d e n t w o r k s w e r e p u b l i s h e d in t h e f a l l Issue of Opus.

Curator, artist speak about Vietnamese art K a t i e Luidens

tor of O p u s . His co-editor Patrick C r u m b (M0) said, " W e felt that the O p u s S o u p event, which was our opening party, and the O p u s fall issue w e r e a big success. We received around 160 submissions for the fall O p u s and then our editorial board narrowed that d o w n . O n c e S E E OPUS, P A G E 6

AJ. Muste Spreading peace through music and poetry

GUEST WRITER

T h e H o p e College c o m m u n i t y recently had the h o n o r of hosting curator Dr. N o r a Taylor and painter Dinh Thi T h a m Poon, w h o s e work is on display as part of the o n going " C h a n g i n g Identities" exhibition in the DePree Gallery. " C h a n g i n g Identities" is the first large-scale show to bring contemporary Vietnamese w o r k s to A m e r i c a n galleries, and it s h o w c a s e s the art of ten female artists f r o m around Vietnam. Taylor and Poon spoke to a large gathering of H o p e students and Holland c o m m u nity m e m b e r s in Cook Auditorium on Friday night, Jan. 25, and visited the gallery again Saturday m o r n i n g to speak more informally with interested individuals. T h e scent of Vietnamese spring rolls set the tone for a presentation on the developing art scene in S E E TAYLOR, P A G E 6

Amy S o u k u p GUEST W R I T E R

To honor the spirit and ideas of A.J. Muste, a world-famous pacifist and Hope College alumnus, a series of events, free of cost, are taking place on campus this week. A f t e r graduating from H o p e in 1905, M u s t e w o r k e d to p r o m o t e his ideas of peace and justice, actively protesting against every m a j o r war until his death in 1967. H e also participated in and helped form multiple pacifist organizations. In 1985, H o p e began the A.J. M u s t e Lecture to c o m m e m o r a t e and continue his life's work. A m o n g the events surrounding this y e a r ' s lecture are t w o nights of m u si c and literature. A night of poetry and song will take place on Thursday, Jan. 31, at 7:30 p.m. in Dimnent

Chapel. T h e e v e n t will feature poetry read by m e m b e r s of the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y and a concert by the college C h a p e l Choir, directed by Dr. Brad R i c h m o n d . The Chapel Choir will p e r f o r m an original piece c o m p o s e d by R i c h m o n d . T h e piece c o m b i n e s t w o p o e m s written by British World War I soldier Wilfred O w e n , w h o was killed o n e week b e f o r e the Armistice. " ( O w e n ) left behind poetry that spoke of the tragedy of war," Richmond said. A l o n g with the choir, the p e r f o r m a n c e will include piano and percussive a c c o m p a n i m e n t and feature baritone soloist, Jeremy Lydic ( ' 0 3 ) . O n Friday, Feb. I, there will also be a perf o r m a n c e o f Quartet for the End of T i m e " at 7:30 p.m. in Dimnent Chapel.

IN BRIEF THE KNICK FEATURES JAZZ S I N G E R ON FRIDAY

H o p e C o l l e g e will feature j a z z vocalist Rachael Price and her quartet on Friday, Feb. | , a t l 7 : 3 0 p.m. in the KnickerbockerTheatre. T h e y o u n g vocalist has won over critics and fans alike with her mature rendition o f s o m e of the great j a z z classics. In 2003, Price was tapped by the G r a m m y Foundation as a vocalist with the High School G r a m m y Jazz Choir, and she w a s a semi-finalist at the Montreux International Jazz Vocal Competition in France. Price has p e r f o r m e d to standing ovations at m a n y j a z z festivals, including the N e w p o r t Jazz Festival. Jazz legend N a n c y Wilson has said about Price, "I think she's brilliant... the depth, the w a r m t h and the enunciation." Price "is young, gifted... it b e c a m e clear that Price... has the talent to match her enthusiasm," T h e Washington Post has said. B o m in Australia, raised in Nashville, Tenn., Price began her career at the age of 18, o p e n i n g for Joshua R e d m a n at N e w H a v e n ' s "Jazz on The G r e e n , " receiving a standing ovation. At the Society o f Singers G a l a to honor Sir Elton John, o n e reviewer said that Price "had the ballroom shaking with Elton's old 'Holy M o s e s , ' which had people j u m p i n g up again." Price's quick grasp of the subtleties of jazz has led to an independent debut C D titled "Dedicated to You." It is a c o m pendium of j a z z standards including "Tea for Two," "People Will Say W e ' r e in L o v e , " and " T h e Folks W h o Live on the Hill." For tickets contact the DeVos Fieldhouse. S I 0 for regular admission, $8 for senior citizens and S6 for children 18 and under.


NEWS

JANUARY 3 0 ,

2 0 0 8

REVIEWS

Twenty-seven Dresses' full of witty humor Abby D e V u y s t

plot.

GUEST W R I T E R

who spends more time planning the wed-

T h e title alone is enough to scare away most males, but on the whole, " 2 7 Dresses" offers m o m e n t s of witty h u m o r that are able

hides her feelings behind a nervous facade thai doesn't break until she is forced to plan the marriage o f her sister and the m a n Jane

and style are expressed during the movie, and a dress-up montage proves that brides-

characteristics as other romantic comedies

loves. T h e ' w e d d i n g hopper," Kevin Doyle

maid dresses are ugly so they don't take

al rollercoaster of emotions. Aline Brosh M c K e n n a ("Devil Wears

K*m*Jk€. HVU. '27 PUtSCJ*

Prada"), the screenwriter o f " 2 7 Dresses" appears to have pulled inspiration from films

..~U*/sm-~'F*suuAKapr*&*i;Ac*

-^aWOSftU^t—'V—.ft*-7*«4*<44u flcwra^icrf aftfttwr nwd ««>« - U6U0*M<*1 wcmor. JUW*JU*X*W

like " T h e Wedding Planner" and " H o w to

- ¥*JLV***c*l*J4 -M€W€<.-.r.Q

Lose a G u y in Ten D a y s " when forming the

(James Marsden), is an ambitious writer ready to do anything to get ahead and he decides to

supporting every cliche there is about the perfect wedding.

than originally planned. Even with the strange tt

a f l a v o r a n d an a p p e a r a n c e t h a t

H a n o i , V i e t n a m , w h e r e P o o n lives

Vietnam. W i t h T a y l o r t r a n s l a t i n g into

a r e e n t i r e l y u n i q u e t o her. " ( I n this e x h i b i t i o n , t h e art-

and works, and where Taylor has

English,

i s t s ' w o r k ) is not a b o u t V i e t n a m ,

of

layering

her

it's a b o u t t h e m s e l v e s .

