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H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n • A s t u d e n t - r u n n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g the Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 116 years

Public Safety gives up state law enforcement powers Department will become the college's private security detail next year Kurt Koehler C A M P U S BEAT E D I T O R

A M O H O R P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

Next year, Public Safety patrol cars will need to be repainted.

S o o n Public Safety patrol cars will no longer have Hope College Police emblazoned on their sides. Starting in the 2 0 0 3 - 2 0 0 4 academic year, Hope College's Department of Public Safety will no longer have the p o w e r to enforce state law

on and off campus. T h e department will revert to a c a m p u s safety and security force with the p o w e r to e n f o r c e c o l l e g e r e g u l a t i o n s and other minor incidents. "Public safety would still take a lot of the more minor incident reports such as lost w a l l e t s a n d b a c k p a c k s . T h o s e are things that Holland Police would take, but there wouldn't be much they could do to remedy that. Public Safety knows the campus more intimately and would be able to f o l l o w u p on t h a t , " said Greg Maybury, director of Opera-

lions and Technology. T h e Michigan C o m m i s s i o n on Law Enforcement Standards ( M C O L E S ) , the state board that certifies both individual police officers and their d e p a r t m e n t s , recently issued a finding that state law precludes Hope College, as a private college, f r o m exercising full police powers. T h i s finding, indirectly, arose out of a case involving a challenge to Hope College's privilege to have a private law enforcement agency. T h e finding will have

m o r e SECURITY o n 2

Hope defeated by Calvin 74-70 Men's basketball travels to Calvin, comes back with loss Olim Alimov STAFF REPORTER

F o r many, the 150 ,h g a m e between H o p e and Calvin w a s worth waiting for. More than 4,500 fans attended Saturday's showdown, which ended in a 74-70 Hope loss. The Flying D u t c h m e n (2-1) walked into the g a m e against Calvin (3-1) in second place in the M I A A behind c o n f e r e n c e leader Albion (3-0). Calvin had suffered its first defeat to Albion on Jan. 15. Both t e a m s w e r e ready to f i g h t . "The game was very important to us b e c a u s e it w a s e a r l y [in the M I A A season] and because of the rivalry,*' said Matt Taylor ( ' 0 4 ) , w h o scored 6 points and m a d e 2 steals. "Every Hope-Calvin game

is a part of history and to be a part of that tradition is definitely something special." Hope led early 6-0 sparked by its 6*9 center D o n Overbeek ('03), w h o scored a team high 16 points

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...If you get beat, life goes on and you just have got to get back up. -Matt Taylor (04) and g r a b b e d 7 r e b o u n d s . T h e knights quickly made a run of their own to take a one point 20-19 lead. On the next possession, Overbeek went u p high and dunked the ball to give Hope the lead. T h e Flying Dutch trailed by one 34-35 b e f o r e Greg I m m i n k ( ' 0 5 ) nailed his third three pointer with

m o r e RIVALRY 8

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Forward Katie Nienhuis ( 03) shoots a basket as the flying dutch remained undefeated (15-0) Saturday by c r u s h i n g Calvin 89-51. Hope is now ranked third nationally. m o r e S P O R T S o n 8

State moves to reduce scholarships' value Budget cut leaves students scrambling Anjey Dykhuis C A M P U S BEAT E D I T O R

Every year, high school seniors are assaulted with a barrage of pap e r w o r k a n d j u n k mail b e g g i n g them to apply to this or that college. Every year, some students push certain colleges aside because tuition is simply too expensive. The state of Michigan has tried to lessen the financial strain on college students by offering scholarships f o r

Hope remembers trustee Avid Hope supporter will be missed Anjey Dykhuis

both need and reward. However, this spring is the last semester that t w o s c h o l a r s h i p s , the M i c h i g a n Competitive Scholarship and the M i c h i g a n Tuition Grant, will be offered at the value originally disbursed. The Michigan Competitive Scholarship is based on a qualifying A C T score and financial need. T o be eligible f o r the M i c h i g a n Tuition Grant, students must demonstrate financial need. Over ter the semester began. "Basically my

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P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

C A M P U S BEAT E D I T O R

Max Boersma

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For the past 61 years. Max D. Boersma, 78, has been affiliated with Hope College. He graduated in the class of 1946 and was a leader on the Board of Trustees f o r over 20 years, f r o m 1981 until his death, serving as secretary f r o m 1982 to 2000. On Friday, Boersma fell ill while playing tennis at DeWitt Tennis Center. He was transported to Holland Community Hospital, where he died. "His was a lifelived well and that

life m a d e a d i f f e r e n c e f o r g o o d . Heaven is brighter today because of M a x ' s homecoming to be with his Lord and Savior; Earth is dimmer because of his absence f r o m us," said Hope College President J a m e s Bultman. He also helped Hope by co-chairing t w o i m p o r t a n t c a p i t a l c a m paigns, C a m p a i g n f o r Hope, which s u r p a s s e d its g o a l in 1987, and Hope in the Future, which topped its objective in 1994. Preceding his death, he was also helping with the current campaign. Legacies: A Vision of Hope. In addition. Max Boersma served as president of the

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Show in Voorhees Campus, page 2

Concerto Aria Arts, page 3

more Public Safety Infocus, page 5

Hockey Sports, page 8


C A M P U S B E A T

V m c h o r

January

22, 2003

WTHS Battle of the Bands canceled, concert held in lieu Nick Denis EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

A musical fracas between eight bands was scheduled for last S a t u r d a y . H o p e F o r A u g u s t a n d Lyle! w e r e t w o of eight b a n d s s c h e d u l e d t o c o m p e t e in the W T H S B a t t l e of t h e B a n d s in t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t e r until the event was c a n c e l e d last W e d n e s d a y . " B a t t l e of t h e B a n d s w a s p o s t p o n e d b e c a u s e w e did not feel like the s h o w we could p r e s e n t last w e e k w a s the o n e we ( W T H S ) a n d the b a n d s i n volved would want to present, s a i d M e r i d i t h De A v i l a ( ' 0 4 ) , g e n e r a l m a n a g e r of W T H S . T h e e v e n t ran into d i f f i c u l ties b e c a u s e of t h e c h a n g e o v e r in W T H S a d m i n i s t r a t i v e s t a f f . Last s e m e s t e r ' s General Manager, Rebekah O e g e m a ( ' 0 4 ) w h o o r g a n i z e d B a t t l e of the B a n d s , is c u r r e n t l y s p e n d i n g a s e m e s t e r in N e w Y o r k . " W e were having a hard time cont a c t i n g a c o u p l e of t h e b a n d s and u n f o r t u n a t e l y that m e a n t t h a t t h o s e w h o had b e e n f a i t h f u l in k e e p i n g t h e r a d i o s t a t i o n updated for Saturday's show a l s o got c a n n e d , at l e a s t f o r t h e

t i m e b e i n g , " De Avila s a i d . W T H S is c u r r e n t l y a t t e m p t ing to r e s c h e d u l e the e v e n t . " W e ' r e h o p i n g to r e s c h e d u l e for the b a n d s s a k e a n d f o r t h e s a k e of o u r r e p u t a t i o n a s an i n s t i t u tion and a v i a b l e v e n u e f o r u p a n d c o m i n g b a n d s . In o r d e r f o r t h i s e v e n t to c o n t i n u e , w e n e e d t o m a k e s u r e that w e a r e c o n -

It's too bad that the Battle of the Bands was canceled... -Jamie Pierce ('03) s i d e r e d r e l i a b l e and loyal to our b a n d s that we exist to p r o mote," said O e g e m a . R e s c h e d u l i n g m a y not be an easy task. " . . . t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r is a l r e a d y r e s e r v e d f o r m o s t of t h e s e m e s t e r — w e ' r e l o o k i n g at p e r h a p s an A p r i l d a t e , " D e Avila said. D e s p i t e the d i f f i c u l ties t h a t got t h e o r i g i n a l s h o w c a n c e l l e d and t h e n e w p r o b l e m s with reserving the K n i c k e r b o c k e r theater, De Avila remains optimistic about t h e s u c c e s s of t h e c o n c e r t .

