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Hope mourns students killed in plane crash Lindsey Bandy C A M P U S N E W S EDITOR

T h e first G a t h e r i n g of s p r i n g s e m e s t e r looked very different t h a n all of c a m p u s w a s expect- v ing w h e n t h e Jan. 17 service at t h e last m i n u t e was t u r n e d into a s o m b e r e v e n t in m e m o r y of David O t a i ('12) a n d E m m a Biagioni ('11) w h o died tragically in a p l a n e crash t h a t m o r n i n g . As s t u d e n t s b e g a n t o c h e c k thei r e - m a i l s a r o u n d 5 p.m. o n Sunday, they f o u n d t h a t t w o dearly loved c l a s s m a t e s a n d f r i e n d s had p a s s e d away earlier. A u t h o r i t i e s f o u n d t h e single e n g i n e p l a n e in a cornfield m i l e s away f r o m Tulip City A i r p o r t a f t e r a distress call w a s m a d e . The two H o p e s t u d e n t s w e r e p r o n o u n c e d d e a d at t h e scene. Trygve J o h n s o n , d e a n of t h e chapel, along with o t h e r m e m b e r s of t h e c a m p u s m i n i s t r y ' s office led t h e s t u d e n t b o d y in a service of prayer. The tearful s t u d e n t s flooded p e w s w e r e packed w i t h s t u d e n t s seeking u n d e r s t a n d i n g a n d c o m f o r t as they grieved and p r o c e s s e d t h e horrific n e w s . J o h n s o n offered w o r d s of a s s u r a n c e o n Sunday, " G o d

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* P H O T O BY E T H A N M O R R I C A L

P H O T O BY A U S O N G A R Z A

Emma Biagioni

David Otai eyes are a t e s t i m o n y t o t h e special place they held in s o m a n y h e a r t s . T h e y b o t h lived big lives a n d will be missed." A l f r e d o G o n z a l e z , associate p r o v o s t a n d d e a n for i n t e r n a -

h a s n o t a b a n d o n e d us. W h e n there's t o o m u c h t o bear, there's G o d , i n t e r c e d i n g for us. In r e f e r e n c e to t h e m o u r n ing across c a m p u s , Bryant Russ ('11) said "All t h e t e a r y

tional s t u d i e s , told t h e G r a n d Rapids Press, "It's a great instit u t i o n a l and family loss. There's a lot of pain. W e have t o hold each o t h e r up a n d pray a n d try t o m a k e s e n s e of s o m e t h i n g

that's so difficult t o u n d e r stand." To help s t u d e n t s grieve, t h e C o u n s e l i n g Offices, S t u d e n t Development, and Campus M i n i s t r i e s cleared all a p p o i n t m e n t s t o be o p e n for t h e n e e d s of s t u d e n t s . M e m b e r s of t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y said t h a t they will rem e m b e r b o t h Biagioni and O t a i for their c o n t a g i o u s smiles and friendly personalities. H o w e v e r these m e m o r i e s are n o t sufficient for t h e lives t h e y led. Lindsay Allward ('11) said "David a n d E m m a lived t h e i r life in t h e p r e s e n t a n d s h o w e d us t h e t r u e m e a n i n g of c o m p a s sion. They t a u g h t us h o w t o app r e c i a t e each day, as it is a gift f r o m God." T h e college a r r a n g e d t r a n s p o r t a t i o n to C h r i s t C o m m u n i t y C h u r c h in St. C h a r l e s , III, for Biagioni's m e m o r i a l service o n Monday. T h e r e will be a service at H o p e today at 7:15 p.m. in D i m nent Chapel. O n Sunday there will be a service for O t a i at 8 p.m. in D i m n e n t C h a p e l .

Civil Rights week celebrates many cultures i . j .together -.i t o p r o m o t e this worked s e n s e of unity t h r o u g h diversity GUEST WRITER by organizing this year's events. This year's Civil Rights These groups worked Celebration at H o p e College, to transform the nine-day aiming to foster a sense of celebration into one that togetherness, began Friday, Jan. celebrates t h e progress m a d e and 15, with the a n n u a l Dr. M a r t i n t h e civil rights goals achieved by Luther King Jr. L u n c h e o n , and those f r o m all a r o u n d t h e world c o n c l u d e d Saturday, Jan. 23, while also raising a w a r e n e s s of with t h e s h o w i n g of t h e film t h e h a r d s h i p s e n d u r e d by m a n y "The Stoning of Soraya M." g r o u p s of p e o p l e in their efforts In t h e past. Civil Rights w e e k to obtain basic at H o p e f o c u s e d h u m a n rights. solely on t h ^ ( W h e n asked a b o u t commemoration The quest for justice finding t h e balance of Dr. Martin b e t w e e n celebration Luther King Jr. Day is never done. As and solemn and t h e African- l o n g a s r a c e i s a c o m m e m o r a tion, American civil d i v i d i n g l i n e , t h e r e Latoya Gates, the rights m o v e m e n t w j j j fa a n e e c j assistant director America. in continue this quest. of multicultural The current — ALFREDO G O N Z A L E S e d u c a t i o n said. celebration, You can't have one however, has w i t h o u t t h e other. been expanded to include t h e civil rights causes of You can't appreciate w h e r e you are unless you recognize t h e all cultures. progress that has happened." La Raza Unida, t h e Black This idea was also a d d r e s s e d S t u d e n t Union, Hope's Asian at t h e Dr. M a r t i n L u t h e r King Perspective Association and the Jr. luncheon. The keynote Delta Sigma Theta sorority all C h r i s Russ

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nr i aowr#»nrp T speaker. Dr. L wrence J. Pijeaux Jr., h o n o r e d t h e m a n y a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s of those w h o had s t o o d up for civil rights in

tthp h e H o pn e organization. La Raza Unida, said t h e college is m a k i n g i m p r o v e m e n t s . G a t e s especially n o t e d t h e positive e n v i r o n m e n t

P H O T O COURTESY P R

H O P E M A R C H S FOR C I V I L R I G H T S — Students, faculty and s t a f f w a l k e d t o g e t h e r across c a m p u s , c o m m e m o r a t i n g c i v i l rights leaders and movements. America, as well as r e m i n d i n g all in a t t e n d a n c e of t h e instances of tragedy and suffering that occurred during the movement. W h e n asked if they felt that H o p e was d o i n g a good job of p r o m o t i n g cultural and racial awareness, b o t h G a t e s and Josh Brubaker-Salcedo ('12), an executive b o a r d m e m b e r of

f o s t e r e d by t h e Phelps Scholars P r o g r a m but said she "didn't always see t h e s a m e climate m o d e l e d elsewhere o n campus." Brubaker-Salcedo and G a t e s also agreed o n t h e i m p o r t a n c e of w o r k i n g together. They said t h a t n o t only is it critical that H o p e reach out t o t h e s t u d e n t s , b u t t h e s t u d e n t s also need to

International tragedy— A 7.0 earthquake devastates Haiti. Page 3 Got a slory idea? Let us know at anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 L

r e s p o n d and take part, and the ai c o n c e p t of collaboration is very i m p o r t a n t to the success of the celebration. Brubaker-Salcedo said, " W e aren't all t h e same, and we should e m b r a c e o u r differences." Gates also e m p h a s i z e d that interest in these events and o t h e r s like t h e m is i m p o r t a n t not only for m e m b e r s of a minority g r o u p . She said t h e p r o m o t i o n of civil rights is a universal c o n c e r n that should t r a n s c e n d political, religious and ethnic divisions. "MLK w a s n o t just a b o u t black rights," said Gates. "God doesn't call us to only fight for our own." She a d d e d that this celebration should be s o m e t h i n g that t h e entire c a m p u s can get behind. In his closing w o r d s at t h e Dr. M a r t i n Luther King Jr. l u n c h e o n , A l f r e d o Gonzalez, associate provost and dean for international s t u d e n t s , said,"The quest for justice is never d o n e . As long as race is a dividing line, t h e r e will b e a need to c o n t i n u e this quest."

Sports sign-up— Intramurals offer athletic opportunities to students. Page 1 1


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T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday Summer Camp Fair

Jan. 27

C a m p recruiters will be available to talk with students about s u m m e r e m p l o y m e n t opportunities. Maas A u d i t o r i u m . 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m.

Memorial Service for Emma Biagioni D l m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel, 7 : 1 5 p.m.

Thursday Jan. 2 8 The Savvy Graduate: a workshop for graduating seniors .Presented by Dr. Michael Edmondson and Dr. Rosina Miller. RSVP by e-mailing careers@hope.edu. W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m . Graves Hall, 4 p.m.

Hope College Concert Series presents Iron & Wine Judson Claiborne will open. Tickets are $ 2 5 for the general public and $ 1 2 for Hope students. D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel. 9 p.m.

Friday Jan. 2 9 Screening and Discussion of "Seven Passages" The d e p a r t m e n t s of English, religion a n d theatre sponsor a free screening of the f i l m "Seven Passages" w i t h a panel discussion to follow. DeWItt Center m a i n theatre. 7 p.m.

Sunday Jan. 3 1 Memorial Service for David Otai D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel, 8 p.m.

IN BRIEF AUSCHWITZ SURVIVOR S P E A K S AT H O P E

Tova Friedman, a holocaust survivor, will -speak at Hope College Wednesday, Jan. 27, which is the 65th annivesary of F r i e d m a n ^ liberation from the Nazi death camp, Auschwitz. The event will include a screening of the P B S documentary, "Surviving Auschwitz: Children of the Shoah," and a question-andanswer session with Friedman will immediately follow the screening. The event will begin at 4 p.m. in the Maas Center Auditorium and will end with a reception in the Maas Center conference room at 5:30 p.m. The public is invited and admission is free. DEPARTMENTS HOST SCREENING OF 'SEVEN PASSAGES'

Hope College's English, religion and theatre departments are sponsoring a free screening of the film "Seven Passages" Friday, Jan. 29 at 7 p.m. in the DeWitt Center main theatre. The film includes seven biblical passages addressing same-sex relations along with a script taken from interviews with 127 Christians in West Michigan. Following the screening will be a panel discussion with director/ playwright Stephanie Sandberg; Jean Bahle, an actor in the film and assistant professor o f theatre; Dr. David Myers, professor of psychology; and Dr. Steven Hoogerwerf, associate professor of religion. "Seven Passages" was originally commissioned as a play by Actors' Theatre in Grand Rapids and performed in the fall of 2007.

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Study abroad deadline is Feb. 1 Amy Soukup C A M P U S N E W S EDITOR

W h e n s t u d e n t s decide t o a t t e n d college, they usually s t e p o u t s i d e their c o m f o r t zone, their "bubble," to d o so. S t u d e n t s m u s t adjust, settle and t h e n ? M a y b e it c o m e s t i m e to burst t h e b u b b l e again. W i t h H o p e Colleges offcampus study program, s t u d e n t s have access t o over 200 p r o g r a m s in over 60 c o u n t r i e s . To t a k e advantage of these o p p o r t u n i t i e s , however, filling out an application is a necessary first step. Feb. 1 m a r k s t h e o f f - c a m p u s study application deadline for t h e fall 2011 semester. A m y O t i s - D e G r a u of t h e offc a m p u s s t u d y office said a b o u t 50 p e r c e n t of each g r a d u a t i n g class at H o p e participates in an o f f - c a m p u s study p r o g r a m of s o m e kind, w h e t h e r d o m e s t i c or international. Two s t u d e n t s w h o will b e part of t h a t 50 p e r c e n t are Sara G o s s e s ( 1 0 ) and James C o l t e n ('11). G o s s e s s t u d i e d t h e a t e r while participating in t h e IES L o n d o n p r o g r a m in t h e s p r i n g of 2009 a n d c o n t i n u e d offc a m p u s study t h r o u g h t h e N e w York A r t s P r o g r a m in t h e fall. C o l t e n recently r e t u r n e d f r o m a s e m e s t e r in South Africa w h e r e h e s t u d i e d reconciliation and social change. M a n y c o n c e r n s arise for s t u d e n t s w h o consider offc a m p u s study. Before c h o o s i n g t o s t u d y in L o n d o n , G o s s e s w o r r i e d a b o u t t h e extra cost and a b o u t being able to pay back her s t u d e n t l o a n s w h e n she graduated.

