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anc or OPE COLLEGE

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OLLAND, MICHIGAN

77th ANNIVERSARY -

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Hope College. Holland. Michigan

January 22, 1965

in Grading

Pluses, Minuses Discarded Studying for finals is despair over a last-minute term paper . .

J M

The administration announced last week that there would be no pluses or minuses on this semester's grades. Last year the faculty voted for a new gr ding system which would initiate pluses and minuses and replace the straight g r a d e average. Hope then acquired IBM machines which would automatically tally the grades. However, in order to do th s, each student's records would have to be tr nsfered from ihe old cards to IBM cards, either by hand or by typewriter. It had been calculated that this process would be complete by September of 1964. At the present time, only the c a r d s of the freshmen and sophomores have been finished. The d a t e for full accomplishment of the task is now set tentatively at September 1965.

. . . and elose analysis of some material previously thought unnecessary . . .

. . . and trying to find a comfortable position after five hours of reading back assignments . . .

Dean of the College, Dr. William VanderLugt stated that the situation was "too b a d " and added that complication of this sort should have been forseen. Dean VanderLougt contemplated no pluses or minuses until the next fall semester. He did feel however, that students may be in a position, grade-wise, (hat will be to their adv ntage. "A student may now receive a B. where he should get a C - f . " Dr. A. J a m e s Prins, associate professor of English, thought that the sudden change was unfair to both students and professors and is " u n h a p p y " about what is getting to be an "unfortunate situation." Dr. P r i n s feels th .t an " a c c u r a t e grade can t be given without the use of pluses and m i n u s e s " and added that he was, as every faculty m e m b e r , in a difficult position. " I ' v e been thinking of my 180 students in t e r m s of pluses and minuses all s e m e s t e r and now two weeks before the end of the semester 1 have to re-evaluate my

g r a d e s . " In most cases, he felt that faculty m e m b e r s would "give the more generous g r a d e . " Assistant professor of history, Dr. David 0 . Powell, stated that " a n y sort of grading system is satisfactory to me. but a definite s t a n d a r d should be set and then applied throughout the semester. This sudden change m a k e s fair grading difficult." Assistant professor of English, Miss .lean Protheroe felt that the whole situation proved that "people do better jobs than m a c h i n e s . " Miss Protheroe said that she was

Decision on R.A.s Given Nine men's dormitory resident advisors who could not sign a pledge stating that they had not broken the drinking rule have been asked to give up their positions at the end of the semester, according to Dean of Students James Harvey. College president Calvin A. VanderWerf told the group last night, however, that any man who sincerely wishes to continue as a resident advisor is invited to meet individually with an administrative committee to discuss his personal situation. Separate decisions will then be made on each such case. The ninr who did not sign the pledge represent 40 per cent ol the 22 male resident advisors employed by he college.

Hope, Talladega College Set To Exchange Students Plans for the student exchange p r o g r a m with Talladega College for the spring break were formulated at a meeting Tuesday night, said committee representative. Alan Chesney. The p r o g r a m , a r r a n g e d under the auspices of the Student Senate, involves students travelling to the Talladega c a m p u s in Alabama during spring vacation and actively

Dr. Lloyd Avcrill To Op en Student Assembly Series Dr. Lloyd Averill of Kalamazoo College will be the first speaker in the second semester series of student assemblies p r o g r a m s on Tuesday. Feb. 9. Dr Averill will be speaking on the subject "The Validity and Viability of the Liberal A r t s " and will, as he put it. " a t t e m p t to m a k e a case for the liberal arts. I will suggest that the liberal a r t s were m a d e to survive because they are culturally and educationally needful." The all-college assembly at which Dr. Averill will speak will

"in f a v o r " of the plus and minus grading system all along and that she had "voted enthusiastically" for it last year. I was just a little indecisive alvout a grading system which employed the use of pluses and minuses but a f t e r the faculty voted for it I changed my attitude in compliance with the faculty wishes." said assistant professor of history. Dr. William R. Barlow. He said he felt a s Dr. P r i n s did that it is difficult to differentiate the individual g r a d e s at such short notice.

be held during the third hour and will begin at 10:4.") a.m. Dr. Averill was I ' m ir. l<Âť2;i and was educ .U\i in ihe public schools of May wood. Illinois. He received his B.A. f r o m the University of Wisconsin with a m a j o r in philosophy. His M.A. f r o m the University of Rochester was followed by an honorary doctorate f r o m Lewis and Clark College. Since 1954 \Dr. Averill has been at Kalamazoo College as vicepresident, dean of chapel and professor of religion.

. and some deep concentration in order to master the material . .

participating in student life there. In r e t u r n , several students f r o m Talladege will spend their spring vacation here at Hope. The school, located southeast of Birmingham, is a co-educational private liberal a r t s college with a student population of approximately 400 students. Founded and maintained by the United Church of Christ, Talledega College has participated in e x c h a n g e p r o g r a m s with m a n y eastern schools in previous y e a r s . "The p r o g r a m is established to provide the student with a rich and rewarding e x p e r i e n c e , " said Chesney. This y e a r , six students will be selected to participate, he continued. " T h o s e interested in participating in the exchange are requested to submit a brief essay explaining why they would like to go and e n u m e r a t i n g their qualifications." Since the final selection of participants will be m a d e Feb. 10. Chesney stressed the importance of having the essays in to him as quickly as possible. The total expense for the trip, he said, will be five dollars. An orientation p r o g r a m and general briefing will be held a f t e r the final selections h a v e been m a d e .

Registration Rules Set Procedure for registering for second semester clasess has been announced. Next week Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday students are to report to Snow Music Auditorium to check their schedules and fill out the necessary cards. This procedure will take approximately five to ten minutes. The hours for registration are Monday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Those, who have an approved schedule on Tuesday, Feb. 2, are asked to report to Carnegie Gvmnasium in the morning to receive their printed schedules and pay their fees. This pro. . . and discovering the library for the first time in five months.

cedure will take five to ten minutes. irom 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon.

Hours are

Those wishing to make a schedule change should report to Carnegie gymnasium in the afternoon between 1 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. Counselors and department chairmen will be present. All registration must be completed on Feb. 2 including fee payments, or students must pay the late registration fee of five dollars. Students who have not turned tentative schedules in to the Records Office should do so immediately. Any student wishing to withdraw from school for the second semester must fill out the pink withdrawal form in order to withdraw in good standing. These forms are available from the Records Office.


