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J A N U A R Y 25. 2 0 1 2 • SINCE 1887

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ANCHORS

HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

"SPERA IN DEO"

ARTS

FEATURES

SPORTS

Stationary Traveler

Healthy Resolutions

Orange Crush

Josh Droppers talks about his music.

VOL. 125 NO. 13

Tips for m a k i n g this the year of taking care of your body.

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Hope downs Calvin 8 1 - 6 5 in one of the biggest comebacks in school history.

for off-campus housing Claire Call CAMPUS CO-EDITOR

At t h e Holland City Council m e e t i n g Jan. 18, a n e w set of policies c o n c e r n i n g landlords renting h o u s e s or a p a r t m e n t s t o s t u d e n t s w a s a p p r o v e d . Although the new policy will n o t affect s t u d e n t s living in H o p e College housing, it will affect those s t u d e n t s w h o c h o o s e to r e n t their o w n housing off c a m p u s . The area in w h i c h these c h a n g e s will be i m p l e m e n t e d is b o u n d e d n o r t h and south by 10 ,h and 17^ streets and east and west by River and Fairbanks avenues. "From t h e s t u d e n t perspective, my sense w o u l d be t h a t t h e m o s t significant proposed changes would be t h e increase of t h e landlords (and by extension t h e s t u d e n t s w h o sign t h e lease) t o t h e n e i g h b o r s and t h e city," said John Jobson, Hope's director of residential life a n d h o u s i n g . The n e w policies include limitation to six unrelated p e o p l e living in o n e residence, limitation of parking t o 50 p e r c e n t of the backyard, r e q u i r i n g landlords to give their 2 4 - h o u r c o n t a c t i n f o r m a t i o n to all t h e adjacent neighbors, placing a fine on t h e landlords (who m a y t h e n fine t h e tenants) if there are m o r e t h a n t h r e e citations to t h e p r o p e r t y ad year, ycdl, dand l i u callowing U I U W U l g l aain i vdj ilvoy ri d s

1 think it's going to i n f o r m s t u d e n t s of t h e e x p e c t a t i o n s of being a neighbor," said Richard Frost, dean of s t u d e n t s , about the new regulations. The need for these c h a n g e s was b r o u g h t u p last spring w h e n a Holland l a n d l o r d s r e q u e s t t o build a s i x - b e d r o o m duplex t o r e n t t o s t u d e n t s w a s d e n i e d by t h e city, according to The Holland Sentinel. Q u e s t i o n s of h o w m a n y n o n - r e l a t e d p e o p l e should be The area around living u n d e r o n e roof arose, as well H o p e is a mixedas c o n c e r n over lack of parking use environment. It space for b o t h t h e s t u d e n t s and t h e families living a r o u n d t h e m . is important for all Because t h e r e are o f f - c a m p u s those w h o live there s t u d e n t s living a m o n g Holland to be able to live in families in t h e area s u r r o u n d i n g harmony. c a m p u s , t h e policies w e r e passed — RICHARD FROST in o r d e r to provide a better living e n v i r o n m e n t for everyone. 55 "The area a r o u n d H o p e is a mixed-use environment. t h e policy c h a n g e s should n o t It is i m p o r t a n t for all those have a great effect o n their living w h o live there t o b e able t o situation. The only foreseeable live in harmony," Frost said. p r o b l e m may be with parking The city's h o p e is that these since there wilj still be a ban o n new policies will create a overnight parking in t h e street. m o r e neighborly e n v i r o n m e n t The alternative, however, n e a r Hope's c a m p u s . As lo n g if s t u d e n t s d o like to listen to as off-campus students are loud m u s i c a n d / o r host o t h e r following t h e law and t h e t e r ms activities that end in a call t o of their lease, they should the Holland Department of have n o t h i n g to w o r r y about. Public Safety, is t h a t they r u n the risk of paying large fines or being evicted by ^ 7 their landlord

t o evict t e n a n t s if illegal activity is going o n in t h e residence. In o t h e r words, t h e n e w policy is going to require o f f - c a m p u s s t u d e n t s t o be good neighbors. If s t u d e n t s are currently living peacefully with their neighbors, n o t having loud parties all night or h o s t i n g illegal activities, t h e n

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C I V I L R I G H T S C O M M E M O R A T I V E M A R C H - Hope students and staff participated In a commemorative march Jan. 18. one of the activities of the Civil Rights Week. The march began outside Graves Hall at 1 1 a.m. and proceeded around campus.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HOPE P R

Sexual assault workshop educates Hope students

. . .. Lauren Madison

foti™ p o i n t e d nut out thp t h e imnlirations implications bu e™ e n raped ir. in Kor her U lifetime, of t h a t long, diverse list: t h a t it while o n e , i n 71 m e n can say CAMPUS CO-EDITOR is a w o m a n ' s responsibility to t h e same. O n e in six w o m e n p r o t e c t herself f r o m rape, to b e have b e e n stalked, and o n e in The Women Studies t h e gatekeeper of her o w n body. four have been t h e victim of Department and Student Sidney Timmer ('14), a severe violence in an i n t i m a t e Development hosted social relationship. Given this worker, t e a c h e r and H o p e prevalence of violence against g r a d u a t e Lesley A. Coghill 66 ~ w o m e n , efforts t o p r e v e n t r a p e Jan. 17 for a workshop N o college or university and assault are crucial. e n t i d e d "Respectful Relations: is i m m u n e to t h e issues of Yet, as Coghill stressed Preventing Dating Violence." dating violence and sexual T h e session f o c u s e d o n defining t h r o u g h o u t t h e w o r k s h o p , m a n y assault. of these p r e v e n t i o n efforts place and discussing healthy dating — L E S L E Y COGHILL b l a m e o n t h e victim, albeit relationships and sexual assault. Coghill w o r k s w i t h Holland's unintentionally. To u n d e r s c o r e women's studies a n d psychology this p o i n t , a t t e n d e e s w e r e asked C e n t e r for W o m e n in Transition m a j o r w h o assisted in organizing to b r a i n s t o r m t h e different ways and t h e O t t a w a C o u n t y DELTA t h e event, is f r u s t r a t e d by this w o m e n can p r o t e c t themselves Project to prevent dating t r e n d of u n d e r h a n d e d victim f r o m d a t i n g violence a n d f r o m violence by e d u c a t i n g m e n blaming. sexual assault. a n d w o m e n of all ages and "Putting t h e pressure o n S o m e of t h e c o m m e n t s b a c k g r o u n d s o n w h a t it m e a n s w o m e n to behave a certain way included c a r r y i n g p e p p e r spray, to be in a healthy relationship. or avoid c e r t a i n situations takes keeping online information She also gave a talk o n w h a t t h e b l a m e off of t h e p e r s o n w h o private, parking in well-lit areas c o n s e n t really m e a n s . actually c o m m i t t e d t h e crime," and m a n y o t h e r ideas. W h i l e A c c o r d i n g to a 2010 study T i m m e r said. n o o n e can deny t h a t these may cited in Coghill's presentation, M u c h of this "pressure" h a s b e sensible t h o u g h t s , Coghill nearly o n e in five w o m e n h a s

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t o d o with t h e victims' behavior and attire at t h e t i m e of an assault, as t h o u g h dressing or acting p r o m i s c u o u s l y is an invitation for rape. O n the contrary, experts assert t h a t revealing attire d o e s not fuel sexual violence, as r a p e is n o t an act of desire, b u t of power and control. Katherine Richert ( 4 14), a social work m a j o r agrees, " W o m e n a r e told t h a t we m u s t n o t dress or act certain ways that will d r a w the attention of potential rapists...as s o o n as we hear a b o u t a w o m a n w h o w a s raped, we automatically q u e s t i o n what she w o r e and w h e r e she was or if she w a s by herself. We all have preconceived ideas of w h y w o m e n (or men) get r a p e d and we use t h o s e ideas t o b l a m e t h e victim for 'getting themselves into t h e situation.'" Says Coghill, "No college or university is i m m u n e to t h e

VOICES

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Got a story i d e a ? Let u s k n o w at a n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u . or c a l U j s a t j g S ^ T g T ^

SPORTS

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issues of dating violence and violei sexual assault." Sadly for H o p e College, r e c e n t events have m a d e this painfully clear. O n Dec. 5, a H o p e s o p h o m o r e allegedly k i d n a p p e d and assaulted his exgirlfriend, a fellow H o p e s t u d e n t . H o w then, is sexual violence to be prevented without blaming t h e victim? It is key t o e d u c a t e m e n and w o m e n a b o u t relationships and the m e a n i n g of c o n s e n t in h o p e s of c h a n g i n g social n o r m s and attitudes t o w a r d s sexual assault. As Coghill r e m i n d s H o p e s t u d e n t s , "It is our personal responsibility t o avoid colluding with those w h o p e r p e t r a t e violence t h r o u g h silence and apathy. Instead one needs to speak o u t against sexist attitudes, micro-aggressions, a n d violence that d e m e a n s and h a r m s others."


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CAMPUS

T I N ANCHOR T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

Thursday Missions Fair 2 0 1 2

Jan. 26

Maas 1 0 a.m.

Shih: Chinese courses benefit students Chris Cohrs GUEST W R I T E R

" 6 5 years of life, 45 years of Hope: A Developmental Psycholgists Reflections" S c i e n c e Center 1 0 1 9 , 1 1 a.m.

Friday-Saturday Jan. 27-28 Eisenhower Dance Ensemble Kinckerbocker Theatre 8 p.m.

Tuesday Jan. 3 1 Visiting Writers: David Cho and Heather Sellers Winants Auditorium 7 p.m.

IN BRIEF STUDENT SOFTWARE SOLD WORLD WIDE Three Hope students in the computer science department with the help of Professor Matt DeJonghiiave created a computer program called C y t o S E E D now being sold worldwide. The students are Josh Kammeraad ('14), Nick Hazekamp ('13), and alum Ben Bockstege ('11). The program is the materialization of three years of DeJongh's work along with a dozen computer science students and one high

JANUARY 2 5 2 0 1 2

W i t h eight s t u d e n t s in her class, p e o p l e could overlook Professor Ling-Ling Lisa Shih's role a n d a m b i t i o n s at H o p e College. However, Shih k n o w s her C h i n e s e language is part of a g r o w i n g t r e n d in t h e United States, a n d she w a n t s m o r e s t u d e n t s to realize w h y learning C h i n e s e is beneficial. Born in Taiwan, Shih c a m e to t h e U n i t e d States in 1986, w h e n h e r family e m i g r a t e d for o p p o r t u n i t y . Shih studied English at California State University b e c a u s e she h a s always loved language and culture. Eventually Shih got a d o c t o r a t e in a n t h r o p o l o g y at University of Albany specializing in E a s t e r n Asian studies and C h i n e s e g e n d e r roles. Shih c a m e to M i c h i g a n f o u r years ago to be an assistant professor at G r a n d Valley State University. She t e a c h e s C h i n e s e p a r t t i m e at b o t h G V S U and Hope. " H o p e is best of b o t h w o r l d s b e c a u s e I c a n teach and be a Christian openly here," said Shih w h o h a s been a Christian since high school in Taiwan. Shih

c o n v e r t e d after learning a b o u t Jesus' teachings and his sacrifice. Shih n o w has a blog in w h i c h she helps C h r i s t i a n s u n d e r s t a n d biblical texts. She b e c o m e s h u m b l e d by Jesus' sacrifice and learning a b o u t her imperfection and salvation t h r o u g h Christ. Because China's e c o n o m y is g r o w i n g 10 p e r c e n t a year, l e a r n i n g C h i n e s e would m e a n o p p o r t u n i t y for A m e r i c a n s in global markets, Shih said. "It will give A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t s an extra edge in t h e business world if they learn Chinese." W i t h China's rising status, t h e A m e r i c a n g o v e r n m e n t also h a s m a n y security positions o p e n e d for those who understand Chinese. "The A m e r i c a n g o v e r n m e n t especially n e e d s p e o p l e w h o can u n d e r s t a n d C h i n e s e w h e n it is spoken o n t h e radio a n d w r i t t e n o n t h e internet," Shih said. Shih would like t o create a C h i n e s e m a j o r and m i n o r p r o g r a m t h a t would involve l e a r n i n g b o t h t h e language a n d t h e culture. Learning a b o u t C h i n e s e c u l t u r e would f u r t h e r help Americans students u n d e r s t a n d h o w to interact with C h i n a in today's world, she said. In addition to m o r e A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t s l e a r n i n g Chinese, t h e

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R I G H T AT H O M E Miller Center office.