' T h i s will a l s o h e l p it to b e an e v e n b e t t e r s h o w — f o r e x a m p l e , we w e r e h a v i n g a t o u g h t i m e f i n d i n g a s p o n s o r to p r o v i d e s o m e of t h e p r i z e s f o r t h e winning bands. While we're p r e p a r e d to pay out of o u r b u d get if n e c e s s a r y , this g i v e s u s m o r e t i m e t o c o m e up w i t h a cool p r i z e p a c k a g e , " D e Avila said. T h e c a n c e l l a t i o n of B a t t l e of the B a n d s did, h o w e v e r , not shut down Hope's Saturday n i g h t m u s i c s c e n e . R y a n Wert ( ' 0 4 ) of A n t e l o p e M u t i n y a n d A n d y Volk ( ' 0 4 ) of H o p e f o r A u g u s t o r g a n i z e d a s h o w in t h e b a s e m e n t of V o o r h e e f i h a l l . " P r i o r to e v e n k n o w i n g b a t t l e of t h e b a n d s w a s c a n n e d , t h e i d e a of p l a y i n g in t h e b a s e m e n t or V o o r h e e s had b e e n f l o a t i n g a r o u n d . H o w e v e r , g e t t i n g it c l e a r e d by t h e R . D . w a s t h e rem a i n i n g c o n c e r n , " Volk said. H o p e f o r A u g u s t and L y l e ! p e r f o r m e in t h e V o o r h e e s b a s e ment. "For only having two d a y s to b l i t z t h e c a m p u s with f l y e r s and p r o m o t e the show, the turnout w a s quite i m p r e s sive and surprising. T h e stud e n t s s e e m e d to h a v e r e c e i v e d

SECURITY from 1 two main c o n s e q u e n c e s for the H o p e c o m m u n i t y : t h e y will be s e e i n g a lot m o r e of the H o l land P o l i c e D e p a r t m e n t o n - c a m p u s ; and P u b l i c S a f e t y will lose a c c e s s to d a t a b a s e s of t h i n g s s u c h a s l i c e n s e p l a t e n u m b e r s . "It will f o r c e u s to rely a lot m o r e o n H o l l a n d P o l i c e d e p a r t m e n t f o r a lot of t h e a c t i v i t y . T h e y a r e r e a d y to p r o vide that support," M a y b u r y said. " We will lose o u r c o m p u t e r a c c e s s to t h e d a t a b a s e . If t h e r e is s o m e o n e s i t t i n g in a c a r o u t side a r e s i d e n c e hall and l o o k s s u s p i c i o u s we c a n ' t run t h e i r p l a t e s as e a s i l y . We w o u l d h a v e to c a l l H o l l a n d P o l i c e t o d o t h e p l a t e . A s a p r i v a t e s e c u r i t y f o r c e t h e y w o u l d be l e s s l i k e l y t o give us that i n f o r m a t i o n . T h e r e are legislative d i f f i c u l t i e s w i t h that k i n d of p r i v i l e g e d i n f o r -

m a t i o n g o i n g to n o n - l a w e n f o r c e m e n t g r o u p s . ...It's a serious loss." D e s p i t e t h i s l o s s M a y b u r y d o e s not b e l i e v e that t h e s a f e t y of t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y will s u f fer. "It s h o u l d n ' t a f f e c t s e c u r i t y . W e ' l l still h a v e t h e s a m e p o l i c e f o r c e in p l a c e . M o s t of t h e o f ficers will be certified law e n f o r c e m e n t o f f i c ers through other connections" D e a n of S t u d e n t s R i c h a r d F r o s t a g r e e d . " I t h i n k t h e r e will be m i n i m a l i m p a c t . I t h i n k o u r s t a f f is e x t r e m e l y w e l l t r a i n e d in t e r m s of m a k ing s u r e w e c o n t i n u e to p r o v i d e a s a f e a n d s e cure environment for students," Frost said. S e e I n f o c u s on p a g e 5 f o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n the c h a n g e s at P u b l i c S a f e t y .

AID C U T from 1 a c c o u n t s h o w e d up m i s s i n g 4 5 0 d o l l a r s , and a f t e r I n o t i c e d that is w h e n I got a call f r o m h o m e telling me. I personally have not received notice except w h e n I w e n t to c h e c k f i n a n c i a l aid," said Dan Hendricks ( ' 0 3 ) . W i t h the p o o r e c o n o m y , b u d get c u t s s t a t e w i d e h a v e hit all a s p e c t s of l i f e , e v e n t h o u g h s c h o o l s were s u p p o s e d to be protected f r o m the lash. "We d o n ' t f e e l g o o d a b o u t it, b u t like e v e r y o n e e l s e , h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n is t a k i n g p a r t of t h e b l o w , " said H o p e C o l l e g e P r e s i dent J a m e s Bultman.

T h i s g a s h i n g of t h e M i c h i g a n Tuition Grant and Michigan Competitive Scholarship aff e c t s t h o u s a n d s of s t u d e n t s t h r o u g h o u t the state w h o had already planned on the m o n e y f o r this s e m e s t e r . N o w i t ' s t i m e t o h u r r y so t h a t s t u d e n t s c a n find that extra 4 5 0 dollars for tuition. " I ' m only a senior, but t h e r e w e r e a lot of p e o p l e , like f r e s h m e n , c o u n t i n g on t h a t , and it will c o n t i n u e to h u r t t h e m in t h e f u t u r e , " H e n d r i c k s s a i d . It d o e s not l o o k like t h e s c h o l a r ship will b o u n c e back very s o o n , but B u l t m a n h o p e s t h a t

t h e s t a t e will h u r r y t o r e s t o r e the first value to students. "We fought through our association very h a r d t o limit t h e a m o u n t of t h e cut. I b e l i e v e it will c o n t i n u e , a l b e i t at a s o m e w h a t r e duced rate," Bultman said. " I ' m a c t u a l l y j u s t f u r i o u s that they b r o u g h t this on a f t e r C h r i s t m a s , in t h e m i d d l e of t h e school year, when students have planned their financial b u d g e t s . We d o n ' t o p e r a t e on the s a m e f i s c a l y e a r that the s t a t e d o e s , but i t ' s r u d e to t a k e it a w a y a f t e r w e ' v e p l a n n e d , " Hendricks concluded.