They're

s p e n t t h e p a s t 15 y e a r s s t u d y i n g

technique

contemporary painting. Taylor explained that Viet-

p a i n t s into a h a n d m a d e p a per that was actually designed

not s p e a k i n g about the country," Taylor said. " W h e n 1 talked to

n a m ' s art w o r l d h a s a rich h i s t o -

t o a b s o r b light s t r o k e s o f w a -

each o f the artists, they wanted to

ry, i n c l u d i n g s i g n i f i c a n t e v o l u -

ter-color.

s p e a k a b o u t t h e i r o w n lives, t h e i r

tion d u r i n g t h e 2 0 t h c e n t u r y , but w h i l e " t h e r e are t o n s o f g a l l e r i e s

against the traditional method,

own families.

in V i e t n a m , n o t t h a t m a n y a r t i s t s

h e r t e a c h e r s in art s c h o o l c r i t i c i z e d her, t e l l i n g h e r t h a t h e r

themselves, like we do." " C h a n g i n g E x h i b i t i o n s " will

get t o e x h i b i t e l s e w h e r e . "

pieces were

be on display t h r o u g h Friday,

Because

opaque

she

unattractive.

goes

To

Feb.

one are thus a rare opportunity f o r t h o s e h e r e in t h e S t a t e s t o

s e e m e d fascinated by the bold colors and the delicate details of

f r o m 10 a . m . t o n o o n a n d 1 p . m .

glimpse

her scenes.

the

artistic

like

this

develop-

I.

The

g a l l e r y is o p e n

to 5 p.m. on w e e k d a y s .

Poon's works have

Opus Soup showcases student work Jon Kay ('08), who discussed

people w h o are working behind

his s c u l p t u r e and p h o t o c o l l a g e

the s c e n e s t o m a k e s o m e t h i n g

w e h a d t h e i s s u e finished w e c o n -

at t h e e v e n t , said, " I t ' s w o n d e r -

like this p o s s i b l e . "

t a c t e d e v e r y o n e w h o had b e e n ac-

f u l t o s e e a c o l l e c t i o n o f this sort

c e p t e d a n d a s k e d t h e m if t h e y ' d be w i l l i n g to read their p i e c e or

b e i n g p u t t o g e t h e r e v e r y year. I think e v e n m o r e than t h e s t u d e n t s

Submissions for Opus of spring 2 0 0 8 are fast approach-

d i s c u s s their v i s u a l a r t " . The party concluded

w h o s e w o r k is f e a t u r e d t h a t t h o s e

p r o s e is M o n d a y F e b . 4 at II

with

individuals

p . m . a n d v i s u a l art is d u e F e b . 11

a

Hol-

this i s s u e into e x i s t e n c e s h o u l d

land-based band The Hurricane

be recognized and thanked. I find it's t o o e a s y to f o r g e t the

• OPUS, from p a g e 5

performance

by

the

Hearts.

who

helped

bring

Reviews published here are reflections of the opinions of the individual writers and not necessarily of the Anchor staff as a whole.

Mildew plagues Dykstra Hall nearly four different occasions,

• MILDEW, from page 1 dehumidifiers in residential r o o m s with r e c u r r i n g m i l d e w

said, " A f t e r the d e h u m i d i f i e r s w e h a v e n ' t had any m i l d e w . " Residential

rooms

with

mil-

problems. M e g h a n Vanderlee ( M l ) , w h o ,

dew should be reported to a residential assistant, residential direc-

prior to r e c e i v i n g a d e h u m i d i f i e r r e p o r t e d m i l d e w in her r o o m on

tor or building service manager within the hall.

T h e y talk about

t h e c o n t r a r y , t h o s e in t h e g a l l e r y

shows

similarities,

27 Dresses" is able to stand on its o w n

m e n t s t h a t are t a k i n g p l a c e in

explained

of Move and marriage' while inadvertently

project. However, after really getting to know her, he finds it harder to expose her ways

• TAYLOR, from page 5

Poon

away from the bride's special day. Overall, "27 Dresses" gives a slightly cynical view

turn the eternal bridesmaid into his special

Curator, artist speak about Vietnamese work

Traveling

y o u ' r e in the mood for marriage, you'll get

to satisfy any comedic palate. This is not to say that the film does not share the same

unusual amount of time getting into the usu-

SHIHWO. h*t>.vaipHW(*uK

dings o f others than worrying about her o w n life. T h e flighty and slightly nerdy character

because of Heigl and M a r s d e n ' s ability to create believable characters. If your fill with this film. Almost every possible wedding theme

that have been dubbed "chick flicks." T h e movie starts out slow and takes an houvs"'#' ttrtuts £**x»iNA«e*r/-»-

Jane (Katherine Heigl), is a woman

Join us at Grace Episcopal Church for an ecumenical

Taize Service first Sunday of every month at 7 : 0 0 p m

ing. T h e d e a d l i n e f o r p o e t r y a n d

at 11 p . m . to O p u s @ h o p e . e d u .

Simple Chants, Silence and Prayer

Pepsi Co. pays a visit to the Dew Crew • DEW CREW, from p a g e 1 w e r e s c h e d u l e d t o c o m e t o last S a t u r d a y ' s g a m e to e v a l u a t e their sponsorship. Chris Maybury

b e e n t h e last t w o or t h r e e y e a r s ,

a check-up, but just to see how

( s i n c e ) t h e r e is a lot o f s u p p o r t .

it's g o i n g and w h a t t h e i r m o n e y

It's g o i n g really w e l l ! " M a y b u r y

is g o i n g t o w a r d , " W i x s o n said. To m a n y H o p e f a n s ' j o y , the

('08), w h o was the Three-Man

s^id. Matt W i x s o n ( ' 0 8 ) h a s also

his f r e s h m a n year, d i d n ' t s e e m to

b e e n an integral part o f the D e w

b e w o r r i e d a b o u t w h e t h e r or n o t

C r e w d u r i n g h i s t i m e at H o p e

the student section would receive

College. "The Mountain

continued sponsorship. " T h e D e w C r e w this

Grace Episcopal Church 5 5 5 Michigan Ave ( 3 9 6 - 7 4 5 9 )

13-year t r a d i t i o n will c o n t i n u e in support of H o p e ' s M e n ' s Basketball t e a m , w h i c h is c u r r e n t l y still u n d e f e a t e d in the M I A A .

Dew

repre-

year

s e n t a t i v e s will u s u a l l y c o m e at

is b i g g e r and l o u d e r than it has

least o n c e a y e a r not so m u c h as

Did you know? ...the Cup & Chaucer has gone green? Reusable travel mugs are available $5.00 with first cup free.

for

Information Meeting

Monday, February 18 6:00 PM Maas Conference Room

Van Wylen Library

- reliable - definitive. wYSw.hope.edu/lib

Check us out!

For more info call 800.424.8580 or visit w w w . p e a c e c o r p s . g o v


FEATURES JANUARY 3 0 ,

THE

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Career fairs: Aj great way to create c o n t a c t s i t e r n s h i p or fulure juo. KnowHope lists six career fairs bet w e e n n o w a n d t h e end of February. Visit h t t p : / / www.hopeiedu/student/ career/calendars/jobfairs. html.

Online Listings: Hope h a s online local listings a n d w o r k s with t h e Liberal A r t s C a r e e r N e t w o r k to list non-local internships. the Classified Ads: Pick up uu Holland Sentinel a n d check oouu t t h e classified section for organizations seeking interns. F o r

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Career Services Office: Located in t h e 8th street building, t h e Car e e r Services office helps s t u d e n t s m a k e c o n n e c t i o n s with local businesses a n d alumni. T h e y are h a p p y t o help s t u d e n t s look for internships, p r e p a r e their resume, write a cover letter, practice interviewing, and evaluate graduate schools. Academic Departments: Sometimes a c a d e m i c d e p a r t m e n t s have u n i q u e o p p o r t u n i t i e s offered to m a j o r s and m i n o r s such as M a y t e r m s , s e m i n a r s , and even internships.

