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Hope College • Holland, Michigan • A n independent nonprofit publication • Serving the Hope College C o m m u n i t y for

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p e a c e .

109 y e a r s

check Core C o m m i t t e e lacks student response it out. LAURA MIMAILOFF staff r e p o r t e r

**c*sm Monk, Kulture, m o r e : 'zines go underground.

Spotlight^ page 3.

If you d o n ' l like i!, s l u d e n l s , loo bad. You had your chance. T h o u g h most faculty m e m b e r s probably w o u l d n ' t say it that way, the m o r e than brash p h r a s e s e e m s to e n c a p s u l a t e the u n s u n g feelings of many m e m b e r s of the C o m m i t t e e to Restructure t h e C o r e C u r r i c u l u m w h o , a f t e r a year and a half o f slaving o v e r a p r o p o s a l to c h a n g e the g e n e r a l education r e q u i r e m e n t s for H o p e College, have yet to hear barely m o r e than a p e e p f r o m the student body. It isn't a s if it d o e s n ' t push a few hot b u t t o n s around c a m p u s . T h e A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Board will vote on the newly p o l i s h e d D e c e m b e r proposal in April of this year.

T h e proposal p r o m i s e s to cut graduation mandates f r o m 5 8 to 50 a c a d e m i c hours. It s u g g e s t s a mandatory First-Year Seminar, and r e v a m p s h u m a n i t y c o u r s e s into a interdisciplinary s c h e m e . Still n o b o d y s e e m s to care, said Amy Vivio ( ' 9 6 ) , a concerned student

Vivio s a i d . " A n d s i n c e t h e r e ' s s o little interest, s t u d e n t s just d o n ' t find o u t a b o u t the m e e t i n g s , S o it's basically c i r c u l a t i n g a r o u n d the faculty now. A c c o r d i n g to Ryan W i l c o x ( ' 9 6 ) , o n e of t w o s t u d e n t s on the C o m m i t tee s i n c e the s u m m e r of

If the proposal passes,

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W h i l e all m e e t i n g s t o ChOOSC trOffl. that d i d n ' t h a p p e n . have been open, the C o m t ^ • "If you say it w a s the m i t t e e held t w o h i g h l y — C W W C / C yjVCCTly COTTlfTllttteeizuW of the f a c u l t y (that publicized discussions for ^ . there w a s little interest), s t u d e n t s . O n l y o n e stuyou're dead wrong," dent attended. W i l c o x s a i d . "If you say "Frankly, s t u d e n t s h a v e n ' t s h o w n a lot of init w a s the c o m p l a i a n c y of students, y o u ' r e right." terest, s o t h e y ' v e b e e n cut (out of the process)," more CORE on 2

Habitat builds family's hope BECKY HOLLENBECK staff r e p o r t e r

Womens* Bb a l l : take home four row.

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Sports, page 6.

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Holland explains

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alcohol policy, CampusBeat, page 2.

Oboe, vocals

piano, blend in

T h e Plym o u t h Trio, Intermission, page 5.

Local visionary c r e a t e s spunky 'zine dubbed

Moxie, Spotlight, page 3

T w o s h i f t s of H o p e v o l u n t e e r s have b e e n s p e n d ing their S a t u r d a y s building hope for a Holland area f a m i l y as they w o r k e d on the renovation of a house located on the c o r n e r of 18th Street and C o l u m b i a . T h e h o u s e that is b e i n g renovated w a s d o n a t e d to L a k e s h o r e Habitat for H u m a n i t y by the city of Holland a f t e r it w a s d a m a g e d in a fire last M a r c h . Since September, Lakeshore Habitat has been working with H o p e ' s c a m p u s chapter to begin reconstruction of the h o m e . Last s e m e s t e r the r e m a i n i n g w a l l s and floors w e r e torn o u t and this s e m e s t e r Habitat will be w o r k i n g to install n e w heating, electricity, and p l u m b i n g systems, repair the roof, put!in windows, piaint, dry-wall, and d o w h a t e v e r e l s e is n e c e s s a r y to e n s u r e the h o m e ' s restoration. " I t ' s a m a z i n g to see h o w easy it is to tear a house d o w n , " said Katherine K r u s e ( ' 9 7 ) , w h o helped out o n behalf of her sorority. A l p h a G a m m a Phi m e m ber, w h o is v o l u n t e e r i n g her t i m e to w o r k on the h o u s e . "It g i v e s you a w h o l e n e w perspective o n the place w h e r e you live." Work for the new s e m e s t e r began the second Satu r d a y in J a n u a r y ; with s h i f t s starting at 9 a.m. and lasting until noon. A g r o u p of f o u r t e e n s t u d e n t s and t w o faculty m e m b e r s labor diligently at the b u i l d i n g site e a c h w e e k e n d . " T h e stairs w e r e not up c o d e , s o this past Saturday, w e helped to m o v e a staircase into a n e w location. We also tore a s u m m e r porch off the h o u s e and d i d other small t h i n g s like f r a m i n g in w i n d o w s , " said Melissa Immink ('96), volunteer coordinator for Habitat for H u m a n i t y . In the early a f t e r n o o n , the second shift of w o r k e r s arrive, this t i m e c o n s i s t i n g of individual representatives f r o m f o u r G r e e k o r g a n i z a t i o n s on c a m p u s . " W e have Cents, A l p h a G a m m a Phis, Sibs, and Praters w o r k i n g with us. T h e y have to w o r k a certain a m o u n t of h o u r s , s o they help us out in the afternoon," I m m i n k s a i d . H o p e ' s f r a t e r n i t i e s and sororities are o n e g r o u p of o r g a n i z a t i o n s that have already m a d e a c o m m i t m e n t to the Habitat b u i l d i n g project. T h e G r e e k s have volu n t e e r e d to rotate S a t u r d a y s t h r o u g h o u t the s e m e s ter w o r k i n g at the b u i l d i n g site so that the H e r n a n d e z f a m i l y m a y one d a y have a h o m e of their own. Juan and D e n i s e H e r n a n d e z , a l o n g with their six s o n s , a g e s 6 to 14, are the local family selected to be f u t u r e o c c u p a n t s of the finished two-story, f o u r bedr o o m h o m e . Currently, the family is renting an apartment until their new h o m e is c o m p l e t e d . Habitat f o l l o w s a " h a n d - u p , not a h a n d - o u t " phil o s o p h y that a l l o w s the family to put in " s w e a t equ i t y " as partial p a y m e n t for the house. Juan and his t h r e e oldest s o n s have put in t i m e on past S a t u r d a y s to fill s o m e of their required hours on the building of the h o m e . T h e f a m i l y m u s t also pay for the interestf r e e material c o s t s of the h o u s e . O t h e r f u n d i n g to c o v e r the a p p r o x i m a t e l y $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 n e e d e d to r e n o v a t e the h o m e c o m e s f r o m H o p e a l u m n i and f r i e n d s o f the college. T h i s b u i l d i n g project is the first to be s p o n s o r e d by H o p e ' s c h a p t e r of Habitat for H u m a n i t y and the o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s goal is to m a k e the restoration a c a m p u s - w i d e e f f o r t . Students and faculty are encouraged to participate in the b u i l d i n g project so that the house will b e fully restored and ready for the H e r n a n d e z family to m o v e in by May.

Anchor

photo by Zack Johnson

B O ^ V L E D O V E R : Shannon Panszi (*96) dedicates time at Holland Bowling Center to help students get geared up for a Special Olympics competition.