Lisa Shih In her Martha P H O T O BY A N N M A R I E P A P A R E L U

n u m b e r of C h i n e s e exchange s t u d e n t s in t h e United States and at H o p e is also increasing. According t o a r e p o r t released by t h e International Institute of Education in D e c e m b e r 2010, C h i n e s e s t u d e n t s enrolling into American higher education institutions h a s increased 30 p e r c e n t since 2009. The institute r e p o r t s that there are a r o u n d 127,628 C h i n e s e s t u d e n t s o u t of 690,923 international s t u d e n t s studying in A m e r i c a as of 2010. At H o p e , C h i n e s e s t u d e n t s are overtaking t h e college's traditional Japanese and British

exchange, a n d C h i n e s e s t u d e n t s are c o m i n g to H o p e College as f r e s h m e n and staying for four years instead of o n e semester. International advisor H a b e e b Awad says t h a t t h e n u m b e r of C h i n e s e s t u d e n t s at H o p e College has g r o w n f r o m six s t u d e n t s to 19 s t u d e n t s in the last three years. Awad said t h e t r e n d is d u e to t h e rise of a m i d d l e class in C h i n a . Awad said t h e biggest challenge right n o w is integration b e t w e e n C h i n e s e and A m e r i c a n students. Shih's teaching assistant SEE S H I H , PAGE 1 0

Philadelphia Center builds confidence, resumes Brooke McDonald C O P Y EDITOR

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Last fall, Sarah Schmidt ('13) was part of the Philadelphia C e n t e r - and this spring, she's d e c i d e d to stay t h e r e for a n o t h e r semester. What makes Philadelphia "an exceptional place to study for a semester," according to Schmidt? Valuable professional direction t h r o u g h internships, "phenomenal" classes, independent living and "interaction with the city." Thirteen Hope students attended The Philadelphia Center (TPC)'s off-campus study p r o g r a m last fall. A l t h o u g h S c h m i d t was t h e only s t u d e n t t o attend a second time, m a n y H o p e s t u d e n t s considered it an invaluable experience, saying they gained a greater s e n s e of confidence in themselves and their abilities f r o m t h e semester. Schmidt, a psychology a n d sociology m a j o r with a criminal justice emphasis, i n t e r n e d 32 h o u r s a w e e k last fall in t h e Philadelphia District Attorneys Homicide Unit. The i n t e r n s h i p provided an important behind-the-scenes look into c r i m i n a l justice. This spring a second i n t e r n s h i p with t h e Philadelphia Police D e p a r t m e n t C r i m e Scene Unit gives her t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o "grow exponentially in my field of interest, that would n o t b e available to m e if I w e r e t o r e t u r n t o Hope," S c h m i d t said. TPC helps students

"(learn) h o w to be completely i n d e p e n d e n t after graduation," she explained. "The i n t e r n s h i p o p t i o n s are a s t o u n d i n g a n d allow students... a greater say in their education." Claire R o e m b a c h - C l a r k ('12), a psychology major, a t t e n d e d T P C last fall and i n t e r n e d at t h e Children's Crisis T r e a t m e n t Center, w h e r e she worked in a t h e r a p e u t i c preschool classroom helping 3-5-year-old children with severe emotional, behavioral and psychological problems. Her u n f o r g e t t a b l e interactions with t h e children convinced her to work with this age g r o u p in t h e f u t u r e . Roembach-Clark also interned with a professional photographer, assisting with shoots and even using the photographer's studio as she pleased. Communications major Jackie Bray ( 1 2 ) was surprised by her internship as a project specialist in t h e Mayor's Office of Faith-Based Initiatives, saying it was a job she never would have e x p e c t e d t o b e good at or enjoy. After being in charge of p l a n n i n g multiple municipal events. Bray said "I learned t h a t I would love to do this as a career." A l o n g with giving s t u d e n t s professional direction t h r o u g h internships, TPC invites s t u d e n t s to explore their o w n SEE P H I L A D E L P H I A , PAGE 1 0


-^WbRLD Internet blackout protests anti-piracy bills THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

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President Obama comes out against SOPA and PIPA Cory Lakatos W O R L D CO-EDITOR

If you t r i e d to access Wikipedia o n Jan. 18, you may have been in for a surprise: t h e p o p u lar online encyclopedia w e n t dark protesting t w o bills i n t e n d ed to t arg e t I n t e r n e t piracy t h a t a r e currently m a k i n g t h e i r w a y t h r o u g h Congress. The protest w a s s c h e d u l e d for Jan. 18 to coincide with t h e H o u s e Judiciary Corrimittee hearing o n SOPA. TWc^tflf n a m e s of t h e bills are t h e Stop O n l i n e Piracy Act and t h e P r o t e c t IP Act. T h e f o r m e r is t h e H o u s e version while t h e latter is its equivalent in t h e Senate. T h o u g h G o o g l e did n o t go d o w n , t h e site p r o t e s t e d by covering its f a m o u s logo with a black b o x a n d asked visitors t o sign a petition. All over t h e Int e r n e t , websites large a n d small blacked themselves out, urged users t o c o n t a c t their senators and representatives, or used o t h e r m e t h o d s t o p r o t e s t SOPA and PIPA. Facebook, Twitter and o t h e r social n e t w o r k i n g sites have b e e n filled with s t a t e m e n t s against t h e anti-piracy bills. Approximately 8 million Wikipedia users followed t h e

website's i n s t r u c t i o n s for c o n t a c t i n g their representatives and senators. Google's petition, w h i c h h a s been signed by 4.5 million people, displays a list of websites that are

66 v

It's designed to eliminate online piracy, but all it will really do is cripple and eventually kill social media and search engines, while determined people will still be able to find torrenting sites to download from. —

A N N E JAMIESON

('12)

99 speaking o u t against t h e bill. Included are eBay, Etsy, Faceb o o k , Linkedln, Mozilla, Reddit, Tumblr, Twitter a n d Yahoo. The blackout's initial a f t e r m a t h indicated t h a t it had s o m e suc-

cess: a c c o r d i n g to Forbes, 18 more senators were committed t o v o t i n g against PIPA. In addition. President Barack O b a m a s t a t e d shortly b e f o r e t h e blackout t h a t h e w o u l d v e t o SOPA and any bill t h a t did not have a n a r r o w e r focus. As public and congressional s u p p o r t rapidly d i m i n i s h e d , SOPA w a s killed in t h e H o u s e by its lead sponsor, Texas Republican L a m a r Smith. T h e S e n a t e vote o n PIPA, s c h e d uled for Jan. 24, w a s delayed. Hailing t h e rise of I n t e r n e t activism in national politics, observers have declared b o t h bills d e a d . H o p e s t u d e n t s were a m o n g t h e voices in t h e o u t c r y against t h e bills.. A n n e Jamieson ('12) c o n t a c t e d her representatives a n d signed a p e t i t i o n . "My favorite p a r t is t h a t m o s t of t h e p e o p l e in C o n g r e s s can't even explain exactly w h a t they think t h e bill w o u l d d o b e c a u s e t h e y ' r e n o t ' n e r d y ' enough," she said. "It's designed t o eliminate o n line piracy, b u t all it will really d o is cripple and eventually kill social media a n d search e n gines, while d e t e r m i n e d p e o p l e will still b e able t o find t o r r e n t ing sites to d o w n l o a d from."

Tim Nagi ('12), w h o also signed an online petition, agrees with Jamieson. "They're terrible," h e said a b o u t SOPA and PIPA. "Basically, w h a t you've got is a b u n c h of congress-

66 Basically, what y o u ' v e got is a bunch of congressmen who know almost nothing about the Internet trying to make laws to censor it, but their ineptitude with the subject results in incorrect definitions and vague laws being written that can easily be abused. —

T I M NAGI

('12)

99 men who know almost nothing a b o u t t h e Internet t r y i n g t o m a k e laws t o censor it, b u t th e ir i n e p t i t u d e with the subject results in i n c o r r e c t defini-

tions and vague laws being written t h a t can easily be abused." O p p o n e n t s of SOPA and PIPA have several p r o b l e m s with t h e bills. Google's petition page lists t h e t h r e e m o s t critical points: t h e bills would lead to censorship o n the W e b , create u n c e r t a i n t y for A m e r i c a n business o n t h e I n t e r n e t , and p r o v e ineffective against piracy. Protesters w o r r y t h a t t h e U.S. gove r n m e n t would block websites, and s o m e even c o m p a r e t h e bills to I n t e r n e t censorship in C h i n a . It is also feared t h a t websites would b e saddled with t h e difficult task of m o n i t o r i n g all c o n t e n t p o s t e d by users a n d would b e left vulnerable to expensive and t i m e - c o n s u m i n g lawsuits. Despite t h e protest, SOPA a n d PIPA a r e n o t w i t h o u t their s u p p o r t e r s , p e r h a p s t h e largest of w h i c h is Hollywood, w h i c h w a n t s t o crack d o w n o n t h e pirating of films online. Rupert M u r doch, Time Warner, t h e Entert a i n m e n t S o f t w a r e Association, GoDaddy.com and the Motion Picture Association of A m e r i ca also s u p p o r t t h e passage of t h e bills or similar legislation.