" W h i l e talking with f r i e n d s and family m e m b e r s , 1 was helped to realize t h a t if I don't d o this n o w I m i g h t never d o this," G o s s e s said. "It m i g h t take m e over 30 years t o go to Europe, like it took m y p a r e n t s . My a d v e n t u r e spirit was biting at t h e bit. I had t o go. I'd m a k e it work." O t i s - D e Grau said m o s t programs o f f e r

Scheduling is another i m p o r t a n t f a c t o r in a student's ability t o study abroad, O t i s - D e G r a u said a n d r e c o m m e n d e d s t u d e n t s plan a h e a d . She said if s t u d e n t s start p l a n n i n g d u r i n g their f r e s h m a n or s o p h o m o r e years, m o s t m a j o r s should a c c o m m o d a t e an o f f - c a m p u s experience.

G R A P H I C BY E M I L Y D A M M E R

scholarships t o help alleviate costs. She said t h e IES p r o g r a m alone has over $2 million to give out t o its participants. G o s s e s also had t h e c o n c e r n of missing f r i e n d s and family while away, b u t she b o u g h t a c a m e r a for h e r c o m p u t e r a n d installed Skype. O t i s - D e G r a u said, "A lot of s t u d e n t s say t h e y ' r e going t o miss H o p e , so t h e y ' r e w o r r i e d a b o u t leaving and missing c a m p u s , but a world awaits, so go e x p e r i e n c e that."

Though there may be s o m e obstacles t o o v e r c o m e before or while studying off-campus, Otis-De Grau e m p h a s i z e d t h e m a n y benefits — e x p a n d i n g course offerings, learning independence, developing cross-cultural skills, n e t w o r k i n g and challenging your worldview. Gossesand Coltenagreed that their t i m e o f f - c a m p u s stretched their cultural knowledge beyond w h a t experiences at H o p e could do.

"I w a s able t o feel t h e cultural differences m u c h m o r e personally," said Gosses. "I was o f t e n given m a n y o p p o r t u n i t i e s t o engage in open, h o n e s t , intellectual conversation t h a t w e r e s o m e t i m e s limited at H o p e d u e t o political or religious assumptions." Colten said, "I think you can get a lot of perspectives at H o p e . You can get a wide variety of perspectives, b u t until you go there, you can't really u n d e r s t a n d what goes o n there. You really have t o go s o m e w h e r e t o have a h e a r t for it. 1 have a m u c h bigger h e a r t for South Africa than b e f o r e I went." W h i l e studying in S o u t h Africa, Colten also had t o o v e r c o m e a language barrier and learn t o speak Zulu. "It was u n c o m f o r t a b l e learning a n e w language, but it was a sign of r e s p e c t to their culture. It s h o w e d we w a n t e d to learn a b o u t t h e culture, n o t just visit. M o s t p e o p l e were h a p p y t o see A m e r i c a n s speaking their language," said Colten. Both C o l t e n a n d G o s s e s had positive experiences o f f - c a m p u s a n d stressed t h e i m p o r t a n c e of a p p r o a c h i n g o f f - c a m p u s study with cultural interest a n d an open mind. Gosses said, "In t h e H o p e off-campus study program booklet t h e r e is a line a b o u t n o t expecting things t o b e like h o m e b e c a u s e you left h o m e to find n e w things. It is imperative you r e m e m b e r this every day. If t h e r e is no ranch dressing in L o n d o n , that's okay."

God's children members visit Rwandan orphanage Gretchen Baldwin GUEST WRITER

W h i l e m o s t H o p e College s t u d e n t s b r a v e d t h e b i t t e r cold of t h e M i d w e s t over C h r i s t m a s break, a few lucky o n e s escaped t o s u n n i e r skies f o r t w o of t h e three weeks. Unlike s o m e break trips, however, the w a r m t h and tanning opportunities were not the motivation behind the plane tickets. Lindsay A l l w a r d ('11), Luke Tubergen('ll),RebeccaCurrey ('11) a n d Jake B a j e m a ('11), as

Firday night is ladies night!

well as Dr. A n n i e D a n d a v a t i a n d Dr. David DeVisser, of t h e political s c i e n c e a n d c h e m i s t r y departments, respectively, t r a v e l e d t o Kigali, R w a n d a , a s p a r t of H o p e for All G o d ' s Children. W h a t w a s t h e i r p u r p o s e ? To t e s t t h e w a t e r s for a J u n e t e r m as well as s p e n d t i m e w i t h R w a n d a n o r p h a n s still a f f e c t e d by t h e 1994 g e n o c i d e . H o p e for All G o d ' s C h i l d r e n b e g a n in J a n u a r y 2009, a n d h a s since a t t r a c t e d a r o u n d 4 0 s t u d e n t m e m b e r s . O n e of t h e g r o u p ' s m a i n g o a l s is to w o r k

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w i t h a n u m b e r of a l r e a d y established non-profits to p r o v i d e for n e e d y c h i l d r e n around the world, with a current focus on Rwanda. N i b a k u r e C h i l d r e n ' s Village is one such non-profit. F o u n d e d in 2008 by F l o r i a n e Robins-Brown, this orphanage o p e n s itself u p t o R w a n d a n children who seem without h o p e , m a n y of w h o m , like t h e r e s t of t h e n a t i o n , a r e still e x p e r i e n c i n g t h e e f f e c t s of t h e country's devastating 1994 genocide. In t h e last year H o p e for All God's Children has partnered with Robins-Braun and her h u s b a n d to, in t h e w o r d s of t h e students' mission statement, "directly apply (their) s t u d i e s a n d utilize (their) r e s o u r c e s ... ( a n d ) t o e n c o u r a g e s e r v a n t l e a d e r s h i p in a global society." A f t e r a full year of h a r d w o r k t o build a r e c o g n i z e d H o p e College s t u d e n t o r g a n i z a t i o n , it is h a r d to i m a g i n e a n y t h i n g that could have appealed m o r e to t h e four m e m b e r s who w e n t o n t h e t r i p t h a n actually meeting the children they had

been serving. T h e H o p e f o r All G o d ' s Children members gained new insight necessary to c o n t i n u e its success in t h e coming months. The amount of w o r k t h e y a c c o m p l i s h e d in a s h o r t t w o - w e e k p e r i o d will b e invaluable w h e n f u r t h e r i n g p r o j e c t s s u c h as s t u d y a b r o a d e x p a n s i o n a n d o r p h a n a g e aid. A l o n g w i t h t h e i r visit of N C V, t h e f o u r w e r e able t o visit otherareaorphanages,dialogue with Rwandan government officials, investigate possible c o n n e c t i o n s n e e d e d for f u t u r e H o p e College R w a n d a t e r m s a n d e x p l o r e t h e b e a u t i f u l "land of a t h o u s a n d hills." T h e i r w i l l i n g n e s s to c o m m i t t i m e p r o m i s e s to o p e n u p a w o r l d of n e w i n v o l v e m e n t and travel o p p o r t u n i t i e s for o t h e r H o p e students. I n f o r m a t i o n o n H o p e for All G o d ' s C h i l d r e n a n d t h e R w a n d a t r i p c a n b e f o u n d at rwandatrip-rcurrey.blogspot. com.


NATIONAL Haiti devastated by magnitude 7.0 earthquake THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 2 7 . 2 0 1 0

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Capital of Port-au-Prince, struck by record-setting earthquake, still enduring aftershocks Amy A l v l n e STAFF WRITER

Just b e f o r e 5 p.m. o n Jan. 12, t h e c o u n t r y of Haiti w a s h i t w i t h a d e v a s t a t i n g 7.0 magnitude earthquake and over 30 aftershocks. S t r i k i n g a b o u t 10 m i l e s southwest of Port-auP r i n c e , t h e c a p i t a l of Haiti, the earthquake brought a s u r r e a l level of d e s t r u c t i o n t o buildings, imperative cultural l a n d m a r k s a n d t h e frail H a i t i a n government. T h e realities of d e a t h a r e i n e s c a p a b l e as d e a d b o d i e s a r e found littering the streets a n d o v e r f l o w i n g in m a s s graves. " W e have a l r e a d y c o l l e c t e d a r o u n d 50,000 d e a d bodies," said H a i t i a n I n t e r i o r M i n i s t e r Paul Antoine Bien-Aime t h r e e d a y s a f t e r t h e initial earthquake. "We anticipate t h e r e will b e b e t w e e n 100,000 a n d 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 d e a d in t o t a l ..." That estimation has sinced i n c r e a s e d t o b e t w e e n 200,00 a n d 300,000 d e a d . With an unimaginable d e a t h toll a n d m u c h of P o r t au-Prince flattened, the r e c e n t e a r t h q u a k e in H a i t i is c o n s i d e r e d t o b e o n e of t h e t o p 10 e a r t h q u a k e s in h i s t o r y . Even t h o u g h t h e 7 2 - h o u r p o s t - e a r t h q u a k e w i n d o w , in w h i c h t h o s e w h o m a y still b e t r a p p e d beneath the wreckage can feasibly b e r e s c u e d , h a s passed, many continued to r a c e a g a i n s t t h e clock, t r y i n g t o uncover anyone who remains buried under the rubble.

Despite the turmoil that arose f r o m the death and destruction, hundreds of p e o p l e t o o k t o t h e s t r e e t s of P o r t - a u - P r i n c e a n d j o i n e d in a c h o r u s of c h a n t i n g a n d s i n g i n g . People marched d o w n the street, exhibiting the resiliency of t h e i r collective voice.

T h e r e are 3 million people a l o n e in P o r t - a u - P r i n c e , w i t h t h o u s a n d s of t h e s e i n d i v i d u a l s currently inhabiting the C h a m p s de M a r s S q u a r e , w h o a r e w i t h o u t access to f o o d , w a t e r , e l e c t r i c i t y a n d vital medical treatment. With the most important

p r i o r i t y c u r r e n t l y b e i n g t o get f o o d , w a t e r a n d t e n t s to t h e survivors. Secretary General of t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s Ban K i - m o o n is p e t i t i o n i n g t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l c o m m u n i t y for $550 million USD to meet the i m p e r a t i v e n e e d s of t h e v i c t i m s of t h e e a r t h q u a k e in Haiti.

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T h i s crisis h a s m a d e t h e n e e d for aid in Haiti even m o r e u r g e n t and various organizations and countries are r e s p o n d i n g to t h e call. D o n a t i o n s t o Haiti via text m e s s a g e s a n d social n e t w o r k i n g s i t e s a r e raising a w a r e n e s s of t h e crisis in Haiti at a r a p i d s p e e d .

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7

S I F T I N G T H R O U G H T H E R U B B L E - Residents of Port-au-Prince and t h e s u r r o u n d i n g areas cope w i t h t h e d e s t r u c t i o n caused by a 7.0 m a g n i t u d e e a r t h q u a k e and t h e c o n s e q u e n t a f t e r s h o c k s . The r e p o r t e d d e a t h t o i l p r o j e c t i o n has been raised t o 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 t o 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 dead w i t h c o u n t i e s s more i e f t homeless.