KBO pins down volunteer spirit JESSICA OWENS staff r e p o r t e r

It didn't matter it it w a s a "gutter ball," three p i n s d o w n , or a strike; a s the s o u n d of falling p i n s e c h o e d t h r o u g h o u t the alley, s o did enc o u r a g i n g w o r d s and c l a p p i n g hands. "Alright Rudy, lets m a k e it three s p a r e s in a row...you have t w o , " c h e e r e d D orian Jodi Frens ( ' 9 8 ) . On T u e s d a y , J a n . 16, the D orian Sor or i t y began helping a special g r o u p of s t u d e n t s f r o m Holland and West O t t o w a S c h o o l s at the Holland B o w l i n g Center. In part, t h e y ' r e h e l p i n g them develop their 4 p i n - k n o c k i n g ' skills for an area Special O l y m p i c s c o m p e t i t i o n in six w e e k s , but, m o r e importantly, the D o r i a n s are giving them moral support b y s h a r i n g the students' e n t h u s i a s m for the sport of b o w l i n g . "It's really rewarding c o m i n g here and helping these k i d s and seeing h o w excited they get just f r o m k n o c k i n g down one pin...we f o r get about t h i n g s like that," Frens later c o m mented. T h e D o r i a n s b e c a m e involved in the program, which is connected to the Special O l y m -

p i c s , t h r o u g h Micki F r e n s ( ' 9 6 ) , president of the sorority. Micki learned of the o p p o r t u n i t y thorough her involvement with physical therapy at J e f f e r s o n E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l . S h e then c o n t a c t e d T o m D r e y e r , director of the p r o g r a m for Holland students, with w h o m she m a d e the a r r a n g e m e n t s for five D o r i a n s to v o l u n t e e r every T u e s d a y a f t e r n o o n . "A lot of us a r e interested in w o r k i n g with children,' ? Micki said. " T h e s t u d e n t s are f r o m trainable m e n t a l l y i m p a i r e d classes," e x p l a i n e d S h a r o n D e W i t , an assistant to t h e c l a s s at L a k e s h o r e E l e m e n tary S c h o o l . " T h e y d o this every year, but this is my first year," D e W i t s a i d . "I think it's a f a n t a s t i c p r o g r a m . It's s o m e t h i n g that, unl e s s you e x p e r i e n c e for y o u r s e l f , you c a n ' t explain h o w o v e r w h e l m i n g it is." A c c o r d i n g to Linda B o o k e r , d i r e c t o r of the s t u d e n t s f r o m West O t t o w a , r o u g h l y 2 5 stud e n t s participate. B o o k e r , w h o also t e a c h e s Folk, Social a n d S q u a r e D a n c e at Hope, is a part time ' a d a p t i v e physical w e l l n e s s ' teacher at West O t t a w a . T h i s her first year with the more BOX^/LING on 2

Voices of Praise hits t h e r o a d JENN DORM cam pus beat editor

Voices of Praise, w i n n e r s of the A l l - C o l lege Sing, traveled to the University of C h i c a g o Friday to p e r f o r m at the M a s t e r C a r d A C T S Great L a k e s Regional S e m i - F i n a l s in h o p e s of m o v i n g on to the national level. T h e g r o u p w a s not selected to m o v e on, but that did not d i s c o u r a g e t h e m in the least. " W e w e r e not c h o s e n to g o o n t o the next level," said A n n e S c h e i b e r ( ' 9 6 ) m e m b e r of Voices of Praise. " B u t w e w e r e very pleased with o u r p e r f o r m a n c e . P e o p l e really s e e m e d to e n j o y it. It w a s another c h a n c e to p e r f o r m and it w a s worth it to take o u r s o n g to C h i cago and s h a r e with t h e m w h a t ' s on H o p e ' s c a m p u s and w h a t H o p e is all about." The ensemble consists of vocalists S c h e i b e r a n d M a r c y Z e i g l e r ( ' 9 7 ) , pianist

A m y Borgan ( ' 9 9 ) , cellist Karen Sepura ( ' 9 6 ) and d r u m m e r T o n y Bull ( ' 9 8 ) . T h e y perf o r m e d " E l Shaddai," w h i c h is the s a m e piece that they p e r f o r m e d at the A l l - C o l l e g e S i n g . " W e a r e s u p p o s e d to p e r f o r m the s a m e act... to k e e p things fair," S c h e i b e r s a i d . G r o u p s f r o m 2 0 d i f f e r e n t c o l l e g e s perf o r m e d at this n a t i o n - w i d e talent s e a r c h . A c t s included bands, s o l o acts, a n d a c o m e d y act. "A m a j o r i t y o f the acts w e r e m u s i c a l , " S c h e i b e r s a i d . " T h e y had d i f f e r e n t s e l - u p s . " A l t h o u g h the g r o u p will not go o n to nationals in N a s h v i l l e , they will not s t o p perf o r m i n g together. " W e have b e e n w o r k i n g on a n o t h e r s o n g , " S c h e i b e r s a i d . " W e have talked about perf o r m i n g in c h u r c h e s . P e o p l e s e e m to like our m u s i c and the m i x t u r e of the voices and the i n s t r u m e n t s . If p e o p l e want to hear o u r music, we m i g h t a s well s h a r e it with t h e m . "


the

C a m p u s Beat

Anchor

D o c t o r cures dating doldrums JENN DORM cam pus beat editor

Students hoping to pick u p s o m e new, innovative dating ideas packed into the Kletz Friday night. T h e s e tips c a m e from David C o l e m a n , the D a t i n g Doctor. Coleman, w h o just signed on as a consultant for Beverly Hills 90210, a l s o t r a v e l s a r o u n d the c o u n t r y holding Creative Dating seminars. Coleman p e r f o r m e d at Hope last year and w a s so popular that S A C decided to ask him back again this year. " T h e r e w a s a large turn-out last year, " said Kevin Randall, Kletz coordinator for SAC. "This year, w e decided to play it up big, so w e had a lot of publicity. T h e thing is, it's a seminar, but it's a lot of f u n . It's interesting to see how people react. They realize it's okay to ask people out and they loosen up." T h e purpose of C o l e m a n ' s works h o p is to provide an energetic, innovative way f o r students to look at dating and to spice u p a relationship that may be caught in a rut. "This is going to be fast-paced, interactive, and spontaneous," Coleman said. " I ' m g o i n g to try to o f f e r alternate ways to have a creative date. We are a l s o g o i n g to identify dating problems and activate s o m e solutions." C o l e m a n , w h o also writes colu m n s and has a radio talk s h o w on dating and relationships, started out

the evening by asking the m e m b e r s of the audience to fill out an index card with a description of their fantasy date, as well as the best or worst p i c k - u p line that they had e v e r heard. Reading the entries f r o m the c a r d s helped to break up his act, as well as p r o v i d e s o m e additional humor to the night. Lines such as " D o you b e l i e v e in love at first sight? T h a t ' s okay, I can walk by a g a i n , " had the a u d i e n c e both l a u g h i n g a n d g r o a n i n g at t h e thought that such a line had actually

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¥ been used in an attempt to snag a date. Though some of the ideas ventured in to the 4 R' rating range, they kept c r o w d m e m b e r s laughing and their interest level high. C o l e m a n gave advice on h o w to tackle dating and how to set u p that first date. "Take a risk. W o m e n , introduce yourself. Men are sick of always having to do the initiating," he said. Coleman also m a d e sure to get t h e a u d i e n c e i n v o l v e d in t h e evening. He had the students break u p into small groups of people that they had not k n o w n previously and introduce t h e m s e l v e s . They w e r e

then told to talk about themselves non-stop for 3 0 seconds. "I thought that the whole night was really e n t e r t a i n i n g , " said Gretchen Schoon ('99). "I really did meet new people." T h i s method of getting people to mingle and meet n e w people did indeed p r o v e s u c c e s s f u l . A s the evening c a m e to a close, the sounds of people exchanging phone numbers and murmuring "It w a s nice to meet you," could be heard. "It's not the number of dates that you have," Coleman emphasized. "It's the quality of them and if you have another one." To spice up the quality of a date, Coleman offered a lengthy list of dating ideas that the a v e r a g e c o u p l e may not have thought of doing. First date ideas ranged from flying a kite in the park to d o i n g s o m e volunteer work. "By volunteering at a local animal shelter and taking care of the animals, it will take the attention off the date and things will feel more comfortable," Coleman said. In addition to his list of creative dating ideas, Coleman also had lists of w a y s to impress members of the opposite sex and things to avoid on a first date, such as long movies, sloppy foods, and being late. " T h e list of things that you can to do on a date is really good because you can do those things with f r i e n d s l o o , " S c h o o n said. "It d o e s n ' t necessarily have to be on a date."