BOERSMAfrom 1 the H o p e C o l l e g e A l u m n i A s s o c i a t i o n , the G r a n d R a p i d s B o a r d of E d u c a t i o n , a n d the G r a n d R a p i d s A r t s C o u n c i l . He w a s a l s o i n v o l v e d w i t h the M i c h i g a n C o l l e g e s F o u n d a t i o n . A s a b e n e f a c t o r of s o r t s t o H o p e , he a n d his w i f e C o n n i e put t o g e t h e r an e n d o w m e n t f o r t h e c a m p u s m i n i s t r i e s p r o g r a m . A f t e r they r e c e i v e d a D i s t i n g u i s h e d S e r v i c e A w a r d in 1978, t h e i r f r i e n d s e s t a b l i s h e d the "Max and C o n n i e Boersma Scholarship Fund." A f t e r finishing his b a c h e l o r ' s degree and M . B . A . at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n , he e v e n t u a l l y b e c a m e e x e c u t i v e v i c e p r e s i d e n t of M a z d a G r e a t L a k e s in G r a n d R a p i d s . H e r e -

t i r e d in 1992 and t h e B o e r s m a s m o v e d b a c k to Holland from Grand Rapids. They bought a h o u s e n e a r c a m p u s , b e c a u s e as B o e r s m a s a i d , "I a l w a y s said I ' d like to r e t i r e h a l f w a y b e t w e e n the f o o t b a l l f i e l d and the l i b r a r y . " Both Max and Connie Boersma were active on c a m p u s , a t t e n d i n g m a n y c o l l e g e e v e n t s . M a x B o e r s m a w a s u n s u r p a s s e d in h i s a f f e c t i o n f o r H o p e C o l l e g e . We h a v e lost a g r e a t c h a m p i o n f o r the m i s s i o n of the c o l l e g e , " B u l t m a n n o t e d . O n S u n d a y , J a n u a r y 26, at 2 p . m . , a m e m o rial will be h e l d at D i m n e n t C h a p e l . T h e serv i c e will be f o l l o w e d b y a r e c e p t i o n at t h e Haworth Center.

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P H O T O C O U R T E S Y RYAN W E R T

Kristlna Rubritius of Hope for August sings in the Voorhees basement. us well a n d w e r e o v e r a l l v e r y g e n e r o u s , " Volk s a i d . " I t ' s t o o bad that t h e b a t t l e of t h e b a n d s w a s c a n c e l l e d , but t h e r i g h t p e o p l e h a d s o m e g o o d i d e a s a n d put t o g e t h e r a g o o d s h o w in t h e V o o r h e e s b a s e m e n t t h a t w a s still a f u n t i m e . I w a s n ' t s u r e if t h e f o u n -

dation w a s s t u r d y e n o u g h to h a n d l e all t h e r o c k that we and Hope For August brought, but t h e s t r u c t u r e h e l d and t h e s h o w went on without incident," said J a m i e P i e r c e ( ' 0 3 ) , lead s i n g e r of L y l e ! . O r g a n i z e r s m a y hold s i m i lar s h o w s in the f u t u r e . .

Greek life silences stereotypes Bible study stresses unity and Christianity among greeks Paul Rabaut GUEST WRITER

A group of Greeks here on campus is out to disprove stereotypes At the start of last year, a few students representing fraternities and sororities at Hope began to meet on a weekly basis for prayer, worship, fellowship and discussion. It has since evolved into what is known today as Greek Life. "I really felt the need to join together with other Greeks on campus to start supporting each other, blur the lines of a false sense of competition between different fraternities or sororities, and allow others to see that we are all dealing with the same struggles, spiritually, socially, and o t h e r w i s e , " said Greek Life Leadership Team member Rachel Peckenpaugh ( ' 0 4 ) . Greek Life, which is run similar to the popular junior high and high school Christian group Young Life combines a time of worship, skits, prayer, a message by one of the Leadership Team members, which often spurs small group discussion, and a time afterward of fellowship, has one rule: come as you are, but come without your letters. "It is really cool to see students from all Greek Organizations come together and not separate into 4 four or five little cliques based on the fraternity or sorority they are in," praised Greek Life worship leader Tim Folkert ('04). "We, as a leadership team, made the 'no letters' rule to encourage this time to be a c o m m u n i t y of Christians first, students second, and Greeks third. Each week a discussion is usually led in a small group format

where three or four students will break away from the larger group to discuss how to maintain a Christian outlook and a Christ centered life in the midst of the o b v i o u s temptations that exist as a m e m b e r of a Greek organization. "It is really encouraging to me to see that I am not alone in wanting to live for Christ while at the same time be an active member in my organization," remarked Bethany Buzanis ('04). Greek Life, although 100 percent student run, has support of both Greek Advisor A m b e r Garrison as well as H o p e C o l l e g e Assistant Chaplain Paul Boersma. "God is doing s o m e great things on this campus involving the Greek system," Boersma hailed. "Greek Life is just one of the events that accentuates a lot of the positives of the Greek System here at Hope. A few limes a semester, Greek Life brings in guest speakers such as Boersma or other local pastors or church leaders, to encourage and instruct in a more formal setting. "It is really nice to see such support from not only the Hope C o m munity, but the city of Holland as well," said Greek Life head Paul Hendricks ('03). Greek Life has experienced substantial growth within the last year, and hopes for more greeks to make it a normal part of their weekly activities. "We (members of the Leadership Team) really try to push attendance at our business meetings, but more so than a high number in attendance, we desire that God would spark something in the heart of one person, and just let Him lead the way," reported Hendricks. Greek Life meets on the first and third Wednesdays of every month in Maas Auditorium at 8:30 p.m.


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Concerto/aria features student performers Musical talents showcased in annual concert Jared Gall STAFF REPORTER

Jack Handey, author of "Saturday Night L i v e ' s " p o p u l a r " D e e p T h o u g h t s " and "Fuzzy Memories," offers this historic insight: "1 bet for an Indian, shooting an old fat pioneer woman in the back with an arrow, and she fires her shotgun into the ground as she falls over, is like the top thing you can do." ' In the much less violent world of the Hope College music department, the lop thing one can do has nothing to do with arrows or shotguns, but a little to do with bows. As far as soloing is concerned, the top thing a music student can do is to be a part of the upcoming Concerto/Aria concert. "It is such an honor to be a part of this performance," said Octavia Reese ('05), a cellist performing Antonio Vivaldi's Concerto for Two Cellos along with Hannah Schroeder (*05). "We both have had silly grins on our faces ever since we saw the list of winners." According to Hope Music Director Richard Piippo, soloists are picked earlier in the semester by a panel of f o u r j u d g e s f r o m throughout the state. Acts are chosen regard-

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Hannah Schroeder ('05) and Octavia Reese ('05) rehearse for Concerto/ Aria, which takes place Friday at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Chapel. less of age or academic status, which lends the concert its unique variety. " T h e program is quite diverse in musical

VWS continues First visiting writer of term reads work Tuesday evening

selections, which should give the audience a wonderful mix of music students displaying their wonderful talent," Piippo said of the

performance. In addition to Reese and Schroeder, Titus Munteanu ('05), violinist, will be performing the Violin Concerto in D minor by Jean Sibelius, Abbie Mathews ('05), soprano, will be singing an aria from the opera "11 Seraglio" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Sara Bolkema ('04), piano, will be performing Concerto No. 2 by Dmitri Shostakovich; and Heidi Dykema ('03), organist, will be perf o r m i n g S y m p h o n y No. I by A l e x a n d r e Guilmant. Competition is fierce for this show. The six acts performing were chosen from 28 entries. Once the students are selected, their work is far from over. "When we first decided to compete, we practiced an hour a day together." Reese said. ' T h e n , two hours a day starting about two weeks prior to the competition date. Now, about two hours a day in preparation for the concert." Hope students can see the result of all this preparation on Friday at 8 p.m. in Dimnent Chapel. Although Jack Handey w o n ' t be reading any of his Deep Thoughts, attendees can keep this in mind: "If you define cowardice as running away at the first sign of danger, screaming and tripping and begging for mercy, then yes, Mr. Brave man, I guess I ' m a coward."