Supreme Court lifts corporate restrictions on campaign financing i n c l u d e d i r e c t d o n a t i o n s to a C O - N A T I O N A L N E W S EDITOR c a n d i d a t e ' s c a m p a i g n . It d o e s i n c l u d e giving c o r p o r a t i o n s m o r e f r e e d o m w h e n it c o m e s to In a d e c i s i o n t h a t c o u l d h a v e independent spending projects m a j o r effects on the u p c o m i n g that, while not being directly m i d t e r m e l e c t i o n s as well as affiliated with a candidate, t h e e n t i r e A m e r i c a n political w o u l d s u p p o r t or o p p o s e a landscape, the Supreme Court candidate. has ruled that Those in the government 66 support of cannot regulate (This ruling reprethe ruling c a m p a i g n sents) a major viccontend that donations by tory for big oil, Wall this s p e n d i n g corporations. is an e x t e n s i o n The 5Street banks, health of f r e e s p e e c h 4 decision insurance companies that the federal overturns a and the other powgovernment number of erful interests that hasnoauthority s i g n i f i c a n t marshal their power over. S u p r e m e campaign finance Court Justice laws t h a t have every day in WashA n t h o n y b e e n p a s s e d in ington to drown out K e n n e d y therecentdecade, the voices of everyw r o t e in s u p p o r t most notably the of t h e d e c i s i o n M c C a i n - F e i n g o l d day Americans . PRESIDENT BARACK t h a t lobbies a n d Campaign Reform OBAMA c o r p o r a t i o n s Act of 2002. The dispute ^Jwere, associations of stems from c i t i z e n s ..." a n d t h a t t h e First a r g u m e n t s over w h e t h e r or n o t Amendment, "... prohibits s p e n d i n g by c o r p o r a t i o n s w e r e C o n g r e s s f r o m f i n i n g o r jailing p r o t e c t e d as f r e e s p e e c h , j u s t as citizens, or a s s o c i a t i o n s of s p e n d i n g by i n d i v i d u a l c i t i z e n s citizens, for simply e n g a g i n g in is p r o t e c t e d . political speech." This spending does not Eric A n d e r s o n

O n the other hand, critics of t h e d e c i s i o n believe t h a t t h e

66 (The First Amendment) prohibits Congressfromfining or jailing citizens, or associations of citizens, for simply engaging in political speech. — SUPREME COURT JUSTICE ANTHONY KENNEDY

99 lack of r e g u l a t i o n will allow c o r p o r a t i o n s t o p o u r large a m o u n t s of m o n e y i n t o t h e election process., Although the vote w a s n a r r o w , e i g h t of t h e nine justices agreed that corporations could be required b y C o n g r e s s to r e p o r t t h e i r spending, which would include a d d i n g d i s c l a i m e r s to th e ir advertisements. In r e s p o n s e t o t h e d e c i s i o n , President Barack Obama remarked that the ruling

place by t h e M c C a i n - F e i n g o l d r e p r e s e n t e d , "a m a j o r v i c t o r y C a m p a i g n R e f o r m Act of 2002 f o r big oil. Wall S t r e e t b a n k s , a n d w a s i n t e n d e d t o give s p e c i a l health insurance companies i n t e r e s t s a w i n d o w to i n f l u e n c e and the other powerful interests elections — a window that that marshal their power every w o u l d n o t r u n u p t o t h e actual day in W a s h i n g t o n t o d r o w n elections. o u t t h e voices of e v e r y d a y Senators Russ Feingold, Americans." D - W i s c . , a n d John M c C a i n , O b a m a w e n t o n to add t h a t R-Ariz., both expressed t h e lack of c a m p a i g n f i n a n c e with the legislation w o u l d be, a disappointment d e c i s i o n . Sen. Feingold w e n t g r e e n light t o a n e w s t a m p e d e so far as t o call t h e r u l i n g , "... of special i n t e r e s t m o n e y in a t e r r i b l e mistake." H o w e v e r , o u r politics." t h e m a n w h o initially b r o u g h t T h e case stems f r o m the 2008 forward the case to defend the presidential primaries, where Citizens United documentary, a highly critical d o c u m e n t a r y David Bossie, w a s entitled "Hilary: _ _ _ _ _ eager to operate T h e Movie" w a s ^ ^ under the new not allowed to (This ruling is) a ter- legislation. be shown. Bossie plans rible mistake. T h e documentary, — SENATOR Russ t o release a n e w FEINGOLD, D - W i s c . d o c u m e n t a r y p r o d u c e d by t h e - ^ e n t i t l e d "Generation conservative ^^Zero" w h i c h will n o n p r o f i t f o c u s o n t h e e c o n o m i c collapse. corporation Citizens United, H o s t e d by Lou D o b b s , Bossie was reportedly disallowed, p l a n s to release t h e film in b e c a u s e j t w o u l d have b e e n t i m e for t h e c o m i n g m i d t e r m s h o w n t o o close to t h e p r i m a r y elections. e l e c t i o n s , a n d b e c a u s e it w a s n o t directly affiliated w i t h a c a m p a i g n or with t h e n e w s media. T h i s reitViction was p u t in


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NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

New obstacles arise for health care reform S a m u e l Tzou STAFF W R I T E R

President O b a m a insisted last Friday t h a t h e will c o n t i n u e t o work with C o n g r e s s o n a health care overhaul plan. " T h e r e are things t h a t have to get done," O b a m a told AP r e p o r t e r s Friday at a t o w n hall m e e t i n g in Elyria, O h i o . "We can't keep o n p u t t i n g this off." D e m o c r a t i c e f f o r t s recently t o o k a t u r n with t h e election of Republican Sen. Scott Brown as t h e n e w s e n a t o r of M a s s a c h u s e t t s . Brown's election gives Republicans 41 votes, allowing t h e m to filibuster Democratic bills, including t h e health c a r e overhaul in t h e Senate. "If B r o w n wins, it'll kill t h e health bill," Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., told AJC n e w s Saturday, Jan. 16, nearly t h r e e days b e f o r e t h e election. This doubt is causing D e m o c r a t s t o rethink their strategy, but it h a s c a u s e d o t h e r s to b e even m o r e fervent for t h e bill t h a n before. "We will have health c a r e r e f o r m in this Congress," v o w e d Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y. This s o r t of c o n f i d e n c e and c o n c e p t of health care r e f o r m , however, d o e s not sit well with all of t h e A m e r i c a n public, as t h e election of B r o w n in t h e M a s s a c h u s e t t s special election would suggest. Brown h a s pledged to vote against t h e c u r r e n t health care overhaul r e f o r m t h a t will allow Republicans t o e m p l o y delay tactics against health care passage in t h e Senate. Despite this opposition and his a n n u a l State of t h e U n i o n A d d r e s s t o n i g h t , O b a m a is still stressing his f e r v e n c y for t h e passage of a health c a r e r e f o r m . "Here's t h e good news. We've gotten pretty far d o w n t h e road," O b a m a told t h e N e w York T i m e s

JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

Republican wins Massachusett's Senate seat

Brown defeated the Democratic candidate Martha Coakley, r e c e i v i n g 51.9 p e r c e n t (1,168,107 votes) of t h e v o t e s Even though Democrats o n Friday, "but I have t o admit, to Coakley's 47.1 p e r c e n t o u t n u m b e r Republicans threewe had a little bit of a b u z z saw (1,058,682 votes). t o - o n e in M a s s a c h u s e t t s , o n this week." This victory by the Tues., Jan. 19, t h e S e n a t e r a c e The W a s h i n g t o n Post r e p o r t e d Republican P a r t y is b e i n g in M a s s a c h u s e t t s w a s w o n by Saturday t h a t D e m o c r a t s have c a l l e d a t u r n i n g p o i n t in U.S. the Republican candidate Scott d r a w n u p o t h e r m e t h o d s to politics because Massachusetts pass t h e health care overhaul. Brown. is c o n s i d e r e d Democrats t o b e o n e of t h e may be able most liberal to employ a s t a t e s in t h e U.S. H o u s e of nation. Representatives For over budget measure 50 y e a r s , the that only D e m o c r a t ic requires a P a r t y h as majority vote to had a strong actually pass t h e grip upon the health c a r e bill. Massachusetts This process S e n a t e seat. blocks any s o r t The seat of Republican b e l o n g e d delay tactics. t o Sen. Ted With 256 Kennedy for Democrats to 47 y e a r s u n til 178Republicans Sen. K e n n e d y in t h e H o u s e , P H O T O COURTESY THE A S S O C I A T E D P R E S S p a s s e d a w a y Democrats U P S E T I N M A S S A C H U S E T T S — Republican Scott Brown o n A u g u s t 25, would have little d e f e a t e d D e m o c r a t M a r t h a Coakely t o send s h o c k w a v e s 2009, after t r o u b l e passing t h r o u g h o u t t h e p o l i t i c a l l a n d s c a p e , as w e l l as t o d i m t h e a long battle a bill that would p r o s p e c t s off p a s s i n g a h e a l t h care refform bill. with cancer. mirror that of t h e Senate, enabling t h e m t o send t h e bill t o the White House. While some Democratic leaders agree with t h e idea, several leading n e w s sources, including the New York Times and t h e W a s h i n g t o n Post, r e p o r t e d Friday that such a r u s h e d decision would u n d o u b t e d l y have t o e n d u r e a significant a m o u n t of public s c r u t i n y and c a u s e huge a m o u n t s of backlash f r o m Republicans in the future. Even so. D e m o c r a t s w e r e still c o n f i d e n t Saturday as they reiterated their efforts to create and pass a health c a r e r e f o r m bill. "This is o u r best c h a n c e t o d o it," O b a m a said. "I'm n o t going t o walk away f r o m it just b e c a u s e it's hard."

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Senate leader apologizes for insensitive remarks Cory t a k a t o s SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

Senate Majority Leader H a r r y Reid h a s b e c o m e caught up in a c o n t r o v e r s y over c o m m e n t s he m a d e d u r i n g President Barack O b a m a ' s election c a m p a i g n . In th e ir b o o k " G a m e Change," Mark Halperin and John Heilemann revealed several c o m m e n t s the senator made privately in 2008. Reid, D - N e v , is q u o t e d saying that O b a m a ' s c h a n c e s of achieving t h e presidency would be h e l p e d by his "light-skinned" features, as well as t h e a b s e n c e in his s p e e c h of a " N e g r o dialect, unless he w a n t e d t o have one." Reid told C N N t h a t h e regretted his " p o o r choice of w o r d s " and e m p h a s i z e d his ongoing s u p p o r t for t h e president. "I sincerely apologize for o f f e n d i n g any and all A m e r i c a n s , especially A f r i c a n A m e r i c a n s ,

STAFF W R I T E R

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for my i m p r o p e r comments," he said. "I w a s a p r o u d and enthusiastic s u p p o r t e r of Barack Obama during the campaign and have w o r k e d as hard as I can t o a d v a n c e President O b a m a ' s legislative agenda." O b a m a himself c o m m e n t e d o n t h e t e l e p h o n e d apology h e received f r o m Reid. "I accepted Harry's apology w i t h o u t q u e s t i o n , b e c a u s e I've k n o w n h i m for years; I've seen t h e p a s s i o n a t e leadership he's s h o w n o n issues of social justice, and I k n o w what's in his heart," he said. "As far as I a m c o n c e r n e d , t h e b o o k is closed." The disclosure of the c o m m e n t s have s o m e p e o p l e calling for Reid t o step d o w n as Senate majority leader and m a y even p u t h i m in jeopardy of losing t h e 2010 m i d t e r m elections. According t o M a s o n - D i x o n Polling and Research, 52 p e r c e n t of N e v a d a n s have a negative

o p i n i o n of t h e senator, w h o has held his seat for four t e r m s . University of Dayton r e s e a r c h e r s Joe Feagin and Leslie Picca, a u t h o r s of "Two Faced Racism," claim t h a t it is n o t u n c o m m o n for w h i t e s t o engage in racist behaviors w h e n in private. " M o s t whites have sharply r e d u c e d t h e blatantly racist stuff they do in public, while they still do^ huge a m o u n t s in private," said Feagin. Perspectives on race relations in t h e U.S. are hardly u n i f o r m . The Pew Research C e n t e r r e p o r t s t h a t 54 p e r c e n t of A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n s believe that O b a m a ' s election to t h e presidency improved race relations, while t h e p e r c e n t a g e t h a t say that t h e "situation of black p e o p l e in this c o u n t r y is better t h a n it w a s five years ago" has almost doubled since 2007.

Uganda passes anti-homosexuality laws Kelsey Colburn

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The unexpected Massachusetts Senate win has resulted in growing concern for President Obama's administration due to the i m p o r t a n c e of B r o w n ' s seat in t h e c u r r e n t h e a l t h c a r e legislation. D e s p i t e m u c h d o u b t in t h e Republican Party winning the S e n a t e s e a t in M a s s a c h u s e t t s , the G O P has capitalized on its m o m e n t u m by t a p p i n g i n t o f r u s t r a t i o n over t h e m o u n t i n g deficit, t a x e s a n d big b u s i n e s s bailouts. T h e R e p u b l i c a n Party's goal is t o gain m o r e m o m e n t u m and take over Democratic Congressional positions and governor offices across the country following Scott B r o w n ' s victory. According to Republican National Committee Chairman Michael S. Steele, "Scott B r o w n ' s v i c t o r y in t h e s p e c i a l e l e c t i o n f o r t h e US S e n a t e in M a s s a c h u s e t t s s h o w s o u r p a r t y can w i n a n y w h e r e in t h e c o u n t r y w h e n w e have a principled, conservative candidate."