January 22, 1965

Hopr College aoehor

Page 2

Spring Rush Feb. 3-24

Frats Flan Rush, Initiations tices, such as paddlings, rides, and o t h e r " f u n and g a m e s . " Violations of the new r u l e s will i c s u l t in the c a n c e l l a t i o n of the i n f o r m a l for the o f f e n d i n g f r a t e r n ity. said B r a u e r . To insure that the r u l e s (see the anchor. D e c e m b e r 15, 1%4 for the official text of the new policies* a r e obeyed. IFC h a s e s t a b l i s h e d an inspection policy. " T h e president and two other m e m b e r s of I F C h a v e the p r e r o g a t i v e of ins p e c t i n g any f r a t e r n i t y ' s initiation program firsthand." explained Br; uer. " T h e y will r e p o r t t h e i r f i n d i n g s to the judicial c o m m i t t e e of I F C . " C o m m e n t i n g on the reception of t h e new policies by the f r a t e r n i t i e s . B r a u e r s a i d . " T r a n s i t i o n s a r e alw a y s a w k w a r d : a lot of people a r e u n c e r t a i n c o n c e r n i n g the correct a p p l i c a t i o n s of the policies.

Spring fraternity rush will begin on W e d n e s d a y . Feb. 3. and r u n f o r t h r e e full w e e k s , e n d i n g F e b r u a r y 24, a c c o r d i n g to Bill B r a u e r , president of the I n t e r - F r a t e r n i t y Council. Since it is the m a j o r rush period of the y e a r , it will be open to all Hope m e n . R e q u i r e m e n t s a r e a 1.7 grade-point a v e r a g e for f r e s h m e n , and e i t h e r a total o r a p r e v i o u s s e m e s t e r g r a d e - p o i n t a v e r a g e of 2.0 for u p p e r c l a s s m e n . The five c a m p u s f r a t e r n i t i e s a r e c u r r e n t l y p r e p a r i n g f o r t h e i r Inf o r m a l initiations, which will t a k e place over semester b r e i k . The initiations will IK4 t h e first to l a k e place u n d e r the n e w rules laid down by the I n t e r - F r a t e r n i t y Council last F a l l . The new rules include n u m e r o u s r e s t r i c t i o n s which r u l e out m a n y of the f o r m e r "hell w e e k " prac-

Although s o m e f r a t e r n i t y m e m b e r s don't like to give up t h i n g s , the m a j o r i t y a r e p l e a s e d t h a t s o m e t h i n g h a s been d o n e . " B r a u e r feels t h a t the f o r m e r s e v e r e Hell Week t a c t i c s w e r e h u r t i n g the i m a g e of the f r a t e r n i t i e s , a n d that c h a n g e s w e r e n e c o s s a r y to go

forward. Each of the fraternities will have its own p a r t i c u l a r s t y l e of in it i at ion. R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of all of t h e m h a v e s t a t e d , h o w e v e r , that t h e y will abide by the I F C r u l e s . The E m e r s o n i a n F r a t e r n i t y will conduct its initiations on just o n e d a y . F e b r u a r y 1. which it styles "Blue Mondry." according to Dennis Catlin. E m m i e pledge m a s t e r . T h e twelve E m m i e p l e d g e s will spend the day w o r k i n g on the f i a t - h o u s e b a s e m e n t , said Catlin " W e s t r e s s that the p l e d g e s bec o m e f a m i l i a r with the history and construction of the f r a t e r n i t y . " c o m m e n t e d Jeff E u b a n k , the Arc a d i a n P l e d g e m a s t e r . " O u r pledging p r o g r a m got off to a weak s t a r t , but w e ' r e looking f o r w a r d to a very good i n f o r m a l initiation period." he continued. Efforts will be m a d e by the Arkies to c o n t a i n the rites f o r their seven p l e d g e s within the d o r m i t o r y . T h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r and Cosmopolitan f r a t e r n i t i e s a r e also planS h a k e s p e a r e L i b r a r y . 18 booklets ning a full s c h e d u l e of a c t i v i t i e s on T u d o r and S t u a r t civilization, in their initiation p r o g r a m s . T h e a set of four p r i n t s of ShakeKnicks will usher in ten m e n u n d e r s p e a r e ' s London, S h a k e s p e a r e a n p l e d g e m a s t e r Max S c h i p p e r . while t h e a t e r , p r o t r a i t s of S h a k e s p e a r e t h e Cosmos b r i n g in s e v e n debua n d S t r a t f o r d - o n - A v o n . and booktantes under Dave Nykerk. The lets on t h e F o l g e r L i b r a r y and F r a t e r n a l Society h a s not disthe .I.C. A d a m s model of the closed any f a c t s c o n c e r n i n g its Globe. init ations. G a r y Holvick is pledgeT h e exhibit w i l l - b e on display m a s t e r for eight OK.E pledges. until -Jan. 27.

Shakespeare Exhibit ART EXHIBIT—A Rembrandt study exhibit tracing tho and style is now on display on the mezzanine floor of Library. The exhibit was brought to Hope through the Information Service and will be on display until the end

artist's life Van Zoeren Netherlands of January.

On Display at Library An exhibit f r o m the F o l g e r S h a k e s p e a r e L i b r a r y h a s b e e n set up on the m e z z a n i n e floor of Van Zoeren L i b r a r y .

Fris

Dr. H e n r y Ten Hoor of the E n g l i s h d e p a r t m e n t a r r a n g e d to h a v e the exhibit b r o u g h t to Hope f r o m the W a s h i n g t o n . D C. l i b r a r y . The P'olger S h a k e s p e a r e L i b r a r y is a d m i n i s t e r e d by t h e t r u s t e e s of A m h e r s t College. The exhibit consist of copies of " T h e M e r r y Wives of W i n d s o r . " e x t r a c t e d f r o m t h e F i r s t Folio (1623' and a copy of t h e 1619 Q u a r t o of " T h e M e r c h a n t of Ven-

WESTERN MICHIGAN'S LARGEST GREETING CARD DEPARTMENT Featuring: Contemporary

and

Studio C a r d i ,

Ring

Books,

Papert,

P«ne

"EVERYTHING FOR S C H O O L " Downtown — Next to Penney's

And at our River Avenue Store Office Furniture and Office Supplies

K X

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I

j t u j e i f o r D « p M ( t a b l c J c w t l e n for Ov«r a Q«art#r Century

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6 W # i t Eighth StrMt HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N

'Winds of Charffe' To Be Theme Of IRC Meetings at Michigan State

ice." Also included in t h e exhibit a r e a f a c s i m i l e edition of the F i r s t Q u a r t o of "Titus Andronicus" (1594 •, an early playbill of a Shakespearean performance, a print of one of the p r i n c i p a l a c t o r s in the b lied play a n d a c o p y of the reproduction of Visscher's "View of L o n d o n " '1616'. A s e r i e s of p h o t o g r a p h s a n d p a m p h l e t s c o m p l e t e the exhibit. They include 35 p h o t o g r a p h s of i t e m s r e l a t i n g S h a k e s p e a r e ' s life and t i m e s and t o the F o l g e r

• The Winds of C h a n g e " will be the t h e m e for an I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations Club c o n f e r e n c e at Michigan S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y Feb. 5-7. The c o n f e r e n c e d e a l s with shifting political, e c o n o m i c and social t r e n d s in our c o m p l e x world. T h e t r e n d s will be t r e a t e d w.th r e g a r d to t h e recent " p o p u l a t i o n explosion." The c o n f e r e n c e will be divided into s e m i n a r s , s p e e c h e s .

iiMmXIMMMMIKIMeXXXXXXKMKKXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXKUXXKNKXXi

FOR A CLEAN W A S H TRY

RUSS'

WALT'S ECONO WASH C O I N OPERATED -

SELF SERVICE

Drive In

LAUND-ROMAT Corner 17th St. and Columbia Ave.