Boko Haram infiltration suspected in Nigeria f e n d e d these attacks in a YouT u b e video. The attacks were, h e STAFF W R I T E R said, revenge for t h e backlog of According t o t h e BBC, NigeChristian attacks o n M u s l i m s . rian president, G o o d l u c k JonaA U.S. Congressional r e p o r t than, a n n o u n c e d t h a t he s u s p e c t s released in N o v e m b e r claimed s y m p a t h i z e r s of Boko H a r a m that Boko H a r a m m a y be joining have infiltrated his nation's gov, a l - Q a e d a g r o u p s . Boko v e r n m e n t . " S o m e are also j H a r a m denied this claim. in t h e a r m e d forces, t h e ] Meanwhile, J o n a t h a n police a n d o t h e r security 1 I h a s c o m p a r e d the curagencies," he explained. ' rent situation t o NigeT h e Nigerian c o n ria's civil war, saying t h a t flict with Boko H a r a m : a l t h o u g h t h e three-year originated nearly t h r e e | conflict killed m a n y m o r e years ago, while t h e people, t h e Boko H a r a m group has been around 1 I situation is w o r s e in t h a t for 10 years. F o u n d e d f j it is m o r e difficult t o deal in 2002 by M o h a m m e d ; with. "During t h e civil Yusuf, t h e g r o u p had its war," h e said, "we k n e w r o o t s in public service. and we could even p r e It built a m o s q u e a n d an dict w h e r e the. e n e m y Islamic school, w h i c h was c o m i n g f n provided an e d u c a t i o n j the challenge wi t o p o o r children across day is m o r e comj Nigeria a n d even b e y o n d . The presii Boko H a r a m w a s a Christian himsel fairly quiet g r o u p u n ! b e e n accused of not d o til 2009, w h e n it began g ing e n o u g h to protect attacking government I fellow ' C h r i s t i a n s . Ayo buildings in Maiduguri. j Oritsejafor, t h e p a s t o r in These attacks, w h i c h inc h a r g e o f . t h e Christian cluded assaults on police Association of Nigeria, stations, w e r e carried telr; ";has since suggested t h a t out predominantly from ^ f - t h e Boko Haram's acts t h e backs of motorcycles. i are' a "systematic ethnic In retaliation, NigeriC H R I S T M A S A T T A C K - Medical officials try to treat a victim of a bomb attack on a Catholic i and religious cleansing." an security forces arrestchurch near the capital of Nigeria on Christmas day, 2 0 1 1 . The radical Muslim organization Boko As a result of c o n t i n u ed Yusuf a n d t u r n e d h i m Haram claimed credit for the attack, which killed more than 2 5 people. ! ing Boko H a r a m attacks, over t o t h e police. W h i l e I a state of e m e r g e n c y in their custody, Yusuf S B h a s been declared in w a s later f o u n d dead. Alicizes it, including clerics f r o m four of t h e c o u n t r y ' s 36 states. took place after t h e inaugua f o r m e r Boko H a r a m deputy, t h o u g h t h e exact c a u s e of d e a t h o t h e r M u s l i m traditions a n d a ration of Jonathan. Since last h a d taken control of t h e g r o u p . r e m a i n s unclear, the L o n d o n Christian preacher." Shekau deJune, the organization h a s also T i m e s speculated he may have The Nigerian police had believed Megan Stevens

b e e n killed while trying t o escape. After h i s d e a t h , t h e security forces a n n o u n c e d t h a t Boko H a r a m had been d i s b a n d e d . S u c h w a s n o t t h e case. In 2010 t h e W a s h i n g t o n T i m e s ann o u n c e d t h a t A b u b a k a r Shekau,

Shekau d e a d since July 2009, b u t Shekau told a journalist h e h a d only b e e n shot in t h e leg and n o w had "intention to retaliate." In D e c e m b e r 2010, Boko H a r a m b o m b e d t h e city of Jos. In M a y 2011, m o r e b o m b i n g s

b o m b e d the Nigerian police headquarters, the UN headq u a r t e r s in A b u j a a n d multiple locations C h r i s t m a s day. A m o n g t h o s e killed were, according t o t h e BBC, "police, politicians and a n y o n e w h o crit-


4

WORLD

THE ANCHOR T H I S W E E K I N HISTORY

Jan. 22:

JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

Future of North Korea in question Citizens punished for not mourning enough over death of Kim Jong-il

1973: Roe v. W a d e legalizes s o m e a b o r t i o n s in t h e U.S.

Shubham S a p k o t a W O R L D CO-EDITOR

Jan. 23: 1964: The 24th a m e n d m e n t to the U.S. consititution, which b a n s poll taxes, is ratified. 1998: Pope John Paul II c o n d e m n s t h e U.S. e m b a r g o against Cuba. Jan. 24: 1679: King C h a r l e s II d i s b a n d s the English parliament. 1924: The Russian city of St. Petersburg is r e n a m e d Leningrad. Jan. 25: 1851: S o j o u r n e r T r u t h addresses the first Black W o m e n ' s Rights C o n v e n tion. 1945: G r a n d Rapids bec o m e s t h e first U.S. city of fluoridate its water. 1964: The Beatles achieve their first n u m b e r - o n e hit in the U.S. with "I W a n t to Hold Your Hand," beginn i n g the British Invasion.

It h a s been m o r e t h a n a m o n t h since t h e d e a t h of Kim Jong-il. N o r t h Korea h a s b e e n going t h r o u g h a lot of political instability, which h a s b e e n a s u b ject of curiosity to t h e outside world; t h e c o m m u n i s t nation is as secretive as it w a s b e f o r e t h e d e a t h of t h e ir "dear leader." Skepticism s u r r o u n d s t h e issue of what t h e f u t u r e of t h e c o u n t r y is going to look like, as their c u r r e n t political a p p r o a c h h a s been d e e m e d deviant by t h e U n i t e d Nations, along with m o s t of t h e international c o m m u n i t y . W h i l e t h e world is w o n d e r i n g if t h e n e w leader, Kim Jong-un, will m a k e c h a n g e s to t h e r e g i m e of his father, t h e g o v e r n m e n t has b e e n acc u s e d of p u n i s h i n g its citizert foT"not m o u r n i n g e n o u g h for t h e death of their leader. Videos and r e p o r t s after t h e d e a t h of Kim Jong-il have s h o w n that m a n y citizens w e r e involved in elaborate m o u r n ing. R e p o r t s have said those w h o did n o t participate in this o r g a n i z e d p e r i o d of m o u r n ing have b e e n s e n t e n c e d to labor-camps. These people have been accused of n o t crying e n o u g h or are r e g a r d e d as just n o t being g e n u i n e d u r ing this m o u r n i n g period. Despite w i d e accusations

1340: English King E d w a r d III is p r o c l a i m e d king of France. 1837: Michigan is admitted as the 26th state in the Union. Jan. 27: 1302: D a n t e Alighieri is exiled f r o m Florence. 1973: V i e t n a m e s e factions a n d the U.S. sign the Paris Peace Accords, e n d i n g direct U.S. military involvement in Vietnam.

Goetz

>ENIOR S T A F F W R I T E R

For t h e last six m o n t h s , Somalia h a s been suffering a food crisis. The mortality a n d m a l n u t r i t i o n rates are staggering. According t o t h e BBC, t h e U N chief for Somalia, M a r k B o w d e n r e p o r t e d t h a t Somalia h a s s o m e of t h e world's highest rates for m a l n u t r i t i o n . " W e k n o w t h a t t e n s of t h o u s a n d s of p e o p l e will have died over the last year," Bowden stated. "Children will have suffered t h e m o s t , m a l n u t r i tion rates in Somalia w e r e t h e highest in t h e world, and I t h i n k the highest r e c o r d e d . . . u p to 50 p e r c e n t of t h e child

1521: Holy R o m a n E m p e r o r Charles V o p e n s the I m p e rial Diet of W o r m s . 1956: Elvis Presley m a k e s his first television appearance. Source; historyorb.com

H a m g y o n g Province, which b o r d e r s C h i n a . The i n f o r m a tion h a s b e e n identified as having b e e n relayed t h r o u g h an illegal C h i n e s e mobile p h o n e . N o r t h Korea h a s b e e n acc u s e d of m u c h m o r e serious actions than these, yet it h a s never appeared unnerved. It s e e m s unlikely that p r o tests f r o m t h e United N a t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g t h e p u n i s h i n g of insufficient mourners will have any appreciable effect. Kim Jong-il ruled N o r t h Korea as its s u p r e m e leader, a n d

his son h a s also been praised as being a g e n i u s a n d a brilliant strategist. The international c o m m u n i t y d o e s n o t k n o w if this is an o p p o r t u n i t y for p e a c e talks or s o m e t h i n g t o w o r r y a b o u t . W h a t e v e r Kim Jong-un does, it will affect t h e global politics in a m a j o r way. It h a s been a little m o r e t h a n a m o n t h since N o r t h Korea's tragedy, and right now, all observers can d o is wait a n d watch h o w t h e c h a n g e s in their g o v e r n m e n t will affect global politics.

p o p u l a t i o n s u f f e r e d f r o m severe or acute malnutrition."

66 Children will have suffered the most... up to 50 percent of the child population suffered from severe or acute malnutrition. — UN

M A R K BOWDEN

C H I E F FOR S O M A L I A

99 The good news is that, acc o r d i n g to Bowden, t h e malnu-

trition rates have finally started to go d o w n . H e adds, however, that t h e f o o d crisis is "expected to r e m a i n high until July or August." This is a n o t h e r six to seven m o n t h s of difficulty and d e a t h for t h e p e o p l e of Somalia. M a n y Somalis have been fleeing t h e area, crossing into Ethiopia and Kenya for relief. According to t h e BBC, "the U N e s t i m a t e s that a total of 1.5 million p e o p l e have been displaced by t h e crisis." The U N h a s been e n c o u r a g i n g relief efforts a i m e d at replenishing Somalis animals, mainly sheep, goats and camels, so t h a t p e o p l e can re-establish their lives a n d move f o r w a r d . This is particularly difficult

in a c o u n t r y t h a t has not h a d a f u n c t i o n i n g central g o v e r n m e n t for m o r e t h a n 20 years. There is infighting b e t w e e n various militias, resulting in set-backs for m a n y of t h e relief efforts. Recently, conflict b e t w e e n Kenyan t r o o p s a n d al-Qaedalinked militants k n o w n as al-Shabab has affected relief efforts. The Kenyans are h o l d ing al-Shabab responsible for a recent series of kidnappings. According to t h e BBC, "Al-Shabab, w h i c h controls m u c h of central and s o u t h e r n Somalia a n d has b a n n e d m a n y W e s t e r n aid agencies f r o m its territory, has

denied

the

allegations."

Perry drops out of Republican race Anneliese Goetz

Jan. 28:

f r o m t h e international c o m m u nity r e g a r d i n g this issue, Pyongyang h a s angrily d e n i e d all these allegations as "misinformation." The Daily N K has stated t h a t "the authorities a r e h a n d ing d o w n at least six m o n t h s in a labor-training c a m p t o anyb o d y w h o didn't participate in the organized gatherings during t h e m o u r n i n g period, or w h o did participate b u t didn't cry a n d didn't s e e m genuine." This r e p o r t is t h o u g h t to have c o m e f r o m an u n i d e n t i fied N o r t h Korean in N o r t h

Somali famine in its sixth month tainellese

Jan. 26:

P H O T O COURTESY OF A S S O C I A T E D P R E S S

F A L L E N D E A R L E A D E R — On Dec. 2 0 , t h e body of t h e North Korean leader K i m Jong-il was laid t o rest In a m e m o r i a l palace In t h e n a t i o n ' s c a p i t a l , Pyongyang.

SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

O n Thursday, Texas govern o r Rick Perry a n n o u n c e d p l a n s t o d r o p his bid for t h e Republican candidacy, t w o days b e f o r e t h e South Carolina primary. Earlier in t h e week, Perry w a s still voicing plans t o r u n in S o u t h Carolina, even after less-than-stellar results in Iowa and N e w H a m p s h i r e . He c a m e in fifth a n d last, respectively, b u t told C N N , "South Carolinians are looking for a conservative c a n d i d a t e t h a t will get this

going to do a n y t h i n g else, o t h e r c o u n t r y back w o r k i n g again t h a n try to and I a m it." i m p a c t this W h e n election shown the We did it because it was our is - that's results of purpose to serve this counwhy we a poll ingot in it." try... and that's what w e ' r e dicating M W e t h a t only 6 going to continue doing. didn't get p e r c e n t of — RICK PERRY in it beSouth Car5 5 c a u s e it was olina votour p u r p o s e in life to be t h e e r s were likely to s u p p o r t h i m . president of t h e United States," Perry did n o t show any signs of he said. " W e did it b e c a u s e it backing d o w n . He told C N N , w a s o u r p u r p o s e to serve this "We're convinced that that's country, and that's what we've our goal, so t h e idea t h a t we're

66

b e e n called for, and that's what we're going t o c o n t i n u e doing." W h e n Perry initially e n t e r e d t h e r u n n i n g in August, h e had a strong following, but s u p p o r t for h i m d e c r e a s e d as t h e debates continued. Both N e w t Gingrich and Rick S a n t o r u m have m a d e an "aggressive effort" to get Perry's e n d o r s e m e n t a n d w i n over his voters. Sources close t o Perry have told C N N that Perry will "indicate his supp o r t for N e w t Gingrich but will not explicidy e n d o r s e him."