The c o u n t r y of U g a n d a h a s recently m a d e h o m o s e x u a l i t y an issue of life a n d d e a t h . H o m o s e x u a l i t y is already illegal in Uganda and is p u n i s h a b l e by u p t o 14 y e a r s in p r i s o n , a l t h o u g h it is e s t i m a t e d t h a t t h e r e are half a million gay p e o p l e o u t of t h e c u r r e n t p o p u l a t i o n of 31 million. However, in O c t o b e r , a g o v e r n m e n t official p r o p o s e d a bill t h a t would s e n t e n c e m e m b e r s of t h e gay c o m m u n i t y t o life in p r i s o n and t h e d e a t h p e n a l t y for "serial offenders." F u r t h e r m o r e , t h e legislation w o u l d penalize a n y o n e w h o "helps, c o u n s e l s , or e n c o u r a g e s

a n o t h e r p e r s o n t o e n g a g e in a homosexual act" with up to s e v e n y e a r s in p r i s o n . T h e legislation w a s said t o have b e e n d r a f t e d partly d u e to s e m i n a r s held in U g a n d a by t h r e e A m e r i c a n C h r i s t i a n evangelists. Dr. Scott Lively detailed t h e s e s e m i n a r s o n t h e "gay agenda" in his weblog, " D e f e n d t h e Family." At least o n e of t h e evangelists h a s b e e n quick t o c o n d e m n t h e legislation, e x p r e s s i n g his d i s a p p o i n t m e n t over t h e h a r s h n a t u r e of t h e bill. UgandaEthicsMinister James Nsaba Buturo has repeatedly s t a t e d t h a t h o m o s e x u a l i t y will never be e m b r a c e d in U g a n d a a n d r e f u s e s to a c k n o w l e d g e it as a h u m a n rights issue.

M a n y c o u n t r i e s a r e lobbying Ugandan President Yoweri M u s e v e n i to block t h e bill, a n d S w e d e n h a s t h r e a t e n e d to c u t off aid t o U g a n d a , i d e n t i f y i n g it as a h u m a n rights violation. The p r e s i d e n t h a s h a d little c o m m e n t since t h e bill w a s proposed but has recently s p o k e n of t h e legislation warily, alerting his g o v e r n m e n t t h a t it is n o w a foreign policy issue d u e t o i n t e r n a t i o n a l p r e s s u r e to d i s c a r d t h e bill. The legislation h a s b e e n p u t b e f o r e P a r l i a m e n t , b u t is still in d r a f t f o r m ; it is yet t o b e debated. Many think that the more objectionable stipulations will be d r o p p e d if not s c r a p p e d altogether.


ARTS

JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

THE ANCHOR

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Petar Jankovic: Classical guitarist with a classy performance Jankovic played Federico M o r e n o Torroba's "Sonatina in A major." The s o n a t i n a consists of t h r e e m o v e m e n t s : "Allegretto," "Andante" a n d "Allegro." M o r e n o Torroba, a Spanish composer, was best k n o w n for his use of t h e zarzuela, a traditional Spanish lyric-dramatic genre. Isaac Albeniz's well-known "Asturias" was p e r f o r m e d next. Even t h o u g h t h e piece was w r i t t e n for t h e piano, Jankovic proved that t h e lively piece can b e played o n t h e guitar just as well. Jankovic explained his f o u r t h piece, Roland Dyens's "Libra Sonatine," w r i t t e n in 1986, in t h e greatest detail. The t h r e e m o v e m e n t s of t h e s o n a t i n e tell t h e s t o r y of t h e French c o m p o s e r ' s h e a r t surgery. The accents, r h y t h m changes, and f r a g m e n t e d style of t h e first m o v e m e n t , "India," d e m o n s t r a t e Dyens' painful h e a r t attack. T h e

Llndsey Wolf ASST. ARTS

EorroR

O n Jan. 14, at 7:30 p.m., classical guitarist Petar Jankovic silently took a seat o n a c u s h i o n e d b e n c h in t h e c e n t e r of t h e stage at t h e Knickerbocker Theatre and began his remarkable p e r f o r m a n c e in f r o n t of a c r o w d of eager H o p e s t u d e n t s and W e s t Michigan residents. For t h e next hour, Jankovic, dressed in a bright red silk shirt, black p a n t s and black shoes, e n t e r t a i n e d the audience with a variety of r o m a n t i c Spanish m u s i c w r i t t e n by c o m p o s e r s of t h e 19th and 20th centuries. The first piece Jankovic played w a s "Cinq Preludes," a series of i n t r o d u c t o r y preludes by Brazilian c o m p o s e r Heitor VillaLobos. W r i t t e n in 1940, "Cinq Preludes" displays t h e folk music of Villa-Lobos' native Brazil. For his second piece.

Jankovic o f t e n closed m e l o d y gradually his eyes d u r i n g his descends in skillful p e r f o r m a n c e , the second which m e s m e r i z e d m o v e m e n t , t h e audience. His "Largo," w h i c h is hands moved representative of quickly, gracefully Dyens' operation and effortlessly up itself. and d o w n his guitar. The sonatine Jankovic has concludes with studied the guitar an energetic since he was 8 third movement, years old. Jankovic's "Fuoco," w h i c h is P H O T O BY C H E L S E A T A R N A S years of practice Italian for "fire." were evident A s t o r J A N K O V I C A T T H E K N I C K - Guitar c r a d l e d In his in his flawless lap f t h e sultry Spanish sounds envelope t h e t h e a t e r . P i a z z o 11 a ' s performance on "Three Tangos" Thursday. In addition to being f r o m t h e enthusiastic audience, was t h e final piece of Jankovic's distinguished performer, Jankovic played "Tango en Skai" a performance. The piece Jankovic is a m u s i c t e a c h e r at by Roland D y e n s as his encore. c o m b i n e s the traditional t a n g o t h e Indiana University Jacobs Jankovic's p e r f o r m a n c e style of A r g e n t i n a with jazz School of Music. h a s been d e s c r i b e d as "an a n d classical music. "Three T h o s e interested in Jankovic's a m a z i n g and exemplary r a n g e Tangos," w h i c h has b e e n used m u s i c can sample his C D of d y n a m i c s " and as " r o m a n c e in m a n y movies, d e m o n s t r a t e s "Leyenda" o n his website, www. in s o u n d " by t h e Herald Times t h e national musical style of petarjankovic.net, w h e r e it is in Bloomington, Ind. Seated Argentina. available for purchase. with his guitar c r a d l e d in his lap. A f t e r a r o u n d of applause

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Labeled as an "Anthology of Hymns and Spiritual Songs," this album is a compilation of covers and original works by Christian artists approaching Christian music from a more humble and diverse perspective than that of the Christian pop music industry. Artists such as Denison Witmer, Rosie Thomas, My Brightest Diamond and The Welcome Wagon make appearances, often in duets and choral arrangements.

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Noteworthy newcomers in the recent trend of harmony-heavy folk-influenced indie bands (Fleet Foxes), Mumford and Sons present a robust blend of bluegrass and rock that is just as effective in dark songs of betrayal and spiritual longing as in upbeat folk romps with singalong choruses. The album has b e e n circulating quietly by word of mouth outside of the UK, but will b e released in this hemisphere this February.

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These album suggestions are courtesy of W T H S music directors Paul Rice. Maria Krebs and Aaron Martin.

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A progression of Bazan's previous work, his latest release continues to explore his relationship with God. The lyrics are poignant and desperate, encouraging his audience to join him in contemplation. Although his focus is on the lyrics, the music is crisp and precise, with more variety than Bazan's past offerings.

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A member of Canada's unique and quirky hiphop scene, Shad released his sophomore effort, the loose concept album "The Old Prince," in Canada in 2007. This summer it was re-released in America as he toured the states, expanding his fan base exponentially with his substantive and clever rhymes and devotion to supporting his rapping with solid, unique instrumentation, ranging from trip-hop to snaky guitar parts to Kanye-like 70*s soul throwbacks.

Jennifer Falck Linssen 'captures light' through contemporary paper sculptures Annelise Belmonte ARTS

EDITOR

The first t h i n g that m o s t p e o p l e will probably notice w h e n they walk into DePree's latest exhibit is t h e a m a z i n g a m o u n t of blue. It's not just any blue, either. It's a beautiful, t o u c h i n g indigo, with d e p t h t h a t people might forget can a p p e a r in color. Jennifer Falck Linssen's exhibit o p e n e d Jan. 15 with a r e c e p t i o n in t h e m a i n gallery. In her artist s t a t e m e n t , Linssen says, "I create s c u l p t u r e in h a n d - c a r v e d paper, metal a n d natural w o v e n e l e m e n t s , which explore the delicacy of nature, t h e beauty of line and t h e transition of light and space." The style began with a class in katazome, a Japanese t e r m t h a t m e a n s "pattern dyeing." Linssen uses h a n d - m a d e paper a n d a r a z o r t o stencil and decorate h e r pieces. The paper is then

w a t e r d o n e in graphite. O n e gallery-goer, Kar i a n n e Bechtel ('12) said, "The plant o n e s are my favorite, b e c a u s e they're just so perfectly textured. (The pieces) honestly have t h e texture of a leaf. O r say, you hold a leaf u p to t h e light, it h a s that s o r t of s e e - t h r o u g h quality that's surprisingly beautiful in nature." T h e r e are m a n y s u r p r i s e s in Linssen's work t h a t o n e might not even notice w i t h o u t looking at the list of materials used. In a few P H O T O BY J E N N A H U N G E R of her pieces, f r e s h w a t e r F L U I D M O T I O N — Linssen portrays one of her h a n d m a d e paper pearls peek out f r o m d e e p sculptures t h r o u g h curves and t e x t u r e s In ' S o f t Caress.' b e n e a t h t h e layers of h a n d carved paper. A c o m m o n m a n - m a d e patterns, I seek t o stitched a r o u n d t h e a l u m i n u m t h e m e with Linssen's work is u n d e r s t a n d h o w p a t t e r n lends f r a m e or c o p p e r wire. She has t h e hidden beauty in nature. In overall s t r e n g t h t o an object taken an ancient b a s k e t - m a k i n g her p l a n t - f o c u s e d series, o n e such as t h e veining in plant t e c h n i q u e and a d a p t e d it into b u d d i n g flower-like s c u l p t u r e leaves, t h e s t r u c t u r e of a moth's her o w n c o n t e m p o r a r y and called " U n z i p p e d " h a s just barely wing, or t h e crystal f o r m a t i o n of u n i q u e style. b u d d i n g petals, with all t h e snowflakes." Linssen in her artist s t a t e m e n t healthy vibrant green color o n Studies include an also writes, "Through my work's t h e inside of t h e plant, creating e x a m i n a t i o n of ripple effects in investigation of b o t h natural and

an almost glowing quality. Linssen, in her artist s t a t e m e n t , says, "I bridge t h e gap b e t w e e n o u r o w n h u m a n scale, t h e m i n u t e and intimate, and t h e vast and grand by freezing a m o m e n t in time, i m m o r t a l i z i n g it in p a t t e r n , light, and shadow. T h r o u g h these m o m e n t s , I a m c o m f o r t e d in seeing nature's change, rebirth, resiliency, and endurance." W i t h e x a m p l e s like pearls h i d d e n b e n e a t h the surface and h a n d - c a r v e d and c h o s e n wavelike baskets dipped in indigo, it's no w o n d e r that her pieces feel like a stolen m o m e n t in time. "Captured Light: The C o n t e m p o r a r y Katagami W o r k s of Jennifer Falck Linssen" will be f e a t u r e d in t h e gallery of t h e D e P r e e Art C e n t e r t h r o u g h Friday, Feb. 12. D e P r e e Art C e n t e r ' s regular gallery h o u r s are M o n d a y s t h r o u g h Saturday 10 a.m. t o 5 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. o n Sundays.