CORE from

HPD gives the scoop on new alcohol law JENN DORN campusbeat editor

Representatives f r o m the Greek organizations on c a m p u s met at a f o r u m Wednesday night to voice their c o n c e r n s about the new alcohol policy. Officer Bancuk, of the Holland Police Department, did her best to clarify the policy and answer any questions that they had. "Basically, this is an MIP law. It s a y s that your body is an open c o n t a i n e r , " B a n c u k said. T h e policy is quite s i m p l e . It b r e a k s d o w n like this; if a s t u d e n t , w h o is a m i n o~r and w h o has been drinking, is walki n g down the street and is s t o p p e d by a police officer, that officer can ask the student to take a preliminary breath test (PBT) right then and there. Yes, anyone can be spot-checked for drinking. Essentially, the criteria for stopping a person is, in addition to j u d g i n g f r o m the p e r s o n ' s a p p e a r a n c e , that the o f f i c e r can s m e l l a l c o h o l o n the s t u d e n t ' s breath. " T h e r e are no real set guidelines to w h o a oolice o f f i c c r can ask to

take the test," Bancuk said. "It is at the officer's discretion. If the officer smells alcohol on a student's breath, they can ask that student to take a PBT." If a student takes the P B T and blows a .02 percent, they will get charged with a MIP (minor in possession). A stut o ^ 0 S P

^ e n l c a n refuse lake the P B T , 7 which results in a $165 fine as well as receiving a citation for a civil infraction. I j u s t w a n t to s t r e s s that the p e n a l t y f o r this new policy is not jail time," Bancuk said. Concerns w e r e voiced about the possible increase in drunk driving. T h o u g h t s are that a person w h o has been drinking will opt to drive h o m e rather than risk being caught by the police while walking home. Students are also concerned that possible police harrassment m a y result f r o m this policy. " T h e r e is no r e a s o n f o r harrassment," Bancuk said. "Officers, though they have the right to, a r e n o t g o i n g to s t o p r a n d o m p e o p l e . If you are just w a l k i n g down the street, I am not going to stop you. But remember, that if you are a m i n o r and you have been d r i n k i n g , you arc b r e a k i n g the law."

l a n u a r y 24, I 996 B O W L I N G from

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"It's a terrific way to get kids involved and it has been especially neat to get Hope students involved," Booker said. "It's a worthwhile endeavor for kids to be involved in sports they can really participate

and I like getting the s h o e s . " Jessica Weidenhamer, 21, known for her bowling talent, said, "I like getting strikes. I get a lot of them." Haley T i m m e r , on the other hand, simply said, "I like it because it's

in." As DeWit says, "They really feel like they're part of something rather than pushed out." T h e students agreed on the positive aspects of the program. T h i s w a s evident in their e n t h u s i a s t i c f a c e s both w h e n on the lane and w h e n c h e e r i n g for their peers. W h e n asked what he thought of bowling, Bradley Rice, 11, replied, "I like rolling the ball, I like pins.

cute." For the next six w e e k s , Tuesday a f t e r n o o n s at the Holland Bowling Center w o n ' t be the s a m e . At these l a n e s the old c l i c h e " I t ' s not w h e t h e r you win o r lose, but how you play the g a m e , " has been transf o r m e d . H e r e it's more than how you play the game...it's about optimism and about the glass of life b e i n g half full r a t h e r t h a n half empty.

C L O d K e R S |R M S O B *

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UNIvC OSAl CiT r STuOOS INC

Time to go see Clockers Friday, Saturday: 7,9:30 & Midnight Sunday: Spm Admission: $Z Concessions: $.50

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Vivio hypothesizes that students are just too busy to care. " I ' v e heard over and over again ' B y the time they implement it, I'll be gone so w h o cares?'," Vivio said. It could also be that the changes are being given the nod of approval across the board. All s e e m s to be qufet on the front of the Political

will actually have a greater variety of classes to c h o o s e f r o m . " More specific changes include: • Requirements f o r admission to Hope may recommend three years of math, two y e a r s of laboratory science, four years of English, secondary language proficiency to at least two years at the high school

Science Department, the first "testpool" for the curriculum changes. T h e d e p a r t m e n t i n c r e a s e s the value of all three credit courses to four credits last fall. Many political science m a j o r s say the system has helped reduce academic stress. " T h e change has helped m e in that I can f o c u s on four classes instead of five and the homework load is not any harder," said political science major Sarah VanHarken ( ' 9 6 ) . "Less credit hours for core and less c o u r s e s per s e m e s t e r w o u l d mean more time to concentrate attention on fewer subjects," added political science major Jon DeWitt

level, two years of history and social science and a m i n i m u m of o n e semester of fine or performing arts. • Addition of a first-year seminar held during their first fall semester in which students would learn library skills, oral c o m m u n i c a t i o n , basic writing skills and get a gen-

('98). T h e s e k i n d s of p o s i t i v e c o m ments are exactly what C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s were after. " T h e p r o p o s a l will h o p e f u l l y make it easier on both students and professors struggling to juggle too many subjects at o n e t i m e , " said C o m m i t t e e Co-chair Chuck Green. "If the proposal passes, s t u d e n t s

eral feel f o r "college life." • Inclusion of a new two-credit hour Encounters with M a t h e m a t i c s course for all students regardless of their mathematical background, followed by at least t w o m o r e general math credits. • A d d i t i o n a l cultural diversity will be introduced in several general e d u c a t i o n c o u r s e s i n c l u d i n g first-year seminar, Expository Writing I, Faith and Learning, Natural Science I, II & III, Social Science II, and Senior Seminar. • T h e requirement of t w o fourcredit hour natural science courses, with o n e being mathematically intensive. • A n e w t w o credit-hour Basic

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Studies in Religion c o u r s e and four more credits at the 200 or 300-level. • Four semesters of foreign lang u a g e s w h i c h may be w a i v e d upon passing a skills test. • Arts I would be required, as well as an Arts II course, though not restricted to studio o r p e r f o r m a n c e activities. O n e bone of contention a m o n g C o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s is the Senior Seminar. T h e original August proposal suggested a two-credit class, but the C o m m i t t e e j i m m i e d the Dec e m b e r version so that it would bec o m e four credits, in the 52-credit hour adaptation proposal, explained Ed Hanson, Professor of Geology and Speaker. W h a t e v e r the c h a n g e s . Green assures s t u d e n t s the core m o d i f i c a tions—if and when they are m a d e — will not hold b a c k those already scheduled for graduation. "It will be a slow and gradual proc e s s , " G r e e n said. " W h a t w e are proposing must be passed in over several years. N o plan as to how to go about d o i n g that has been documented, although the need is unders t o o d . A d v i s o r s will h a v e to sit d o w n with their students and handle each case individually." At any rate, " I t ' s g o i n g to be a close vote," Green said.

I f f

INQUIRING MINDS wants to know! The answers t o this and other boggling questions can be discovered at the Leaf & Bean this Thursday at 4 p.m.


l a n u a r y 24,

I 996

'Zine Scene FREE FOR A L L : U n d e r g r o u n d m a g a z i n e s yield u n c e n s o r e d m a d n e s s by Amy-Lynn Halverson & Matt Morgan spotlight e d i t o r & staff r e p o r t e r

Off-beat publications satisfy starving readers M ainstream: to float d o w n the middle, not m a k i n g any waves. T h e 'SO's b r o k e the current's pull to the middle by bringing on a tidal wave of what were to b e c o m e k n o w n as underground m a g a z i n e s . K n o w n a s ' z i n e s within underground circles, these tabs posses certain characteristics that separate them f r o m other g e n r e s of print media. Unlike typical magazines found in newsstands, ' z i n e s are c o m p l e t e l y u n c e n s o r e d , never fazed by public o p i n ion, print submissions of all kinds, and a r e n ' t afraid to be a little raunchy. Dripping with s a r c a s m , full of acerbic wit and totally raw, ' z i n e s are the product of a c o m m u n i c a t i o n revolution. S o m e make a onetime splash, o t h e r s f l o a t into the m a i n stream, but any breathing pers o n c a n e x e r c i s e t h e i r 1st A m e n d m e n t rights by firing up the copy m a c h i n e , buying staples in bulk, putting pen in hand and f o r m i n g a 'zine. No one k n o w s h o w m a n y are out there f l o a t i n g around, but "zines are sucked up by i n v i s i b l e or p e r h a p s even neglected culture groups. For each passion there is a 'zine. R a n g i n g f r o m Queer Culture to Punk Girls, they cover a large range of subjects o t h e r w i s e i g n o r e d by t h e mainstream media. Breaking all journalistic rules, def y i n g all p r o d u c t i o n s c h e d ules, and c o m i n g out w h e n time and cash allow, they are the alternative vehicle of expression for those a v o i d i n g the mainstream. A t h o u g h they a r e like wall p a p e r in N e w York or Los A n g e l e s , l i v i n g in the mid-west, it's a trip to locate real live undeground 'zine. Those who want a change and are tired of Rolling Stone, Spin and other m a s s media publications can send a S A S E to : ' Z i n e , c/o Utne Reader, 1624 H a r m o n Place, Minneapolis, M N 55403.