Car or inside service Eating out together - is always fun at RUSS

O n l y 4 Blocks South of KOLLEN HALL

I Westrate's

Ladies Apparel

15 West 8th Street

HOPE CHURCH invites you to worship and study on the

3 r d Sunday after Epiphany. A College Class for students meets in the Recreation Room at 9:30 a.m.

Dresses,

Skirts,

Slacks

Sweaters,

Suits, Blouses by

and " w o r k i n g g r o u p s " which wii' b e lead by an e x p e r t in the oesign a t e d field. Registration costs $8.50, but Hope's International Relations Club o f f e r s f o u r g r a n t s of $5 each, •wo of which a r e open only to f o r e gn s t u d e n t s . Two d a y s l a t e r . F e b . 9, the Int e r n a t i o n a l R e l a t i o n s Club will sponsor a b a n q u e t for its m e m b e r s in D u r f e e ' s T e r r a c e R o o m . T h e p r o g r a m will begin at 6 p . m . with a " c o c k t a i l h o u r " in the .luiiana Room of D u r f e e w h e r e a film on C o m m u n i s t China will be4 p r e s e n t ed. T h e b a n q u e t is s c h e d u l e d for 7 p.m. Dr. J a m e s D o r d a n n , J r . , will s p e a k on the topic of China in his a d d r e s s "Sino - Soviet Conflict: I m p l i c a t i o n s for W e s t e r n P o l i c y . " This topic will s e r v e as a kick-off for an i n f o r m a t i o n d r i v e which will c u l m i n a t e in s e n d i n g d e l e g a t e s f r o m Hope to a n a t i o n a l confere n c e on the s a m e s u b j e c t at P r i n c e ton - U n i v e r s i t y o v e r s p r i n g vacation.

.

. . You Get a TOTALLY

NEW SOUND, this w e e k end, from

JACKIE DUNHAM

Junior House, Jantzen

( I m p e r i a l Records)

Koret of California, Shapely

M r . James Lamb is t h e teacher.

Worship will be held at 9 : 3 0 and 1 1 : 0 0 a . m . with Mr. Hillegonds preaching. The School of Christian Living meets at 6:45.

Birthday

Pizzas

Free Pizza for all College Students on Their Birthday Up To $ 1 . 4 0

HOPE CHURCH 7 7 W . l l t h Street

BOWSER'S PIZZA

RECORDS AT DISCOUNT PRICES All Leading Labels

Meyer Music House 17 W. 8th St.


January 22, 19f.5

f

Hope College anchor

i

Page 3

Off The Cuff

GOP Face Lifting by Robert Donia

TRIBUTE—Sy Van Asperen (far right), 196-1 campa : gn manager for (he muscular dystrophy drive, and Don Lichty (right, center), district director of the MDAA of America, Inc., presented Dr. Calvin VanderWerf and Ken Walz, Student Senate treasurer, a plaque in appreciation the sudent body's help In raising funds for the drive.

Big-Name Entertainment, Attire Studied by Senate The possibil ty of b. inging nationally known e n t e r ! linment to t h e c a m p u s w a s brought up at the Student S e n a t e m e e t i n g last Tuesday night. P e t e Stoketee g a v e a r e p o r t on the cost involved. S o m e of the groups under c o n s i d e r a t i o n a r e t h e New Christy Minstrels, the Serendipity S i n g e r s and the L e t t e r m e n All of those g r o u p s would cost in the neighborhood of $3000. T r e a s u r e r Ken W.ilz offered t h e possibility of -bringing the " r i s i n g singing s t a r " J a c k i e D u n h a m . A motion w a s p a s s e d to add M r . D u n h a m ' s n a m e to t h e list of e n t e r t a i n m e n t being c o n s d i e r e d . Since the next s e n a t e m e e t i n g will not be until the second week in F e b r u a r y and the list of d a t e s a v a i l a b l e for obt ining nationally known s t a r s such as M r . D u n h a m is diminishing, t h e e x e c u t i v e comm i t t e e of the Student S e n a t e w a s given the power to act on one of the n a m e s u n d e r c o n s i d e r a t i o n . The question of w o m e n ' s a t t i r e once again c a m e to the s e n a t e floor T u e s d a y night. It w a s decided that since AWS had a g r e e d to u n d e r t a k e a poll of w o m e n stud e n t s the s e n a t e would wait to t a k e action until they h a d finished the poll. NSA c o o r d i n a t o r Bob Donia p r e sented his r e p o r t to the s e n a t e r e g a r d . n g NSA's budget. He suggested that his previous request for $533 dollars be cut to $100 a n d th .1 a r e q u e s t be m a d e to the adm i n i s t r a t i o n to h a v e the Student

El Club Espanol Slates Meetings For Semester El Club E s p a n o l h a s scheduled its second s e m e s t e r activities, Diane C o u r t n e y , p r e s i d e n t , h a s announced. On F e b . 18. the club will t r a v e l to G r a n d R a p i d s for a Spanish Banquet at La F i e s t a rest m r a n t . Different foods will be tried by t h e curious Spanish s t u d e n t s . I n a r a Bundza, a senior, who p a r ticipated in t h e GLCA p r o g r a m , will s p e a k to t h e club on h e r adv e n t u r e s and e x p e r i e n c e s during the f i r s t s e m e s t e r in Bogota, Col u m b i a on M r c h 4. T h e following month, on April 8 a " T r i p to P e r u , South A m e r i c a " will be voiced by Bertha M a g a n f r o m Lima a n d Miss Courtney who w a s an exc h a n g e s t u d e n t t h e r e . Following the p r o g r a m a P e r u v i a n — P a n a m a n i a n style p i r t y h a s b e e n sl a t ed. The final m e e t i n g on M a y 6 will be a p cnic and h a y r i d e , " a s typically Latin A m e r i c a n as wo can m a k e i t . " Miss Courtney s a i d . "We invite all i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s for we feel it should p r o v e interesting and r e w a r d i n g , " s h e added. BREDEWEG SHOE REPAIR M I C H I G A N CLEANERS 230 SOUTH RIVER

S e n a t e budget i n c r e a s e d by that a m o u n t . No official action was taken. P r i n t e d p r o p o s a l s for constitutional r e f o r m w e r e h a n d e d to the s e n a t o r s for t h e i r consideration. S e n a t o r John W o r m u t h o f f e r e d a resolution which s t a t e d t h a t all S e n a t e m e e t i n g s should be r u n by " R o b e r t ' s Rules of O r d e r . " The resolution was p a s s e d , but no offical action w a s t a k e n on t h e constitutional r e f o r m pr oposals. T h e possibility of m a k i n g a recoommendaton that chapel be switched f r o m 8 a . m . to 10 p.m. was also d i s c u s s e d , b u t action was held over until a n o t h e r meeting.