1 HE A N C H O R

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The q u e s t i o n " W h o w a s E m m a ? " is o n e that m a n y of us are n o w asking. For t h o s e of us w h o km h e r well, t h e r e are infinite w o n d e r f u l m e m o r i e s we can still r e m e m b e r a l t h o u g h she is gone. F t h o s e w h o did n o t k n o w E m m a , m o s t w o u l d agree t h a t she could be described by o n e word: "Joy: I m a g i n e a small ball of light, b o u n c i n g a r o u n d a r o o m , filing t h e r o o m with happiness. It w o i be impossible to completely d e s c r i b e E m m a t o a n y o n e w h o did n o t have the privilege t o k n o w h b u t o n e trait t h a t was especially incredible was her drive to always o v e r c o m e h e r greatest fears, ev at the e n d . This is a goal t h a t m a n y of us w o u l d h o p e to be able to achieve, b u t E m m a actually coi a n d o f t e n did. A l t h o u g h I k n e w E m m a very well, I was lucky t o be able t o teach E m m a h o w to sail and t o h( h e r to c o n q u e r t h a t fear. She c a m e to college a n d joined just a b o u t every club that she possibly cou quickly realizing she was o v e r w h e l m e d . I was glad she d e c i d e d to stick w i t h sailing. In m y opinic to c o n n e c t to life a n d G o d t h a n t h r o u g h sailing. The skills involved, including p a t i e n c e a n d awarei a p e r s o n to c o n t e m p l a t e life a n d even c a n offer a certain perspective o n h o w to live life. E m m a rei a f t e r b e g i n n i n g to sail. M y greatest m e m o r i e s a n d s o m e of m y greatest conversations were o n the E m m a w a s learning to sail, I was forced to learn as well. W e raced t o g e t h e r at m a n y regattas (weekem events), a n d to begin with, we did n o t win. T h r o u g h m u c h struggle a n d discussion a n d learning of t ently I had b o t h a " n o r m a l " a n d "racing" t o n e of voice a n d personality, t h e latter of w h i c h w a s compL by the e n d of o u r sailing career together, we were f r e q u e n t l y finishing races t o p 5 of 15 to 20 boats. O f t e n , I convinced her it w o u l d be a g o o d idea to do m o r e and m o r e d a r i n g things in sailing (incl o u t o n t h e "trap" a device w h i c h is a h a r n e s s c o n n e c t e d to t h e top of the m a s t . In o r d e r t o keep the b the p e r s o n in the h a r n e s s puts only h e r feet o n the side of t h e boat; the rest of h e r b o d y is s u s p e n d e d i slipped and c a r e e n e d into the water, w a s d r a g g i n g t h r o u g h the water, a n d laughing in b e t w e e n m o u t h f at m e for making h e r "trap"). The brilliant thing a b o u t E m m a was, of course, even a f t e r t h a t experie w e r e high w i n d s , she w o u l d beg m e to let h e r use t h e trapeze.

O n e of my f o n d e s t m e m o r i e s o f E m m a w a s at t h e H o m e c o m ing d a n c e this p a s t O c t o b e r . W h i l e d a n c i n g , I a m n o t o r i o u s a m o n g s t m y close f r i e n d s f o r making the m o s t ridiculous faces w h i l e p e r f o r m i n g s o m e of m y g o o f y d a n c e m o v e s k n o w n as " t h e lawn mower", "the shopping cart" o r " t h e m i c r o w a v e " . Usually, w h e n m y f r i e n d s first see m e d o i n g t h i s , t h e y k i n d of laugh at first, a n d t h e n just l o o k at m e s t r a n g e l y later. At this y e a r s h o m e c o m i n g dance, E m m a joined our dance circle and s o o n a f t e r d i s c o v e r e d my r i d i c u l o u s m o v e s . M u c h t o my surprise, E m m a then proceeded to dance these same oddities with me, bobbing her head up-andd o w n in a p p r o v a l ( a n d of c o u r s e

Emma's ability t o use h e r fears t o h e r advantage, a n d to instead of living w i t h i n h e r s t r e n g t h s , fir u n i q u e ways to g r o w o u t s i d e of h e r zone of c o m f o r t , is an ability t h a t 1 h o p e o n e day t o be able to a a goal for which e v e r y o n e should strive. W i t h i n this ability, t h r o u g h h e r learning, she also was forevt o t h e r s , even w i t h o u t words, a b o u t h o w to live life, love life a n d love G o d . W h a t is m o s t a m a z i n g is t was so m u c h m o r e t h a n t h i s o n e ability, a n d a l t h o u g h I was o f t e n yelled at in t h e best of ways, I will m h e r laugh, h e r smile a n d the joy that she s h a r e d w i t h so m a n y just f r o m t h e seemingly simple act of c h e r fear of sailing. O n January 24, 2010 fifteen s t u d e n t s and a l u m n i stayed for the w e e k e n d just to be W e all h a d a c o m m o n t h r e a d : 'lil Em h a d i m p a c t e d o u r lives, each in a different w; c a n n o t be d e s c r i b e d by a few adjectives. A few m e m o r i e s may give a glimpse into Em n o article will ever articulate correctly w h o E m m a Biagioni was as a p e r s o n . E m m : a h o u s e of 7 girls. That quickly b e c a m e h o m e , called "7 i n l Home." The 7 of us ca f r i e n d s a n d b o n d e d into a family away f r o m o u r h o m e t o w n s . O n e m e m o r y begar E m m a cooking Rice-A-Roni. She cooked t h e rice for twelve m i n u t e s w i t h o u t putting water with the rice. E m m a was sitting with Maria, a h o u s e m a t e , w h e n black s m o k t to fill the living r o o m . E m m a froze n o t sure of w h a t to do. W e got o u t of the h o u s e an c a m p u s safety. E m m a was c o n v i n c e d that Rice-A-Roni had t h e w r o n g direct i o n s o n t h e back of box. E m m a could not cook, b u t we loved her q u e s t i o n s a b o u t cooking. E m m a could m a k e an English tea. She h a d it d o w n to science a n d generously m a d e tea for t h e h o u s e at night while we were studying" upstairs. She g r e e t e d o u r h o m e with "Hi H o n n n e y " or "Hey b a b e o r "Hey, Hey." E m m y d a n c e d a n d we loved to w a t c h h e r dance. She also loved love. Jaci V a n G r o n i n g e n , o n e of the h o u s e m a t e s , is engaged to Ryan Sweet w h o w a s a b r o t h e r to h e r at H o p e College. She asked Ryan once, " W h a t s it like to be in l o v v w v e ? " Love, 7 in 1 H o m e

w i t h h e r big s m i l e o n h e r f a c e ) . E m m a had s u c h a w a r m h e a r t , a n d she will b e d e a r l y m i s s e d .

E m m a Porter ('11), M e g a n Sweet ('10), M e g h a n Fore ('10), Jaci V a n G r o n ingen ('10), Erin V a n O o r d t ('10), Maria K o t m a n ('11)

- Blair W i l l i a m s 4 1 0 P h o t o C r e d i t s : E t h a n M o r r i c a l , Alison G a r z a , Illiana Garcia, Z o e Lalo Layout Credit: Brennigan Gilson and Karen Patterson


JANUARY 2 7 . 2 0 1 0

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"Events in time are not boom — over. They have tentacles, and they wrap around, and they swish hack and forth " —Amy Fusselman One cannot put 300 words to a life. This is because life is not this way. It cannot be packaged this way. It would not be accurate enough. Several years ago, I learned the two Greek words for time, Chronos and Kairos. As a Western white male, 1 know what chronos is. It means instantaneous time; it means being on-time time. David and I shared many interests in guitar, media. Christian missions, and Africa (most specifically Uganda). He and I spent many hours translating and editing footage in my dorm room for a documentary film. This spawned into evening burgers, guitar jam sessions, and longer conversations. Through these experiences, I learned his most remarkable story of brokenness, betrayal, exile, love and yearning. When we set up our meetings for editing the film or to just hang out, I would say a time and he would respond with, "Africa Time or U.S. Time?" By this he meant, can I arrive an hour late or do I need to be there on time? We would always joke about Africa and my experiences there, especially how in Africa time is different. For David, and I will never forget this, time was distinctly different. By this I do not mean he was simply late for things- but that he viewed time less as a commodity- something to have or to loose but more as a fluid or air. Amy Fusselman in her book, titled 8 says, "the nature of time itself.. .is plastic, and around and in the human body at all times, like air." David understood time this way. He saw life through Kairos time, he understood time in the tentacles of memory or the swish back and forth of our hearts. When time went inside of him, to his lungs, it then came back out and became the medium for which his relationships existed — the give and take of the air between people or love that permeates all defenses. It is this unique understanding of time that was so counter-cultural about David, so Christ-like, so transformative, so deeply-moving, so incredibly risky, so laugh-out-loud hilarious, and so shake-you-toyour-core-bring-a-grown-man-to-tears beautiful about him.

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ing p u t t i n g herself t f r o m tipping over, he air. She p r o m p t l y of w a t e r a n d c u r s in g e, w h e n e v - er t h e r e

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I miss hearing your laugh. I miss your smile and joy for life. I miss our conversations that consisted of English, Spanish and Swahili. I miss texting you ridiculous ideas and your response always being "I'll pray for you." I miss seeing you in Martha Miller. Thank you for all the hugs and times of laughter we shared. Thank you for always encouraging me and reminding me of my identity in Christ. Thank you for making Fall Semester 2009 memorable. 1 know y o u ' r e having a fiesta in Heaven right now and looking down on us and smiling. You were one of my favorite people.

•5 . V i S

Z o e L a l o '11

M o r e m e m o r i e s on p a g e 10


8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

Musings on mutual misunderstandings Karen Patterson and Emily West Co-Editors-in-Chief

Two lives: a stirring testament The A n c h o r is n o stranger to difficult s i t u a t i o n s c o n t r o v e r s y a n d tragedy have b e e n an integral p a r t of o u r relationship with t h e college c o m m u n i t y . However, tragedy has never hit quite so close t o h o m e as it did last w e e k w h e n David O t a i a n d E m m a Biagioni w e r e taken f r o m u s so suddenly a n d unexpectedly. T h e trem e n d o u s influence t h e s e t w o s t u d e n t s had o n c a m p u s , if n o t obvious before, h a s b e c o m e u n m i s t a k a b l e in their absence. David and E m m a were beloved friends, classm a t e s and s t u d e n t s . Specifically, E m m a was a b r i g h t s p o t o n o u r n e w s p a per staff, a reliable, engaging, w o n d e r f u l p e r s o n . E m m a w a s a p e r s o n of great presence; t h a t is, w h e n s h e w a s in t h e r o o m , she wasn't necessarily t h e focus, b u t she w a s impossible t o miss. Despite having t h e n i c k n a m e "Petite Emma," there w a s n o t h i n g small a b o u t h e r love of life or dedication t o t h e things i m p o r t a n t t o her. As t h e national c o - e d i t o r for The Anchor, E m m a was a d e p t a n d creative. At t h e b e g i n n i n g of t h e year w h e n issues arose that could not have been f o r e s e e n

by t h e staff, E m m a h a n d l e d t h e situation with t h e grace of a s e a s o n e d pro, n o t as a n e w editor trying to learn t h e ins and o u t s of a newspaper. H e r k n o w l e d g e and e x p e r i e n c e with local, national and global h a p p e n i n g s b r o u g h t an invaluable perspective t o t h e staff. She w a s always able to take a step back and see the big picture. This h e l p e d the rest of us, blinded by t h e i m m e d i a t e issues in f r o n t of us, to look u p and ahead with d i s c e r n m e n t and u n d e r s t a n d i n g . A n y b o d y w h o ever spoke with E m m a for m o r e t h a n t w o m i n u t e s k n e w t h a t she was s o m e o n e w h o could b e t r u s t e d . In t h e world of journalism, w h e r e m a n y are afraid to c o m e o u t and say exactly what t h e y are thinking, E m m a w a s u n a f r a i d to tactfully state her p o s itio n a n d m a k e o t h e r s feel c o m f o r t a b l e stating theirs. A n d w h e n she saw r o o m for i m p r o v e m e n t , s h e took t h e initiative t o advocate for corrective change. W h e n few o t h e r s w e r e willing to be critical a b o u t bias issues o r deal with difficult situations, s h e s t e p p e d f o r w a r d . W h i l e s h e was never afraid t o put herself out there, E m m a always p u t o t h e r s at ease with h e r beautiful

smile a n d love of life. R u n n i n g into her o n c a m p u s or in t h e office w a s always a pleasant experience, b e c a u s e even w h e n s o m e t h i n g w a s n o t perfect, she did not let it affect h o w she treated others. Her smile and laugh h a d t h e ability t o b r i g h t e n even t h e r o u g h e s t d a y E m m a was n o t naive to the ugly injustices of this world, b u t she was a p e r s o n of incredible h o p e . So while it is easy t o see t h e injustice in her life being cut s h o r t , she inspires us t o celebrate t h e joy, faith, h o p e and love she e x u d e d and t h e gift h e r p r e s e n c e was for those w h o k n e w her and worked alongside her. Despite w o r k i n g with The A n c h o r for just o n e semester, her impact will b e felt for many s e m e s t e r s to c o m e as the s e e d s she p l a n t e d c o m e t o fruition. As each of us in t h e c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y at large c o n t i n u e s to grapple with t h e loss of David a n d E m m a , m a y we r e m e m b e r the activities they b o t h w e r e involved in, t h e p e o p l e they loved and h o w they inspired and c h a n g e d t h e lives of those they c a m e I n t o c o n t a c t with. W e will miss E m m a , as an incredible m e m b e r of o u r staff, as an incredible friend and as an incredible h u m a n being. Emily and Karen are grateful beyond words to the editorial staff of The Anchor for their poise and continued effort through this difficult time. You all make our jobs so rewarding.