TheAnchor t r i e d to f i n d ^ s o m e 'zines to feature for you, but living in M i c h i g a n they can be hard to c o m e by. H e r e are some m a g a z i n e s that are off the beaten path. T h e s e featured here plus 15,000 others c a n b e f o u n d at R e a d e r s World in d o w n t o w n Holland. I t S o n l c

http://u;vuu;.monh.com/ Monh/ buried: 6 feet under readers: yjannabe liberal, hippy dropouts yjho are lovers of the open road layout simple yet inviting copy: sunny, clear, Informal with repeated t , johes pics: ones you vuould tahe on your own road trip. Unashamedly unprofessional. cool stuff: lots of info on millet: the King of grains. verdict: travel ujith a twist

h o w

* a r ^

j r f c C

| ^ .

r

We r a t e d t h e s e o f f - t h e beaten-path m a g s to help you c h o o s e b e t w e e n the processed and the priceless. I to 3 f t : loo trendy, put it back on the rack 4 to 7 f t worth three bucks, and no Calvin Klein ads 8 to 10 ft 5 o raw that you got a staple cut when you picked it up.

0

HTTF://U;WU;.2one. org/hulture buried: one foot under readers: twenty-something, trendy fimerican pop culture hids who vaguely remember the 80s layout: things never seen in the daylight or anytime here in Holland copy: style is totally honest pics: In YoUr f a C e photos that scream "REftEi ME!" cool stuff: p i c s of Mr. T verdict: rifle through it, but never pay the cover •

j m m i

o

c

getjuice ÂŤ aol.com buried: 2 feet 'J readers: those who I the Q to eat, drinh and screw i r around layout quich and easy with lots to looh at copy; many appetizers pics: tantalize your taste buds cool stuff: sauceaj ads verdict: read only on a full stomach

.

ormalcy is ... neat. Consistepcy < and stability ( should be praised... Perhaps this i s / true according to the whirlwind of A m e ^ can pop culture. * But never according to the eccentric and visionary S u f j a n Stevens ( ' 9 7 ) . In his opinion, these a d j e c t i v e s c a n b e c o m e a trap l e a d i n g to m o n o t o n y a n d stagnation. Trying to avoid this und e r t o w of m a i n s t r e a m life, Stevens created a underground 'zine dubbed Moxie. Geared for culturally malnourished Hope students, Moxie not only focuses on the creative soul, but f e e d s it. H i s

vision:

S u f

& the

'zine

An English/communication m a j o r , a c c o m p l i s h e d Anchor w r i t e r / e d i t o r , d e d i cated Latin student and f o u n d i n g m e m b e r of l o c a l band, Marzuki, this wellrounded individual desires something m o r e for Hope. " I t ' s not the first time this has been d o n e at H o p e , " Stevens said. " A n d I felt that it w a s my moral obligation to the school." S t e v e n ' s prior involvement with various f o r m s of print m e d i a w a s i n v a l u a b l e training for Moxie as well as for his goal of a publishing and editing career. F r o m h i s print m e d i a w o r k S t e v e n s r e a l i z e d an e n o r m o u s a m o u n t of his talent remains hidden f r o m lack of e x p o s u r e . " I wanted to provide a m e d i u m for students to expose thems e l v e s

Stevens

0

said. Spending countless hours parked in front of the c o m p u t e r screen, Stevens is slowly turning his idea into a reality. "It takes a dysfunctional personality to d o s o m e t h i n g like this," Stevens said. The self-professed obsessive-compulsive entrepreneur h a s taken the all-important step f r o m s i m p l y c o n ceiving the m a g a z i n e to making it available to the campus. " W h a t ' s art in a dark r o o m ? If n o one is there to look at it, w h a t g o o d is it?" S t e v e n s s a i d . " I h o p e that Moxie will provide a c a n v a s for students." MoKle Raur. What's

at

the

core

D u r i n g the ' 8 0 ' s , the n a m e Moxie a p p e a r e d on another independent project. It w a s the n a m e of a pirate record label s p e c i a l i z i n g in the illegal distribution of underground bands. T h e original Moxie gave exposure to talented bands previously unheard of. In the s a m e way, Stevens said, the n e w Moxie will s h o w c a s e students w h o are not normally able to receive exposure. T a r g e t e d at r e a l s t u dents, Moxie is designed to be a true r e f l e c t i o n of the starving creative souls here at Hope. While budding writers are g e t t i n g the ax f r o m mainstream publications, Moxie n o t o n l y o p e n s t h e door, but encourages free thinking and subm i s s i o n s of all kinds. Chock full of raw wrjtmore MOXIE on 6

price

of

$3.99


the

Opinion

Anchor

l a n u a r y 24, I 996

your voice.

our voice

Cosmos back pledging proposal

Leaving a Legacy When rumors fly around campus that the administration is c o n s i d e r i n g b a n n i n g the Pull, y e l p s of a n g u i s h can be heard reverberating throughout the Pine Grove for months. When the Holland Police put in place a policy to give minors an on-the-spol preliminary breath test, people are flagging the United States Constitution, citing invasion of privacy and harassment. When the Hope-Calvin basketball game is sold out. fans are on the verge of rioting. But when a proposal that takes four times as long as it took to change the pledging process revamps policies that effect 80 percent more people and alter the way the liberal arts are taught at Hope College—be it for better or for worse—all but a handful of students say boo. The Committee to Restructure the Core Curriculum has spent the past year and a half reevaluating Hope's general education requirements. Within the proposal are provisions to increase science and humanities credits for graduation, add a new freshman seminar and even beef up admittance requirements for seniors in high school. In fact, the Committee did a test run in the Political Science Department this fall, b u m p i n g up the number of credits of so-called heavier classes from three to four so that students can take fewer, more in-depth courses and still graduate on time. Few batted a lash. While that's cause for concern, it's not news to members of the Committee. They say student participation has been fairly nonexistent since they began the process in 1994, despite posted meeting t i m e s and e n c o u r a g e m e n t from faculty to incorporate student participation. T h o u g h the idea of sitting through meetings shuffling papers with a philosophy thesis waiting on the back burner is daunting, the issues being presented garner more of a response than a lackadaisical nod over meatloaf in Phelps. After all. Co-chairperson C h u c k Green says the vote over the c h a n g e s 44 ...is going to be close..." Though the proposal has been formally submitted to the Academic Affairs Board for approval and the work of the Committee is officially done, there is still time before the vote for students to give feedback on the efforts. Talk to your professors during noon ball, send ^n e-mail, drop a note to your department head on what you think will work, and what w o n ' t . D o n ' t f o r g e t , f a c u l t y m e m b e r s say, that the remaining meetings are open to all students. The next one. in fact, will be announced soon. True, the c h a n g e s may not effect the education of current seniors and juniors, but the core revamp will change the long-term plans and curriculum of sophomores and freshmen—not to mention the generations of Hope students to come. And the way the legacy-thing works here at Hope, that means our kids could be receiving a very different education than

Dear Editor, We are writing to express our feelings about the Ad Hoc Committee recommendations for a restructured pledging program. This letter is on the behalf of the entire Cosmopolitan Fraternity. First we would like to thank each member of the Ad Hoc for their hard work and determination on this proposal as well as the Campus Life Board for their role in this process.