The Republican Party h a s just gone through a m a j o r f a c e - l i f t i n g job—or r a t h e r a f a c e changing job. In t e r m s of the House l e a d e r s h i p , a b o u t the only f o r m e r l e a d e r still in power is whip Leslie A r e n d s , whom few people outside of the political s c i e n c e d e p a r t m e n t h a v e e v e r h e a r d of. New f a c e s a r e app e a r i n g all over—The faces of G e r a l d F o r d , Melvin Laird and Ray Bliss a r e e n d e a v o r i n g to p r e sent a new i m a g e of the G r a n d Old Party. Basically, the e s s e n c e of this " N e w Republican i m a g e " is creative. p r o b l e m - c e n t e r e d and nonideological. C h a r l e s P e r c y , def e a t e d c a n d i d a t e for g o v e r n o r of Illinois, said on Nov. 22 of last y e a r . "I believe o u r p a r t y has f o u n d e r e d bee use we h a v e dwelled too much on theory and ideology . . . 1 ask the R e p u b l i c a n P a r t y to th nk c o n s t r u c t i v e l y , to act progressive, and to a c c e p t responsibility." The p u r g e s and r e p l a c e m e n t s since that t i m e h a v e been designed to m a k e the p a r t y do just t h a t . T h e belief is abroad t h a t the cons e r v a t i v e s who ran the p a r t y since G o l d w a t e r received the n o m i n a t i o n a r e not really c o n c e r n e d about the p r o b l e m s our nation f a c e s . T h e y s e e m to be m o r e c o n c e r n e d with tenaciously s t i c k i n g to ideology of limited g o v e r n m e n t t h a n with m e e t i n g the n e e d s of A m e r i can citizens.

Carol Van Lente, Bob Bosman Win Local Oratory Contests Carol Van L e n t e and R o b e r t Bosm a n w e r e chosen a s the w i n n e r s of the Adelaide ( w o m e n ' s ) a n d Raven ' m e n ' s ) o r a t o r i c a l c o n t e s t s last T u e s d a y . Miss Van L e n t e ' s winning oration w a s entitled. " F o r Want of a Little C o u r a g e , " and w a s a plea f o r selff u l f i l l m e n t of w o m e n . "Witch H u n t " was the title of B o s m a n ' s oration and it w a s c o n c e r n e d with the House C o m m i t t e e on Un A m e r i c a n Activities. Also c o m p e t i n g in the Adelaide contest was M r s . Carole K r a m e r whose speech w a s entitled, " B u r i e d in P a g a n i s m . " She w a s a w a r d e d second place. T h e third c o m p e t i t o r w a s Suzanne Radliff who s p o k e on " T h e People, Y e s , the P e o p l e . " G r a h a m L a m p o r t placed second in the R w e n contest with the oration " T h e y Done Quit T r a v e l ing T h e m . " R o b e r t Donia also c o m p e t e d and spoke on " T h e Cris : s of E x t r e m i s m . " F i r s t prize in the Adelaide contest w a s $25 a n d second p r i z e w a s $10. In the R a v e n contest first prize w a s $30 a n d second $20. The p r i z e s will be p r e s e n t e d at the

Honors Day Convocation in t h e Spring. J u d g e s in the Adelaide contest w e r e Mrs. Ruth DeWolf. English d e p a r t m e n t ; Mrs. H a r r i e t P r i n s , ret red d e a n of w o m e n . Central College, Pel la, Iowa; Miss P e g g y Buteyn. p l a c e m e n t b u r e a u ; Mrs. Delia S t e i n i n g e r , r e t i r e d Hope College h o u s e m o t h e r : Dr. C l a r e n c e De G r a a f , c h a i r m a n of the English d e p a r t m e n t : Rev. Allen Cook, college p a s t o r : Mr. Ed E r i c s o n . English d e p a r t m e n t : Dr. A. J a m e s Prinz, English dep r t m e n t ; a n d Dr. A r t h u r Jentz, d e p a r t m e n t of religion and Bible. J u d g e s in the R a v e n contest w e r e f o u r f r o m the Adelaide cont e s t : Rev. Cook, Mr. E r i c s o n . Dr. P r i n s . and Dr. J e n t z . In addition, Dr. Henry Ten Hoor, English dep a r t m e n t : Dr. D. I v a n D y k s t r a . c h a i r m a n of the philosophy dep a r t m e n t ; and Dr. P a u l F r i e d , c h a i r m a n of the history d e p a r t m e n t s e r v e d as j u d g e s . The w i n n e r s of the contest will r e p r e s e n t Hope in the s t a t e MISL Contests at Western Michigan University on April 3.

Expert «hoe repairing and dyeing

In an i n t e r v i e w last week, Mr. F o r d even s t a t e d his o p e n - m i n d e d a t t i t u d e t o w a r d A d m i n i s t r a t i o n proposals: " W e m u s t a n a l y z e e a c h proposal that the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n s e n d s to Congress. T h e r e m a y be s o m e we will s u p p o r t . " Mr. L a i r d likes the label " c r e a t i v e c o n s e r v a tive while Mr. F o r d r e c e n t l y called himself a "constructive moderate." The other significant aspect of this c a m p a i g n , of course, is t h e selection of an " i n c l u s i o n i s t . " R a y Bliss, as n a t i o n a l c h a i r m a n to rep l a c e D e a n B u r c h . who yielded u n d e r p r e s s u r e to resign. Bliss gives m o r e e m p h a s i s to p a r t y t h a n ideology, e m p h a s i z e s his willingness to work for all c a n d i d a t e s . He is a p r a c t i c a l and e f f i c e n t o r g a n i z a t i o n m a n who c o m m a n d s the r e s p e c t of a wide s c o p e of party leaders. A n o t h e r aspect of this e m p h a s i s on c o n s t r u c t i v e i m a g e is being provided on the s t a t e level. Young, p r o g r e s s i v e g o v e r n o r s such as R o m n e y p r o c l a i m the need for a strong, a c t i v e s t a t e g o v e r n m e n t if f e d e r a l e n c r o a c h m e n t is to be resisted. T h e s e m e n realize w h a t the G o l d w a t e r people failed to grasp—that Americans generally a r e m o r e f a v o r a b l e to p e r f o r m a n c e and r e s u l t s t h a n to just p r o t e s t s a g a i n s t the evils of the opposition. T h e f o r c e s of c o n s e r v a t i s m , howe v e r , h a v e not just packed up and gone h o m e . T h e ideological cons e r v a t i v e s h a v e been a c t i v e in Michigan s i n c e the election, and one of the m o r e unique things t h a t h a s o c c u r e d is the f o r m a t i o n of a group to bnck Ronald R e a g a n for the 1968 P r e s i d e n t i a l nomination. We c a n rest a s s u r e d that the noise f r o m t h e s e q u a r t e r s will continue u n a b a t e d , even though the noisem a k e r s r e p r e s e n t only a s m a l l m i n o r i t y of the citizenry, a n d for th ^t m a t t e r e v e n the R e p u b l i c a n party.