Parentheticalities t h e heat t e n d s t o be slightly above r o o m t e m p e r a t u r e — an excellent n a p p i n g space. Certainly w e m u s t n ' t forget t h e library, w h e r e 1 have b o t h w i t n e s s e d a n d b e e n a victim of s p o n t a n e o u s napping. It is of similar t e m p e r a t u r e and cushiness, but t h e e x p e r i e n c e includes fewer panicked awakenings d u e t o s o m e o n e ' s desire for a very loud bottle of M o u n t a i n D e w ( t h a n k

Kaili Doud Columnist

Loonette the Clown had it right Whilst spending somewhere around 40 p e r c e n t of my day-lit C h r i s t m a s break nestled u n d e r t h e s n u g and freshly l a u n d e r e d layers of m y m u l t i p l e - m a t t r e s s h o u s e d bed, it o c c u r r e d t o m e that I have s p e n t a lot of m y life sleeping at t h e w r o n g times. I t h o u g h t back to t h e few weeks prior t o finals h e r e at H o p e . Several of my nights w e r e s p e n t w i t h i n t h e w a r m and dimly lit r o t u n d a of M a r t h a Miller in a glazey-eyed, face-to-face staring c o n t e s t with M i c r o s o f t W o r d and several t h o u s a n d p a r a g r a p h s of m o n o t o n o u s b o o k text. W h e n such staring c o n t e s t s are as aggravatingly necessary as they were then, there is never a n y t h i n g m o r e tantalizing t h a n t h e t h o u g h t , or in this case, presence, of a good n a p e n v i r o n m e n t . T h o u g h t s arise. "It's perfectly sensible that 1 could take a little s n o o z e o n a M a r t h a Miller n o n - b e a n bag for 15 m i n u t e s and t h e n get back up and finish things. Just a p o w e r nap, is all." But, of course, even at t h e earliest h o u r s of t h e m o r n i n g w h e n t h e caffeine has w o r n off, r e a s o n sets in and simply says, "No." It is i n d e e d these t i m e s that o u r senses are keenest for s p o t t i n g potential n a p sites. 1 can't imagine t h a t e x a m p l e s are entirely necessary, but nap-site c o m m o n a l i t y is f u n . M a r t h a Miller is one, namely t h e r o t u n d a , with its fine chairs, n o n - b e a n bags and sizeable m u l t i - p o t t e d plants for additional a m b i e n c e . T h e a t m o s p h e r e is quiet a n d

Karen Patterson Amy S o u k u p Lindsey Bandy Eric A n d e r s o n

EmoR-is-CHiEf

Ctiifi/s Nws CAMWS NATIOSAL

CO-EDITOR

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To t h e Editors: I a m so s a d d e n e d t o read a b o u t t h e administration's decision to not allow D u s t i n Lance Black to facilitate a discussion a b o u t homosexuality o n c a m p u s . As a g r a n d a u g h t e r , niece and cousin of m a n y H o p e alumni, I can speak confidently of t h e fact t h a t m a n y of those p e o p l e would be sincerely d i s a p p o i n t e d by t h e decision m a d e . This decision d o e s not s e e m to be in keeping with C h r i s t i a n principles of tolerence and loving kindness. I a m o n c e again c o n f u s e d by a Christian g r o u p w h o p r e a c h e s o n e thing and d o e s a n o t h e r against a g r o u p w h o h a s already suffered so m u c h discrimination. I really encourage t h e s t u d e n t s to d e m a n d an o p p o r t u n i t y t o discuss an issue that is very real and alive and will be p r e s e n t for m a n y of them, either personally, in t h e w o r k p l a c e or in t h e i r n e i g h b o r h o o d s . O n t h e legal side, isn't this a first a m e n d m e n t right, the right to free speech? I really t h o u g h t H o p e College w a s a safe haven. I guess not. especially if you're gay.

Sincerely, Carol W i c h e r s

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i d t a : Kaili would like everyone to know that nap assistance can now be obtained by means of the Dreamy. Sorry to everyone who received a Snuggle for Christmas: your gift is so 2009.

2010

Annclise Belmonte

EDITOH-IS-CHIEF

e

Disappointed about discrimination

you, C u p & Chaucer). Just a s a side note, I c a n n o t a d m i t t o never taking an accidental n a p in P h e l p s b e f o r e a W e d n e s d a y m o r n i n g breakfast. S o m e t i m e s Latin c o n j u g a t i o n s c a n get t h e b e t t e r of you. Truly, however, a nap n e e d s n a u g h t but acquiesced will and an irrational calculation of available t i m e t o be genuine. I w a s a w o k e n by only t h e kindest d e m a n d for an ID-swipe, and 1 did not accomplish my Latin. Therefore, n a p successful! Of course, n o t h i n g beats t h e soft confines of y o u r o w n bed, but in s o m e s i t u a tio n s we simply m u s t m a k e - d o a n d let o u r fatigued m i n d s w i n us over. If only we had appreciated o u r t i m e in kindergarten a little m o r e acutely. If you haven't already, I'd highly r e c o m m e n d taking the t i m e t o appreciate a nice, v o l u n t a r y siesta in your n a p site of choice. Naturally, I c a n n o t c o n d o n e sleeping life away (although I o f t e n find myself subconsciously leaning t o w a r d such an existence), b u t t h e r e is never any h a r m in s p e n d i n g a little while in blissful repose, at least to power u p for t h e rest of t h e day. G o o d things c o m e t o those w h o relax!

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VOICES

JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

THE ANCHOR

9

Quote for thought we have t o read t e x t b o o k s t o learn about o u r o w n world. We're stuck here. N o w personally, I don't m in d that, but 1 d o like t o have m y s o j o u r n s in book-worlds. It s e e m s t o m e t h a t I learn as m u c h a b o u t "real life" f r o m these " f u n b o o k s " as I d o f r o m t h e textbooks. Fiction m i r r o r s reality. W h e n 1 was h o m e for C h r i s t m a s break, I watched "The Return of t h e King" with my family. I've read t h e book n u m e r o u s t i m e s and t h e e n d i n g always gets m e (Frodo sailing away with t h e elves). As usual, I got choked u p watching t h e film. As I watched t h e four h o b b i t s saying goodbye, I started t h i n k i n g a b o u t t h e kind of f r i e n d s F r o d o had: M e r r y and Pippin, w h o both f o u g h t battles way bigger t h a n they could have imagined in o r d e r t o help Frodo, and Sam, w h o offered everything h e had t o Frodo t o help him. Sure, h e was fat and clumsy, shy and awkward, but he loved Frodo. H o w m a n y of my relationships with m y f r i e n d s are d e e p enough, s t r o n g e n o u g h , to w i t h s t a n d all that Frodo and his f r i e n d s w e n t t h r o u g h ? W o u l d any of my f r i e n d s see past m y faults t h e way F r o d o saw past Sam's? A n d would 1 be able to d o t h e s a m e for t h e m ? W o u l d I offer to help t h e m c a r r y their heaviest, real-world b u r d e n s t h e way Sam offered to c a r r y t h e ring

Kate Schrampfer Columnist

Fact or fiction? FACT: 1 read a lot m o r e , in t e r m s of " f u n books," w h e n I'm h o m e t h a n at school. Big surprise! There really isn't m u c h t i m e to read purely for e n t e r t a i n m e n t w h e n you have t o n s of t e x t b o o k s waiting for you. The t e m p t i n g \yorlds that sit b e h i n d t h e covers of mysteries, fantasies, r o m a n c e s and a d v e n t u r e b o o k s m u s t b e a b a n d o n e d for t h e dry, dusty speculations of t h e real world of textbooks. Sure, those real-world things can b e interesting and are certainly i m p o r t a n t , but t h e allure is n o t t h e same. Given a choice b e t w e e n "The Lord of t h e Rings" and " W h e r e t h e Red Fern Grows" or "The M o r a l M e a s u r e of t h e E c o n o m y " and " T h o m a s ' Calculus: Early Transcendentals: Part One," I'm pretty sure m o s t p e o p l e would c h o o s e t h e first two. But t h e choice isn't always u p to us. As s t u d e n t s .

for Frodo? If 1 had to leave t h e m forever would they h u g m e like they never w a n t e d t o let m e go, like M e r r y and Pippin? I didn't read all this in s o m e psychology book a b o u t i n t e r p e r s o n a l relationships. These fictional, m a d e - u p c r e a t u r e s called "hobbits" t a u g h t m e a lot a b o u t t h e real world. 1 w a n t m y f r i e n d s t o be like this. I w a n t to b e a friend like this. Jessamyn W e s t said that "Fiction reveals t r u t h that reality obscures." So true. Would I have paused to consider t h e way I related to my f r i e n d s if I hadn't read "The Lord of t h e Rings"? If you had asked m e b e f o r e break t o tell you a b o u t my friends, I'd have said I loved t h e m . They are great, and we have t o n s of f u n together. I would have m e a n t it. But n o w I'm way m o r e c o m m i t t e d to s t r e n g t h e n i n g those relationships t h a n I was, b e c a u s e I w a n t t h e love and loyalty t h a t c o m e s with t h e m . FACT: "Fun books" teach too. M a k e t i m e for t h e m . Kate would like to thank Liz textbook title suggestions she used... recommendations on good reads.

and Sara for the and is open to any

An outside perspective Blair Williams Guest Columnist

Pondering our contemporary freedom and its roots W h i l e sitting in my dad's c o n d o over C h r i s t m a s break, a n e w s headline o n t h e television caught my eye: "The Top National N e w s Stories of 2009." My dad and I t u n e d in attentively, as we r u m i n a t e d o n t h e p o p u l a r U.S. media a c c o u n t s of t h e decade's closing year. I m u s t admit, I was slightly e m b a r r a s s e d by what I saw: Kanye W e s t steals Taylor Swift's t h u n d e r at M T V ' s V M A . Colorado's balloon b o y s t u n t staged for selection t o reality T V show. Tiger W o o d s alleged of affairs with n i n e mistresses. Enraged Serena Williams t h r e a t e n s to shove tennis ball d o w n line judge's throat. W i t h headlines such as these, America shall u n d o u b t e d l y r e m a i n k n o w n as "The land of t h e f r e e

and t h e h o m e of t h e brave." In several ways, I think m u c h of o u r c o n t e m p o r a r y society h a s lost sight of its f u n d a m e n t a l precepts. T h e n o t i o n of a d e m o c r a t i c , "free" n a t i o n w a s first established by t h e A t h e n i a n s t w o and a half millennia ago. W h i l e such a society e m p h a s i z e d individual f r e e d o m s a n d rights for all citizens, f u n d a m e n t a l to its success w a s t h e Greek n o t i o n of s o p h r o s u n ^ . S o p h r o s u n e m o s t closely resembles t h e idea of self-control or discipline; it implies living by selfe n f o r c e d limits and striving for social h a r m o n y . This p h e n o m e n o n was key to t h e A t h e n i a n s ' establishment of t h e first successful d e m o c r a c y and its e n d u r i n g f r a m e w o r k for f u t u r e civilizations. N e w s headlines like t h e o n e s I saw that night really m a k e m e w o n d e r if we have lost o u r s e n s e of s o p h r o s u n e within "free" society. It s e e m s t h a t m o r e and m o r e , individual f r e e d o m s are exploited in t h e a b s e n c e of limits and discipline. T h e societal r e p e r c u s s i o n s of such m a k e o u r c o u n t r y u n i q u e a m o n g t h e nations of today's world. The facts speak for themselves. W e have o n e of t h e highest divorce rates in t h e world, nearly 4 5 percent. W e are in t h e t o p tier of cases of e c o n o m i c stratification. O u r h o m i c i d e rate t o p s t h e c h a r t s in c o m p a r i s o n to o t h e r industrialized nations. T h o u g h t h e United States only contains 5 p e r c e n t of t h e

world's population, we m a k e up 2 5 p e r c e n t of t h e world's incarcerated. If we were m o r e disciplined in exercising o u r f r e e d o m s , could s o m e of these U.S. idiosyncrasies be lessened? G o i n g back to o u r roots, I believe t h a t b o t h t h e individual and society as a w h o l e would benefit f r o m m o r e personal exercise of s o p h r o s u n e . It may s e e m sacrificial u p f r o n t , but by actively restraining s o m e of o u r acts of legal narcissism, p e r h a p s we can achieve greater societal repose. W h a t I a m trying to suggest is that p e r h a p s we should be m o r e introspective and conscious of o u r actions. W h i l e our d e m o c r a c y g r a n t s us m a n y rights, we n e e d t o be careful h o w we use t h e m . W e should accept our f r e e d o m with a sense of humility and responsibility, r a t h e r t h a n with a s e n s e of e m p o w e r m e n t and liberation. W h i l e our rights entitle us to m a n y vehicles for fulfilling personal desires, we should be m o r e c i r c u m s p e c t in considering t h e c o n s e q u e n c e s of d o i n g ^ o . Blair is thankful for his democratic freedoms and will utilize them to participate in volunteer service work in Japan this summer.