Del Michel gives presentation Professor explains language of artists in the abstract Maureen Yonovltz ARTS EDITOR

Katie Taylor STAFF REPORTER

Welsh, Chinese. Malaysian, British.and American cultures are all explored in the writing of Peter Ho Davies, who will read at the Knickerbocker at 7 p.m. on Tuesday as part of the Visiting Writers Series. Davies has written several short stories and is the author of two short story collections. His first, "The Ugliest House in t h e W o r l d , " w o n t h e Macmillan Silver Pen Award in 1998 in Britain. In the U.S., it received the H.L. Davis Oregon Book Award. The second work is "Equal Love," which was a finalist for the Los Angeles T i m e s B o o k Prize in 2000. The same collection was declared a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. The work of the 37-year-old author has shown - up in the pages of The Atlantic, Harpers, Granta, The Paris Review, and T h e C h i c a g o T r i b u n e . Perhaps the most prestigious acknowledgement his stories have received, however, was t h e O. H e n r y S h o r t S t o r y Award in 1998. T h o u g h V W S has hosted four authors already this year, Davies' background is vastly different than any of the other speakers. A diverse cultural blend exists in his writing because Davies was born to Welsh and Chinese parents but was raised in Britain before finally calling the U.S. home. In a d d i t i o n , h i s C h i n e s e

Author Peter Ho Davies reads at 7 p.m on Tuesday. mother grew up in a Malaysian community, so that has also become part of Davies' identity. Davies' educational background includes a bachelor's d e g r e e in both English and physics from the University of M a n c h e s t e r in E n g l a n d . He also has an master's in creative writing from Boston University. After teaching at the University of Oregon and Emory University, Davies now finds himself in Ann Arbor. The author teaches in the English graduate program at the University of Michigan. So, as a professor, Davies is accustomed to "performing" in front of an audience. As always, the Hope College Jazz Ensemble will play at 6:30 p.m. until the author takes the stage. The event is open to the public, and admission is free. To find out more about Peter Ho Davies, visit www.granta. com/authors/56 on the Web.

For all those who have looked at abstract art and wondered what it meant, a p r e s e n t a t i o n by Del Michel, professor of art, helps provide some answers to this question. Michel's presentation takes place at 4 p.m. on Thursday in Cook Auditorium, Room 141, of DePree. It is a continuation of the Hope Arts and Humanities Colloquium, run this year by Kathleen Verduin, professor of English, and sponsored by the Office of the Dean for the Arts and Humanities to provide information from these two departments to the academic community. According to Michel, observers miss the importance of an artwork by trying too hard to find its meaning using the language that has been imposed upon them by society. The focus of the lecture is to provide a language with which to understand abstract art. "If I ask people if the concept of abstraction bothers them, they say yes," Michel said. "I think it bothers them because they don't have a language." After laying the groundwork for this language. Michel plans to apply it to examples from art history as well as from his own work to s h o w h o w a b s t r a c t ideas c o m e about. ''Appreciating art is not a passive experience," Michel said. "It's a very active experience the same way making art is." Michel believes abstract art is important because it helps to cultivate intuition, stating that this req u i r e s an active role that most people do not carry out enough in everyday life. "I think that abstraction encourages this active participation by the

Del Michel, professor of art at Hope will give a presentation entitled, "The Nature of Abstraction" as part of the Arts and Humanities Colloquium on Thursday at 4 p.m. in Cook Auditorium of DePree.

Ws not what a work of art means, it's what a work of art means to you. -Del Michel, professor of art viewer," Michel said. He also wants others to realize that not everyone will get the same thing out of looking at a piece of artwork. " I t ' s not w h a t a w o r k of art

m e a n s , i t ' s what a work of art means to you," Michel said. "Everyone will have their own views." In teaching about abstract art, Michel finds some advice from his colleague Jack Ridl of the English department to be especially helpful. "It's like reading poetry," Michel said. "If something has meaning for you, hang onto it. Eventually, you will have a meaning." Refreshments will be served at 3:45 p.m. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend this free event.


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Hope has missed a wonderful ehanee to further promote understanding and diversity. This isn't the first time that the college has passed on this prospect. 1 am, of course, referring to Martin Luther King Day. The observance of Martin Luther King Day could be a large step toward the diversity education and understanding that is sorely needed. Instead of using this national holiday as a vehicle to better the college community, however, the powers that be decided to hold classes on Monday. If the college wanted to do anything that it could to promote diversity, it would not pass up such an educational opportunity. Instead of continuing with a normal day of classes, it would be more beneficial to our c o m m u nity to hold seminars and host speeches on topics of diversity and understanding. The holiday was instated to remind us of the struggles that the African-American community has gone through to be recognized as equals and the peaceful advancements made by one of America's great leaders. Not all students let the college's decision to skip the observance of Martin Luther King Day stop them from recognizing the great achievements made by a great man. In many classes on Monday, an email drafted by the Black Student Union was read aloud in classes to inform students more about Martin Luther King Day and what it means to our community. Also, cards embossed with a cross and BSU meeting times were passed out in Phelps. Maxine Gray (*04), president of the Black Student Union, said that this campaign was an attempt to remind the campus that MLK Day is a perfect opportunity to work toward diversity, but we need to be aware of this need year round. To Gray, Hope's choice to skip the observance of this national holiday does not signify blatant disrespect, but she believes there is room for improvement. According to Gray, BSU is working toward some kind of observance for MLK Day. Whatever way the day is observed in the future, it would be in the community's best interest to start a new tradition next year. It's too late to do something this year, but with some planning, next M L K Day can help us become more understanding.

CORRECTION TheEmersonian Fraternity (Phi Tau Nu) was omitted f r o m the "Spring rush begins for greeks" (Jan 15) article. The Emersonian Fraternity is having spring rush with the other Greek Life groups.

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J a n u a r y 22, 2003

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Student grateful for Tony Campolo's message To the Editor: The Veritas Forum left me with a lasting impression of some of my favorite parts of Christian philosophy, such as really living out life to its fullest, a life of purpose and meaning, a life committed to serving Christ and serving people. I am thankful to all the people who worked hard to set up the Veritas Forum on our campus. A friend of mine from another uni was over that weekend, and from my conversations with him. I was again reminded of what a blessing it is to go to a Christian college. I am thankful to the faculty, staff, students, and friends of this college who, through their prayers and actions, have made Hope into the welcoming, encouraging, supportive, Christian environment that I so often find myself in. With all the different Christian fellowship groups, bible studies, chapel services, retreats, missions trips, prayer meetings, etc., I have been able to take part in groups that I feel comfortable in. And I know other Christians here who are not in the same groups as me, but who also are able to experience beautiful Christian fellowship. It is a beautiful thing when we find ourselves with friends w h o support us in whatever we are going through, who pray for us and with us, who accept us as the people we are, and who encourage us to continue seeking the Lord.