Consider, for instance, this exc e r p t f r o m the l a t e s t m a i l i n g of the Michigan Young A m e r i c a n s for F r e e d o m , e a s i l y the l e a d i n g cons e r v a t i v e youth o r g a j n z a t i o n in Michigan: " W h i l e r e c e n t l y looking through the S t a t e m e m b e r s h i p c a r d s , our m e m b e r s h i p c h a i r m a n c a m e to the s. ' p r i s i n g conclusion th it t h e r e a r e only t h r e e m e m b e r s ol Y.A.F. in the city of D e a r b o r n with a population of o v e r one h u n d r e d t h o u s a n d . " Y.A.F. then gives this q u e s t i o n a b l e r e p r i m a n d to its t h r e e a d h e r e n t s : -"Conservatives in D e a r b o r n , you c a n do b e t t e r than t h a t ! " This m a y be an e x t r e m e e x a m p l e , but it m a y i n d i c a t e in p a r t the real d e p t h of rock-hard c o n s e r v a t i v e s t r e n g t h . The time for a new GOP image h a s a r r i v e n . Now it will be up to t h e p a r t y l e a d e r s to p r e s e n t cons t r u c t i v e , w o r k a b l e a l t e r n a t i v e s to the p r o g r a m s of the D e m o c r a t s if they a r e to r e g a i n n a t i o n il support. And that, in view of the booming p o p u l a r i t y of the P r e s i d e n t , will be no e a s y t a s k .

as w

Captain J . Richard Goulet from the 644 USAF Hospital in Battle Creek will address the pre-medical fraternity on Thursday, Feb. 4, at 7 p.m. in the Ca»-ley Room. A 30-minute film will be shown and Capt. ^•eulet will show slides.

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PHONE 396-3421 HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

The c a m p a i g n to r e v e r s e this i m a g e of u n c o n c e r n is a m a n y sided one. The election of G e r a l d Ford, formerly congressman from this d i s t r i c t , to r e p l i c e C h a r l e s Halleck as m i n o r i t y l e a d e r of t h e House is one m a n i f e s t a t i o n of this. Melvin Laird w a s chosen to replace .Mr. F o r d a s head of the H o u s e Republican Conference. I h e s e two m e n give the i m p r e s s i o n of d e s i r i n g c o n s t r u c t i v e a l t e r n a tives to D e m o c r a t i c p r o g r a m s and a willingness to work out solutions.

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January 22. 1%'. Hope CollejJr a n c h o r

Fane 4

T.S. E l i o t : A Man oC Views He was a man with views, in l i t e r a t u r e a n d m life,

by Dr. Joan Mueller, Assistant Professor of Fn^lish IN T H E

F O R T N I G H T s i n c e t h e d e a t h of T. S.

Eliot, those who knew him personally a n d p r o f e s s i o n ally, one c a n feel s u r e , h a v e begun to recollect, revisit a n d even revision ( " / u-ill l>r inm . . .") t h e life, the work, the i n f l u e n c e of the m a n w h o , with a relatively limited p r o d u c t i o n of p o e m s , p l a y s and critical s t a t e m e n t s , indelibly m a r k e d with his n a m e t h e l i t e r a r y a g e in which he lived. And one c a n be e v e n m o r e confident that the n a m e will r e c u r with inc r e a s e d f r e q u e n c y in the w e e k s a n d m o n t h s to c o m e ; t h e r e will most inevitably be an " E l i o t R e v i v a l . " a n d surely it will be c o u n t e r e d by an " E l i o t D e b u n k i n g , " and that in turn h a r d p r e s s e d by D e f e n s e s , Reconsiderations, R e c a n t a t i o n s , a n d m o r e R e v i s i o n s r 11" "• will

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We c a n e x n e c t . 1 suppose, s o m e f a s h i o n a b l e y o u n n critic to d a m n Eliot as once Eliot did Milton r . I ' / r / u hm am

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if he. our voung critic, h a s l e a r n e d the e s s e n t i a l critical lesson from his n r o d e c e s s o r . he m a v then r e v i e w and r n c a n t that d a m n a t i o n , as did Eliot, and s u r e l y in b^th in^tPnces t h e H e r r i e r e Garde, for want of on 1,n opinion of Hs own. will m i s e the c h o r u s C'1 firohlnl—mid

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For m e , b e c a u s e Eliot w r o t e a m o n g us, it is a richer w o r l d . As a critic and a s a poet h e r e m i n d e d us that t h e past holds u n s u s p e c t e d t r e a s u r e s for t h o s e who would look with new e y e s . We can t h a n k him for much of our c o n t e m p o r a r v a p p r e c i a t i o n of the m e t a physical poets of the e a r l y s e v e n t e e n t h c e n t u r y , f o r a r e n e w e d interest in the r e v e r b e r a t i n g m v t h s a n d legends of w o s t e r n ( a n d s o m e t i m e s e a s t e r n ) civilization, for s e n d i n g us again to t h e m v s t i c a l w r i t e r s in our t r a d i t i o n — t o St. J o h n of the Cross a n d A u g u s t i n e and D a n t e — a s well as to t h e G r e e k t r a g e d i a n s a n d S h a k e s p e a r e and Milton.

a n d w h e t h e r or not one a g r e e d or d i s a g r e e d , o n e could not long r e m a i n a p a t h e t i c about the issues, w r i t e r s , styles or m a t e r i a l s to which he g a v e his a t t e n t i o n . A great p a r t of his g e n i u s , it s e e m s to m e , w a s his s e n s e of h i m s e l f , his willingness to c o m m i t himself to u n h e a r d or c e r t a i n l y unlikely or u n p o p u l a r positions, to try untried m o d e s , to listen to old, f o r g o t t e n voices. And a l t h o u g h in his early t a s t e - m a k i n g d a y s he set vogues and w a s e c h o e d and i m i t a t e d to a f a u l t , his sense of h u m o r — t h e one that p r o d u c e d Old Poss u m and his p r a c t i c a l c a t s and Mrs. P o r t e r w a s h i n g h e r feet in soda w a t e r — s e e m s to h a v e kept him f r o m t h e d e v a s t a t i o n of taking himself too s e r i o u s l y . ("SOI inn

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He could, much to the e m b a r r a s s m e n t of his e c h o e r s ( a s in t h e i n s t a n c e of the Milton c r i t i q u e s ) , c h a n g e his m i n d in public. He often q u a r r e l e d w i t h his own e a r l i e r j u d g m e n t s and hoped his r e a d e r s would be a s i n d e p e n d e n t in their r e a d i n g of h i m . In the p r e f a c e to his " S e l e c t e d E s s a y s " he o b s e r v e d : " A s one g r o w s older one m a y b e c o m e less d o g m a t i c a n d p r a g m a t i c a l ; but t h e r e is no a s s u r a n c e t h a t o n e b e c o m e s w i s e r ; and it is even likely that o n e b e c o m e s