Manager

It would be untrue to say that we agree with everything that the proposal says. There was a time when all Greeks seemed ready for a campus wide revolt. But attitudes have c h a n g e d and d i f f i c u l t d e c i s i o n s have been made. With that in mind we would like to give our full support to the recommendations made by Ad Hoc and strongly encourage the Hope College c o m m u n i t y to

support them as well. This proposal is an intelligent and cohesive approach to a new pledging program and we are committed to its success. It represents a very fair compromise for all parties involved. We are willing to give it a chance and hope that the college is as well. Sincerely, The Cosmopolitan Fraternity

says WTHS shafted

Dear Editor, I would like to thank you and your staff for the coverage of our benefit concert entitled "Cans For Kids." I am extremely frustrated when 1 open up the last issue of the school newspaper and it has a two page spread on holiday giving and not one word on the four barrels of food we collected for the Salvation

Enforcement

Army. T h i s c o m e after you and your staff identified our campus station as 8 8 . 9 F M instead of 89.9 which may not seem like a big deal to you but we do not sound anything like the NPR jazz station down that way on the frequency and sure don't need to c o n f u s e the s t u d e n t s on campus that do not know that we

of alcohol

Dear Editor, This letter is in reply to "Take A Deep Breath" in last week'sAnchor. Through my years at Hope, I have always suspected that Hope College did not really "uphold state and local laws regarding the posession and consumption of alcoholic beve r a g e s " (see your student handbook) as claimed. The decision of Public Safety to not enforce the new law allowing breath testing of minors confirms my suspicions. Although underage drinking is widely accepted, it is still against the law. Anyone breaking the law must be willing to accept the consequences if they are caught. 1 believe enforcing this law would be a more effec-

exist. I am c o n f u s e d where this animosity and blatant lack of support comes from but, we as a fellow c a m p u s organization do not appreciate it. Sincerely, J. Eric Hultgren, General Manager, W T H S

policy prevents

tive way"to create a safe and secure environment which is as free as possible from crime, disorder, injury and loss" as stated in the student handbook as the goal of Public Safety. Duane Terpstra suggests enforcing the law will prevent students from calling Public Safety w h e n medical attention is needed. I suggest that the enforcement will prevent many alcohol related medical emergencies in the first place, if Hope College were to start an effort to prosecute underage drinking, I believe more students would choose not to drink, leading to less vandalism on campus, less injuries,

harm

and a safer environment for all students on campus, not just the drunk students. T h e decision to not enforce the n e w law s h o w s Hope College is more concerned with its image (numerous student arrests would not impress prospective prospective students and heir parents) than with the safety of the students on campus and taking a stand against illegal activity. It is sad that a Christian college has so little backbone. Sincerely, Stephanie Toering ('96)

Congress

their parents.

A h h r e u i u t e d N l i n u t e s :

meet the press editon-in-chief operation manager campusbeat editor spotligHt editor infocus e d i t o r intermission editor sports e d i t o r graphics e d i t o r photo editors photographer copy e d i t o r business m g r . / a d r e p page designers

ad creator distribution m a n a g e r f a c u l t y advisor

ii

Julie Blair Arin Neucks Jenn Dorn Amy-Lynn Halverson Heather Bosch Melissa Henvaldt Greg Paplawsky Jacob Koesch Jill Fischer Zach Johnson Matt Sterenberg Julie Harris Nina Bieliauskas Dave Schrier Angie Strey Becky Hollenheck Dan Oder kirk Dennis Renner

Glyn Williams • Becky Hollenheck • Ally son Pickens Nicole McClain • Peter Emery • Michelle Piel • Laura Mihailoff* Ben Swets

A

4. O r i g i n a t i n g in t h e R . A . C . Task G r o u p , C o n g r e s s f i n a l i z e d p l a n s f o r a c a m p u s " T o w n M e e t i n g " f o r u m to d i s c u s s i s s u e s o f s a f e t y o n campus. Officer Duane Terpstra will discuss c a m p u s violence, shuttle van issues a n d the ever present p a r k i n g p r o b l e m . T h e m e e t i n g will b e h e l d in t h e M a a s C o n f . r o o m o n F e b . 19th a n d is o p e n to all s t u d e n t s .

5. Parliamentarian Jeremy VanEk announced an upcoming Congress constitutional review. 6. N o students w e r e present for "Speaking Frankly."

Student Congress was adjourned at 9:46 PM.

m The Anchor is a p r o d u c t o f s t u d e n t e f f o r t a n d is f u n d e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e College Student Congress A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e . Letters t o the editor are e n c o u r a g e d , t h o u g h d u e t o s p a c e l i m i t a t i o n s the Anchor r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t - T h e o p i n i o n s a d d r e s s e d In t h e e d i t o r i a l a r e s o l e l y t h o s e o f t h e e d i t o r - i n chief. Stories f r o m t h e H o p e C o l l e g e N e w s S e r v i c e a r e a p r o d u c t o f t h e Public R e l a t i o n s O f f i c e . O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o the Anchor a r e available f o r $ 1 I. W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t o r r e j e c t any a d v e r t i s i n g .

the

c

Student Congress Meeting was called to order at 8:05 PM on January 18,1996. 1. President Nina Bieliauskas announced there would be no meeting next week due to a conflict with the Board of Trustees meeting. 2. It was announced that Representative Ken Howk was up for attendance review after missing 3 respective meetings. 3. Congress discussed the upcoming proposal from President Jacobson intending to ban smoking in all public buildings (aka the Kletz) and referred it to the Campus Ideals Task Group to formulate a plan of action.

CORRECTIONS • In the Dec. 6, 1995 issue of The Anchor,

• • the rennovations m a d e in Kollen Hall were

reported to be five million dollars. T h e y cost $ 7 0 0 , 0 0 0 . • In the Dec. 6, 1995 issue of The Anchor, the C o s m o p o l i t a n letter to the editor w a s not printed.

We regret any problems this may have caused. Please report any corrections to 395-7877.


the

January 2 4 , I 9 9 6

Anchor

Intermission

THE PLYMOUTH TRIO WETS ITS WHISTLE WITH RICH OBOE AND MUTED VOCALS

Tony's Salad Bowl

M. HERWALDX intermission editor B e h i n d e v e r y great: n o t e is a f a c e : The

Just as the notes of a baroque composition rise and fall f r o m highs to lows, so did the performance of T h e Plymouth Trio. T h e m a r r i a g e of o b o e , sop r a n o v o c a l s , a n d p i a n o in Dimnent Chapel on Jan. 20 at 8 p.m. reached heights of definite splendor, and lows of status q u o vocal performing. John M a c k , a p l e a s a n t - f a c e d white-haired gent, w a s the soaring peak of the e v e n i n g on his oboe, maintaining potent beauty through controlled breathing into the w o o d w i n d instrument. His performance, packed with emotion in clear melody, scales and trills, rose above Christina Price's soprano voice, and harmonized with Elizabeth D e M i o ' s quite capable piano, b e c o m i n g an uncaged voice in itself. T h e trio p e r f o r m e d a varied repetoire, r a n g i n g f r o m H a n d e l ' s classical, "Guardian Angels," to a n u m b e r called, " D o m e s t i c T r a n quility," by the contemporary c o m poser Samuel Adler. Price, dressed in blue silk and s m i l i n g a s u b d u e d s m i l e at t h e c r o w d in the Chapel, sang beauti-

Ply-

mouth Trio from left to right, Christina Price, John Mack, and Elizabeth Demio. TOSSING UP THE FRESHEST, GREENEST ARTS EVENTS FOR YOUR TASTEFUL PALATE. D I G IN! •The Used Side of the Sofa A Reading by Writers Alberto Rios and Heather Sellers Wed., Jan. 24, 8 p.m. DeWitt T h e a t r e fully at intervals. Her happiest and best m o m e n t s vocally were w h e n she sang the folk music of Richard Cummings," "tra-la-la-ing" her staccato w a y through the simple, rich waves of melody, and beaming the entire time. T h e low points of t h e e v e n i n g h a p p e n e d w h e n Price w a s required to maintain the shelf of each note, yet project the music in an explosion of sound. On c o m p o s i t i o n s like " F l o s s t M e i n Heiland," the explosion never came because Price hesitated to deliver,

• D o w n the Road An Interview With A Serial Killer A Theater F o r u m Production Fri., Sat., Jan. 26, 27, 8 p.m. DeWitt Studio Theatre almost laboring under a nonexistent volume control that let her sing no louder than her muted projection. On piano Elizabeth DeMio played c h o r d s and v a r i a t i o n s of chords that kept her in the background; she provided the skeleton

of each piece f o r the v o c a l s and the o b o e . But her skills in precision, controlling v o l u m e , and e v o k i n g the basic emotion in each piece rendered her a valuable member of T h e Plymouth Trio.