The Veritas Forum was another example of this type of environment. I know things at Hope are certainly not perfect, and if you haven't found yourself in this type of loving environment, I pray that you will. And for any of you who missed the Veritas Forum, just ask someone who went what s/he got out of it. At the forum, Tony Campolo described a big problem that our society has. He described it as one that pressures us to work really hard in order to earn a bunch of money we don't need, which keeps us away from our families, and makes us emotionally dead. He reminded us that in Christ we have something much greater to live for, such greater purpose and meaning. I appreciated that he told us that we should sign up for a mission year, and that he encouraged us to spend time with the poor. He said that when we look at the poor, we see Christ in them, and that can release us from all that holds us back. James 1:2- "Religion that G o d our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world."

Lynette Wehmer (*03)

Diversity is still an issue at Hope, attend seminars To the Editor: Hope College . . . where you can have a student body of 3,000, and h a v e less than 1 percent of t h e m show up to a D i a l o g u e o n R a c e about the Civil Rights Movement. Where you have a community so bent up on "caring" and "Christiani t y , " yet f e w a c t u a l l y a p p l y it. Where it is so important to "look Christian." Where an adult authority figure on this campus tells a student that she was "not happy" about articles that were posted up detailing hate crimes and current issues of discrimination and bigotry. Why is it that in the year 2003, right after the holidays, and "peace and love to all," I can still walk the sidewalks of Hope Campus and hear a while c o u p l e m o c k i n g a f o r e i g n accent? Why is it that some who read my words are uncomfortable by the fact I used "white" as a qualifier, yet don't think twice about say-

ing "that black girl over there." It disturbs me that there are people on this campus that don't even know t h a t F e b r u a r y is B l a c k H i s t o r y Month. It disturbs me that there are people on this campus that are bothered by the fact that there is a Black History Month, while completely failing to realize that every single month in America is White History Month and that the contributions of non-white people to our world are glossed over or ignored. It angers me to hear people whining about affirmative action, while ignoring the fact that America has always operated on a system of affirmative a c t i o n — b u t that it j u s t f a v o r e d white, protestant males. The civil rights movement is not over. There are still so m a n y inequalities, so m a n y injustices happening every single day in America, every single day on Hope C o l l e g e ' s c a m p u s . There may not be the communitysponsored lynchings on Saturday

afternoons anymore, but 80 percent of the people on death row are nonWhite. T h e m o t h e r of E m m e t t Till, a young black man whose face was crushed, his eye gouged out, and shot in the head at the beginning of the civil rights movement is still alive. T h e families of other civil rights martyrs are still alive, and the grief is still very real and still very relevant. T h e r e are m a n y events going on for Black History Month, and there are posters all over the campus detailing those events. I beseech the campus body to attend these events. They don't lake a lot of time. Bui they will affect you. T h e y will go a long way towards opening hearts, educating minds, and changing this campus for the better.

Angela Matusiak ('04)

campus beat editors Anjey Dykhuis Kurt Koehler arts editor Maureen Yonovitz

" T H E LARAMIE PROJECT

sports editor Dave Yetter

by M o i s e s K a u f m a n and the m e m b e r s of Tectonic Theatre Project

photo editor Rob Ondra business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants

Based on more than 200 interviews with the people of Laramie, Wyoming following the murder of Matthew Shepard in 1998. E a c h p e r f o n n a n c e to be f o l l o w e d by a roundtable discussion

ad manager Ana Santibanez Zamora production asisstant Jason Johnson

Feb. 14, 15, 19-22 DeWitt main stage theatre

DeWitt ticket office: 395-7890

$7 general admission $5 staff and faculty $4 students

advisor Mark A. Lewison Staff Reporters: OHm AHmov, Jared Gall, Katie Taylor, Erin RHey

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e within t h e college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r reserves t h e r i g h t to edit d u e to s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s

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The Anchor is a product of sliulenl effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Sen'ic e are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the

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Hope police lose powers HPD to take over many campus safety responsibilities. Kurt Koehler C A M P U S BEAT E D I T O R

It is a little-known fact to Hope students and m e m b e r s of the Holland c o m m u n i t y that the college's Department of Public Safety has full powers to e n f o r c e the law, as deputies appointed by the county sheriff, both on and off c a m p u s . For o n e motorist that fact c a m e to light on July 15, 1997, when, according to press sources, Hope College Public Safety officers driving f r o m o n e college-owned property to another stopped and arrested the motorist, David VanTubbergen, citing him for drunken driving. T h e t r a f f i c stop t r a n s p i r e d off campus. T h e location of the arrest led VanTubbergen to file a motion to suppress all evidence relating to the arrest, which also led to his conviction on two grounds. VanTubbergen claimed that Public Safety w a s not authorized to make traffic stops or arrest anyone outside of college properly and that using the e m p l o y e e s of a religious school to enforce the law violated restrictions in the M i c h i g a n and federal constitutions prohibiting the establishment of religion. The motion claimed this constituted an a d v a n c e m e n t of religion, because " k n o w i n g their p a y c h e c k comes from a Christian college could greatly affect the ( o f f i c e r s ' )

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actions and that "allowing a Christian college to b e c o m e a public police force is an excessive entanglement." These arguments were rejected by two appeals courts and the Michigan S u p r e m e Court, w h i c h held that Public Safety could enforce the law off of H o p e ' s c a m pus. After the courts ruled in their favor, the college thought the issue w a s behind them. "It was upheld that the law enforcement authority granted to public safety w a s legal. At that point we thought that it w o u l d not be an issue, but it w a s after that case w a s resolved that M C O L E S felt that it n e e d e d to c l a r i f y e x a c t l y w h o should have law e n f o r c e m e n t authority," said Greg Maybury, Hope College director of Operations and Technology. "The Michigan C o m mission on Law Enforcement Standards ( M C O L E S ) issued an opinion that they felt any agency deriving law enforcement p o w e r s as a s e c o n d a r y r e s o u r c e is not legal. That is not backed up with legislation yet, but there is legislation in process to say that sheriffs' departments (in M i c h i g a n ) cannot authorize non-direct lines of supervision. T h e r e w e r e a lot of groups that had deputy p o w e r s b e c a u s e a sheriff would authorize them or a police c h i e f would auth o r iz e them. T h e MCOLES g r o u p said that is not w h a t ' s really in the i n t e n t of the legislation. T h e y really don't

Law ehfbrcemeiffTs "not as big an issue (as safety and security) si nee...the Holland Police Department is on our doorstep. -Greg Maybury

ANCHOR

PHOTO BY NICK D E N I S

Steve Scholl, public safety officer, unlocks doors for those who unwittingly lock themselves out.