Sell yourself with well-written resume Justine Vlietstra GUEST W R I T E R

Don't freak out! It sounds like a huge task, but why should it be? You're writing about the person that you know BEST in the world—yourself! You know what y o u ' v e done. Just start by brainstorming and getting it down on paper. Remember that the point of a resume is to sell yourself, so brag about your many accomplishments. So what do I put onto the paper? Start with your name—larger than anything else on the page—and your contact information (phone number, address and email). After this heading comes an objective in most resumes. An objective states what you are pursuing; however, it is better to leave an objective out than to use one that is way too broad.

The next key component of a resume is educational experience—what type of degree you are pursuing, such as a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or a Bachelor of Science (B.S.). It is recommended to add your CPA if it is over 3.0. Think about your experiences—any paid or volunteer work, summer jobs, or internships; you can even add major class assignments or a certain class if it is pertinent to the j o b you are seeking. If it makes you look good for the potential job, get it down. Be sure to organize these experiences into subheadings such as skills, work experience or course highlights. For any work experiences, be sure to include the name of the employer, position you held in that company, and a description of your job. In the description of your responsibilities, be sure to use action words such as: arranged, examined, drafted, coordinated, assisted.

etc. Also, think about any other interests or activities you are involved in, such as CASA, SAC, service trips or small groups. It is also important to contact potential references, and note on your resume that references are "available upon request." D o n ' t just hit p r i n t ! Make sure you proofread your resume before sending it to any employer; a grammatical or spelling error on a resume is almost sudden death. When you're creating and formatting your resume, you want to remember to keep it simple and linear—every font, hyphen, punctuation arid bullet point should create a straight line that's very readable and easy to glance at. The employer may only scan your resume, so be sure to catch their eye. For more information visit the Career Services webpage at www.hope.edu/student/career/resources/search.

J*

I


VOICES THE

JANUARY 3 0 ,

ANCHOR

2 0 0 8

In pursuit of knowledge me the art of c r o s s w o r d puzzle solving. She revealed through her stories h o w a m a z i n g it is to travel around the world. M y g r a n d m a taught m e the importance of g o i n g to c h u r c h , and she m o d e l e d what it m e a n t to be a devout Catholic. M y g r a n d m a had eight c h i l d r e n , three s o n - i n - l a w s , f o u r d a u g h t e r - i n laws, t w e n t y - t w o g r a n d c h i l d r e n and seventeen great-grandchildren. More t h a n a n y t h i n g else, she loved t a k i n g care of her f a m i l y — t h i s love s h o w e d in h e r e v e r y d a y actions. O n c e w h e n m y g r a n d p a and g r a n d m a w e r e d a t i n g , a police o f f i c e r n o t e d her petite figure and asked if she w a s old e n o u g h to be s e e i n g m y g r a n d p a . S h e told the o f f i c e r her age he d e c l a r e d that she w a s j u s t a " h a l f p i n t . " T h e term b e c a m e a n i c k n a m e of e n d e a r m e n t t h a t m y g r a n d p a a l w a y s called m y g r a n d m a . W h e n she got her first car, he had a special license plate m a d e f o r h e r that r e a d " H A F PT."

Emily Papple

HAF PT I will never forget w h e n my g r a n d m a c o n v i n c e d m e that the reason G o d gave us fingers w a s so that w e could be sure to s c o o p that last d r o p of b r o w n i e batter f r o m the b o t t o m of the m i x i n g b o w l into o u r mouths. G r a m taught m e m a n y other things like h o w to play double-solitaire and h o w to plant petunias. M y g r a n d m a taught m e that if I w a s g o i n g to do s o m e t h i n g I should do it right the first time. S h e taught m e the i m p o r t a n c e of m a n n e r s at the dinner table—(I learned this lesson quickly a f t e r being poked in the arm by her fork f o r reaching across the table). S h e taught

I n o w drive the car my g r a n d m a d r o v e and my plate still reads H A F PT. People often ask m e (usually in a very bewildered tone of voice): w h y exactly d o e s your license plate say ' H A F P T ? ' I a l w a y s get so very excited w h e n I hear this question b e c a u s e 1 get to tell the questioner about h o w I got my plate. M o r e importantly, 1 get to tell the questioner about my G r a m . I get to tell t h e m h o w a m a z i n g she w a s and h o w m u c h she m e a n t to m e . I will never forget the times my g r a n d m a and I spent in the k i t c h e n — f r y i n g zucchini or m a k i n g m u d h e n s (a favorite family dessert). I will never forget s p e n d i n g hours talking to m y g r a n d m a about n o t h i n g or about everything. I will n e v e r forget the time spent in her dining r o o m — j u s t reading or d o i n g h o m e w o r k . Jan. 2 7 w a s m y g r a n d m a ' s birthday; she w o u l d h a v e been 89 years old. As m y g r a n d m a got older she d e v e l o p e d d e m e n t i a and her o w n m e m o r y b e c a m e fuzzy. M y g r a n d m a died almost

f o u r y e a r s ago and it is still s o m e t i m e s difficult for m e to recall my m e m o r i e s of her b e c a u s e it m a k e s m e r e m e m b e r how m u c h 1 m i s s her. H o w e v e r , I am beginning to realize h o w important these m e m o r i e s are to me. It is in the never forgetting that these m e m o r i e s gain real value. T h e importance o f m e m o r i e s w a s solidified for m e last w e e k e n d w h e n I attended the memorial service f o r o n e of my best f r i e n d ' s m o m . A s I listened to the stories her family, f r i e n d s a n d c o - w o r k e r s told I saw her b e c o m e alive again t h r o u g h the m e m o r i e s being shared. F r o m the m o m e n t w e m a k e m e m o r i e s until the last time w e share t h e m it is important to r e m e m b e r to hold a special place in our hearts f o r our m e m o r i e s . Emily was disgusted according

to learn this week that

to the New York Times an "estimated

2.2 pounds

of beef is responsiblefor

a m o u n t of carbon dioxide emitted European

that

the equivalent by the average

car every / 5 5 miles"

LETTERS TO T H E E D I T O R S

'Chivalry' not inherently oppressive So, although 1 agree that the social structure of dating and relationships should be critically examined in order to end sexism and bring about a m o r e egalitarian society, 1 h a v e to take u m b r a g e w h e n Evelyn writes, "Equality in society is dependent on the end of chivalry." To illustrate this, let m e tell a quick story. During my freshman y e a r I w a s walking along and overheard a girl from Scott Hall in the midst of complaining about a recent relationship problem that she w a s having. I didn't catch the contents of the little that I overheard, but 1 did notice when she suddenly exclaimed in a markedly louder voice, "1 wish there could be chivalry a g a i n ! " That scene struck m e at the time because, although 1 strongly believed in equality and liberty and justice and all of those w o n d e r f u l m o d e m - e r a virtues shouted f r o m the men and w o m e n armed to the teeth at the barricades of history, I felt something very real in her exclamation about chivalry. And now, as 1 write this, something else is b e c o m i n g clear to me. Romantic gestures like o p e n i n g doors for w o m e n might be the language that men in the West have traditionally used