•Contemporary Motions Dance Co. Fri., Sat., Jan 26, 27, 8 p.m. Knickerbocker Theatre

Book Reviews Reads Like A L i p - S m a c k i n g S n a c k

Secrets

Deana Rennick staff reporter

oman

mi

$

Mouth-watering descriptions of c h e w y r i c e c a k e s [mochi] a n d breaded, deep-fried dishes of pork tonkaisu. L o n g , d r a w n - o u t PTA meetings and sweaty, swirling crowds of festival participants. All these invite the reader to be on int i m a t e t e r m s with the l i f e a n d t h o u g h t s of a t y p i c a l J a p a n e s e w o m a n . Elisabeth Bumiller, the author of The Secrets of Mariko, f o l l o w s Mariko through her life and household for one year as she initerviews, o b s e r v e s and questions. Mariko, the w i f e of a morose and heavy-drinking man and mother of three children, lives in a tiny house with her family and ailing parents. Bumiller, at the onset of this year, is incredulous concerning Mariko's responsibilities and servitude which is similar to that of a 1950's American housewife. T h e first few chapters of Secrets are m u d d i e d by B u m i l l e r ' s approach to Mariko's life. She brings her American feminism to a society where feminism is largely invalid, which strains the reader's relationship with Mariko and makes the book hard to digest. However, while the oppression of the Japan e s e w o m e n s e e m s to d i s g u s t Bumiller, it does not even phase Mariko, who philosophically works within the Japanese family

constructs. "1 try to let him [her husband] think h e ' s number o n e — that puts a man in a good m o o d , " she says. As the year progresses, though, Bumiller sees that Mariko does, indeed, have m o r e f r e e d o m than it appears. By w o r k i n g within the c o n f i n e s of J a p a n e s e society, Mariko has managed to b e c o m e an i m p o r t a n t m e m b e r of the P T A , works part time for the Japan Travel Bureau, and by reading meters parttime she earns money to pay for her creative passion . . . lessons on the samisen, a traditional Japanese string instrument. The irritation that a f f l i c t s Bumiller is slowly and gently replaced with a grudging admiration a n d h a z y u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e w o m a n ' s c o m m i t m e n t to children and family despite personal feelings of unhappiness. T h i s understanding allows the reader to lean forward and enjoy looking into the next nook, the next cranny, the new secret of Mariko. A s B u m i l l e r ' s anger and irritation subside, she also realizes that s o m e J a p a n e s e women, much to the m e n ' s chagrin, are not as complacent as they seem. "I am not a Japanese m a n ' s type of w o m a n , " Mariko says, "I do what I want. I have initiative. I go according to my o w n schedule. Most Japanese w o m e n do what their husbands say." T h r o u g h o u t the year, Bumiller grasps the difficult decisions fac-

ing Mariko. Decisions dealing with the m u c h - f e a r e d " c r a m " s c h o o l s (juku), w o r k , family, and personal happiness. T h e s e questions can not be d e a l t w i t h i d e a l i s t i c a l l y . If Mariko does not force her children into these schools, they may not ever be financially successful as adults. If she g o e s to work her ailing parents will suffer. If she stays home, she will b e c o m e depressed and sick. M a r i k o ' s optimistic attitude, though occcasionally clouded by everyday events, shines through the entire book. Her logic and love of the predictability and safety of her life o v e r c o m e s B u m i l l e r ' s doubts and perhaps the doubts of the readers. Despite the fact that Mariko, like many other Japanese w o m e n , gives up many of her personal goals and refuses to leave her unhappy marriage, her husband, Takeshi, tells Bumiller, "Seriously speaking, you made a mistake to select Mariko as a model. S h e ' s not a typical housewife." And despite Bumiller's rocky b e g i n n i n g , she e v e n t u a l l y c o m e s to the heart of things, to The Secrets of Mariko. Bumiller brings us to the s a m e understanding that she comes to and that Mariko's husband c o m e s to. A f t e r a few drinks, he s a y s it succinctly. " S h e ' s a very mysterious person. I don't understand h e r . . . but you were right to c h o o s e h e r . J a p a n is f u l l of Marikos."


the

Sports

Anchor

lanuary 24, I 996

D u t c h b i t e Bulldogs Timmer

leads Hope

to victory

with

have b e e n able to sustain a highly

GLYN WILLIAMS

impressive 4-1 record in the M1AA. H o p e ' s latest o p p o n e n t on their

staff r e p o r t e r

sprint back to life w a s A drian C o l lege on S a t u r d a y , J a n . 20. T h e

Less than a m o n t h a g o the H o p e College Flying Dutch basketball team w a s d r i f t i n g in a s e a of d e s p a i r

battle, w h i c h H o p e w o n s m a s h i n g l y 58-46, propelled the Dutch into sec-

with a m i s e r a b l e record of 1-10. " W e had a w h a l e of a pres e a s o n . " s a i d c o a c h Tod G u g i n o . " E i g h t of o u r g a m e s w e played w e those, w e lost s o m e o n e s w e s h o u l d

s h o o t i n g and a full f o r c e drive to

reflect the w a y the g a m e went. With

with only 2 : 0 0 left. A controversial call by the ref-

T i m m e r ( ' 9 7 ) , and that m a d e all the difference. Timmer immediately

T h e n l e a g u e play started and the Dutch began to s w i m again and

play b e f o r e h a l f t i m e . With the additional help of Karri N y s s e ' s ('96) perfect free throw the h o l e by Tara Porter ( ' 9 8 ) , the D u t c h took back the lead, 2 1 - 1 9

i n g q u i t e s o l i d . In c a m e L i s a

have lost, and w e lost s o m e o n e s that w e s h o u l d have w o n "

with 5:00 left, and then a shot in the paint p r o v o k e d a foul shot, which s h e hit s m o o t h l y with 4:25 still to

ond p l a c e b e h i n d Calvin. T h e s c o r e d o e s not c o m p l e t e l y 5 : 2 0 left in the first half, H o p e w a s d o w n 1 8 - 1 2 and Adrian w a s play-

w e r e b l a t a n t u n d e r d o g s . We lost

double-double

w e n t to w o r k , hitting a nice lay-up

e r e e s with 1:36 left in the half gave A drian the c h a n c e to tie the g a m e up. T i m m e r b l o c k e d a shot and then got the ball b a c k , but the ref rushed in, called no shot, a n d d e c l a r e d a

&

j u m p ball, t h u s giving possession t o Adrian. Once again, two Nysse free t h r o w s lifted the D u t c h to a 2 3 - 2 1

>Ar?c/7or p h o t o b y J i l l F i s c h e r

lead at the b r e a k . H o p e led all t h r o u g h o u t the sec-

EYE O F T H E X I G E R : Christie Eding ('98) looks to drive the ball in for an easy basket.

ond half, but A drian held on tight,

sition b e f o r e this s e a s o n , " G u g i n o

d a y w e beat A dr i an with o u r f r e e

slowly losing their g r a s p around the

said. " S h e has had to a d j u s t her play to the f o u r position...it has b e e n a

throw s h o o t i n g . I c a n ' t wait to see

game. H o p e m e t h o d i c a l l y began to dis-

s l o w p r o g r e s s i o n to this point a n d I

b i n e o u r play." It is o d d to s e e a t e a m with a 5 -

tance t h e m s e l v e s in c h a m p i o n - l i k e

T h e D u t c h shot an a b o m i n a b l e 2 7 percent f r o m the f i e l d .

D u t c h ' s neck with 8 : 0 0 left in the

fashion. N y s s e led all s c o r e r s with 18

d o n ' t think s h e is d o n e . "

"27 percent? H o w ' d we w i n ? "

w h a t w e can d o w h e n w e can c o m -

11 overall r e c o r d b e in second place in the M I A A . Still, G u g i n o r e m a i n s c o n f i d e n t in his t e a m a n d f e e l s that the o n l y record that really c o u n t s is that earned

points, i n c l u d i n g 10/11 f r e e t h r o w s h o o t i n g , eight r e b o u n d s , and an u n u s u ally high five f o u l s in 27 m i n u t e s of play. A m y M e y e r s ( ' 9 7 ) also had a g o o d g a m e , with 12 points, four r e b o u n d s , and

You get one win here, one there, and they begin to snowball. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tod Gugino, Women's Basketball Coach

only t w o f o u l s in 2 9 m i n -

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

utes of play. T i m m e r w a s b y far the p l a y e r of the g a m e , a s she scored

G u g i n o yelled t r i u m p h a n t l y .