ARTS

JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

THE ANCHOR

5

Hope artist profile: Jack Droppers of Stationary Travelers Is your writing a sporadic thing? Or d o y o u set aside time?

Ben Lemmen GUEST W R I T E R

H o w long writing?

have

you

been

My m o m claims that I was writing songs as s o o n as 1 could write. She would find little lyrics, just c h o r u s e s , t h a t I would write, w h i c h w e r e just gibberish. That w a s as soon as I was able to s e m d f c e s . But I picked u p ^itSr Tn sixth grade. That's rarted w r i t i n g c o m p l e t e songs. I l e a r n e d o n e c h o r d a n d just w r o t e a song off of o n e chord. Can y o u p i n p o i n t anything that captivated or attracted y o u t o writing s o n g s ? I've always loved writing or creating s o m e t h i n g . As a kid 1 was always dressing u p and creating p e r s o n a s in a way. So to b e able to create a s o n g w a s always just a feeling. Plus, I loved music f r o m the get-go. M e a n d my b r o t h e r used to h a n g out in our playground and p r e t e n d that we w e r e p u t t i n g o n a c o n c e r t for people. We'd sing D C Talk songs or w h a t e v e r p o p u l a r artists that o u r p a r e n t s would let us listen to mostly. D o you r e m e m b e r t h e first s o n g y o u wrote? No, I don't. I r e m e m b e r t h e first b a n d t h a t I ever played in. M y friend got a guitar and d r u m set for C h r i s t m a s . I w a s like, "well, I'll try and learn h o w t o play guitar." So we have t h e t a p e of t h e first t i m e we ever played. That w a s w h e n I k n e w like t h r e e chords. I h a t e listening to it (laughs). It's not a good nostalgic moment. W h a t ' s o n y o u r iPod? Let's see, today was The T e m p t a t i o n s . I don't k n o w why, I just was listening t o t h e m as I woke u p this m o r n i n g . I'm really getting into this band f r o m Australia called Jinja Safari. They w e r e my s u m m e r b a n d . Everyday I would wake up and just drive with t h e m on. O n e of my favorite b a n d s of all t i m e is this b a n d called Delta Spirit. They're p u t t i n g o u t a n e w a l b u m in M a r c h . O n e of my s t a n d a r d s is U2. Every week there's a m o m e n t that, I don't know, you just have to listen to U2.

It's different with every song. S o m e t i m e s it will be sporadic. I'll have an experience or something, and I'll just feel like I n e e d to write. This s u m m e r , I remember one t \ m e I was going to the beach and I got this drumbeat in my h e a d . I w a s like, "All right, I n e e d to w r i t e something on this." So I just r e c o r d e d spoken word vocals on m y phone. S o m e t i m e s I get really m e t i c u l o u s a b o u t it, and I say s o m e t h i n g like, "For t h e next t h r e e h o u r s I'm going to work o n this song." Usually those are t h e t i m e s that the music sucks, because I'm forcing it to happen.

T h e r e was a Battle of t h e Bands in Phelps that year. The event was o n Friday. I g r a b b e d G a r r e t t on that Tuesday, along with Colin Rathbun, a t r u m p e t player and bass player. It all kind of r a n d o m l y started

There are certain songs t h a t I absolutely love t h e s o u n d of but 1 don't want to play a n y m o r e j u s t b e c a u s e t h e lyrics are either lame or don't fit into h o w I see things now. The lyrics add to "the vibe" a little bit m o r e t h a n t h e m u s i c

find s o m e t h i n g that sticks. W e p u t o u t an E.P. in May, and o n e of t h e songs never had a second verse until we did o n e take in t h e studio and I w a s like, "All right, that's it. I like t h e way that sounds." I've b e e n l i s t e n i n g t o your song "Hispaniola" with Laura Hobson recently. That is an a m a z i n g song. H o w did that o n e c o m e about? Is t h e r e a story b e h i n d it?

This is actually a really f u n n y story. F u n n y a n d sad. W e really w a n t e d to d o a s o n g with a girl singing in it, particularly Laura Hobson because I wanted t o set G a r r e t t up with her. They're actually still dating now. Anyway, we had been pressing for a s o n g to write that would be a p p r o p r i a t e for a girl t o sing o n so we could find an excuse for t h e m t o h a n g out. Then the earthquake h a p p e n e d in Haiti. G a r r e t t and I sat in f r o n t of t h e T V for like, a whole day, just staring at t h e images t h a t day. W e w r o t e a n o t h e r song t h a t we played once, b u t it just never stuck. P H O T O BY W O L F O A N C E R T h e n we got an o p p o r t u n i t y S T A T I O N A R Y T R A V E L E R S A T P A R K T H E A T E R - Droppers and t h e Travel to play at a benefit s h o w for Tell me the ers play a benefit show last Friday. Haiti. We really w a n t e d t o story behind write s o m e t h i n g special for it. Stationary Mike Bass c a m e to u s with this does, in my brain at least. o u t of necessity. I felt like there Travelers. riff, and we started playing with was s o m e t h i n g missing in m y it. In o n e h o u r or so, it c a m e o u t W h i c h side d o y o u find m o r e I played in a b a n d all life w h e n I wasn't playing, and a n d we agreed t h a t this was the of a c h a l l e n g e ? G a r r e t t felt t h e s a m e way. Mike t h r o u g h o u t high school called s o n g Laura n e e d e d t o sing on. Bass j o i n e d us as a f r e s h m a n The Pow Wow. Stationary W e b r o u g h t h e r in and it just Lyrical for sure. The blessing c o m i n g in t h e next year. The f o u r Travelers w a s o n e of the n a m e s clicked in a b o u t two takes. of playing in Stationary Travelers of us have just m e s h e d t o g e t h e r t h a t we h a d spoken a b o u t for is t h a t t h e o t h e r t h r e e guys are really well. t h a t band, b u t was p u s h e d aside What's the future for far better musicians t h a n I am. for o n e reason or another. W h e n Stationary Travelers? D o y o u When I'm I c a m e to H o p e I really w a n t e d have any musical plans or challenged to play music s o m e h o w , and with a p a r t , or aspirations? I was still convinced that The M e d i u m : Singer/Songwriter w h e r e a song Pow W o w was going t o end W e are s o r t of taking it o n e is going to u p w o r k i n g o u t a n d move to H o m e t o w n : Maitland, Fla. s t e p at a time. Three of us are go, they have Michigan, but t h a t just never g r a d u a t i n g this year, so we're great ideas. happened. M a j o r : International Studies weighing o u t w h e r e we will be I've w r i t t e n all G a r r e t t Stier, t h e d r u m m e r of www.stationarytravelers.bandcarnp.com next year. We're in t h e w o r k s of t h e lyrics so Stationary Travelers, and I m e t getting a live C D r e c o r d e d . That far, so t h a t is t h r o u g h our m o m s basically. We will probably b e toward t h e e n d something that had b o t h played in high school of t h e school year. That will be is m o r e of a and we were like, "Oh, we should sort of a "last h u r r a h " or m a y b e battle for myself. O n e thing t h a t W h i c h side of s o n g m a k i n g d o j a m sometime," w h i c h usually as a send-off to s o m e t h i n g t h a t a lot of p e o p l e don't k n o w is that y o u find m o r e fulfilling: the doesn't really m e a n anything will look way different f r o m we o f t e n will play a s o n g for six musical or lyrical? w h e n you say that to s o m e o n e here. If we c o n t i n u e to play m o n t h s and t h e lyrics will be (laughs). different every t i m e we play it. If it will be hard for it to be t h e If I h a d to c h o o s e between Eventually I w a s fed up four of us, but we definitely those two 1 would probably pick w e t h i n k a s o n g is just d y n a m i t e , b e c a u s e different music avenues want to c o n t i n u e to play. t h e n we'll c o n t i n u e to play it and t h e lyrical side. The musical just weren't w o r k i n g out, so I I'll c o n t i n u e to ad-lib until we always c o m e s first for us. just w a n t e d t o start s o m e t h i n g .

WTHS Review: "We Bought a Zoo" by Jonsi Review by C h r i s t o p h e r Rodriguez WE BOUGHT A ZOO !«•»*

Saturation f r o m the d e p t h s of i m m o r t a l paradise. This s o u n d t r a c k for "We Bought A Zoo" is a w h o l e grain musical loaf f r o m the oven of nature. Jonsi, vocalist/ guitarist of Icelandic Sigur Ros, takes his m o r e personal and m e l o d i o u s creations to give m o t i o n picture, " W e Bought A Zoo," and us a collection of p u r e glory. Each track displays a variety of a m b i e n t i n s t r u m e n t a t i o n w r a p p e d in beautiful vocals. Track "go-tos" include Boy Lilikoi, Sinking Friendships, G o D o and G a t h e r i n g Stories. Seek o u t o t h e r tracks for soothing, pleasurable c o m p o s i t i o n s for the ears. Overall, this s o u n d t r a c k is a n o u t s t a n d i n g example for t h e potential of i n s t r u m e n t ability, including Jonsi's vocal chords.


Martial Arts This class combines Tae Kwon Do and Kempo Karate, teaching hand and foot techniques for self-defense. Strength, balance and coordination are just a few of the health benefits of martial arts. Tae Kwon Do consists of kicks, blocks and punches to attack an opponent. Kempo Karate involves rapid-fire moves to overwhelm an opponent. Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays Times: 5 - 6 p.m. (Advanced class 5 - 6:30 p.m.) Dates: 1/17 - 4/26 Cost: $30

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A powerful rela3< ti sion and anxiety. Because it stimu ti mind. The practic and clarity. If you'] es, head to the Dc and small pillow. Days: Tuesdays Times: 11 - 11:45 ; Dates: 1/17 - 4/23 Cost: $50

...to excercise more PHOTOS COURTESY OF F L I C K R

Looking for a fun, healthy way to los weight, improve strength and reduce stress Join a fitness class open to students through Hope's H^O program! Head to httpw://wellness.hope.edu/classes signup_spring.html and register online.