To the Editors: I appreciate and agree with Evelyn Daniel's recent c o l u m n " L a d i e s First," which called attention to possible sexism present in c o m m o n dating and relationship practices. It is certainly true that there would be a level of sexism present in holding a door open for a w o m a n , if, for example, the m a n ' s intentions were to display his physical superiority over her. (Not to mention that this would be totally unimpressive.) But, while sexism does to s o m e extent underlie this and other similar dating protocol that occur in American society, o n e s h o u l d n ' t forget the m a n y w a y s that traditional dating and relationship practice c o m m u n i c a t e things other than dominance and control. I, for one, like holding doors open for w o m e n . I like buying them m o v i e tickets. These sorts of things have nothing at all to* do with physical and e c o n o m i c power, and everything to do with making the w o m a n feel like she is, in this moment, the most special person to you in all the world. And men like doing these sorts of things because - w h e n w e don't screw it u p - w e feel special too.

to s h o w w o m e n how m u c h they m e a n to them. T h e y could also be violent expressions of fundamentally unjust patriarchal structures. But both of these cannot be true at the s a m e time (or at least not c o m pletely true; it might be and likely is a mix of the two). And that means that, if feminist social criticism is a sufficient explanation of traditional romantic gestures, then that girl f r o m my freshman year is a misguided, deluded pawn who, with her nostalgic longing for chivalry, perpetuates the very system of control that oppresses her. According to feminist social

To Nicholas: T h e reason that chivalry must " e n d " is that it is inherently lopsided. We can hold on #to the traditional w a y s in w h i c h m e n used m o n e y and status to s h o w their a f f e c t i o n , but those traditions cannot remain exclusively m a l e if w o m e n seek an equal position in society. To use an e x a m p l e 1 cited in the c o l u m n , each person in a relationship can take turns p a y i n g w h e n g o i n g out for dinner. Although the "chivalric romantic

criticism, she's just wrong. If Evelyn can accept that, then - and only then - is she entitled to the opinion that "chivalric" romantic gestures need to " e n d " or "cannot continue in their present f o r m . " Her next sentence, where she writes, " w e may not need to abandon these traditions entirely," hints that, granted, h e r real position is w e a k e r than the earlier sentence suggests. But if that's the case, then 1 would urge Evelyn to be a little more cautious with word choice in future columns. —-Nicholas Engel ( ' 0 8 )

g e s t u r e " is still there — treating o n e ' s significant other to a meal — f e w w o u l d label such a s y s t e m "chivalry." T h e sentiment behind these gestures is f u n d a m e n t a l l y a very good thing f o r h u m a n r e l a t i o n s h i p s — a s long as both partners participate in the relationship equally. T h e danger, h o w ever, lies in idealizing relationships in w h i c h w o m e n are m e r e l y the objects and loving recipients of a f f e c tio n . —Evelyn

Daniel

('08)

Can Campus Safety handle everything? To the Editors: 1 am in complete agreement with Michael Lausch's thoughts on C a m p u s Safety, or the lack there of (Jan. 23). Anyone remember the tornado warning that w e had last year? Well, I remember that people were told several conflicting messages about what was going on a n d what we

THE

were supposed to be going. Some people were instructed to go down to the basement of their dorm or academic building. Others, like myself were sent outside and simply told "go back to your room," with no instructions from C a m p u s Safety that would prevent this dangerous situation. And then there was the C a m p u s Safety car

ANCHOR

Evelyn Daniel Emily P a p p l e Brittany Adams Samuel Ogles Amanda Gernentz Ashley DeVecht M e g h a n Tore Katie B e n n e t t Nick Hinkle

James Ralston Kathy Nathan

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

NATIONAL ASSISTANT FEATURES ASSISTANT ARTS

NEWS

David M o o r e

EDITOR

NEWS

EDITOR

NATIONAL

EDITOR

EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

Dylana Pinter Gina Holder Nicholas Engel

EDITOR FEATURES

1 know that they will never come. In something as simple as that, the system is going wrong. If C a m p u s Safety cannot handle a severe weather warning, let along the shuttle van system, then how do w e ever expect them to handle a more challenging situation? —Stephanie D y k e m a ( ' 10)

2 0 0 8 SPRING SEMESTER STAFF

EDITOR-IS-CHIM

CAMTUS

roaming around yelling out ambiguous instructions to those of us left to go wander outside. Did anyone on c a m p u s have any idea of what w a s going on? And alright, I know its simple and petty, but has anyone really ever had a successful time with the shuttle van? 1 learned long ago not to call them anymore because

EDITOR

Maggie Almdale ErikaTerLouw Troy Page

Ben Gorsky

SPORTS EDITOR

Matt Oosterhouse

STAFF ADVISOR PHOTOGRAPH GRAPHICS

GRAPHICS

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION

EDITOR

Laura H a u c h

ASSISTANT

COPY EDITOR ASSISTANT ASSISTANT ASSISTANT

COPY

EDITOR

Kali ie W a l k e r

STAFF WRITER

Justine Vlietstra

Amy Clinton

STAFE WRITER

Jeffery Vredenburg

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kevin Soubly

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

COPY EDITOR

G o r d i e Fall

STAFF WRITER

COPY EDITOR

Ann Green

STAFF PHOTOGRIPHER

Kevin Raley

SENIOR

ASSISTANT

Alex Quick

STAFF WRITER

Alexander Quick

Jayni Juedes

STAFF WRITER

Derek Street

Kevin Soubly

STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

STAFF WRITER

Chris Lewis

MANAGER

Erin F o r t n e r Grace Denny

MANAGER

MANAGER

BUSINESS

Andreas VanDenend

EDITOR

ASSISTANT

ADS

Jayni Juedes

r EDITOR

BUSINESS

S U F F PlIOTOGRiPHER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER STAFF PHOTOGRIPHER

David Lee

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHIR

STAFF PHOTOGR\PHER

Joshua Warner

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A n d r e w Gehl

STAFF PHOTOGKKPHER


JANUARY 3 0 ,

VOICES

2 0 0 8

THE ANCHOR

9

Yellow Wallpaper Rachel Lackey

p a r e n t s still k n o w m e . A m o n g the e x p e c t e d p r e s e n t s u n d e r the tree this year I w a s

j u s t t o eat and m a k i n g c l o t h e s j u s t t o

d o e s e v e r y d e c i s i o n feel like it is g o i n g t o

b e d e c e n t . A s I h i d e h e r e in m y h o u s e

s h o c k e d to find a n e w record p l a y e r with

w a i t i n g for m y b r e a d d o u g h to rise, m y u n - s t r a i g h t e n e d hair b o b b i n g to the Beatles

c h a n g e the c o u r s e o f m y life? I c a n ' t h e l p but feel the w e i g h t o f t h e w o r l d ' s p r o b l e m s

m y n a m e on i t — s o m e t h i n g I h a v e a l w a y s w a n t e d but n e v e r k n e w it. I h a v e t o a d m i t that this n e w brand o f m u s i c w a s n o t instantly i n t e g r a t e d — s i m p l y out o f f e a r o f the fragility o f history,