have a problem with Hope College having police powers, but t h e y ' r e trying to tighten u p s o m e of the groups that have police powers that really s h o u l d n ' t . " A l l of t h e s e i s s u e s c e n t e r e d around the interpretation of Michigan Public Act 120, which allows public c o m m u n i t y and f o u r - y e a r colleges and universities to have their o w n law enforcement agencies. N o mention w a s made of private colleges in the act. According to M a y b u r y , M C O L E S is c o n cerned about private colleges with multiple statewide c a m p u s e s like Baker College and Davenport University. ' T h e y w o u l d essentially have a statewide police force outside the jurisdiction of s o m e local authorities," M a y b u r y said. Currently, H o p e College is o n e of only t w o private educational institutions in the state to have its o w n law e n f o r c e m e n t agency. Ultimately, the decision a b o u t w h e t h e r o r not to a l l o w P u b l i c Safety to keep its police powers was Hope College's. In order to maintain the powers, H o p e w o u l d have had to seek legislation allowing the college to keep t h e m Such legislation likely would have required Hope, as is required of public colleges maintaining law enforcement agencies, to establish a civilian oversight committee, c o m p o s e d of faculty, students and staff, e m p o w e r e d to h e a r grievances against c a m p u s police departments and r e c o m m e n d disciplinary actions to officers found guilty of misconduct. ' T h e y were willing to work with us to have us keep our police p o w e r by legislative relief. T h e administration got together and said what do w e w a n t p u b l i c s a f e t y to be about in the long-term. Is law enf o r c e m e n t o n e of the key c o m p o nents? T h e y determined that really safety and security are the key components of Public Safety," Maybury said. "Law e n f o r c e m e n t w a s not as big an issue since w e ' r e right in the middle of downtown. T h e Holland Police Department is on our doorstep. If we have a serious problem they can be here within two minutes. W e ' d be the only private college in the state that w o u l d have it. Right n o w w e ' r e assuming that, through the end of this academic year, w e ' l l continue with our police powers and then, instead of trying to renew it next year, w e ' l l just go to a safety and security environment (force)." Both Maybury and D e a n of Students Richard Frost agreed that the safely of students, faculty and staff

We'll still have a very strong presence to ensure everyone's safety and security. -Richard Frost, Dean of Students J 1 5

Nick Denis H E L M E T OF P O W E R

Editor-in-Chief

Campus safety matters There are m a n y thankless j o b s here on H o p e ' s campus. T h e cleaning staff and physical plant staff get f e w thanks for cleaning u p after our messes. T h e mailroom d o e s n ' t get letters of adulation w h e n our mail arrives on time. Of all the thankless jobs, however, there is one that stands out in importance and difficulty and is probably the least recognized. Our Public Safety o f f ic e r s fill this important role in our community. I h a v e heard m a n y negative things about Public Safety f r o m students. I have overheard discussions about h o w the officers do next to nothing or h o w they are always late to respond to alarms and the like. Because I k n o w most of the officers, I can attest that these c o m m e n t s are unfair. T h e Public Safety officers at this school truly care about the c o m m u n i t y they have sworn to serve, and they do their best. Despite this loyalty to the college. Public Safety is losing its police powers at t e r m ' s end. W h a t does this me a n ? Well, w o u l d not be j e o p a r d i z e d by the c h a n g e at Public Safety. t4I think there will be m i n i m a l impact. I think our staff is e x t r e m e l y well trained in terms of making sure w e continue to provide a safe and secure environment for students. T h a t is of u t m o s t i m p o r t a n c e , " Frost said. "We will still do patrols around campus, respond to emergencies; we will still be doing the shuttle vans, w e ' l l still have a very strong presence to ensure e v e r y o n e ' s safety and security. T h e side that will c h a n g e slightly is that w e ' l l now work m o r e closely with the Holland Police Department. You'll see them being invited to things in d i f f e r e n t w a y s . . . Holland Police D e p a r t m e n t will be more visible around c a m p u s doing some investigations and e n f o r c e m e n t as the need be. I would never want th e m to feel that they couldn't c o m e and that is part of a c o m m u n i t y . "

RECYC1E THE

first we have to look at what the officers were authorized to do before this change. Right now, our officers have police powers and are authorized to respond to complaints and enforce the law. T h e s e events will change all of this. All disturbances and complaints will have to be sent through the Holland Police Department. T h i s means that H P D will have to take additional time to police H o p e College, potentially backing u p the officers and the department. This means that h o w e v e r slow people thought response times were before, they will be worse now. Also, the consequences will be far worse for rules violations on campus. Holland Police officers will charge students with the state or federal law that they have broken, and not just violating Hope policy. Many things are going to change, and not f o r the better. This adjustment affects our entire community. I would invite everyone to contact the school administration and share your concerns.

Be safe! Do you know these important Ottawa County safety facts? O v e r 150 sex offenders live in the H o l l a n d area. In the slate of Michigan in 2001. 1981 fatal car crashes occurred. In 2001, 33 car crashes look place in O t t a w a County, u p f r o m 3 0 in 4

2000. In 2001, 345 alcohol related automobile car crashes occurred in Ottawa County. 4 of these resulted in fatalities; 126 resulted in injuries. T h e rape drug G H B , known to have caused 5 deaths in Michigan, carries a penalty of u p to $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 if it is found in s o m e o n e ' s possession. Drunk driving and minors in possession of alcohol carry heavy penalties such as fines and possible jail time. In 1999, more than 100 w o m e n in Michigan w e r e murdered as a result of domestic violence. Information from www.michigaii.gov


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• Weighs 1,790 lbs. • Is 6 feet long and nine 9 across. • C a m e f r o m Baldt Anchor Chain and Forge Division of the Boston Metals Comapny, Chester. PA.

This is the story behind where Hope's symbolic monument came from.

• Was placed on a stone base that weighed five tons.

Erin Riley

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STAFF REPORTER

as anyone ever really t h o u g h t about the a n c h o r that represents Hope College? T h e symbol is on almost every sweatshirt, Christmas ornament, pen, pencil, folder, planner, notebook and even shot glasses available in the bookstore. Most people probably walk past that 9 feet long, 6 feet across, 1,790 p o u n d anchor at least a couple times a day without ever giving it a second thought. T h e credit is due to one idea conceived by an A l p h a Phi Omega ( A P O ) fraternity member in 1964. John N o d o p ('65), had been reading an A P O newsletter about a chapter in Colorado w h o had obtained a live panther as a school mascot. His e y e s w a n d e r e d to the anchor-patterned curtains that draped the w i n d o w s in Kollen Hall. According to N o d o p , there it was, the inspiration that became the symbolic repre-

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• T h e simgle most represented national undergraduate intercollegate organization in the United States. • A P O was started in 1925 at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania. • A P O was brought to H o p e ' s c a m p u s in 1959. • W o m e n were permitted into A P O in 1976. • It remains H o p e ' s only national service organization.