The foreign journey Amanda Gernentz Columnist

Defying gravity: Preparations, waiting and "Glee" W h a t does it feel like t o be p r e p a r i n g t o go abroad? T h e r e is a plethora of intense e m o t i o n s . Sometimes, I feel like I'm o n a rollercoaster, but t h e p r e p a r a t i o n s , overall, are very exciting. I've b e e n s p e n d i n g my t i m e reading g u i d e b o o k s and trying to fit m y life in a single suitcase, while t h e p e o p l e I've spent my last five s e m e s t e r s with have been starting classes. I've had t o talk t o t h e bank, go t o t h e doctor, apply for a visa t o e n t e r t h e United K i n g d o m and, lastly, just wait. I have d o n e a lot of waiting. I have learned s o m e i m p o r t a n t things a b o u t traveling — and a b o u t myself: Always plan t o carry everything, and I m e a n E V E R Y T H I N G , i m p o r t a n t with you. I filled an

entire b i n d e r with i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m t h e University of A b e r d e e n t h a t I w a s told to keep h a n d y while traveling. The p r o b l e m with this plan? It greatly decreases my c a r r y - o n space for t h e flight. The state of M i n n e s o t a (as in o t h e r states, I'm sure) refuses t o send o u t driver's licenses earlier t h a n your birthday. Since I t u r n 21 in a foreign country, it could be interesting going t h r o u g h a i r p o r t security. • Unrelated: t h e state of M i n n e s o t a also believes t h a t people b e t w e e n t h e ages of 18 and 25 a r e particularly irresponsible. Statewide chlamydia tests are n o w required. Gee, d i s c r i m i n a t e m u c h ? It's hard to be alone. I've always t h o u g h t I was a f r e e and i n d e p e n d e n t spirit, b u t it's not that simple. I d r e a m big, but t h e reality for m e is t h a t t h e n e w n e s s of a n o t h e r c o u n t r y a n d c o n t i n e n t is terrifying. Don't get m e wrong; I'm incredibly excited. I've been d r e a m i n g of studying a b r o a d since I first t h o u g h t a b o u t college. But until I t a k e m y first steps o n Scottish soil, m y nerves are

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going to c o n t i n u e to pester m e . I'll work o n t h a t o n e . 1 wish I could say t h a t I'm fearlessly setting out into t h e great u n k n o w n or s o m e t h i n g cliche like that, but I can't. There has b e e n a lot of fear involved, especially as m y d e p a r t u r e d a t e d r a w s ever nearer. M y e n t h u s i a s m is building, but it is m o r e out of restlessness t h a n anything else. I'll just say it: I'm scared, b u t I k n o w it will b e w o r t h the worry, w o r t h t h e anticipation a n d w o r t h t h e fear in t h e end. To b o r r o w f r o m "Glee" (who b o r r o w e d f r o m "Journey"): "I'm just a small-town girl living in a lonely world. I'm taking a m i d n i g h t train going anywhere." Well ... it's actually a plan ... and it won't be at m i d n i g h t . . . b u t you get my drift. Amanda will remain in her small Minnesota hometown until she leaves for Aberdeen, Scotland, (not South Dakota, although that could be considered a foreign country as well) on Jan. 28. and typographical errors. However, if such mistakes occur, this newspaper may cancel Its charges for the portion of the ad if. In the publisher's reasonable judgment, t h e ad has been rendered valueless by the mistake.

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JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

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1 had the pleasure of meeting E m m a Biagioni for the first time when she w a s a freshman at Hope College. E m m a came to my office and introduced herself to me. She struck m e as a self-confident, yet humble individual with a cheerfiil personality. The reason for her visit w a s to ask me if she could set up an appointment to interview me about s o m e questions she had regarding the Dining Services department. She and another student would be producing a video for a class and w e would be their subject matter. We proceeded with the project and met several times. E m m a w a s not afraid to dig deep and ask pointed questions in order to satisfy her research. At the same time, she was always respectful, pleasant and wanted everyone to win as a result of their work. She and her friend finished the work and shared it with me for my approval before submitting it to their professor. I grew to appreciate, respect and admire E m m a through this process. I k n o w she touched m a n y other people's lives in a similar way. I a m grateful for having had the opportunity to k n o w her these past few years. - B o b VanHeukelom, Director of Dining Serives

tc

David w a s the sunshine to my days, because he would always smile whenever I saw him. We first met in the Multicultural Retreat, and my first impression of him was that he w a s very friendly and outgoing. M y friends and I had a great time with him. After that day, David became my "Biffel," a term we used to say good friend. I think that I shared my best memories of Hope College with him, because he had the funniest personality 1 had ever met. David w a s a very friendly and understanding person. He w a s my competition, because my goal was to learn more languages than him; 1 w a s h a l f w a y to reaching my goal. I miss seeing him in Martha Miller or at Chapel, because we would always hug and then talk about the weirdest things ever. I have attached some pictures of David and those wonderful days we shared.

J

P H O T O S COURTESY OF E T H A N M O R R I C A L A N D B R E N D A C U E L L A P

r e m e m b e r a time when David and I were at the gym, working out and just catching up on life. I got to learn so much about him and his family and what life w a s like back home for him and just got to k n o w what an amazing person he was. Afterwards we went to do abs and couldn t stop laughing because of the j o k e s David w a s making. He w a s something else—such a great person with a lively spirit and a smile that just made your heart melt. I will really miss seeing him on c a m p u s and over the weekends. -Gabrielle Underwood ' 1 2

Awaits vibrant co mmu mty e p p g m g faculty istry

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W h o was E m m a ? You cannot exactly answer that question in one short reflection. She was so loving and caring that she affected everyone she met in tremendous and diverse ways. Yet, I do know who E m m a was to me. She w a s in every way a sister in Christ. Her faith w a s real, and she lived everyday of her life seeking to make the Kingdom of God a reality for all of his people and creation. E m m a w a s in so many ways my other little sister at Hope. As a friend to my sister Megan, E m m a would always refer to m e as her "big brother at H o p e . " After she returned from Japan, she w a s sharing her reflections and memories of a wonderful semester abroad with me. It w a s getting late, and she needed a ride home. It was still warm out, so 1 suggested that I give her a ride on my bike. She sat on the seat, and I stood and pedaled the whole way across campus. H a l f w a y though our j o u m e y , she said I needed to stop, because she had to take a break. However, E m m a and I neglected to think through our dismount for this new way of bike riding. 1 definitely forgot that I w a s taller and able to simply step off the bike, but E m m a w a s suspended in mid air on the seat and could not get off. In an instant, we toppled over into a massive heap of bicycle and laughter. I w a s so scared that I might have hurt her and embarrassed that we were not as graceful as I anticipated. She was always so quick to set others fears at ease, and she certainly did mine in that moment. She said, "It s O K big b r o t h e r . . . h o w else would we be able to remember this great adventure?" Your friend and other big brother, Ryan Sweet. -Ryan Sweet '08


SPORTS

JANUARY 2 7 . 2 0 1 0

THE ANCHOR

Intramurals offer chance to continue athletic career James Nichols WEBMASTER

I

T h o u s a n d s of high school athletes come to college d r e a m i n g of a glorious s p o r t s career. However, reality o f t e n races in like a t h o r o u g h b r e d h o r s e at Churchill D o w n s , quickly dismissing t h a t d r e a m . W h e t h e r they get c u t or realize t h e y just aren't good e n o u g h t o play t h a t s p o r t at a collegiate level, athletes' h e a r t s break at t h e b e g i n n i n g of every s p o r t s season. But there is o n e saving grace for all of those w o u l d - b e Michael Jordans: i n t r a m u r a l sports. While SportsCenter may b e e n o u g h to m e n d s o m e of t h e c r u s h e d souls, i n t r a m u r a l s are a n o t h e r great alternative. According t o t h e i n t r a m u r a l website, "The p u r p o s e of t h e i n t r a m u r a l p r o g r a m is t o provide an o p p o r t u n i t y for all s t u d e n t s , faculty and staff, regardless of skill level, t o t a k e p a r t in a well-organized p r o g r a m of s p o r t i n g activities. All individuals are urged t o participate in as m a n y I M s p o r t s as time, interest and knowledge allow." W i t h a wide variety of s p o r t s available, every h u n g r y athlete can get t h e i r fix.

"I c h o s e i n t r a m u r a l s b e c a u s e I love playing soqcer," said David H a m i l t o n (13). "I c a m e t o H o p e late, so I did not have a c h a n c e to go o u t for the team here."

Every half s e m e s t e r offers four different s p o r t s t o play; four seasons of f o u r s p o r t s each, for a total of 16 different s p o r t s t o relieve t h e itch. The first half of fall s e m e s t e r offers men's soccer, co-ed flag football, women's volleyball and men's flag football. The s e c o n d half a d d s a little m o r e variety with men's a n d coed tennis, c o - e d basketball and t h e newly a d d e d w o m e n ' s badminton. Spring semester offers t h e m o s t diverse and possibly m o

unique sports first

half

G R A P H I C BY EMILY D A M M E R

Always boarding. Never bored. When the rta l i closc in. it's lime ftwa road l/ip. And thtte's nc better way for getting a-u^nd Holla'd than riding the MAX. Our 8 fixed routes j o everywhere

:o the malii, stores. bowKng and movies. You dor'*, rave to be

a finance major to know that ridins MAX saves big bucks. One ways fares are still "jsi $ 1 . 0 ' buy a Studen: Sfcmeste# Pass fa- S50 fo-' unlimited fides on the eight :'x.ed bus routes ail s w e s t e r long. Visit www.catchamax.org for bus routes and

schedules or to purchase a bus pass a n l i n c .