Living is Easy with

m e a n i n g and vinyl. As I s l o w l y b r o k e t h r o u g h the wall of fear, I felt a s though the

Eyes Closed

record, I a m p r e t e n d i n g 1 j u s t picked u p a s a n e w r e l e a s e — I w o n d e r if 1 c o u l d h a v e s u r v i v e d their lifestyle. I a m w o n d e r i n g w h a t it w o u l d be like t o hear this m u s i c a n d o w n it in a w a y the t i m e g a p s i m p l y w o n ' t allow. A s I hear J u d e ' s a n t h e m and feel it d e e p in m y gut, I am e n v i o u s o f the age

a n d w a n t d e s p e r a t e l y to m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e . M y life n e e d s to c o u n t for s o m e t h i n g . With the smell o f i n c e n s e b l a n k e t i n g the house, I am suddenly wishing my first j o b could be playing a tambourine and living in a van; writing lyrics of conviction so deep it hurls and speaking out against a world I no longer

w h e n p e o p l e w e r e beautiftil b e c a u s e they

believe in. I wish 1 could c o m m i t to s o m e t h i n g a s m e a n i n g f u l as p l a y i n g m y t a m b o u r i n e in

believed in s o m e t h i n g . W h e n did m y p a r e n t s lose this p a s s i o n ?

order t o c h a n g e the w o r l d . A t least everyday I would wake up knowing that someone was

J a c k s o n ' s "Thriller." I c r o u c h e d low in m y

W h e n did they s t o p b e i n g h a p p y j u s t b e i n g ? H o w l o n g d o 1 h a v e until it h a p p e n s

going to hear what I had to say. S o m e days I feel like hatred has m e

less

seat t h i n k i n g o f t h e desired a l b u m tucked

to m e too? W h e n did the w o r l d g r o w u p —

surrounded—backed into the c o m e r with no

and less e x c i t i n g . We e a c h r e c e i v e d the

d e e p u n d e r m y b e d . M a y b e he k n o w s . T o d a y I f o u n d m y s e l f a l o n e in t h e h o u s e

take out a second m o r t g a g e and d e c i d e everyone must have a college degree to

escape. S o m e d a y s I feel helpless like m y v o i c e isn't heard and I am s t a n d i n g alone.

w i t h n o t h i n g o n the a g e n d a but b a k i n g for

mean something? It is n o w , in

S o m e d a y s I s t r u g g l e to find one o u n c e o f k i n d n e s s — b u t today, t o d a y in m y solitude,

music was entering my bloodstream, taking

J u s t a f t e r the h o l i d a y s I c a n ' t

r e s i d e n c e in m y v e i n s — b e c o m i n g visible o n m y skin. I listened t o T r y g v e reveal his

help

but feel the w e i g h t o f m y a g e . A t 2 1 , C h r i s t m a s f o l l o w e d the s a m e routine

n e w f o u n d love o f vinyl and plead with the c o n g r e g a t i o n for a c o p y o f M i c h a e l

a s it did at age 2 0 , 19 and 18. With e a c h year, visiting relatives, w r i t i n g C h r i s t m a s cards

and

wrapping

presents

gets

typical sweaters, j e a n s , C D s and m o v i e s as requested o n o u r p e r s o n a l s h o p p i n g lists. In m y p a r e n t s ' h o u s e , cluttered with suitcases and dirty laundry, we struggled to find the

the s a k e o f b a k i n g . T o d a y 1 d r e a m t of the life I h a v e a l w a y s

synchronization that w a s once second nature.

w a n t e d . With n o c h o i c e b u t f r e e d o m a n d no f r e e d o m s but choice, w h e r e p e o p l e relied

1 w o n d e r if it will ever feel like h o m e again. A s 1 struggle to enter a d u l t h o o d , I a m continually

surprised

at

how

well

the

senior

cloud

of

uncertainty, 1 a m struggling to c o m m i t . I c a n ' t s e e m to d e c i d e w h i c h fairly-traded

in m y field o f strawberries, I c h o o s e to b e l i e v e the w o r l d is g o o d . Rachel Lackey is an English

major from

o n e a c h other for survival and h a p p i n e s s —

blend best f e e d s m y c a f f e i n e addiction, let alone w h i c h city 1 will v e n t u r e t o in a f e w

L O V E is a l w a y s the prize. M a k i n g m o n e y

short m o n t h s f o l l o w i n g graduation. W h y

the world is good.

j u s t like y o u or m e . But the p r a c t i c e s o f G r e e k L i f e d e s e r v e s e r i o u s criticism.

b u t it is u n q u e s t i o n a b l y still h a z i n g . I e n c o u r a g e you t o ask around a b o u t stories

b e c a u s e H o p e is d e p e n d a n t

I'll gladly c o n c e d e that G r e e k Life, with all o f its sororities and fraternities, raises a

from p l e d g e w e e k and I d o u b t y o u ' l l h e a r

d o n a t i o n s , and it's i m p o r t a n t to G r e e k a l u m n i that the legacy in w h i c h they

lot o f m o n e y for D a n c e M a r a t h o n , R e l a y

that it w a s pleasant or " e d u c a t i o n a l . " N o t only d o e s h a z i n g exist, but there

participated c o n t i n u e s . What was once perhaps a harmless

for L i f e a n d other causes. B u t this could be d o n e b y g r o u p s a n d individuals o u t s i d e

are also f e w dry activations. A n d a f t e r p l e d g e w e e k , all o f G r e e k L i f e o r g a n i z e s

institution is n o w a d a n g e r o u s o n e .

o f G r e e k L i f e just a s easily and is a p o o r

s o that e a c h g r o u p hosts a party o n a

r e a s o n f o r its c o n t i n u e d existence. I w o n ' t a r g u e that m e m b e r s h i p in a sorority o r frat has b e e n r e m e m b e r e d f o n d l y b y many. But

d i f f e r e n t night.

c l a s s i s m ( s o m e G r e e k s refer to t h e rest o f u s a s G D I s , literally, " g o d d a m n e d i n d e p e n d e n t s " ) a n d the entire a t m o s p h e r e

the s u p p o s e d benefit c o m e s at a great price t o t h o s e individuals and t o o u r c o m m u n i t y .

to its d r i n k i n g culture. T h e f a c t t h a t G r e e k

my

Davison,

Michigan.