A R T I C L E S BY L

Pilates is all about developing a strong core, the center of the body. Through smooth, continuous movements in sitting positions, Pilates elongates and strengthens, giving you long, lean muscles and improved flexibility. Good posture and body awareness are additional health benefits. Days: Tuesdays and Thursdays Times: 11 - 11:50 a.m. Dates: 1/17 - 3/1 and 3/6 - 4/26 Cost: $50 for each session

LAYOUT BY A L E E S A R I B B E N S

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T'ai Chi, a se^ of slow, continuous combines low-impac ity, meditation and s fense. The ancient C practice reduces strej ers blood pressure an rate, improves cardic lar fitness and enhan tion of our internal ei Days: Tuesdays (Intermediate Class) Times: 5 - 5:50 p.m. Dates: 1/17 - 4/24 Cost: $50


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heart ascuis mood. T'ai Chi helps with the circulairgy throughout the body. Days: Thursdays (Advanced Class) Times: 5 - 5:50 p.m. Dates: 1/19 - 4/26 Cost: $50

rew by /niffles, flu, wintery season To increase your remaining immune, Askmen. r e c o m m e n d s taking the following precautions: 1. W a s h your hands Physical t o u c h is h o w many illnesses get transferred. Bacteria live on h a n d s greedily waiting to c o m e into contact with their next victim. To avoid both getting sick and passing on your sickness, wash your hands. Use w a r m water and soap, and wash f o r at least 15 seconds. 2. Don't touch your face N o t only can you get sick by breathing in airborne droplets f r o m s o m e o n e who has sneezed, cold and flu viruses can enter your body through your nose and your eyes. Askmen.com gives us a friendly reminder of what we all learned in kindergarten: don't pick your nose, don't lick your fingers and don't rub your eyes. Quite simply, don't touch your face. 3. Avoid p e o p l e w h o a r e sick While you might be tempted to bring your flu-stricken friend chicken-noodle soup and crackers, don't. Rather, send h i m or her a text with well wishes. It lets your friend know that you are thinking of him or her without getting you sick. 4. Exercise Kill two birds with o n e stone this year. Not only will exercise help you shed those extra p o u n d s you resolved to lose, it will help boost your i m m u n e system

les itam help i m m u n e ' system h j h t off infection. C o n s u m i n g a vafcety of fruits and vegetables helps do so. 6. Stay hydrated O u r m o t h e r s have all told us to drink lots of water when we get sick. However, according to Askmen.com, "staying hydrated may actually help you prevent illness as well." 7. Don't share Ignore all childhood notions of sharing your toys with others. In order to stay healthy, avoid sharing food, drinks, hairbrushes and other items that may spread sickness. 8. Don't drink alcohol Studies show that c o n s u m i n g alcohol weakens your i m m u n e system. If you feel like you are coming down with something, skipping a Friday night party might be a good decision in the long r u n . 9. C l e a n c o m m o n s u r f a c e s Although cold and flu viruses are mostly transferred between two people, according to Askmen. com, "indirect transmission can be responsible for spreading sickness as well ... because cold and flu viruses can survive outside the body for several hours or even days." This means that commonly touched surfaces such as counters, faucets and d o o r k n o b s could be covered with germs. To avoid getting sick, clean common surfaces often. 10. Get e n o u g h sleep

P H O T O S COURTESY OF W I K I M E D I A C O M M O N S

With h o m e w o r k , papers and exams galore, sleep is the last thing o n many college students minds. However, in the long run, getting at least eight hours of sleep a night might pay off by keeping you healthy enough to attend class.


8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

Writer's Block

I'll take your word for It

A column about c o l u m n s

Seriously, 1 could use the advice.

Jennifer Hermenet Columnist

Caitlin Klask Co-Editor-in-Chief

Being a kid was s u p e r for me. W h e n I w a s young, I w a s fully provided for by my very h e l p f u l a n d insightful p a r e n t s or a r a n g e of o t h e r adult figures: my nanny, g u i d a n c e counselors and teachers. 1 haven't really faced adversity bec a u s e p e o p l e have b e e n w a t c h i n g over me. But o n c e you hit a c e r t a i n age, you b e c o m e the p r o v i d e r for o t h e r people. It doesn't s o u n d like a foreign c o n c e p t , I know, b u t o n c e you e x p e r i e n c e t h e transition personally, it's o n e of those things you have t o talk about. I'm a senior in college now, and my plate is really full (I w o n ' t go into detail or a n y t h i n g , but I'm digesting 19 c r e d its, an internship, an o n - c a m p u s job, three leadership positions in s t u d e n t organizations, a radio show, a long-distance relationship a n d a f e r v e n t determ i n a t i o n to watch every movie in my instant queue). 1 don't k n o w w h e r e I'll be after g r a d u a t e school. J a m a b o u t to swim in t h o u s a n d s of dollars of s t u d e n t loan-related debt. W h a t I'm craving n o w is advice. Happily, I can share s o m e of t h e advice I've received over t h e years: 1. "If you're feeling u p s e t , w a s h your face a n d p u t on a n e w pair of socks.'' -Vali Helppie, m y high school AP English teacher. She said this at o u r c o m m e n c e m e n t my senior year, right before she a n n o u n c e d she was retiring. 2. "Every day, o n c e a day, give yourself a present." -Dale C o o p e r in "Twin Peaks." It could be a n e w shirt f r o m t h e men's store, h e says, or a h o t , black c u p of coffee. The day after I h e a r d this for t h e first time, I slept in t o o late a n d enjoyed t h e heck o u t of it.

3. " N o o n e u n d e r s t a n d s you." -Bruce M c C u l l o c h in "Kids in t h e Hall." Bruce is d i r e c t i n g his advice to aspiring a c t o r s a n d actresses in this sketch c o m e d y scene, telling t h e m it's pointless to fall into n o r m a l society b e c a u s e they're d e s t i n e d for better, b u t I get it; I'm s u p p o s e d to m a k e my o w n decisions. I u n d e r s t a n d me; that's w h a t matters! 4. "Slow that d a r n e d thing down." -A crazy c u r m u d g e o n back h o m e . It was really s n o w y outside, b u t my b e s t friend a n d I w e r e late to take o u r A C T s , so I d r o v e quickly. H e rolled d o w n his w i n d o w and m o t i o n e d for m e to d o t h e s a m e , a n d I could tell h e was irate even b e f o r e he yelled. I didn't listen. N o t even two m i n u t e s later, I was stuck in a s n o w bank and had to call a t o w t r u c k . I don't really drive quickly a n y m o r e . 5. "Think w h a t you w a n t a b o u t me; I'm n o t changing. W h a t you see is what you get." - J o h n C a n d y in "Planes, Trains & Automobiles." I've never necessarily p u t this advice to use, b u t I k n o w it's not useless to keep it stored upstairs. W h o e v e r doesn't cry at this p a r t in t h e movie m u s t be terminally j u d g m e n t a l or w i t h o u t a soul. John H u g h e s m u s t have been a really great dad. So m y list is small but full of h e a r t , and I'm w o r k i n g o n it gradually. By t h e t i m e I'm fully t r a n s i t i o n e d into adulth o o d , I h o p e I have e n o u g h advice to give kids in m y position. Do you think you have s o m e t h i n g better? You should share it; write a letter to t h e e d ito r with your advice and send it t o a n c h o r © h o p e . e d u ! I w o n ' t be t h e only o n e w h o appreciates it.

You would think writing a c o l u m n would be easy. You get to write a b o u t w h a t e v e r you w a n t , no rules, it's just a page of you and your t h o u g h t s . So why is it so hard to t h i n k of ideas for it? It's not like I don't have any t h o u g h t s . I could easily write a b o u t missing my dogs, d e b a t i n g transferring, missing d a n c i n g or t h e beauty of Pinterest. However, n o n e of those things are catching my eye to write 500-700 w o r d s about. Since I w a s finding myself in a writer's block pickle, I decided t o Google "column ideas." D o i n g so m a d e m e realize w h y e v e r y o n e gets stuck w h e n writing c o l u m n s , because the ideas p r o v i d e d w e r e simply awful. But if they get at least o n e p e r s o n inspired, t h e n I guess they are w o r t h it. I typed "column ideas" in the search bar and clicked o n t h e first link that p o p p e d up. O n t h a t website I w a s provided with, "Jelly b e a n s and ... stickers ... w h a t e v e r t h e devil you kids talk a b o u t these days." That was actually o n t h e t o p of my priority list w h e n it c a m e to i m p o r t a n t things t o talk a b o u t in my c o l u m n . W h a t is t h e r e to say a b o u t jelly b e a n s and stickers? They are b o t h p e r f e c t for y o u n g children to eat a n d play with; t h a t is a b o u t it. I personally g r e w up, and still a m , an incredibly picky child. I always h a t e d jelly beans, b u t I k n o w m o s t kids m y age at t h e t i m e loved t h e m . Stickers, however, I could not get e n o u g h of. I t h o u g h t stickers were t h e best invention ever; I had multiple b o o k s of stickers just to have t h e m b e c a u s e I t h o u g h t they were cool. S u c h little things e n t e r t a i n e d m e w h e n I was little. Stickers and p a p e r dolls kept m e busy for h o u r s at a time. I only played with paper dolls at m y cottage t h o u g h ; it was a l m o s t s o m e t h i n g specifically r e s e r v e d for C a n a n d a i g u a , w h e r e my cottage is located. W h e n I w a s n ' t at m y cottage I spent all my t i m e playing with my A m e r i c a n Girl Dolls and Barbies while my b r o t h e r s kept busy with their Legos §nd Power Rangers. W h e n w e w e r e little kids we all w o r s h i p e d o u r toys. O n e t i m e I b r o k e t h e head off of my older b r o t h e r Joe's Power Ranger, and he w a s so m a d h e t h r e w m e into t h e television. G r a n t e d , I was only a year old and Joe was only three, so he didn't m e a n to - h e didn't k n o w h e w a s going to h u r t me. He w a s that protective over his toys, t h o u g h . They w e r e that i m p o r t a n t t o h i m . As kids w e had n o t h i n g to w o r r y a b o u t . We woke up, went t o school, c a m e h o m e and had a snack, went to play with o u r toys, t h e n w e n t to bed t o wake up the next day to d o t h e s a m e old thing. W e never c o m p l a i n e d a b o u t it t h o u g h ; we didn't c o m p l a i n a b o u t o u r days like we d o n o w as y o u n g adults. Sure, o u r lives have all gotten a little m o r e complicated, but they follow t h e s a m e p a t t e r n s . We w a k e up, go to class, c o m e h o m e a n d eat s o m e t h i n g t h a t will surely m a k e us gain that college weight while doing o u r h o m e w o r k ; we play with o u r toys, w h i c h would b e o u r laptops; get o n Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or w h a t e v e r else o n t h e internet catches o u r fascination; t h e n we go to b e d and wake up to do it all again t h e next day. W e ' r e all living t h e s a m e lives we did as kids; we follow t h e s a m e s t r u c t u r e that we did in o u r e l e m e n t a r y days. W e t r a d e d in o u r dolls for laptops a n d our Legos for iPods. W e g r o w u p and m o v e o n t o bigger a n d better things. O u r toys b e c o m e m o r e and m o r e complex, b u t we live t h e s a m e life we always h a d . O u r lives b e c o m e m o r e c o m p l i c a t e d every day, but t h a t all is a p a r t of g r o w i n g o u t of the kid life we h a d . However, I think if you're 19 or 90, you still hold o n t o that kid life a little bit. Myself included. I have a c a b i n e t full of my A m e r i c a n Girl Dolls, and I still sleep with a stuffed animal version of my first d o g every night. I still h o l d o n t o my c h i l d h o o d like e v e r y o n e else. I think p a r t of m e will always live my kid life.

The college chef Better t h a n Petrino's Charlotte Park Columnist

&

^ol lUiw

Pizza is by far o n e of my favorite meals to make. W h y ? Because t h e possibilities are endless. W h e n using s t o r e - b o u g h t pizza d o u g h , m a k i n g a delicious c r e a t i o n of your o w n couldn't be simpler. Next t i m e you get t h e craving for cheesy g o o d n e s s , w h i p u p o n e of t h e s e recipes for you and your friends. O r e x p e r i m e n t with your o w n u n i q u e c o m b i n a t i o n of toppings. Petrino's a n d Papa John's won't s t a n d a chance, I g u a r a n t e e it. For all pizzas, begin by p r e h e a t i n g t h e oven t o 4 2 5 degrees. Stretch and roll d o u g h t o fit y o u r baking sheet or pan a n d b r u s h it with olive oil.