THE LATE T. S. ELIOT

less s e n s i t i v e . " For the reader of his poetry, Eliot left a w r e a t h of once s t a r t l i n g , now almost c l i c h e d , but alwaysmemorable images and phrases. His first m a j o r p o e m , w r i t t e n in his m i d - t w e n t i e s u n d e r t h e unlikely title of " T h e Love Song of J . Alfred P r u f r o c k . " set the l i t e r a r y world on its e a r in 1915 with the t h e m e s he w a s to r e i t e r a t e and develop in s u b s e q u e n t p o ^ m s such as " T h e W a s t e L a n d " (1922- and " T h e Hollow M e n " (1925). In g r a p h i c f r a g m e n t s he w r o t e out the a n a t o m y of m o d e r n a l i e n t a t i o n a n d d e s p a i r . H e a t t e m p t e d to o b j e c t i f y - i n p o e t r y m a n ' s d i l e m m a in a w a r r i n g , wasting, wanton world, to hold up the m i r r o r to h u m a n n a t u r e gone w r o n g a n d to a n p e n d s o m e e x h o r t a t i o n s a b o u t the possibility of s a l v a t i o n and the w a y s to it.

F o r all of this a n d much m o r e , 1 find myself g r a t e f u l . In his e s s a y on Ezra P o u n d , Eliot a s s e r t e d that " ' G r e a t n e s s , ' when the t e r m m e a n s a n y t h i n g at all, is an a t t r i b u t e c o n f e r r e d by l i m e . " It m u s t necessarily be s o m e w h i l e b e f o r e we c a n really begin to a s s e s s E l i o t ' s i m p a c t on o u r age. Yet one c a n — a n d 1 think e a c h of his s e r i o u s r e a d e r s m u s t , at the p a s s i n g of such a m a n — p r i v a t e l y e s t i m a t e the i m p a c t upon o n e s own i m a g i n a t i o n and u n d e r s t a n d i n g . And if. as for m a n y m o d e r n r e a d e r s , that h a s b e e n c o n s i d e r a b l e , p e r h a p s we might specul a t e t h a t g e n e r a t i o n s of c r i t i c s to c o m e will find T. S. Eliot to h a v e b e e n a g r e a t poet.

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m i / . / / nnnr?"

Feb. I 1-12-13

'The Crucible' To Be Presented by Randy Millrr "The C r u c i b l e " by A r t h u r Miller will be p r e s e n t e d by the Hope College Little T h e a t r e u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n of Mr. Robert Wegter on F e b . 11-12-13. Set a m i d the witch t r i a l s of the 17th C e n t u r y , the play conc e r n s the p r o b l e m of the value ol t r u t h in the midst of he c r u c i n l e . ha which m e l t s down all conceal ment. Mr. W e g t e r , d i r e c t o r , selected the Miller p l a y b e c a u s e it is applicable to all a g e s and a s k s q u e s t ons a b o u t the m a s k s t h a i people put on while on c a m p u s , c o m m u n i t y , or in c h u r c h . " B e c a u s e of the v a r i e t y of c l r r a c t e r s on s t a g e , each person in the audie n c e should be able to identify with s o m e o n e r e p r e s e n t e d on s t a g e These characters are realistic people but not so well d e f i n e d a s to b e c o m e stylized. T h e i m a g i n a t i o n of the a u d i e n c e is challenged to truly identify with •'CRUCIBLE"—John Cox as John Proctor (left) tries to give confidence to his wife played by Kathy Lenell in rehearsal for the Palette and Masque production of Arthur Miller's play, "Tre Crucible."

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Specializing In Spaghetti and Meatballs — Beef and Cheese Ravioli — Spinach — Epg Noodles and Meatballs — Submarine Sandwiches with everything, 6DC and up — Pizza in or out only 99c instead of $ 1 . 2 5 for 10-inch pie with an order of 10 or more.

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For Hope Students Only For Reservations or Delivery at any time Call in advance at 394-8431 Open Tuesday - Sat. 5 : 3 0 - 11 p.m. Sundays 3 : 0 0 - 1 0 : 0 0 p.m.

them." When w r i t t e n -by Miller, " T h e O u c W e " in s p : t e of its historical c o n t e x t w a s understood a s a propo g a n d i s t play of c u r r e n t signific a n c e . " T o d a y we c a n look beyond the historical a s p e c t , as well a s t h e t h e n c o n t e m p o r a r y social signif c a n c e of t h e play and see o u r own m a n e u v e r i n g s exposed. " O u r p r e s e n t view of the world a s a m a c h ne to be questioned a n d a p p r e c i a t e d in a solely s c i e n t i f i c s e n s e is challenged a s the " C r u c -

ible" f o r c e s us to realize a m o r e spiritual, aesthetic, and emotional tone exist ng within u s . " An exa m p l e is t h e a s s a s i n a t i o n of P r e s i deni K e n n e d y and m u r d e r of Lee H. Oswald when the e n t i r e nation u a s m e l t e d down so t h a t t h e t r u e \ m e r i c a n feeling c a m e o u t . " P o r t r a y i n g this v a r i e t y of chara c t e r s is a cast as well differentiated as the c h a r a c t e r s and r e p r e senting a cross-section of the Hope College c a m p u s . S o p h o m o r e J o h n Cox p l a y s J o h n P r o c t o r , d i s c e r n e r of t r u t h , a n d is opposed by senior Linda M u n r o . as Abigail Williams, r e p r e s e n t i n g the d e c e p t i o n and will ol the m a j o r i t y . J u n i o r Bob Dahl • m e d i a t e s as J u d g e D a n f o r t h . Kathy Lenell port r a y s E l i z a b e t h , the wife of Proctor, and senior Dirk de \ elder will play the p a r t of the R e v e r e n d

Japanese Art Film 'Rashoraon To Be Shown By MortarBoard " R a s h o m o n . " a J a p a n e s e film which r e c e i v e d the G r a n d P r i z e at the Venice Film F e s t i v a l , will be p r e s e n t e d by M o r t a r B o a r d il Snow A u d i t o r i u m on F e b . 5 at 7:00 and 9:00 p . m . Time mag..zine states concern ing the f i l m : " B r i l l i a n t l y a c t e d . " R a s h o m o n " b u l g e s with b a r b a r i c f o r c e . . . But. m o r e t h a n a violent

Glatz Restaurant 28 West 8th Street Daily Specials

Hale. Freshman Tim Truman plays the Reverend Parris. Other p a r t s will be p l a y e d by Bonnie Abbott, Candy C l a a s s e n , Gini L o u d e r m i l k , Carol Oosterink. Don B a t t j e s , R a n d y Miller, Leslie B r u y p e n m e y e r . Alice F r e n c h . Jeff M a c G i l v r a v . Bill P e a c o c k . Lee Van Dyke, Mike Vogas, Dennis J o n e s , Sue Radliffe, and S h a r o n Wozniak. Mr. J a m e s M a l c o l m , technical d i r e c t o r , will be a s s i s t e d by B a r b B r u n s o n as s t a g e m a n a g e r . Crew H e a d s include: Guy S e a m a n , set c o n s t r u c t i o n : Bob Hecht, lights: M a r y Ann Bicking, p r o p s : Chuck T o d d , m a k e - u p ; Don C a m p b e l l , p u b l i c i t y : Wayne M a r s m a n and Dennis Wilcox, c a r p e n t e r s ; Doug S m i t h , b u s i n e s s ; M a r c i a Voight. house m a n a g e r . T h e sound will be supplied by Bob S c h r o e d e r .