She chooses to believe

Inside Out Sam Ogles

W hat's W r ong W i t h Greek We

are

a

community

from

the

B o a r d o f Trustees to the students, w e are a c o m m u n i t y . A n d as m e m b e r s o f this c o m m u n i t y w e h a v e t h e responsibility to i d e n t i f y p r o b l e m s of terrific i m p o r t a n c e w h e n they arise. I a m o f c o u r s e r e f e r r i n g to t h e e x i s t e n c e o n this c a m p u s o f G r e e k Life. Let m e p u t forth t h e p r e f a c e that I d o

What

does

that

say

a b o u t t h e s e institutions? It s a y s that G r e e k L i f e is largely a slave

G r e e k L i f e ' s a p p e a l a n d faults are t h e

L i f e ' s p a g e on K n o w H o p e has a guide for t h r o w i n g " B Y O B " f u n c t i o n s (yes, B for

exclusivist and secretive a s p e c t o f it; the s e n s e o f b e l o n g i n g and p u r p o s e that is

beer) is appalling. It's e s p e c i a l l y t r o u b l i n g that H o p e e n c o u r a g e s this b e h a v i o r within

f o u n d in a g r o u p identity; and the elitist s e n s e o f c l a s s i s m that f r a t s a n d sororities

o u r c o m m u n i t y w h i l e the a d m i s s i o n s o f f i c e

b r i n g their m e m b e r s . A n d w h a t o f h a z i n g ?

p r o s p e c t i v e student and their parents. S o w h y do w e as a c o m m u n i t y sit idly

not think that G r e e k s are bad p e o p l e . M o s t

Well, H o p e is very c l e v e r in that w e n o w call it " N e w M e m b e r Education.'* It

of u s h a v e s o m e G r e e k f r i e n d s and t h e y ' r e

certainly takes the sting out o f t h a t w o r d .

w a v e s the " d r y c a m p u s " b a n n e r t o e v e r y

b y w h i l e t h e s e injustices exist? W h y are there few consequences? M a y b e it's

on a l u m n i

It

m a y be ftin for s o m e , but the hazing, the

is w r o n g , and it h a s absolutely n o place on a Christian c a m p u s . Our community,

especially

the

administration, should be ashamed. We should b e a s h a m e d that w e a f f i r m these injustices t h r o u g h silence and b y letting a l u m n i c h e c k s o u t w e i g h the car e o f o u r students. Sam Ogles wants his readers to know he rushed the Knickerbocker Fraternity but divorced himself from irreconcilable

the concept due to

differences.

LETTERS TO THE EDITORS

Misery, pain continue in Palestine To the Editors: Oh the misery, pain and blood that Pal-

or water is allowed just for the security o f Israel. Oh peace will c o m e one day, for it will

barrage o f missiles against Israel, it forgot to mention w h y the Palestinian resistance launched 140 missiles and mortar shells at

when such a siege pushes 1.5 million human to the line of starvation and the death, then yes, the Gaza Strip will require help from

plish their rightful state on their land and remove the enemy from their ranks and their

Israel. The Anchor forgot that Israel started

c o m e from one of those 1.5 million. The Anchor made another mistake. The

the new chapter of violence by killing 3 8 ci-

Gaza Strip does not need help from foreign

land. Faced with bullets, American missiles

vilians when peace negotiations were occurring. The Anchor forgot to explain that in this

services to survive; it is capable of surviving by itself and developing successfully.

case, it is but normal for Palestinians to fight

However when a Zionist racist government

house over Christmas, I did not see hunger, but I saw an adult trapped in the body o f a 3

for their o w n rights and defend themselves; didn't a founder o f your country detail a pre-

(Israel) supported by the super nation (USA) imposes a siege on 1.5 million humans for

year old eating mozzarella cheese for the first time ever in her life; lucky for her she got a

cious document about this right? One that you have adored and memorized — well

two years consecutive to such a point where, according to my relatives living in Gaza, Ad-

permit to m o v e out for the Christmas vacation, when her parents did not, and lucky for

vil is not available, chocolate and pop are not allowed in, flour, milk and water are running

her my father was out o f the Gaza to be able

Palestinians in Gaza: 27 adults, 10 children

seemingly Condoleezza Rice has not, as is an indication by her statements; the security of Israel is a priority for her, and for which

out, there are no cattle, there are no comput-

to host her for twenty days of freedom. Oh I see Palestine free, but I do not see it

' a n d an infant dead; In its Jan. 23 issue, The Anchor forgot

1.5 million Palestinians are allowed to die of hunger and cold. 1.5 million Palestinians are

ers, metal, gasoline, gas, cement or mattresses, and the siege reaches to a state of absolute

the w a y you do . . . — G e o r g e Philip Khoury('09)

to mention why Palestinians launched a

allowed to go into darkness o f night, no light

void of daily necessities, at that point in time

estinians have to provide daily to accom-

and hunger, Palestine will face the world and defeat its enemies. Despite the visit o f President Bush to the Middle East, less than one hour after he reached cruising altitude his faithful allies went back to slaughtering humans. Seventytwo hours later, Israel, the state that promised Bush, their ally, peace, has killed 38 civilian

Our Mission: The Anchor strives lo communicale campus events throughout

serves

the

Hope College and the Holland community. We hope to amplify awareness and

tacks

or

promote dialogue through fair, objective Journalism and a vibrant Voices sec-

ple

will

right other

be

to

edit

editorial

taken.

No

due

to

space

considerations.

anonymous

letters

constraints, A will

personal

representative be

printed

at-

samunless

UNRWA and others. W h e n I looked into the eyes o f my third cousin, while she w a s eating pizza in my

and typographical errors. However, if such mistakes occur, this newspaper may cancel its charges for the portion of the ad if; In the publisher's reasonable judgment, the ad has been rendered valueless by the mistake.

discussed with Editor-in-Chief. Please limit letters to 5 0 0 words.

Advertisement Deadlines. All ad and classified requests must be submitted

Disclaimer The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through

Mail letters to The Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the An-

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the Hope College Student Activities Fund. The opinions expressed on the

chor office (located In the Martha Miller Center 151) or e-mail us at

Contact Information: To submit an ad or a classified, or to request a brochure

Voices page are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of

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or other information, contact our Ads Representative at anchorads@hope.

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Advertising Policies. All advertising is subject to the rates, conditions, stan-

edu. To contact our office, call our office at (616) 395-7877.

Anchor reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising.

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'"ANCHOR


VOICES Where the wind still blows 1 0

JANUARY 3 0 ,

THE ANCHOR

Stephen Cupery

Tread lightly The last time I saw my footprint it was stoutly mismatched with a raccoon's human hand-like paw track. Both were imbedded d e e p in the snow, their shapes crisscrossed with s h a d o w s dancing a w r y beneath swaying forest sentinels. It occurred to m e our business differed there a m o n g the garbled speech of water and trees. N e e d apparently compelled this bandit of a creature towards the meandering stream I w a s traipsing along, whereas my doing w a s n ' t necessarily to gain a drink or arrive at my den or

DO YOU

Weekly Sudoku 7

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Every SUNDAY, 6 p.m. MMC 1,51 "

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Upon publication, anyone daring enough to find Stephen losing his way in Belizean jungles is more than welcome to come and join him in tracking the elusive jaguar

o w n niche. A bird can fly where the w h i m of wind takes it. And at first glance birds e v o k e trem e n d o u s freedom. A s it seems, the flights of terns, swans or gulls are without borders, perimeters and prevail unregulated.