A N CHOR Chris Russ Caitlin Klask C l a i r e Call Lauren Madison Cory

Lakatos

Shubham Sapotka

WORLD

LindseyWolf

ARTS

NEWS

Sam H i r t

ARTS

CO-EDITOR

CO-EDITOR

CAMPUS

NEW

CO-EDITOR

WORLD

NEKS

CO-EDITOR

Aleesa R i b b e n s

FUTURES

Bethany Stripp

SPORTS EDITOR

SI-RING SEMESTFR

CO-EDITOR

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EDITOR-IS-CHIFJ NEW

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James Rogers Becca Hawkins

ASST. YOKIS

STAFF

StoKfS EonOh IfmaCruz Con EDHOR Etrnon B r o o k e Mc Donald Con EDITOR

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ADS

MANAGER

Mike Connelly

BUSINISS

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Lauren Bull

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Ann M a r i e Paparelli Elena Rivera Ashley Fraley

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STAEFWRITER


VOICES

JANUARY 2 5 . 2 0 1 2

Cabin fever

Lauren Bull ('12) a n d C o l ^ n Kulba

THE ANCHOR

the abroad column coundess pots of coffee, brought us freshly baked bread for a midnight snack. The classroom was seamless: questions were asked around the dinner table, professors went on walks with us, and we shared our existential crises with one another. In the fast-paced lifestyle of go-go-go we don't have the time to really sit with questions heavy on our minds and hearts. In Oregon, it was welcomed, encouraged and expected. Before cabin fever hit, there was always a well-timed trip that gave us a break from our secluded mountain community. We crossed the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, hugged and climbed Redwoods, backpacked for seven days throughout the Pacific Northwest, and slept in yurts along the Oregon coast. On Monday, you might see a man wearing a black wide brimmed hat— kinda cowboy—most likely paired with zip-off nylon pants and an olive green Northface jacket. Hell be outside Maas during lunch and dinner hours with an assortment of free Clif Bars. If you think he looks like a man who just wandered in from the woods (and slighdy confused), you'd be right. Introduce yourself. Take a Clif Bar. His name is John and he's a professor at the Oregon Extension. If you want more information, we'd love to talk your ear o f f , or you can speak with Jim Allis in the philosophy department. Remember that off-campus applications are due by Feb. 1.

With all the study abroad opportunities that Hope offers, you may not have heard about the Oregon Extension. Just like there are programs in New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia—there is also one settled on top of A mountain in Lincoln, Ore. In August 2010, as juniors in college, we were ready to take a break from the traditional college setting. Twenty-three other students from Colleges around the U.S. journeyed to Oregon where we all lived communally: chopping wood for our woodstoves, sharing potlucks on Wednesdays, tending to the chickens in their coop, spending our Friday nights in Ashland, the town down the mountain. We read up to three books per week and our "assignment" included open dialogue with one another. There were lectures everyday, followed by small group discussion where we talked about the previous day s reading, over cups of hot tea and coffee. There was no homework on the weekends. Three times during the semester, we focused in on our own individualized projects. We read, researched and wrote a paper on our chosen topics: how ants live in community, a chapbook of poems, the origin and role of clowns in society, the ethics of eating. A student who was a creative writing and women's studies major even wrote a paper on quantum me-

(•12) t t u d y l n i In;

Lincoln, Ore.

9

chanics. Our batch of six professors opened their homes up to us, brewed

Pizza, pizza • J U M P , from page 8 Buffalo Chicken Pizza Total time: 50 minutes 1 store-bought pizza dough Olive oil 2 boneless skinless chicken breasts Vi cup tomato sauce 2 tablespoons hot sauce (I like Frank's) 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 cup shredded Monterey jack Vi cup blue cheese, crumbled 3 scallions, thinly sliced

Margherita Pizza Total time: 30 minutes 1 store-bought pizza dough Olive oil 1 ball fresh mozzarella, sliced thin % cup Parmesan, grated 2 Roma tomatoes, sliced thin 1 garlic clove, minced 6 fresh basil leaves, chopped

Season chicken breasts with salt and pepper, and driz-l zle with olive oil. Saut^ over medium heat, around seven/ minutes per side, until browned. Meanwhile in a separate pan, melt butter and stir in hot sauce, Worcestershire and tomato sauce. When chicken is cooked through, remove from pan and cube into 1-ii pieces. Add to sauce and stir to c o a t Cover dough with chicken, cheeses and scallions and bake for 15-18 minutes.

Top dough with mozzarella slices, then layer with tomato slices. Sprinkle with Parmesan, chopped basil, garlic and drizzle of olive piL Bake for 15 minutes.

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Veg-Ont Pizza Total time: 30 minutes

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1 store-bought pizza dough Olive oil 1 cup tomato sauce Vi cup marinated sun-dried tomatoes, diopped 1 cup button mushrooms 1 cup b d l peppers, sliced Vi cup mozzarella cheese, shredded Vi cup Parmesan cheese, shredded Top dough with tomato sauce, vegand cheeses. Bake for 12-15

may c a n c e l c h a r g e s for the portion o# the a d if, in the ixAiaher's reaaonabfe judgment, the ad has been rendered talueieaa by the motalie. A d i a i d M n e t D a a A a e a : A l ad and c i a s A e d requests rrmAt be s U v n A e d

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1 0

NEWS

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JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

Remaining winter 2012 sports schedules Women's Basketball Saturday, Feb. 4 - CALVIN, 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8 - OLIVET, 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11 - at Alma, 3 p.m. Wednesday Feb. 15 - at Trine, 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 - ADRIAN, 3 p.m. Thurs.-Sat., Feb. 23-25 - M1AA Tournament Friday, Mar. 2 - N C A A Tournament, 1st Round Saturday, Mar. 3 - N C A A Tournament, 2nd Round Fri.-Sat., Mar. 9-10 - N C A A Tournament, Sectional Fri.-Sat, Mar. 16-17 - N C A A Tournament, Final Four

|Vlen's Swimming and Diving Thurs.-Sat., Feb. 16-18 - MIAA C H A M P I O N S H I P S Wed.-Sat, Mar. 23-26 - N C A A Championship

Women's Swimming and Diving Thurs.-Sat., Feb. 16-18 - M I A A C H A M P I O N S H I P S Wed.-Sat., Mar. 23-26 - N C A A Championship

Men's Basketball Wednesday, Jan. 25 - at Trine, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28 - at Alma, 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1 - at Adrian, 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4 - at Albion, 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 8 - K A L A M A Z O O , 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11 - at Calvin, 3 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15 - at Olivet, 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 - TRINE Fri.-Sat., Feb. 24-25 - MIAA Tournament Friday, Mar. 2 - N C A A Tournament, 1st Round Saturday, Mar, 3 - N C A A Tournament, 2nd Round Fri. and Sat., Mar. 9-10 - N C A A Tournament, Sectionald Fri. and Sat., Mar. 18-19 - N C A A Tournament, Final C-ouH

Winter Happening features variety of seminars Saturday Hope PR W i n t e r H a p p e n i n g will feature multiple s e m i n a r s in two blocks in t h e m o r n i n g , a l u n c h e o n with musical e n t e r t a i n m e n t and a h o m e men's basketball g a m e with A l m a College. O p e n t o t h e general public, t h e event is s p o n s o r e d by t h e college's office of public and c o m m u n i t y relations. The m o r n i n g will f e a t u r e six seminars, t h r e e at 9:30 a.m. a n d t h r e e at 11 a.m. The 9:30 a.m. s e m i n a r s are " E n t r e p r e n e u r i a l Leaders and Student S t a r t - u p C o m p a n i e s at Hope," "Shakespeare's Prayers" a n d "Helping People to See Better with Mobile Phones." The 11 a.m. s e m i n a r s a r e "Reading and W r i t i n g o n t h e Nanoscale: Imaging and Manipulating Nanoparticles, Molecules, and Atoms," "The G a r d e n s of PostIndustrial Michigan," and "Bi-

cycles, Volleyballs, a n d t h e A r a b Spring: Insights f r o m M a t h ematical M o d e l i n g with U n d e r graduates." " E n t r e p r e n e u r i a l Leaders and S t u d e n t S t a r t - u p C o m p a n i e s at H o p e " will highlight experiences and vision of s t u d e n t s w h o have p u r s u e d p r o j e c t s t h r o u g h t h e m e n t o r s h i p of t h e H o p e Ent r e p r e n e u r s h i p Initiative (HEI). The s e m i n a r will be p r e s e n t e d by Dr. Steven VanderVeen, professor of m a n a g e m e n t and director of the center, and stud e n t s including s o p h o m o r e s Taylor Brushwyler of St. Joseph and H a y d e n Davis of Stevensville, senior M a t t Rutter of Sylvania, Ohio, and senior S a m a n tha Wolffis of G r a n d Rapids.

Students get work experience in Philadelphia center internships • P h i l a d e l p h i a , f r o m page 1 explore their o w n identities e n c o u r a g e s s t u d e n t s to explore t h e city's n e i g h b o r h o o d s d u r i n g in t h e c o n t e x t of t h e city. t h e first week of t h e p r o g r a m . " M o r e t h a n anything, I c a m e " T P C provides a great deal of away f r o m the s e m e s t e r having a better u n d e r s t a n d i n g of myself," s u p p o r t d u r i n g this process.... Every s t u d e n t is g u a r a n t e e d a said R o e m b a c h - C l a r k , a d d i n g place to live," said E d m o n d s o n . that her elective class "Exploring "I feel better p r e p a r e d t o Relationships in Fiction and Film: Sex, G e n d e r , and Sexuality" go a p a r t m e n t h u n t i n g after I g r a d u a t e this spring," said was "eye-opening." Roembach-Clark. Jackie Bray ('12), said h e r S t u d e n t s should c h o o s e T P C o f f - c a m p u s experience t a u g h t her a lot a b o u t herself t h r o u g h . b e c a u s e it "directs t h e m to do meaningful, productive and " m e e t i n g n e w people, keeping t r a n s f o r m a t i v e w o r k , fostering a m y values a n d m o r a l s firm but desire for lifelong learning," said still (going) and (exploring) t h e city" as well as traveling to N e w Edmondson. "Everyone s h o u l d d o it!" York City, W a s h i n g t o n D.C., a n d a d d e d Bray. "It challenges you in the Jersey Shore. an a m a z i n g way." Living i n d e p e n d e n t l y in a Hope's deadline to apply C h i n a t o w n bi-level a p a r t m e n t t o study o f f - c a m p u s is Feb. 1. with four o t h e r girls w a s a n o t h e r S t u d e n t s interested in studying high point of t h e p r o g r a m for in Philadelphia for t h e fall of Bray. . R o e m b a c h - C l a r k , w h o lived 2012 should s u b m i t b o t h a H o p e application and T P C application in Philadelphia's eclectic South by Feb. 1. For those interested Street neighborhood, said in going t o Philadelphia in the this is o n e of t h e "invaluable spring of 2013, applications experiences" T P C offers that s h o u l d be s u b m i t t e d by April 15. "other o f f - c a m p u s p r o g r a m s do not." Michael Edmondson, D i rec t o r of M a r k e t i n g and Recruiting and a d j u n c t professor at T P C , affirmed t h e value of T P C ' s "unique a p p r o a c h " towards housing, which