sentation of H o p e College. T h o u g h very late into the night, N o d o p immediately ran over and banged on the bedroom doors of a few of his fellow f r a t e r n i t y brothers, W a y n e G r o e s b e c k ( ' 6 7 ) , Albert M c G e e h a n ('66), Richard Dickson ( ' 6 6 ) and R. Douglas Dixon ('69). 4 T h e y thought I w a s crazy but agreed to the idea just to get me the hell out of their r o o m s , " N o d o p said, chuckling. Groesbeck recalls. "1 pointed to a 16-inch wrought iron replica on the Kletz wall, and said. 'see. an anchor.' John, never easily deterred, said, "that's not an anchor, that's a toy. I m e a n an anchor that can hold a s h i p . ' " Soon after, the A P O brothers got approval f r o m Dr. Calvin Vanderwerf. H o p e ' s president at the time, and the Nu Beta chapter of A P O agreed to sponsor it. " N u Beta's treasury w a s inadequate f o r a really good party, let a l o n e an a n c h o r , " s a i d G r o e s b e c k . A c c o r d i n g to Groesbeck. they were able to raise the f u n d s necessary with support of administration and appropriate " s c h m o o z i n g " of the alumni association. T h e y obtained a maritime mailing list f r o m D i c k s o n ' s father who had a publishing business for specialized c o m p a nies. T h e project w a s getting bigger and the m e m b e r s f o u n d it difficult to find time to hand address all of the letters. O n e fraternity brother had been a signalman in the Navy, responsible f o r typing u p m essages received over the radio. " H e said he could type as fast as w e could talk." said Nodop. " W e all thought it was a j o k e . " But it w a s no j o k e , he typed u p all 300 address labels on a

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Lois Dykema, Gerald Auten, Bob Donia and Barb Alhart, 1967 Senior Class officers pose for their Milestone photo. Upper left, workers in 1964 install the legendary college landmark. typewriter without one error in less than t w o days. After sending hundreds of flyers requesting an anchor an o f f e r returned. A shipyard near Lake Superior directed them to a company named Baldt A n c h o r Chain and Forge Division of the Boston Metals C o m p a n y , Chester, PA. After contact, the c o m p a n y offered to donate the discontinued Admiralty pattern anchor they had been searching for. T h e y received two blue prints to c h o o s e f r o m and Nodop, of course, chose the biggest one. t4 I didn't want a toy. I wanted o n e as big as a house." he

John Nodop

"In those days, $ 5 0 was nothing to sneeze on," N o d o p said. A sophomore girl at the time. Diane Hale Smith ('67), won the contest with a verse f r o m H e b r e w s 6:19. Later, a professor noted that the verse chosen was actually the same verse VanRaalte used in his dedication address on the founding of Hope College. T h e plaque reads, "We desire that everyone of you lay hold on the hope set b e f o r e us, which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and steadfast. —

said. Following a year of hard work and delays the project was completed. T h e anchor was shipped f o r free by the Holland M o t o r Express C o m p a n y and placed on a stone base, weighing 5 tons, designed by a local artist and adorned with a plaque whose inscription c a m e f r o m a c a m p u s contest conducted by the Nu Beta chapter. The school agreed to o f f e r a $ 5 0

H e b r e w s 6:11, 18, 19." "It fit in place like it w a s meant to be," said Nodop. T h e anchor continues to be the symbol of hope f o r Hope College and a reminder f o r m a n y of the hope Hope College has inspired through it's years. T h e anchor m o n u m e n t is part of that legacy. N o d o p said, " A picture of the anchor sits on my desk and reminds m e daily that Hope College was indeed, ' m y anchor of h o p e . . . ' f o r my future which is too

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quickly b e c o m i n g my past."

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Where did the anchor in front of Graves Hall come from?

"It is a real anchor that c a m e f r o m a shipyard in N e w E n gland." Kate Vanoss 4 05

" C a p t a i n H o o k f o r g o t his anchor here and we stole it. We totally o w e o n e to C a p tain Hq&k. Tlial^s u t o a t I — S t e p h e n G o m b i s ' 04

"I think it was probably donated by s o m e b o d y to be in m e m o r y of s o m e o n e . " —Rebecc

&

"It w a s dropped f r o m the sky by God as a blessing It's His favorite college." — G l e n n Lester 4 0 5

"The story behind the anchor is a l e g e n d . J o h n P a t n o t t brought it over on his boat." —Stiles K n e c h t 4 05


C L A S S I F I E D S & M O R E

J a n u a r y 22, 2 0 0 3

Cosmos found in violation of policy

Classified

Nick Denis EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

R i g m 10 Life 01 f t o n a n d A r e a has information regarding abortion, euthanasia, infanticide,and stem cell research. 100 S. Waverly Rd. Holland,Mi 49423 Ph.616-396-1037 FAX 616-396-4566 website: http://www.rtlofholland.org E-mail-rtlholland@egl.net

T ^Anchor

before Flag Day. Drop me a line. -N M o n e y - It's a gas... A n j e y ' s advice of the week- Don't eat live goldfish...they squirm. G i r l in t h e f o u r t h r o w - Dating me...a universal law? I hope so! That is definitley the best of all possible worlds -Boy in t h e t h i r d row

L I K E T O SAVE $$$!? N E E D SOME CLOTHES? NEED TO FURNISH YOUR DORM ROOM? JUST LIKE T O SHOP? You should c o m e to L a k e s h o r e Rescued Treasures at 32nd and Lincoln. W e ' r e open 10 am to 6 pm Monday through Friday and from 10 am to 5 pm Saturday. We offer a huge selection of clothing, books, household items, and furniture, all gently used and at prices that are gentle on your budget. WANTED! Avon Reps. $10.00 to get started. Free brochures f o r first m o n t h . 40% off first 2 months. Products shipped to your door, shipping is free. Call Annie Wiley 399-3429 or email anniewiley@chartermi.net D U P L E X FOR R E N T on Holland South side, until April 30th, 2003. 2 bedrooms 1 bathroom. Clean and reasonable. Call Keith at 335-8208 for more information. R A applications are due in Student Development Friday, January 24. You can get your application at the residential life website. A- When can I come down to the Pitt? We really need to hang out

A long-time campus fraternity this w e e k finds itself faced with charges of violating several Risk Management policies, and a possible threat to the status of their charter. A brief new release from the Greek Judicial Board received Tuesday states that the Cosmopolitan fraternity was found in viola-

Lyle! tonight at Parrot's at 10:30. www.lylerocks.net

Listen to 89.9 fm, W T H S , the voice of Hope College.

WTHS

Free Mumia!!!

president of the Cosmopolitan fraternity, they " . . . a r e currently appealing the decision, (and) we are taking steps to eliminate any question of our adherence to Risk Management policies at our social functions." Amber Garrison, Greek Coordinator had no c o m m e n t . John Norden, the Cosmopolitan fraternity's faculty advisor, was not available for comment.

tion of policies concerning the sale of alcohol at an off-campus Cosmopolitan house. These violations have resulted in the Cosmopolitan fraternity being placed on withheld suspension until the end of the 2002 - 2003 academic year. At the conclusion of this semester, the fraternity will be placed on a probationary status for one year. According Billy Norden ('04),

A n c h o r E m o j o k e of t h e weekQ : What do you call chauvanistic

A r c h o n L e e - H a h a ! We h a v e dragged you further down the spiral of wasting money on little army men! - W a r b o s s Nick

Emo? A : Machissi-mo

P o r c h - Puella est bona.

No c o m m e n t .

Watch this space

WTHS

The Philadelphia Center Live, Work and Study in Philly! Visit Linda KoeQe In the Communication Department for more information! www.philactr.edu experience life: education at work you are weCcome to attend •Mid-Winter tfome educator's ConJerence sponsored6y 'ReformedBifaCe Coffege to be feCdjnauary 31 and Tebruarxj 1 at "Fair (hfaven 'Ministry Center in iSudsonviffe, Michigan. Tickets are avaifabfe at tfie door - Us adult and S15 teen. 'Doors open at 1:00 y.m. -Friday for slumping in our vendor area with a syeciaf information session for beginning home schooCers at 2:00. Seating for Triday evening sessions beginning at 6:30 p.m.