5

9

8

farming past. For those like I w h o have heeded an itch, a compulsion to learn of the vastness and uniqueness in that distant land, w e might not be so m u c h the victims in an "unsettling o f A m e r i c a " as Wendell Berry puts it, and instead find our migratory w a y s naturally lending to realizing each ones

9

3 9

1

Though as I understand more about birds I found they are not quite the gloriously unrestrained things I imagined th e m to be. Theirs is a world of territory, ritual journeys, repetition, and personal property too. T h e y then, are as much earth-bound and homely as us despite divisions of will and choice. So, amid this endeavor of going, finding, experiencing novelty in other settings foreign, make your mark with tracks that h a v e purpose, inhabit roosts with all dutiful carefulness, and leave appreciative of places not your o w n , wild or friendly as they m a y be.

Anchor meetings are always open to all Hope students 8

6

5

neer call spurring us westward into frontier lands for lucky strikes of opportunity and space or, at least, for this college generation, simply the affordability, the independence granted and probably a lacking in the bind of generational inherited trades displayed within agrarian communities of

nest. Rather, the footprints 1 left were, I think, evidence and reminder of that ancient primordial want for travel, for g o i n g elsewhere, s o m e w h e r e , anywhere. In his book Outside Lies Magic, John Stilgoe notes a certain significance of o u r essentially innate drive to investigate. " E x ploration is second nature, a second nature intimately linked to the adolescent days, but a nature easy enough to recover any w e e k d a y evening, any S u n d a y morning, any hour snatched a w a y from p r o g r a m m e d learning, f r o m the w e b s and nets that invisibly and insidiously snare." But w h y do w e really find it in us to leave h o m e , uprooting the familiar and setting off on the loose? W h a t draws o u r souls such and beckons if not motivates us to imitate that v a g a b o n d i n g spirit found so pervasively yet differently in the animal k i n g d o m ? Whether it be the far off pio-

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Rachael Price Quartet jazz vocalist

Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m. Knickerbocker Theatre Sponsored by Hope College

T h i s y o u n g v o c a l i s t ' s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of classic jazz w o r k s h a s c a p t u r e d t h e p r a i s e of f a n s a n d critics alike a

Price is right for stardom."

The Boston Herald For tickets call 616-395-7890 $10 adults, $8 senior citizens, $6 children

emonieno s


SPORTS THE JANUARY

30,

ANCHOR

2 0 0 8

Hope basketball, the heart of Holland As the women's basketball team continues its winning streak and the men

11

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Wednesday Men's Basketball

Jan. 30

H o m e vs. Trl-State at 7 : 3 0 p.m.

come off a close 79-76 victory over Calvin College, students, community

Saturday Feb. 2 Men's & Women's Swimming and Diving

members and faculty reflect on what their home team means to them.

Away vs. Olivet College at 1 p.m.

"I am from Midland, and got a job teaching at Holland High. This has become my town, and Hope is a big part of it. By living here, Hope has become my team." - tiave Sanderson, 63, Hope fan

There is a great love affair here in Holland for Hope and for Hope sports. The sports piece surely begins with men's and women's basketball. It goes on from there. - Holland Mayor M McGeehan

"One of the reasons we were selected as the school to host the 2008 and 2009 NCAA D3 Women's National Championship was because of the community of Holland, and our campus being so supportive of basketball in general and of somen's basketball." - Brian Morehouse, Hope's women's basketball coach

P H O T O COURTESY HOPE P R P H O T O EV M E G A N

PrrztR

PHOTO BY M E G A N PITZER

"I think it helps that il's such an intimidating atmosphere, with everyone dressed in orange and blue and the house packed. When I go to play other places, there's not nearly as many fans. (Hope's fans) are really loyal and we appreciate all their support." - Jordyn Boles ('08), Hope women's basketball player

"I am a Calvin graduate, but a Hope fan. My wife says she reformed me." - Ivan Compagner, 79, Holland resident

"You look around the arena and you see people from every position in Holland, people from all walks of life. Pastors, businessmen, teachers, children. The arena is just awesome, and we've always had great student involvement." - Glenn Van Wieren, Hope men's basketball coach

Quotes c o m p i l e d by: Gordie Fall

P H O T O COURTESY

S t a f f Writer

HOPE P R

Graphics by: Dylana Pinter

F a i r b a n k s

T a i u n h a u s e s

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H o m e vs. K a l a m a z o o College a t 3 p.m.

Men's Basketball Away vs. Albion College 3 p.m.

Hockey H o m e vs. Albion College 9 p.m.

IN BRIEF

HOPE M E N ' S BASKETBALL DEFEATS RIVAL CALVIN The Hope College men's basketball team extended its winning streak to eight on Jan. 2.6 by defeating Calvin College 79-76. The score was tied 10 times before Hope took the lead for good when Tyler Wolfe made a layup with 2:36 left to play. Hope now leads the all-time head-tohead series with Calvin 84-83. The Calvin victory improves the Dutchmen's record to 14-2 overall and 6-0 in the MIAA. Hope will play Tri-State today in DeVos Fieldhouse at 7:30 p.m.

HOPE SENIORS HONORED AS MIAA PLAYERS OFTHE WEEK Marcus Vanderheide ('08) and Jordyn Boles ('08) both received M I A A player of the week honors after impressive performances last week. Vanderheide scored a total of 47 points, shooting 21 for 27 over two M I A A victories. He recorded his third double-double of the season on Saturday's win over Calvin 79-76, while scoring a career-high of 30 points. This is the second time Vanderheide has received this award this season and the third time in his career. Along with Vanderheide, Boles scored 38 points in a pair of Dutch victories. The senior guard scored 11 points in the Alma g a m e and followed with a career-high 27 points in the 7263 win over Saint Mary's. Also, in the Saint Mary's game. Boles recorded seven three-point baskets, which set a school record. This is the third lime Boles has received this award in her career.

HOPE HOCKEY DEFEATS DIVISION II GVSU

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The Hope College hockey team defeated Grand Valley State University 5-1 on Jan. 25. In the Dutchmen victory, four different players scored including Maarten Galantowicz ( ' 1 0 ) with two and Jon Shaver('08). Ryan Kelly ('09) and Malt Schrader ( ' 1 0 ) with one goal a piece. Goalie Mike Headley ('09) slopped 35 of 38 shots. Hope will play Albion College at The Edge on Feb. 2 at 9 p.m.


12

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 3 0 , 2 0 0 8

Leadin

tion, Dutch still perfect

Team gains co

continued wins When an opportunity Knox

Nick Hinkle S P O R T S EDFTOR

With 17 wins and zero losses, the Hope College w o m e n ' s basketball team continues to strive for perfection. Recently, the Dutch came back from a threepoint deficit at halftime to defeat Saint M a r y ' s College 82-73. In the c o m e - f r o m - b e h i n d win, captain Jordyn Boles ( ' 0 8 ) scored a career-high 27 points, w h i c h included a tie for a school record of seven three-point baskets. Boles, w h o has 186 three pointers, is only t w o a w a y f r o m the school's all-time three point record held by Bria Ebels ( ' 0 6 ) . Also, Boles w a s named M I A A player of the week for last w e e k ' s p e r f o r m a n c e . On Saturday, Hope and Bales will face K a l a m a z o o College (18) for the first time this season. Although Kalamazoo has struggled this year, the team d o e s h a v e t w o standout players Hope will have to contain. "One of there guards is averaging 14 points a g a m e and is