"Shakespeare's Prayers" will explore t h e variety of prayers t h a t Shakespeare included in h i s plays, c o m e d i e s and tragedies alike; s o m e serious, s o m e slight a n d s o m e devious; a n d w h a t they reveal a b o u t his u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e f u n c t i o n of prayer in t h e Christian m o r a l life. The seminar will b e p r e s e n t e d by Dr. John Cox, w h o is t h e D u M e z Professor of English at H o p e . "Helping People t o See Better with Mobile P h o n e s " will c o n sider h o w t h e p o w e r a n d flexibility of m o b i l e p h o n e s — o f w h i c h s o m e five billion are in use worldwide—provide a unique o p p o r t u n i t y in t h e search for c o m p u t i n g assistance to visual i m p a i r m e n t . T h e s e m i n a r will be p r e s e n t e d by Dr. Michael Jipping, w h o is a professor of c o m p u t e r science and c h a i r p e r s o n of the department. "Reading and W r i t i n g o n t h e Nanoscale: I m a g i n g and Ma-

nipulating Nanoparticles, M o l ecules, and A t o m s " will c o n s i d e r h o w scanning p r o b e m i c r o s c o p y p e r m i t s t h e exploration of t h e nanoscale regime at u n p r e c e d e n t e d levels of resolution a n d applications of t h e t e c h n o l o g y in research at H o p e . The s e m i n a r will be p r e s e n t e d by Dr. Beth A n d e r s o n , assistant professor of chemistry, and Dr. Jennifer H a m p t o n , assistant professor of physics. "The G a r d e n s of P o s t - I n d u s trial Michigan" will feature p h o t o g r a p h s taken of a b a n d o n e d industrial sites in Michigan's N o r t h e r n Lower Peninsula and W e s t e r n U p p e r Peninsula, a study p r e s e n t i n g u n i q u e perspectives of a b a n d o n e d structures f o u n d within t h e e x p a n s e of r e m o t e n a t u r a l vistas. The s e m i n a r will be p r e s e n t e d by Steven Nelson, associate professor of art a n d c h a i r p e r s o n of t h e department. "Bicycles, Volleyballs, a n d t h e Arab Spring: Insights f r o m M a t h e m a t i c a l M o d e l i n g with U n d e r g r a d u a t e s " will explain t h e process, p r o m i s e and pitfalls of using m a t h e m a t i c a l modeling

to u n d e r s t a n d a n d predict p h e n o m e n a in t h e world—including faculty/student research at H o p e investigating topics. The s e m i n a r will be p r e s e n t e d by Dr. T i m o t h y Pennings, professor of m a t h e m a t i c s , and H o p e j u n i o r M o r g a n Smith of G r a n d Rapids. The l u n c h e o n b e g i n s at 12:30 p.m. at t h e H a w o r t h Inn and C o n f e r e n c e C e n t e r ballroom, and costs $12 per person. Highlights will include t h e p r e s e n t a tion of a M e r i t o r i o u s Service Award to Barbara Dee Folensbee '43 T i m m e r of Holland a n d musical e n t e r t a i n m e n t . Reservations for the l u n c h e o n are required. A d v a n c e registration is reco m m e n d e d for t h e seminars. Additional i n f o r m a t i o n may b e o b t a i n e d by calling the college's office of public and c o m m u nity relations at (616) 395-7860 or online at w w w . h o p e . e d u / pr/12WinterHappening.html Registration during the m o r n i n g of t h e event will be f r o m 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at t h e H a w o r t h Inn a n d C o n f e r e n c e Center.

for international s t u d e n t s like m e to m a k e f r i e n d s with o t h e r H o p e students," Z h e n g said. Of h e r work with Shih, Zheng said, "Professor Shlh is always willing to help students Improve their Chinese skills and she is also very outgoing and

personal. I love w o r k i n g for her as a TA a n d have l e a r n e d a lot f r o m her." Shih said she would love to b e c o m e a full-time professor at Hope and see the Chinese program expand.

• S h l h , f r o m page 1 Zilong Z h e n g ('14), a C h i n e s e e x c h a n g e s t u d e n t , said " H o p e h a s been a w o n d e r f u l place to m e b e c a u s e all t h e p r o f e s s o r s I had were very caring and helpful. But t h e Hope community as whole Is hard for me to get Into; p e o p l e are friendly but It if hard

Have you written a substantial paper in t h e field of Theatre, History, A r t , Music, Philosophy, English, L a n guages, Religion or Dance t h a t y o u w o u l d lihe to share w i t h t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y ? Submit it for consideration!

Arts a n d Humanities Colloquium 3:30-5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 at the Martha Miller Center, 1st floor rotunda Refreshments from 3:30-4 p.m. 30 minute presentations t o follow -Tin? < ••ll..qu!«iin is a svni formol o<c'4Sion resembling a protessiona' acaHemii c o n f e ^ n o v -Pcipuiirntiy hei from any Arts and Humanities cuursc t a u g h t h\sprhiu/Uilj / o i l -Any type of p u | ^ r It eligible, b u t preference will be giuen to project - iip&oMng j e s e u r d u iiume should only aopenr o n Ihe title page. Also IhcHjHh th'* processor a n d cou''® nnmc. j

PU«jk> •Aibrilt ibrc? Kiplc* r>f youi p a p e r bv " w m r.n F r f m m i v "V -01.' Arf -. und * UiiTHjniltei Dean's Othce I ubbeiv Mnii


SPORTS Hockey checks off two more victories

JANUARY 2 5 , 2 0 1 2

James Rogers ASSISTANT S P O R T S EBITOR

The hockey t e a m was n o t h i n g s h o r t of d o m i n a n t this w e e k e n d against Kettering University, w i n n i n g o n Friday by a score of 13-2 and c o m i n g back Saturday with an 8-1 ousting. The D u t c h m e n improved t o 19-1-0-1 for t h e season following the two victories. M o r e t h a n a m o n t h passed after their 4-2 victory over Robert M o r ris, 111. o n Dec. 9 b e f o r e t h e m e n w e r e back o n t h e rink o n Jan. 13, w h i c h resulted in a 12-2 defeat of D e t r o i t Mercy. W h i l e not m a n d a t e d to rem a i n at H o p e d u r i n g C h r i s t m a s Break, coach C h r i s Van Timm e r e n e x p e c t e d his c r e w t o stay consistent. A few t e a m m a t e s f r o m t h e Detroit area g a t h e r e d for a couple skates over t h e vacation.

I N BRIEF BASKETBALL T E A M S RANKED IN NATIONAL POLL

PHOTO BY A N N M A R I E PAPARELLI

D O M I N A N T â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Riley Hoernschemeyer ( ' 1 4 ) s t e e r s t h e p u c k around a K e t t e r i n g player on Saturday. The hockey t e a m Is now 1 9 - 1 - 0 - 1 on t h e season. t h a t wide of a scoring range, as 10 different players scored. Click led t h e t e a m with five assists. Goalie Dave Nowicki ('12 s t o p p e d 13 of 15 shots o n t h e night. The D u t c h m e n t h e n took their talent to Edge Ice A r e n a in Holland o n Saturday in a rem a t c h w i t h Kettering. H o p e o n c e again p r o v e d t o b e t h e stronger side, cruising t o an 8-1 w i n and a 2 1 - 3 total scoring advantage in t h e w e e k e n d d o u b l e with t h e Bulldogs. Riley H o e r n s c h e m e y e r ('14) and K u n n e n b o t h scored twice. Twelve different players w e r e awarded an assist as Click o n c e again led t h e way with three. " O n e t h i n g we have b e e n w o r k i n g o n is w h e n we get ahead, we n e e d to keep pressing and not letting t h e o t h e r t e a m c o m e back," H o e r n s c h e m e y e r said. "I think we did a good j o b

of t h a t in b o t h games." Nowicki s t o p p e d 24 of 2 5 shots o n Saturday. For t h e weeke n d h e d e n i e d 37 of Kettering's 40 shots. To Hope's liking, t h e goals have b e e n p o u r i n g in at fast rates. "The goals have b e e n c o m i n g easy t h e last few g a m e s b e c a u s e t h e level of c o m p e t i t i o n hasn't been t h e greatest," Click said, "but also we have c h a n g e d u p t h e lines a little f r o m last semester and have f o u n d s o m e c h e m istry t h a t s e e m s to be working." Slapping in 41 goals t h r o u g h four g a m e s in January is a g o o d indication of u n w a v e r i n g c h e m istry. "The guys o n t h e t e a m really keep each o t h e r focused," H o e r n s c h e m e y e r said. The D u t c h m e n will face t Saginaw Valley State at Edge Ice Arena o n Jan. 27 at 8:45 p.m.

Statistical L e a d e r s

P o i n t s - 1. C h r i s K u n n e n ( 5 2 ) 2 . J u s t i n C l i c k ( 4 9 ) G o a l s - 1. C h r i s K u n n e n ( 2 6 ) 2. C o u r t F a l l , D r e w O ' B r i e n ( 1 3 )

T E A M W O R K â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hope hockey t e a m c e l e b r a t e s one of t h e i r e i g h t goals In Saturday's g a m e a g a i n s t K e t t e r i n g University f r o m Flint.

A s s i s t s - 1. J u s t i n C l i c k ( 3 9 ) 2 . C h r i s K u n n e n ( 2 6 ) S a v e s - 1. D a v e N o w i c k i ( 3 6 3 ) 2 . L a D o u c e S e a n ( 1 1 4 )

Synthetic turf coming to Holland Municipal James Rogers A S S I S T A N T S P O R T S E DIT OR

Holland Municipal Stadium has t h e potential t o receive a well-deserved makeover. The u p g r a d e w o u l d consist of a b r a n d new, player-friendly artificial turf field installed and ready for action by t h e start of t h e 2012 football c a m p a i g n . Since 1979, b o t h H o p e College and Holland H i g h School football players have b e e n battling and tearing u p t h e 33-yearold field. The natural grass surface h a s seen its better days, a n d a renovation would benefit b o t h players a n d fans. Players would experience

e n h a n c e m e n t s in their m o v e m e n t s , t h e risk of injury would dwindle, a n d t h e turf would be appealing and e n d u r i n g . City of Holland officials a n d a select n u m b e r of representatives f r o m H o p e a n d Holland Public School have b e e n m e e t i n g a n d conversing a b o u t c o n s t r u c t i o n and m a n a g e m e n t p l a n s for t h e synthetic turf. An agreed p a r t n e r s h i p bet w e e n these two sides w o u l d increase t h e quality of Holland Municipal Stadium and also create a l o n g - t e r m m a n a g e m e n t plan. From 1932-78, t h e D u t c h m e n h o s t e d c o n t e s t s at Riverview Park, w h i c h is n o w a recreation

Jan. 2 8

vs. A l m a at 3 p . m

2.

PHOTO BY A N N M A R I E PAPARELLI

11

T H I S W E E K I N SPORTS Saturday Men's basketball

"The t e a m was n o t forced to stay o n c a m p u s d u r i n g t h e break," said Justin Click ('14), "but we w e r e e x p e c t e d t o c o n tinue practicing o n o u r own." The break in action took no s h a r p n e s s o u t of Hope's spikes, as they proved to be relentless in a Jan. 14 r o u t of L a w r e n c e T e c h and in t h e t w o s m a s h e s of Kettering. O n Friday night at Kettering's Ice M o u n t a i n Arena, t h e D u t c h m e n w e r e off a n d firing f r o m the beginning, never backing d o w n and o u t s c o r i n g t h e Bulldogs 13N i n e different H o p e players scored in t h e g a m e , as C o u r t Fall (13), A n d r e w Haggerty ('12), C h r i s K u n n e n ('12), a n d D r e w O'Brien ('14) all p u t in two each. K u n n e n was also credited with four assists. O n l y in t h e 12-2 t r i u m p h over Detroit M e r c y did H o p e have

THE ANCHOR

area. The year 1979 b r o u g h t H o p e football to Holland M u nicipal. The s t a d i u m , w h i c h p r o vides r o o m for u p w a r d s of 5,000 spectators, h a s been h o m e t o nearly 90 wins for t h e D u t c h m e n . T h r o u g h 3 3 years and 148 games, H o p e possesses a record of 89-56-3 at Holland Municipal. This past season t h e D u t c h m e n w e r e 4 - 1 at h o m e a n d held an impressive 7 - 3 r e c o r d overall. If t h e turf is installed, t h e freshly r e n o v a t e d surface will experie n c e its first action o n Sept. 1 as H o p e is s c h e d u l e d t o take o n N o r t h Park o n C o m m u n i t y Day. N e a r t o Holland Municipal and already u n d e r c o n s t r u c t i o n

is a n e w o u t d o o r t e n n i s c o m plex consisting of 12 c o u r t s . A l o n g with t h e installation of the c o u r t s will c o m e an officials shelter a n d elevated seating for fans. H o p e tennis players will be given a gift they have n e e d e d . The entire t e n n i s p r o g r a m will b e improved, as it can n o w host h o m e matches on campus rather than h e a d i n g t o and calling local high schools its h o m e v e n u e s . The c o m p l e x will b e available to t h e public and every H o p e s t u d e n t and will serve as a b e a u tiful addition t o Hope's already respectable athletic facilities. C o m p l e t i o n of t h e c o m p l e x is set for this c o m i n g s u m m e r .