14 p o i n t s , g r a b b e d 12 r e b o u n d s ,

nearly perfect 73.5 percent f r e e throw s h o o t i n g . N o p l a y e r w e a r i n g

four blocks, shot 4/4 f r o m the f r e e throw line and had only o n e foul which c a m e in the last few minutes. S a t u r d a y ' s g a m e s e e m e d to be

Anchor

photo

by Jill Fischer

a H o p e j e r s e y missed m o r e than o n e f r e e throw, with t h e e x c e p t i o n o f

"You get one win here, o n e t h e r e , and they begin

to

snowball,"

G u g i n o said. " N e x t thing you k n o w y o u are b e g i n -

n i n g t o b e l i e v e in t h e team, and you're fighting a good battle for second place. A n d then w e fight f o r first p l a c e . W e have m u c h c o n f i d e n c e in o u r s e l v e s a n d w e are t a k i n g t h e g a m e s one at a time." E v e r y p l a y e r s e e m e d to contribute at least a little bit, a s m a n y play-

earlier in the season, w h e n she ap-

one p e r s o n . " T h e g a m e w a s definitely w o n f r o m the f r e e t h r o w line," G u g i n o

peared to b e u n c o m f o r t a b l e with the

s a i d . " W e hit e i g h t e e n m o r e f r e e

talk a b o u t . " W e are p l a y i n g with m o r e c o n -

role she w a s f o r c e d to play. "As far as I know T i m m e r has

t h r o w s than they d i d and that is a

tinuity," said G u g i n o . " T h i s w a s o u r

lot of points. W e beat K a l a m a z o o

g a m e all the way. W e s h o u l d have

never, ever played the f o r w a r d po-

(Jan. 17) with o u r d e f e n s e , and to-

w o n this g a m e and w e did."

a s h a r p contrast to T i m m e r ' s play

T H E S K Y IS F A L L I M G : Lisa Timmer ('97) #JJ and Kari Nysse ('96) #32 box out a Bulldog in the paint.

T h e a n s w e r to that question is the

in l e a g u e play.

e r s had g a m e s that b o x scores d o n ' t

SPOUTS OX THE ROAD... Cosby's Pick of the week M e n ' s B a s k e t b a l l - T h e beat just c o n t i n u e d to g o o n f o r the H o p e

C o l l e g e m e n ' s h o o p s t e a m as they a m b u s h e d A d r i a n and c a m e a w a y

Offsides fox

by Jeff Brown

-rv

with a 7 3 - 5 3 victory. H o p e w a s lead by the s h a r p s h o o t i n g of Kevin

It's that special time of year

Brintnell ( ' 9 6 ) w h o m a d e five of seven three point s h o t s o n his w a y to a 19 point night. T h i s w a s H o p e ' s eighth c o n s e c u t i v e w i n and it k e e p s

a g a i n . It is the o n e time in the season w h e r e I get to c h o o s e the S u -

them in first place in the M I A A . T h e B u l l d o g s of A d r i a n w e r e abl e to shut d o w n the paint on the D u t c h m e n , but H o p e ' s o u t s i d e s h o o t i n g m o r e

be Dallas or

than c o m p e n s a t e d . As a t e a m H o p e shot 10-20 f r o m b e h i n d the arc.

I h a v e to g o

T h i s g a m e w a s H o p e ' s 20th c o n s e c u t i v e w i n against A d r i a n . W o m e n ' s S w i m m i n g - T h e Dutch have d o n e it again. A n o t h e r tour-

Pittsburg hate the

nament, another title. H o p e took the W h e a t o n Invitational with 5 1 4 points

boys

to defeat host W h e a t o n w h o c a m e points. H o p e took gold in six

secon

events

^ P'

ace

with

w l

' h ^96 Kristen

, h r e e o f , h e e v e n t s a n d M o v i n g ("96) t a k i n g first in ; Megan Hunter ( ' 9 7 ) earning gold in t w o . M e n ' s S w i m m i n g - T h e m e n m a t c h e d their f e m a l e c o u n t e r p a r t s at

fsr

A < U - T ^ S .

because I a n d ev-

thing e r y they s t a n d for. E v e n t h o u g h the C o w b o y s m a y h a v e m o r e talent at a l m o s t e v e r y position, they lack the o n e t h i n g Pittsburg has, and

with 5 5 6 points, just e d g i n g out K a l a m a z o o College w h o had 5 5 0 points.

that is heart. You c a n ' t m e a s u r e that o n paper. P i t t s b u r g w a n t s it

T h e S w i m m i n g D u t c h m e n took gold in f o u r e v e n t s . A n d t h e r e w a s e v e n a tie in the 5 0 freestyle b e t w e e n t w o Hopeites, B o b S p r i n g s t e e n ( ' 9 9 )

m o r e than Dallas, s o they shall w i n . It's like I a l w a y s tell T h e o

and Derek V a n d e r H e i d e ( ' 9 7 ) w h o had t i m e s of 2 1 . 8 3 s e c o n d s . T h e D u t c h m e n also g r a b b e d the gold in the 100 f r e e s t y l e ( V a n d e r H i e d e ) ,

w h e n he gets d o w n about his b a s -

the W h e a t o n Invitational w h e r e the t e a m p l a c e d first.. H o p e finished

U o C K e ^

per B o w l c h a m p i o n . Is it g o i n g to Pittsburg?

2 0 0 b a c k s t r o k e (Keith N y k a m p ( ' 9 6 ) ) , and the 4 0 0 freestyle relay.

ketball skills: talent d o e s n ' t alw a y s g u a r a n t e e a victory.

MOXIE from 3 ings, Moxie's

table of c o n t e n t s

For the literary side of the c a m -

ing to their r o o m m a t e s and tell the

c o m e , and only t h i n g s d e t e r m i n e d

m o n t h , a n d will cost a b o u t $ . 5 0 an

includes regular articles pertinent to

pus, Moxie

will be p a c k e d with

student b o d y h o w they really feel

by the staff to be b l a s p h e m o u s , slan-

issue. Moxie

the cultural side of H o p e .

s n a p p y b o o k r e v i e w s , fresh m o v i e

a b o u t D e a n Frost and Student D e -

derous, or g r a t u i t o u s l y v u l g a r will

s o any p r o f i t s will b e used to de-

be e x c l u d e d . S t e v e n s e n c o u r a g e s all to s u b m i t your local monster. T h e r e ' s n o t h i n g

f r a y printing c o s t s or will b e do-

to lose, he said, a n d only f a m e and

the stands late J a n u a r y or early February. G r a b a c o p y at the Student Union D e s k in Dewitt a n d p e r u s e it

Not only will " D e a r A b b y " f r e -

reviews, and h a p p e n i n g music

v e l o p m e n t o n the " B i t c h , B i t c h ,

q u e n t the p a g e s , but H o p e ' s o w n 'zine w o u l d never be c o m p l e t e

p a g e s e x p o s i n g s t u d e n t s to culture o u t s i d e of O t t a w a County.

Bitch" page. T h r o u g h all the scrappy copy and

without a Christian t e a c h i n g s page.

For t h o s e w h o gain pleasure f r o m

Don't forget everyone's favorite topic, which is c o v e r e d o n the " S e x -

m a k i n g sarcastic m o c k e r i e s of life, be sure to c h e c k out the " S a t i r e " page. Students can stop complain-

Sex-Sex" page.

hip g r a p h i c s , Moxie's main f o c u s is on student s u b m i t t e d p o e m s , stories, art, and a n y t h i n g else turned in. E v e r y t h i n g s u b m i t t e d is w e l -

f o r t u n e to gain. If all g o e s a c c o r d i n g to plan, this 'zine will be published t w i c e a

is not a b o u t money,

nated to charities. T h e first issue o f Moxie

f r o m c o v e r to cover.

will hit


Campus Beat

Anchor

the

lanuary 24, I 996

Its

Wee^SlzVay 9(pzi>...

BE AT PHELPS ON 5 THURSDAY, FEB. I ' FOR

0째째

The

PEPSI PISTONS CHALLENGE S

p^ \ W I N A ROUND TRIP J PACKAGE TO THE PISTONS GAME ON FEB. 7 t h / l a s A W I N A NEW SONY DISCMAN

v

i

Plus Many More Prizes!!! ORIENTATION

/T

JANUARY SPECIAL < A j V

TAMMIMCi PACKACifc 5 v / l d l T d f O R 'IB00

o * UOTIOM a P & G I A t d

Vic Henley

flU&ARAMG&

I T & M d & A U S T R A U I A M (aOUO 2 - 5 ^ O f f , * ^,c' flUEARAMfle

OM AUU TOWeU BAGS WAS'2.5

If your first days at Hope were one big question mark, get in on the action and be a part of Orientation 1996. Orientation Director, Assistant Director and Orientation Assistant Applications are available

i

at the Student Union Desk. Pick one up today!