able to shoot the ball very well," Boles said. " T h e y also h a v e a post player that is averaging nine rebounds and 13 points a game. It is g o i n g to be important that w e c o m m u n i c a t e where these t w o are at all times." K a l a m a z o o ' s guard, Kelsea Howell ( ' 0 8 ) , led the Hornets in points, steals and blocks and received second-team a l l - M I A A honors last year. Hope defeated K a l a m a z o o twice last season 8134 and 101-53. Despite having a perfect season thus far, the Dutch are continually trying to improve every day in practice. " C o a c h M o has really been stressing to our team about playing all 4 0 minutes of a g a m e and not just turning it on w h e n push comes to shove," Boles said. " E f f o r t and energy are the keys to h o w each g a m e should be

played. We need to concentrate on rebounding, close-outs, communication and m a k i n g sure that w e get the ball inside." An added bonus has c o m e f r o m winning this season as well—confidence. With the combination of experience and talent, this y e a r ' s team is living up to its ranking of the nation's number one team on w w w . d3hoops.com. " T h e team has a lot of experience, m a n y of the girls have been in the N C A A tournament before," captain Kaitlyn Kopke ( ' 0 9 ) said. " W e also have some strong underclassmen w h o work hard and contribute to the team." By continuing their hard work and solid play, H o p e will try to make a run at the M I A A and N C A A titles. "It is going to be important that w e all continue to play together and trust each other." Boles said. "I would take this team that I h a v e right n o w over any other team in the nation."

James R a l s t o n

the post position on the second line behind Lindsay Lange ( ' 0 8 ) has been inactive since Jan. 9 due Despite being on the Hope College varsity women's to a foot injury. In the game following basketball team for three years, Courtney Knox ( ' 0 9 ) has never Snikkers' injury, Knox led the started a game. She spent her team with 13 points scored. She also contributed freshman and with a team-high eight sophomore years rebounds in the victory. learning from "Courtney has really experienced post players on the team stepped it up and has earned every minute and transferred that she has got," teammate knowledge onto Kaitlyn Kopke ( ' 0 9 ) the court w h e n an said. " S h e got an unfortunate injury opportunity and really to t e a m m a t e Carrie took advantage of it." Snikkers (Ml) Courtney Knox With her added forced Knox to take SPORTS EDITOR

on a larger role. " C o u r t n e y is stepping up big, she's rebounding, playing defense and scoring for us; she's doing a really good j o b . " Snickers said. " S h e ' s working hard, and its good to know that there are people on the team that can step up w h e n t h e y ' r e needed." Snikkers, w h o had been filling

playing time, Knox has continued to put up impressive numbers. S h e currently leads the team with 95 rebounds. "I kept wanting to improve and looking f o r an opportunity to step up and help out the team," Knox said. " W h e n I got my chance I just played hard because I knew the team needed m e . "

Swimming prepares for final dual and MIAA championship o v e r c o n f i d e n t . We need to k e e p f o c u s e d a n d k n o w that they are g o i n g to bring it." T h e c o n f e r e n c e m e e t s will c o n c l u d e with a dual meet at Olivet C o l l e g e F e b . 2. F o l l o w i n g that meet the t e a m s will h a v e t w o w e e k s o f f to p r e p a r e for the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p s , w h i c h will be held at the H o l l a n d A q u a t i c C e n t e r Feb. 14-16. " W e ' r e starting o u r taper n o w in preparation f o r t h e M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p s , " M e i e r said. " N o w w e j u s t need to f o c u s on the details, plenty of sleep, p r o p e r eating a n d the small technical things in the pool that will help us s h a v e t h e tenths o f s e c o n d s that m a k e a d i f f e r e n c e . " T h e m e n are also h o p i n g that their hard w o r k will lead to s u c c e s s at the M I A A meet. T h e i r final meet at Olivet h o l d s significance as Olivet is the reigning M I A A c h a m p i o n for the past t w o years. Last year, the m e n ' s team lost to the C o m e t s 109-189 a n d the w o m e n w o n 191-93. " C o m p a r e d to p r e v i o u s y e a r s I think w e ' v e d o n e very well b e c a u s e w e h a v e put in the extra hard w o r k that it takes to i m p r o v e , " Vander Broek said. " T h e entire t e a m is w o r k i n g really hard, and s w i m m e r s like Ryan V o g e l z a n g ( ' 0 9 ) , Phil H e y b o e r ( ' l O ) , Ryan N e l i s ( ' l O ) and Matt R o s e ( ' 1 0 ) h a v e been d o i n g very well b e c a u s e they h a v e stepped up their

James Ralston S P O R T S EDITOR

In the 2 0 0 7 M I A A season the H o p e College m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s swim teams both s w a m to a strong second place finish at the c o n f e r e n c e finals. T h i s y e a r both t e a m s are h o p i n g to build on that result t o w a r d s a M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p and p o s s i b l e national bids. " T h e t e a m as a w h o l e has s t e p p e d u p training to a n e w intensity level this y e a r , " captain C h a s Vander Broek ( ' 0 8 ) said. " N o t w i n n i n g c o n f e r e n c e the past t w o y e a r s has inspired us to w o r k that m u c h h a r d e r to s u c c e e d . " T h e s w i m t e a m s hosted rival Calvin C o l l e g e Jan. 2 6 and c a m e out victorious. T h e m e n had a.decisive win o v e r the rival 163-116. " D e f e a t i n g Calvin puts us in a g o o d place for the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p s , " Vander Broek said. " S w i m m i n g well in such an important c o n f e r e n c e meet should get us excited and help us p r e p a r e for c o n f e r e n c e . " T h e w o m e n prevailed in a tough battle against d e f e n d i n g M I A A c h a m p i o n C a l v i n that c a m e d o w n to the final relay, w h i c h lead to a 154-146 w i n . " C a l v i n w a s a very t o u g h team and w e focused a lot of o u r training on t h e m , " captain Trish M e i e r ( ' 0 8 ) said. "It w a s a close meet so w e c a n ' t go into c o n f e r e n c e

T h e w o m e n h a v e also seen strong team and individual s u c c e s s largely t h a n k s to their hard w o r k . M e i e r pointed out a few s w i m m e r s to w a t c h out f o r h e a d i n g into the c o n f e r e n c e finals. " L a u r a A n s i l i o ( ' 0 9 ) is really g o i n g t o bring it," M e i e r said. " S h e is a c o m p e t i t o r and has been w o r k i n g e x t r e m e l y h^rd. A l s o o u r entire b a c k s t r o k e g r o u p has

T A P E R T I M E — The s w i m m i n g a n d d i v i n g t e a m s c o n t i n u e t o t r a i n h a r d a t t h e Dow Center. Cody Tozer ( ' 1 0 ) c o o l s d o w n a f t e r a h a r d w o r k o u t .

training."

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to the season. " W e feel better about o u r c h a n c e s n o w c o m p a r e d to the b e g i n n i n g o f the s e a s o n , " V o g e l z a n g said. " H o p e f u l l y all of our hard w o r k will pay o f f w h e n it c o u n t s . "

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a l w a y s been s t r o n g . " W ith plenty of potential c o m b i n e d with energy and hard w o r k , both t e a m s are l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to a s u c c e s s f u l finish

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01-30-2008