The men's basketball t e a m (16-1, 6 - 0 M I A A ) j u m p e d up four s p o t s in t h e N C A A Division III national poll released o n Monday. The D u t c h m e n are n o w ranked third in the nation. After a scintillating 81-65 w i n over Calvin o n W e d n e s d a y and a decisive 84-53 beating of Olivet o n Saturday, t h e m e n have w o n 12 consecutive g a m e s and are well-deserving of t h e b u m p up in t h e polls. Despite losing at h o m e t o Albion o n Saturday, Hope's w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m is still r a n k e d n u m b e r 20 in t h e nation. The D u t c h d r o p p e d eight slots in t h e poll, but still possess a 153 (7-2 M I A A ) record. MIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK Men's Basketball David Krombeen C I 2 ) Guard Men's Swimming Josh Grabijas ('13) Distance

TRACK TEAM COMPETES ATGVSU M a n y H o p e track athletes c o m p e t e d in t h e first i n d o o r m e e t of t h e season at G r a n d Valley State University o n Friday. The m e e t consisted of over 900 athletes a n d lasted for m o r e t h a n eight hours. S o m e notable p e r f o r m a n c e s were: Sheri M c C o r m a c k ('14) in 800 m e t e r s (2:19.72) and 1 mile (5:13.67); Camille Borst ('14) in 3000 m e t e r s (10:31.18); Joel Rietsema ( 1 3 ) in 600 m e t e r s (1:22.76); Sam P e d e r s o n ('14) in 5000 m e t e r s (15:25.41); Christian Calyore ('12) in 60 m e t e r h u r d l e s (:08.69); Steffon M a y h u e ('14) in long j u m p (21-4); Jonas Lawson ('13) in triple j u m p (405); David Dolfin in triple j u m p (40-0). Two m o r e stellar perform a n c e s c a m e in t h e men's 3 0 0 0 - m e t e r race. Hope's school r e c o r d is listed at 8:39.11 set by Ryan TerLouw in 2006, and o n Friday at G V S U N a t h a n Love ('12) nearly broke it, r u n n i n g 8:39.47. Teammate Andrew McKeachie ('12) wasn't far behind, r u n n i n g a 3000 personal best of 8:41.34.


(2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

JANUARY 25, 2 0 1 2

Men's basketball keeps perfect MIAA record over Calvin, Olivet Kathcrine Maguire GUEST WRITER

The H o p e College men's basketball t e a m d e f e a t e d Calvin 81-65 after o n e of t h e biggest c o m e b a c k s in Hope's history o n Jan. 18. "It was t h e tale of t w o halves," head coach M a t t Neil said. " O u r boys m a n n e d u p the second half and played s o m e H o p e defense and that's w h a t we were after." The e x c i t e m e n t t h a t filled the arena at t h e b e g i n n i n g of the g a m e quickly quelled as Calvin s t a r t e d t h e g a m e m a k i n g shot after shot. "They w e r e s h o o t i n g the ball well, and w e weren't playing very g o o d defense," K r o m b e e n said. The Knights w e n t o n to s h o o t 64 p e r c e n t in t h e first half. At o n e p o i n t H o p e was d o w n by as m a n y as 12 p o i n t s . "I t h o u g h t for 3 5 or 38 m i n u t e s that we d e f e n d e d really well," Calvin h e a d coach Kevin Vande Streek said. "We took good shots, took c a r e of t h e ball." In w h a t could have been a m a j o r u p s e t to Hope's season, the Flying D u t c h m e n trailed t h e Knights 32-40 after t h e first half of t h e game. The Flying Dutchmen s t e p p e d u p its defense and took back t h e c o u r t s h o o t i n g a l m o s t 60 p e r c e n t in t h e s e c o n d half. "We got tougher," Neil said.

"It's a t e s t a m e n t to w h o they are as individuals not just basketball players." H o p e t i g h t e n e d u p its d e f e n s e totaling 11 steals, four blocks a n d 25 r e b o u n d s for t h e g a m e . "(Calvin) shot 28 p e r c e n t f r o m t h e floor t h e s e c o n d half and that's b e c a u s e o u r guys w e r e relentless," Neil said. H o p e tied up t h e g a m e with 11:21 to play in t h e second half. In less t h a n a m i n u t e and a half, H o p e was u p by five points. "I k n e w going in that w e w o u l d have to play a b o u t as well as we w e r e capable of playing," Vande Streek said. H o p e went o n a s h o o t i n g streak racking up 49 points total in t h e second half. In t h e end, H o p e was victorious over Calvin sealing the w i n 81-65. " W e just had t o have m o r e heart. That's p r e t t y m u c h the b o t t o m line," K r o m b e e n said. "There wasn't really m u c h else to talk a b o u t (at halftime)." The largest s t u d e n t t u r n o u t of t h e season also helped motivate the Dutchmen. "Anytime we get that c r o w d involved it translates to us," K r o m b e e n said. Even Calvin a d m i t t e d the D e w C r e w was an effective tool. "Their crowd is pretty l o u d it's hard to hear," Calvin f o r w a r d Tom Snikkers said. "It definitely affected o u r defense."

P H O T O BY A U S T I N T I M V A N

L E A D E R â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Krombeen ( ' 1 2 ) puts up a s h o t over Calvin. W i t h p o i n t totals of 21 a n d 2 $ respectively, K r o m b e e n a n d

Bunn were major contributors to Hope's victory.

"We talk a b o u t playing like a championship team and c h a m p i o n s h i p Yearns have to play good defense," Neil said. "And we certainly did t h e second half." W i t h a victory over Calvin u n d e r its belt, t h e H o p e College men's basketball t e a m w e n t o n to beat Olivet 84-53 o n Saturday. The D u t c h m e n finished t h e first half after playing tough defense and aggressive offense with a 4321 lead. The second half w a s full of e x c i t e m e n t as K r o m b e e n , with a l e f t - h a n d e d reverse scoop layup, r e a c h e d t h e c a r e e r milestone of 1,000 points. Bunn also reached s u r p a s s e d t h e 1,000-point m a r k this season in Hope's Jan. 14 victory over Kalamazoo. Snuggerud. and K r o m b e e n led t h e way to Hope's defeat of Olivet with 17 and 16 points respectively. K r o m b e e n was also credited with six assists. The D u t c h m e n will travel to Indiana to take o n t h e T h u n d e r f r o m T r i n e o n Jan. 25. T r i n e was previously Hope's t o p c o m p e t i t i o n for t h e M I A A lead with just o n e c o n f e r e n c e loss o n t h e season until Calvin u p e n d e d t h e T h u n d e r 78-51 on Ian. 21. T r i n e is n o w tied with Adrian for s e c o n d place in t h e M I A A . H o p e will be back in action at DeVos Fieldhouse on Jan. 28 hosting Alma.

Women's basketball defeats Trine, suffers rare DeVos loss to Albion Bethany Stripp SPORTS EDITOR

The women's basketball t e a m split its g a m e s last week, defeating T r i n e 6 7 - 3 4 but falling to Albion 46-63, and is n o w tied with t h e Britons for second in t h e c o n f e r e n c e race. O n Jan. 18, t h e w o m e n h o s t e d T r i n e in its first h o m e g a m e since m i d - D e c e m b e r . T h o u g h t h e T h u n d e r were the first o n t h e b o a r d , two t h r e e - p o i n t e r s by M a d d i e B u r n e t t ( 1 2 ) in t h e first two and a half m i n u t e s of play gave t h e Flying D u t c h a lead they would maintain for t h e rest of t h e g a m e . H o p e o u t s c o r e d T r i n e 3114 in t h e first half. B u r n e t t p u t u p a strong offensive effort in t h e first 20 m i n u t e s , scoring all of her t e a m - h i g h 14 p o i n t s d u r i n g t h e first half of t h e game.

B u r n e t t also pulled d o w n t h r e e offensive r e b o u n d s in t h e s a m e time frame. H o p e c o n t i n u e d its t o u g h offense t h r o u g h o u t the second half, leading by n o less t h a n 15 p o i n t s t h r o u g h o u t the half. H o p e also d o m i n a t e d t h e battle of t h e b o a r d s in t h e s e c o n d half, pulling d o w n 26 r e b o u n d s c o m p a r e d t o Trine's eight. C o u r t n e y Kust ('13) led t h e Flying Dutch's rebounding b o t h in t h e second half and in t h e w h o l e g a m e , g r a b b i n g 10 r e b o u n d s overall and narrowly missing a d o u b l e - d o u b l e for t h e game, scoring n i n e p o i n t s . Allie C e r o n e ('12) stole t h e ball f r o m T r i n e f o u r t i m e s in t h e game, marking the third time this season she h a s had four or m o r e steals in a game. O n Jan. 21, H o p e o p e n e d t h e second half of its M I A A

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season against Albion in DeVos Fieldhouse. Albion e n t e r e d t h e g a m e with a 10-game w i n streak that began after its loss to H o p e on Dec. 3. H o p e struggled offensively d u r i n g t h e first half, s h o o t i n g a chilly 24.2 p e r c e n t and missing all 16 of its a t t e m p t e d threep o i n t e r s . T h e D u t c h defense w a s able t o keep Albion f r o m pulling t o o far ahead, t h o u g h , and t h e half finished with H o p e trailing by three. Liz Ellis ('13) s c o r e d eight p o i n t s off two threes and a j u m p e r early in t h e second half to give H o p e a 28-27 edge after just over t h r e e m i n u t e s of play, b u t Albion took t h e lead back less t h a n a m i n u t e later a n d held o n t o it for good, h e l p e d in p a r t by a five-minute scoring d r o u g h t from the Dutch. Hope's shooting woes c o n t i n u e d t h r o u g h t h e rest of t h e g a m e with a 23.2 overall field goal p e r c e n t a g e and Albion finished o n top, 63-46, h a n d i n g t h e D u t c h its worst loss since an N C A A t o u r n a m e n t loss to W i s c o n s i n - E a u Claire in 2003. " W e got beat by a g o o d team," H o p e head coach Brian M o r e h o u s e said after t h e game. "There's a reason they had a 10g a m e w i n n i n g streak and they played very, very well." The loss t o Albion was only the third DeVos Fieldhouse loss for t h e D u t c h , t h o u g h M o r e h o u s e was quick t o point o u t t h a t even t h o u g h t h e D u t c h may have a good record at

PHOTO BY B E T H A N Y S T R I P P

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Liz Ellis ( ' I S )

t a k e s on t w o Albion

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Saturday's g a m e . h o m e , playing in DeVos d o e s n o t g u a r a n t e e wins. "Just b e c a u s e you play in this building doesn't m e a n you automatically win," M o r e h o u s e said. "It's h o w you play in this building t h a t allows you to win." The women's basketball season is far f r o m over, t h o u g h , with seven more MIAA g a m e s b e f o r e the c o n f e r e n c e

t o u r n a m e n t including its next h o m e g a m e o n Feb. 3 against Calvin. " W e still have a lot of t h e season left and a lot of t i m e to make adjustments, improve and keep going at it," Ellis said. "I don't think that this should m e a n t h e end of the season for us"


01-25-2012  
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