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men's five-player basketball, coed volleyball, women's i n d o o r soccer and t h e ever p o p u l a r coed i n n e r t u b e w a t e r polo. "1 d e c i d e d to play i n t r a m u r a l basketball," said Jonathan Weppler(11), "because!wanted s o m e t h i n g f u n t o d o with my roommates." T h e final season of t h e school year dishes o u t co-ed o u t d o o r soccer, m e n ' s Softball, co-ed ultimate Frisbee and w o m e n ' s flag football. H o p e also offers f o u r o n e t i m e s p o r t i n g events â&#x20AC;&#x201D; o n e per half semester. A lawn g a m e s day is t h e first event of t h e school year a n d takes place within t h e first couple of weeks at school. D u r i n g exams for fall semester, t h e r e is t h e cleverly n a m e d Exam W e e k H o o p Shoot, w h i c h is exactly what it s o u n d s like. Spring s e m e s t e r offers an i n d o o r triathlon (swimming, biking and r u n n i n g ) , w h i c h took place this past Thursday. O n M a y 4, t h e s p r i n g s e m e s t e r Exam Week Bowling/Pizza event will provide s t u d e n t s with t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to t a k e a study break and relax. Surely with so m a n y choices, s t u d e n t s m u s t be able to find a s p o r t of t h e i r liking, right? "They should add lots of sports," said Ashley O l n e y ( 1 1 ) . "Kickball, field hockey a n d w o m e n ' s and c o - e d softball c o m e t o mind." "Men's i n d o o r soccer would b e fun," said Weppler. "I also think they should add i n t r a m u r a l paintball. If H o p e could rent a place and you could have teams, t h a t would b e really cool." Besides a possible need for o t h e r sports, there is only o n e visible p r o b l e m with i n t r a m u r a l s at Hope: t e a m s t h a t don't c o m e t o t h e game, or n o - s h o w s . " W e had n o - s h o w s , like, t h r e e weeks in a row," said H a m i l t o n . "This was very f r u s t r a t i n g , so we emailed t h e c o o r d i n a t o r of i n t r a m u r a l s and asked if she could penalize t h o s e t e a m s w h o did not s h o w up. It's a w a s t e of time." Official i n t r a m u r a l policy states: " O n e ' n o - s h o w ' or t w o forfeits voids all IM t e a m and individual p a r t i c i p a t i o n p o i n t s e a r n e d to d a t e in that IM sport/ activity season ... and places that t e a m o n probation. O n c e o n probation, o n e additional 'no s h o w ' or forfeit will eliminate t h a t t e a m f r o m c o m p e t i t i o n in that sport." T h e first half of t h e s e c o n d s e m e s t e r s p o r t s has already begun. However, t h e s p o r t s for t h e s e c o n d half of t h e semester, w h i c h include coed o u t d o o r soccer, men's softball, w o m e n ' s flag football and coed ultimate Frisbee will not start until M a r c h 15. S i g n - u p s will take place online o n M a r c h 8, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

11

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Wednesday Women's basketball

Jan 27

vs. Trine at 7:30 p.m.

Jan 3 0

Saturday Swimming vs. Calvin at 1 p.m.

Men's basketball vs. Calvin at 3 p.m.

Hockey vs. Lansing CO at 8 : 3 0 p.m. at The Edge Ice Arena

IN

BRIEF

RIVALRY M A T C H U P S THIS WEEKEND

T h r e e of H o p e College's winter s p o r t s t e a m s will t a k e o n rival Calvin College o n Hope's c a m p u s o n Saturday. At 12:15 p.m., t h e men's )V basketball t e a m will begin t h e day as they take o n Calvin's JV basketball t e a m in t h e DeVos Fieldhouse. At 1 p.m., t h e men's and w o m e n ' s s w i m and dive t e a m s will c o m p e t e against Calvin in t h e D o w Center. T h e n at 3 p.m., t h e varsity men's b a s ketball t e a m will conclude t h e day with t h e highly anticipated m a t c h - u p against t h e Knights in DeVos. Student tickets a r e sold out. W O M E N ' S BASKETBALL CONTINUES HOME WIN STREAK

The w o m e n ' s basketball team brought their current home winning streak to 60 on Thursday as they defeated Adrian, 77-53. The Flying Dutch are the seventh team in Division III to accomplish this and have the longest current streak. The all-time leader is Rust College, Miss., who put together an 88-game home winning streak in the 1980s. Hope's women are also on top of the M I A A after defeating Calvin last w e e k and are the only team in the conference with a perfect M I A A record. The w o m e n will look to continue their success tonight as they take on Trine in DeVos at 7:30 p.m. CO-ATHLETIC DIRECTOR IN N C A A M A G A Z I N E

Co-athletic director Eva Dean Folkert ( ' 8 3 ) is featured in the winter edition of the N C A A magazine Champion. The article, "Paths Less Traveled," tells the stories of six athletic leaders who came to sports through different paths. Folkert, a 1983 graduate of Hope, began sportswriting for the Holland Sentinel while she was still a student at Hope. She began to work for Hope in 1985 in the public relations and registrar's offices, but didn't begin working in the kinesiology until 1997, when she became assistant director of intramurals. She has since worked in the ticket office and as senior woman administrator for athletics, director of w o m e n ' s athletics, w o m e n ' s golf coach, and assistant professor of kinesiology. In 2009, she was named co-director of athletics at Hope.


( 2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 2 7 , 2 0 1 0

Senior 'sets standard for determination' Bethany Stripp SPORTS EDITOR

It's n o secret that hard work and dedication are t h e keys to success. Just ask C h r i s Nelis ('10). Nelis, a psychology m a j o r f r o m Zeeland and t h e lone senior captain o n this year's men's basketball team, worked his way up f r o m JV to starting varsity even t h o u g h he didn't begin his college education at Hope. NelistransferredtoHopefrom G r a n d Valley State University for t h e spring s e m e s t e r of his s o p h o m o r e year. H e talked to assistant men's coach M a t t Neil and was able t o begin playing with t h e IV t e a m t h a t year. The following season he m a d e t h e varsity t e a m but didn't see m u c h t i m e o n t h e c o u r t , averaging 9.5 m i n u t e s p e r game. His senior season, though, h a s b e e n a different story. "1 put in quite a bit of t i m e over t h e s u m m e r and w o r k e d my way into t h e starting lineup for my last year," Nelis said. All t h a t t i m e has paid off for Nelis. So far this season, he h a s scored 217 points with an average of 12.8 per game. He is a force u n d e r t h e basket as well, w h e r e h e leads t h e t e a m in offensive, defensive and overall r e b o u n d s with 40, 66 and 106, respectively. "(Nelis) is a relentless worker

P H O T O BY HOLLY EVENHOUSE

D E T E R M I N A T I O N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chris Nelis has s t a r t e d every g a m e t h i s season c o m p a r e d t o one last year. and (has) set t h e s t a n d a r d for determination," men's head basketball coach G l e n n VanWieren said. "Chris brings c o u n t l e s s a t t r i b u t e s to o u r t e a m â&#x20AC;&#x201D; friendship, i n d u s t r i o u s n e s s , t r u s t , sacrifice, passion, faith a n d c o m m i t m e n t . But m o s t i m p o r t a n t , he brings courage. He h a s t h e c o u r a g e t o p r o c e e d , w h i c h enables h i m to share all his w o n d e r f u l t e a m qualities with a definite fruition."

His hard work h a s also led to recognition o u t s i d e of t h e immediate Hope community. Nelis shined during the a n n u a l Russ DeVette Holiday T o u r n a m e n t , scoring 27 p o i n t s and grabbing 14 r e b o u n d s over t h e course of t w o games, e a r n i n g h i m t h e title of t h e t o u r n a m e n t ' s m o s t valuable player. S o o n after, t h e M I A A n a m e d h i m as o n e of the M I A A players of t h e week for week eight of t h e season.

Nelis, however, is quick t o a c k n o w l e d g e t h e i m p o r t a n t role the rest of t h e t e a m played. "The individual a w a r d s a r e all great, but usually w h e n t h a t h a p p e n s , it m e a n s t h e t e a m is winning," Nelis said. "I'd m u c h r a t h e r have it t h a t t h e t e a m is w i n n i n g t h a n get a b u n c h of a w a r d s for myself." The t e a m figures largely into Nelis' experience as a basketball player at H o p e . O n e t h i n g Nelis

thinks he'll miss t h e most after this season c o m e s t o a close is t h e interaction he's had with the o t h e r m e m b e r s of the t e a m . "A lot of t h e m are real good friends," Nelis said, "so that'll be a big part a b o u t graduating." The t e a m also is i n c l u d e d in Nelis' h o p e s for t h e rest of t h e season. "I'd love for us as a t e a m to w i n the M I A A T o u r n a m e n t so we can get back into t h e national t o u r n a m e n t and try t o make a run," Nelis said. Nelis played last year in Hope's first round NCAA Division III T o u r n a m e n t loss to UW-Platteville, b u t despite t h e o u t c o m e of the game, he still considers making the t o u r n a m e n t to be t h e highlight of his career t h u s far. However, h e would be h a p p y to replace that m e m o r y with a new o n e if t h e o p p o r t u n i t y arises. "Hopefully, it (the highlight of m y career) hasn't h a p p e n e d yet," Nelis said. "It would be sweet if we could make t h e t o u r n a m e n t for my senior year." Having seen the results of his hard w o r k , Nelis advises underclassmen on Hope's basketball t e a m s t o do t h e same thing. "Put t h e t i m e in," he said. "You have to keep the right attitude a n d keep m o v i n g in t h e right direction."

Swim team members achieve NCAA consideration times Chris (TBrien ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

They lean forward, all of their feet p o i n t i n g t o w a r d t h e water below t h e m . They s t a n d in anticipation, t h e w o m e n w e a r i n g s w i m c a p s and t h e m e n s p o r t i n g either t h e s w i m cap or t h e Bruce Willis shaved h e a d look. Their goggles a r e s u c t i o n e d against their eyes and their stances o n t h e w h i t e p l a t f o r m s vary. T h e y wait. The b u z z e r goes off and the race begins. It is simple. Each s w i m m e r goes t h e assigned distance, and w h o e v e r reaches their h a n d out and t o u c h e s t h e wall first wins. C a p t a i n Phil H e y b o e r ('10) h a s w a t c h e d his s e n i o r s e a s o n d e v e l o p exactly t h e way he w a n t e d it to.

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"So far my t i m e s have improved from last year," H e y b o e r said. "I have t u r n e d in a N C A A A cut in t h e 400 IM and B c u t s in t h e 500 f r e e and 1,650 free." H e y b o e r h a s t u r n e d in t h e season's best 400 individual medley, 500 freestyle and 1,000 freestyle times. Both men's and w o m e n ' s t e a m s have m a n a g e d t o build a successful season. The w o m e n ' s t e a m h a s w o n every m a t c h with t h e exception of their m a t c h against G r a n d Valley last Friday a n d finished third at t h e W h e a t o n Invitational. The w o m e n ' s t e a m has also seen impressive t i m e s so far this year. C a p t a i n Christina Vogelzang ('10) has h a d N C A A c o n s i d e r a t i o n t i m e s in both t h e 100 a n d 200 freestyle.

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Sarah S o h n ('12) has t h e team's best t i m e in f o u r categories and has an N C A A c o n s i d e r a t i o n t i m e in t h e 1650 freestyle. T h e men's t e a m only has o n e loss and finished in first place at t h e W h e a t o n Invitational. "The t e a m as a whole is really p e r f o r m i n g very well," H e y b o e r said. " W e had a big win (on Jan 8) against K a l a m a z o o College, w h o is r a n k e d second nationally in dual m e e t s . At t h e m e e t , t h e w h o l e t e a m s t e p p e d u p to o u t t o u c h their o p p o n e n t s in m a n y races." Along with Heyboer, Aaron Welsch (10), M i t c h Ruch ('10), Michael Huisingh ('12) and fellow c o - c a p ta in Ryan Nelis ('10) also haveputforthNCAA consideration times. Welsch holds the team's b e s t in b o t h t h e 50 and 100 freestyle, w i t h the 100 freestyle gaining NCAA consideration. Ruch holds t h e team's best 100 and 200 backstroke with b o t h of these acquiring NCAA consideration. Huisingh holds t h e team's best 100 and 200 breaststroke t i m e s and has m a d e

N C A A c o n s i d e r a t i o n for the 400 m e d l e y relay with Ruch, Huisingh a n d Nelis. Nelis h o l d s t h e team's best 100 and 200 butterfly and has landed N C A A consideration o n t h e 400 m e d l e y relay t e a m . Both t e a m s have less t h a n a m o n t h left in their respective seasons. The men's and w o m e n ' s t e a m s b o t h close with t h e M I A A C h a m p i o n s h i p s taking place at Calvin College over t h e Feb. 1113 weekend. While the swimmers anxiously await t h e c o n f e r e n c e

meet, H e y b o e r said that the men's t e a m is looking f o r w a r d t o the final regular season m e e t o n Jan 30. "The next big m e e t is Jan 30," Heyboer said. "It is s e n i o r night and also o u r m e e t in w h i c h we are s u p p o r t i n g c a n c e r research. W h a t could possibly m a k e the meet a n y m o r e exciting?" "To top it off it is against Calvin College." The men's a n d w o m e n ' s m e e t against Calvin will begin at 1 p.m. in t h e D o w Center.

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01-27-2010