T h i r d

R e f o r m e d

Church W o r s h i p Services 8:30 &

11:00 a . m .

C o m e r of 1 2 t h a n d P i n e

< 3 i e +

r e a d e r

a r a a k

+ o

It's a short walk 3 blocks west of campus

u p ! College Student G r o u p

T h i s K e t *

f

r i d a y a t

i n

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e i S O p m .

fun. food, focus on Bible study and issues S u n d a y , 9:45 a . m . 76 E. 13lh St., Apt. 6 COME

JOIN

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o O

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T i r e d of w a i t i n g for a terminal at the R e f e r e n c e LAN? Ask a t t h e R e f e r e n c e Desk about the n e w sign up s h e e t . LIBRARY HOMEPAGE UP CHECK OUT THE NEW LIBRARY HOMEPAGE ON THE WEB BY CLICKING ON INFORMATION RESOURCES" FROM THE HOPE COLLEGE HOMEPAGE (http: / / w w w . h o p o . o d u / r o s o u r c o s / I i b )


dieAnchor

c k

^ThousKtof

BoW<!>3 O f f

lanuary 24. I 996

College A n j

Tl s

plus tax

n

s

cjazdU^sporis^

One medium, one topping pizza.

Expires

3/31/96

Valid al p a f l i c p a l m g s t o r e s onty No! vahd w<h a n y d h e r o«o* P n c w m a y vary C u s l o m a r p a y s s a l e s lax a p p t e a h o Delrvefy a r e a s limbed to e n s u r e s a f e drwing. Our d r i e r s c a n y l e s s t h a n S 2 0 0 0 C a s h ^ a l u e l ^ O c Our d r r / e r s a r e no! p e n a l i s e d lor lale d e l v e n e s 0 1 9 9 6 D o m i n o ' s P « 2 a , Inc

Jolly

I •

plus tax

"///////f/fTTT.

One large, one topping pizza.

Expires

|

3/31/96

j

l Vabd al p a r t o p a l m g s i c e s only N d vafcd w d h a n y other oiler P r i c e s m a y vary C u s t o m e r p a y s s a l e s lax I w h o r e a p p h c a b l a Delivery a r e a s I«n4ed lo e n s u r e s a f e drr^ng. Our d r t v e n carry l e s s t h a n S 2 0 0 0 C a s h I v a l u e 1/20c Our d r r / e r s a r e not p e n a h z e d tor lale d e l ^ e n e s . O l 9 9 6 0 o r r a n o ' s P i u a . Inc .

Janu&ry

m

plus tax & d e p o s i t

I ?* O ?< I

J dckpol

392-4556

January 25, 26, 27

10 Piece

$ 3.99

20 Piece

$ 6.99

30 Piece

$ 9.99

40 Piece

$12.99

50 Piece

$15.99

|

Twisty Bread Dipping Sauces

8 Piece

Pizza Sauce Jalapeno Cheese Ranch Coke / Diet Coke / Sprite

$1.49 $ .49

Garlic Butter Blue Cheese 2 0 oz. 2 liter

$ .89 $1.79

PAID TRAINING, ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES, FLEXIBLE HOURS, DAY A N D EVENING SHIFTS, MERIT ( RAISES, PIZZA D I S C O U N T S , T I P S A N D M I L E A G E P A I D NIGHTLY, PAID VACATIONS, FULL A N D PART-TIME POSITONS.

on

OUTDOOR APPAREL!

Domino's Pizza is now hiring drivers. We guarantee you will earn $8.00 per hour for the first 60 days. You qualify if you are at least 18 with an insured dependable vehicle, and good driving record. Apply at Domino's Pizza 738 S. Michigan.

SAVE up to 5 0 %

s t r i c t l y l classified

on

FOOTWEAR!

SAVc^ o n T O N S of great stuff! HOLLAND D o w n t o w n *24 W 8th St

N E E D A FRIEND? If y o u ' r e pregnant, it's N O T the end of the world. At Bethany in Holland, we can help turn your crisis into a plan YOU can live with. FREE counseling and assistance. To explore your options, call l - 8 0 0 - B e l h a n y (toll-free) or (616)396-0623. We listen! World Wide Web: http://www.bethany.org/ and Internet email: infoCabet hany.org

To Hank and all those who helped m a k e the d r a m a H u n k y , D o r y , Peachy, Keen, Okey, Dokey, Nitty, Gritty: thank you for all your time and p a t i e n c e ! ! God is g l o r i f i e d through your gifts and we love you dearly. — Love in Christ, Anna and Lx)ri

H A P P Y 2 1 s l BIRTHDAY S A R A H D E H A A N ! ! ! Wishing you the very best birthday ever. Roomie. Love ya! —You know who!

Support life, Planto attend the 23rd annual Pro- Life Rally. Speaker: John Willke, M.D. Past President of the National Right to Life Committee. Current President of the Inter-

So/e hours: Th & Fr 10-9 'Sol 9-4 Roxie-Want to get a taco? —Grif Sale also at our omec locations G R A N D RAPIDS-East Paris S h o p p e s KALAMAZOO • Downtown SOCCER PRO SHOP S o c c e f Z o n e - G r o n d Voliev Th & Fti 5 - 9 . 3 0 p m - S o f 9 om-9:30 pm Sale also at

G e n d e r Issues

Paper Contest

P.S. Christ was a great last minute addition, but what do those plates mean anyway?

national Right to Life Federation and Life Issues Institute. Thursday, Jan. 25, 1996. 7:30 p.m. Central Wesleyan Church, 446 W. 40th St., Holland. Everybody welcome! No admission! Sponsored by Right to Life of Holland Area. 100 South Waverly Rd. Holland, MI 49423 Phone# 396-1037. Was he an oaf? A saint? Was she leech? An angel? Tell us your dating h e a r t b r e a k e r s , h a p p y tales and horror stories and we'll publish them in the St. Valentine's mega-issue of The Anchor in Spotlight. E-mail us via: A N C H O R or

call, x7S77. T H E BIG KISS. Maybe it happened when you were one or twenty-one, involved gum and orthodontics. If so, its worthy of publication. Give us a call, x7877 or e-mail. T h i r t y - e i g h t , s c h m e r t y - e i g h t , we are still the better team. — # 1 3 Hal, I've been monked! -Millet Man Padre: Never underestimate a princess. - W.C. Counselor-Congrats on being "The Chosen."

Have you been missing someone special in your life lately?

HOPE eHUKCH

s t s " ^ OX - o S -"Sz

5l|l ^

• J .

L.

.i- "'t I o u-S a-

S o c c e r Z o n e -West M i c h i g a n - P o r t a g e

invites you to worship with us

sponsored by WIG

g a z e t t e e r ts^

/ J l e y o u

3/31/96

$8.00 per hour guaranteed

^SAV£ 3 0 - 6 0 %

|

L

Wings

@0

Expires

Vabd al p a l e p a l i n g s t o r e s onfy Not valid with a n y o t h e r offer P r i c e s m a y vary C u s t o m e r p a y s s a l e s tax I w h e r e a « ^ c a b i c Delivery a r e a s limded lo e < a u r e s a l e d r r n n g Our d n v e r s carry l o s s than S 2 0 0 0 C a s h »aJuq 1/20c. Our d n v e r s a r e not p e n a l i z e d tor lale d e l f t e n e s . 0 1 9 9 6 D o m i n o ' s Pizza. Inc

738 Michigan

Jubilee! Thursday Friday Saturday

One medium, one topping pizza, 2 Cokes and an order of Twisty Bread.

a pxUiUccd

Oeaclline -'Jxh. 2 t'nlrij forms available in Sludmi (()evelopineni and all academic departments

j u s i k i e , iov&i

OA. a / i t i and

II.OO a.m., Sundays Jrom Hope's campus, walk west through Centennial Park, to 77 West 11th Street

iUe/uUusie

o^i a bp&iti

jjcuuztia?

If so, give us a call at ^keAncko*.. We're always recruiting fresh talent. Staff meetings Weds, at 8 p.m.; Sun. at 6 p.m.

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01-24-1996