In 2001, Student Congress used $500 of the student activity f e e to buy this scrolling marquee sign in the lobby of DeWitt Center. Although active in 2001, the sign has yet to display anything since. As a service to you, The Anchor will keep track of how many weeks it has been blank since installed.

Today's y n Count: / U

Sessions feature SaCCy Cfarkson of Whole tfeart Ministries and Dr. Joe WheeCer of focus on the Tatndy TubCishing. SveciaC bonus sessions and book signing with Monte Swan, author of 'Romancing Your Child's rfeart. Saturday seating begins a t 8:30 a.m. Tor additional

information

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tfaworth Inn bedding Reception Showcase •See representativesfrom (BridaCtoouttques, Tux#do Shops, and (Photographers •Jis^qutstions of our Catering Manager and <Event Coordinator •(pickup ourfret 'Wedding fyception Qhectfist

Monday, February 3,2003,8:00 - 10:00 p-m. at the Haworth Inn Ballroom


'ts

Sports Sports

Sporft Issue 15 of 25, published \

ports

Sport? Spor

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Skating Dutchmen defeated by Calvin 3-1 Hockey team falls to Knights, defeats Muskegon on Sat.

We didn't capitalize on our chances -George Dickinson ('05)

David Yetter S P O R T S EDITOR

In front of a record crowd at the Jolly Roger Ice Arena in Grand Rapids, The Hope Ice Hockey Club fell to the Calvin Knights by a score of 3-1. An a n n o u n c e d crowd of 2,159 saw a very aggressive, but scoreless first period. Calvin scored the first goal of the g a m e about six minutes into the second period. Hope battled back and answered a few minutes later with a goal by Steve Fugitt ('06). The teams battled each other the rest of the second period and played pretty evenly. It looked like the period was just about winding down, but Calvin scored another goal with just over a minute left, making the score 2-1. Both teams played very well to start the third period. There was a lot of checking, much to the delight of the crowd that was almost too rowdy. F a n s f r o m both s c h o o l s were on their feet all night, but trouble arose w h e n Calvin f a n s threw debris onto the ice. The game

had to be stopped, and the crowd was warned by one of the officials on the PA system to stop throwing things or a penalty would be charged to the Knights. Calvin scored another goal with about five minutes left in the third period and held on for a 3-1 win. T h e r e w a s s o m e c o m m o t i o n in front of the net with six seconds left in the game and Hope players Will Farrar ('05) and Jeremy Von Eitzen ( ' 0 3 ) were ejected f r o m the game. While Calvin played well defensively, Hope did have more than a f e w opportunities to score. T h e y ended up with 28 shots on goal, but could only put one of those shots in the net. T h e D u t c h m e n then d e f e a t e d M u s k e g o n on S a t u r d a y night at h o m e by a s c o r e of 3 - 2 . T h e y played very strong defensively and outshot the Hawks 33-24. Hope got t w o g o a l s by S o p h o m o r e Will Farrar and another goal in the third

hi

AA/CHOR

P H O T O BY DAVID Y E T T E R

The puck is about to drop at the Jolly Roger Ice Arena in Grand Rapids on Friday. period from Jon Sedon ('04). "We played pretty well over the wekend but we didn't capitalize on chances," says Geroge Dickinson ('05). "We need to step it up next

weekend and convert some of our good shots into goals." The Flying D u t c h m e n remain first in their division, but need to play better if they want to keep their

spot. Calvin now has the same number of l o s s e s a s H o p e , but t h e Knights have only won nine games. Hope plays at Saginaw on Friday and host Jackson on Saturday.

RIVALRY f r o m 1

A/JCHOfl

PHOTO COURTESY DAN VOS

Don Overbeek ('03) tries to block a shot on Saturday.

two seconds on the clock to give Hope a two point lead heading into half-time. There were eight lead changes in the first half. "We felt good being up by two at halftime, but we could have been up by more," said Travis Spaman (*05). "We looked forward to building on that lead, but unfortunately we couldn't do it." Calvin opened the second half by hitting 3 consecutive three-point baskets, and was sparked by Jeremy Veenstra, who finished with 25 points, including 4 three-point shots in the game, to give his team a 4439 lead. H o p e q u i c k l y w e n t to O v e r b e e k , w h o c o n n e c t e d on a t h r e e - p o i n t play. A n d y P h i l l i p s ( ' 0 6 ) gave the Dutchmen a fourpoint lead after hitting a free throw. The teams exchanged baskets for three minutes before Calvin hit 2 three-pointers, giving them a 65-59 lead. But Matt T a y l o r ( ' 0 4 ) answered with a three of his own, to pull Hope within a basket. The g a m e w a s tied at 67 with 1:47 remaining, but Calvin guard Chris Prins scored on a j u m p shot

Swimmers finish third David Yetter SPORTS E o r r o R

Both the m e n ' s and w o m e n ' s swimming teams finished third in their respective meets on Saturday in a five-team meet at W h e a t o n College. The men finished with a score of 413, behind W h e a l o n ' s 505 and Kalamazoo's 422. Brian Slagh ('03) was Hope's only winner on the day, finishing the 1000-meter freestyle with a time of (9:44.05). The women scored 418 points in their meet, finishing behind

Wheaton (522) and Wisc.-Stevens Point (434). The Lady Dutch got winning performances from M i c h e l l e Smith ( ' 0 4 ) and Kelly Parker ('03). Smith was a double winner for the Dutch, capturing the 200-meler freestyle (1:57.26) and the 500-meler freestyle (5:06.99). P a r k e r won the 2 0 0 - m e l e r breastroke with a time of (2:29.03). The swimmers were hoping that their hard work over C h r i s t m a s break would pay off. Both teams returned back to c a m p u s on December 27 for practice. The stu-

dents that lived in dorms had to slay at the Haworth Inn and Conference C e n t e r u n t i l J a n u a r y 2. L o c a l s w i m m e r s had the team over for breakfast and dinners. Once the semester started up, the swimmers went back to their usual schedule of 6 a.m. practices. Both teams compete against Grand Valley this Friday. They are also looking forward to the league meet at the Holland Aquatic Center in February. Those who qualify for Nationals will then travel to Atlanta in March.

and then drove to the lane for a lay-up. O v e r b e e k s c o r e d on the next possession and was fouled as well to make the score 70-71 with 26 seconds left. After Calvin committed an unforced turnover, Hope took a timeout to draw a play to take a lead in the game. "Coach [Van W i e r e n ] drew a play for Don [Overbeek], but told him to throw it to an open guy if he got d o u b l e t e a m e d , " Spaman explained. "I AHCHOR P H O T O C O U R T E S Y D A N V O S was wide open and Hope players smother the ball. t o o k a shot that I thought was good. Unfortunately, against their rival and 1-7 in this it w a s n ' t ! " decade. H o p e w a s f o r c e d to foul and "It hurls to lose, especially to Calvin hit two free throws. The Fly- Calvin, but playing sports teaches ing Dutchmen had one more chance a life lesson. If you gel beat, life to tie the game but couldn't capi- goes on and you just have got to lalize on a three-point shot. get back up," Taylor said. T H o p e fell to 7 2 - 7 9 all-lime The next match-up is on Feb. 12.

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