— 65c and up

G o o d Food Priced to Fit Your College Account

s t o r y , t h e film is a h a r s h study of u n i v e r s a l d r i v e s s t r i p p e d down to the c o r e ; lust, f e a r , s e l f i s h n e s s , p r i d e , h a t r e d , v a n i t y , c r u e l t y . The crime depicted lays b a r e the m e a n n e s s of m a n with S w i f t i a n b i t t e r n e s s and c o n t e m p t . " " R a s h o m o n " h a s been c a l l e d a masterpiece of cinematograph, i m p r e s s i v e in its s c o r c h i n g insight —insight with a p e c u l i a r l y O r i e n t a l f l a v o r — i n t o t h e f r a i l t y of m a n . T h e plot of the film, whose title is t r a n s l a t e d as " I n the F o r e s t , " h a s as its " b a r e f a c t s . " t h e story of a b a n d i t who c o m e s upon a t r a v e l i n g s a m u r a i and his w i f e in t h e f o r e s t ; T h e " f a c t s " a r e rec o u n t e d later by f o u r people, the a r r o g a n t b a n d i t , the t e a r f u l wife, t h e s a m u r a i ' w h o lies d e a d , but whose s t o r y is h e a r d t h r o u g h the w e i r d i n c a n t a t i o n s of a m e d i u m L a n d a w o o d c u t t e r who c o m e s upon t h e s c e n e .in the f o r e s t . Akira K u r o s a w a d i r e c t s t h e four-fold plot.


Page I

Hope College anchor

January 22, 1965

KuwaiCs First Heart Surgeon

\ U i m i n i s To S e r v e in K u w a i t by John Muldrr Yesterday Dr. Egbert Fell, 59 y e a r s old, an internationally renowned surgeon in the field of c a r d i a c s u r g e r y , a Hope College alumnus and a m e m b e r of the staff of P r e s b y t e r i a n - S t . Luke's Hospital in Chicago, d e p a r t e d with his wife for Kuwait to be a medical missionary. In leaving Chicago. Dr. Fell turned his back on a lucrative medical pi act ce to become the first heart surgeon in Kuwait. Why he decided to go to Kuwait concerns the story of another Hope a l u m n u s . Dr. I>ewis Scudder. Dr Scudder was surgeon and medical missionary to Kuwait until S e p t e m b e r . 1964. In September he received a blow on his head and as a result, within a short period of t i m e lost control of the e n t i r e left side of his body.

Kell signed up for a p p r o x i m a t e l y a ten-year t e r m in Kuwait. He will be assisted by his wife, Florence. who is a registered nurse. A m e m b e r of the P r e s b y t e r i a n church. Dr. Fell will be -working under the auspices of the Reformed Church but will be paid by the P r e s b y t e r i a n church. Dr. Fell was born in 190;") and g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope in 1927. He received his M.D. in 1931 from the University of Chicago and served his internship at Presbyterian Hospital. During World War

m a d e possible by a $50,000 gift c a r d i a c difficulties. The trip was f r o m a patient. In 1962 he went to Scotland, and the N e t h e r l a n d s to investigate oxygen t h e r a p y under high p r e s s u r e . in 1963 he was given an a w a r d by the University of Chicago for " o u t s t a n d i n g contributions to medicine." Dr Fell is the f a t h e r of t h r e e children: J a n e Fell P i t n e r , a son J a c k who is a doctor in microbiology and another son Tom whn is also a doctor. Dr. Fell will be taking over for Dr. Scudder, who comes f r o m a long line of medical missionaries. His g r e a t - g r a n d f a t h e r was the first medical m i s s i o n a r y to India, and included in this line were his father. b r o t h e r , sister and himself.

Strapped to a s t r e t c h e r , he an J his wife and brother-in-law flew to Ch cago. By the t i m e he re ched Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital his breathing was t e r m i n a l and he was near d e a t h . At the hopsital a series of three operations w e r e p e r f o r m e d , the first removing 300 c.c. of blood which were causing e x t r e m e press u r e on his b r a ; n . After the operation, Dr. Fell visited Dr. Scudder. Dr. Scudder told him of the p r o b l e m s in Kuw u t . especially now t h a t he. the only surgeon at the hospital, h'ld left. Dr. Scudder said, "1 explained the situation to him and then said. 'What about you going to Kuwait?' and he replied. 'All right, I will.' With this impetuous decision. Dr.

S0C1ET

DK. EGBERT FELL 11 he w a s a m a j o r in the medical corps and was discharged as a lieutenant colonel. Ills list of publications include over 75 articles in medical journals. In 1954 he was sent to Sweden to buy diagnostic equipment for

He was born in India in 1905. was educated up to the seventh - r a d e in India and continued his t r a i n i n g in the United Stales. He g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope in 1931 and f r o m Rush Medical School (now a part of the University of Chicago* in 1935. Dr. Scudder left for the mission field in 1937 and h a s been in Kuwait almost continuously until his illness in Sept e m b e r , 1964. The Kuwait hospital at wh'.ch he served handles approximately 400 cases a day.

IN CELEBRATION—The men of the Fraternal Society gave a party for Dr. Arthur Jentz last Sunday In celebration of the acceptance of his doctorate. Also present was Dr. Calvin VanderWerf. a Fraternal alumnus.

Rev. Jentz Earns Doctorate With Study Of Whitehead

He is the f a t h e r of a son, Lewis, a 19B3 g r a d u a t e of Hope, and a d a u g h t e r Marilyn, a 1961 g r a d u a t e of Hope. At the p r e s e n t time Dr. Scudder i.-, r e c u p e r a t i n g here in Holland and plans to r e t u r n to Kuwait in September

Rev. Arthur J e n t z . instructor in religion and Bible, has been a w a r d e d his Ph.D. by Columbia University. The a n n o u n c e m e n t w a s m a d e last F r i d a y and the doctorate was given in the field of philosophy in religion and ethics. Dr. J e n t z thesis w a s entitled " K t h i c s in the Making: the Genesis and N a t u r e of Ethical Theory in the Philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead." Dr. J e n t z g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope in 11)51) s u m m a cum laude and f r o m New Brunswick S e m i n a r y in 1959

cum laude. He is an a l u m n u s of Union Theological S e m i n a r y in New York City. The p r o g r a m under which he was studying w a s a joint p r o g r a m between Union and Columbia. Dr. J e n t z is faculty resident advisor in F r a t e r n a l Hall. In celebration of the a c c e p t a n c e of his thesis, the men of F r a t e r n a l honored him with a party last Sunday a f t e r n o o n . Also present was F r a ternal a l u m n u s Dr. Calvin VanderWerf. president of Hope College.

B u s i n e s s iVlaiia^er R e t i r e s

Visscher Relates College Career "Mv f a t h e r m a d e it possible for m e to h a v e the opportunity to live in A m e r i c a and lo enjoy this g r e a t e o u n t r y ' s h e r i t a g e , " said Rein Visscher. retiring Hope College business m a n a g e r . "My p a r e n t s had the c o u r a g e and d e t e r m i n a t i o n lo pull up thei'' roots, leave their native land w h e r e they had some feeling of security in contrast to the unknown adventure of the new w o r l d . "

BLUFPRINTS—Dr. Calvin VanderWerf goes over the blueprints for (he physics-math building with retiring business manager of the college Rein Visscher.

National Teacher Examinations To Be Given At Hope Marth 20 Hope Co'lege h a s been designated as a test center for a d m i n i s t e r i n g the Nat onal Teacher E x a m i n a tions on March 20, according to Dr. F. Phillip Van Eyl. College seniors prep'tring to teach and t e a c h e r s applying for positions in school s y s t e m s which encourage or require applicants to submit their scores on the National T e a c h e r E x a m i n a t i o n s along w th their other credentials a r e elig ble lo take the tests. The exmin tions a r e p r e p a r e d and administered by Educational Testing Service, P r i n c e t o n , N.J. The designation of Hope College as a lest c e n t e r for these e x a m inations • will give prospective t e a c h e r s in this a r e a an opportunity to c o m p a r e their p e r f o r m a n c e on the e x a m i n a t i o n s with candid a t e s throughout the country who take the tests, Dr. Van Eyl said. At the one-day test session a c a n d i d a t e m a y t a k e the Common lExaminations, which include t e s t s in P r o f e s s i o n a l E d u c a t i o n and General Education, and one of 18 Teaclvng A r e a Examinations, which a r e designed to . e v a l u a t e

his u n d e r s t a n d i n g the subject matter and methods applicable lo the area he m a y be assigned lo teach Bulletins of information describing r e g i s l r a f ' o n procedures and containing Registration P o r ms m a y be obtained f r o m Phychology D e p a r t m e n t . 280 College Ave., or directly f r o m the National Teacher Examinations, Educational Testing Service, Box 9U, Princeton, N.J. Prospective t e a c h e r s planning to take the tests should obtain their bulletins of information promptly. Dr. Van Eyl advised.

" D a d had $17 in his pocket and owed $80 on the passage and that is all I hey had in the world, except a family of five, a bond of love and c o u r a g e and a g r e a t deal of f o r t i t u d e . " Prior to his r e t i r e m e n t , Mr. Visscher told this story recently to Dr. Calvin VanderWerf, Hope College president. " G e r t r u d e Wilhelmina K a t r i n a . my m o t h e r , w a s born in Almelo. and my f a t h e r , Gerrit, w a s born in A m s t e r d a m . They met in 1890 and m a r r i e d in 1895. When he brought his family lo the United States—and t h e r e were five of us—there was not much left over f r o m my f a t h e r ' s $9 weekly check. "My f a t h e r taught us lo pay cash for th ngs we needed and this c a r r i e d over lo my business career. T h e r e wasn't any • credit available in those d a y s and 1 r e m e m b e r my f a t h e r buying a house for $900. He worked 500 hours at the r a t e of 20 c e n t s per hour for just $100 of that needed amount for a h o m e . "

After working in the tool and die industry and on mechanical drawing p r o j e c t s for ten y e a r s , Mr. Visscher e n t e r e d the retailing business. "The depression was a difficult period, but we had been taught by my h a r d w o r k i n g f a t h e r and strong willed m o t h e r to face up to such c i r c u m s t a n c e s . " he said. For a lime Mr. Visscher was m a n a g e r of the student training store for the Kroger Company. He then went into the food business for himself, and for m a n y y e a r s was the successful proprietor and m a n a g e r of the l.G.A. Food Market on .Eighth Street. In 1943 he sold his business. "1 rested, then took a trip lo E u r o p e , " he said. "Upon my return I talked with Dr. Raymond and he was having a difficult t i m e in p r e p a r i n g for the influx of World War 11 v e t e r a n s . Some five Hundred wanted to enroll and we had to find the facilities for t h e m . " Raymond said to me, 'Would you help m e , ' and I said 'yes.' 1 bec a m e the m a n a g e r of the c a f e t e r i a and d o r m i t o r i e s . " Mr. Visscher continued, "We had limited facilities and converted the Masonic Hall into a dining hall for 500 students. We used war

surplus e q u i p m e n t . " In 1949. when Dr. Raymond joined the Michigan Colleges Foundation, Visscher b e c a m e business m a n a g e r — j u s t in lime to be a c e n t r a l figure in the extensive building p r o g r a m of the college. "We constructed Durfee Hall for 100 women and could provide m e a l s for 165. Then in 1951 Voorhees Hall was renovated and refurnished for 110 women. In 1956 the Nykerk Hall of Music, Snow Auditor u m and Kollen Hall were c o m p l e t e d , " said Mr. Visscher. F u n d s for the Music Hall were provided by the City of Holland and the church. "In 1959 funds provided by the Housing and Home F i n a n c e agency w e r e used to build Phelps Hall. 160 women and 600 diners w e r e provided for h e r e , " he continued. In 1961 the Van Zoeren Library was completed. Graves Hall was converted to foreign l a n g u a g e c l a s s r o o m s and laboratory space, and in 1964 the Physics-Math building was erected. When asked about his plans for the f u t u r e , Mr. Visscher said, "I want to maintain my home h e r e in Holland with my m a n y friends, f r o m May to J a n u a r y , but we'll travel to Europe and visit Florida.*'

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Pagc«

Hope College anehor

January 22, 1965

The Lesson of Winston Churchill by Dr. Paul Fried,

—that in the face of g r o w i n g n a t i o n a l i s m it is possible t o serve t h e n a t i o n best by p r o m o t i n g t h e u n i t y of n a t i o n s ,

Chairman of History Dept. (Editor's note: As this issue goes to press, Sir Winston Churchill is still alive, though his condition is failing and his doctors believe his death is imminent. Mr. Churchill's life has been of such importance to the world that his passing away will certainly be the cause of sadness everywhere. In the following tribute to the former prime minister. Dr. Paul Fried discusses the talents which made Mr. Churchill the great statesman that he was.)

H

OPE S T U D E N T S C R A M M I N G f o r finals m a y find it e a s y t o i d e n t i f y w i t h y o u n g W i n s t o n C h u r c h i l l , w h o w a s a d e c i d e d l y p o o r stud e n t a n d passed his e x a m s at H a r r o w o n l y w i t h g r e a t e s t d i f f i c u l t y . Yet h e l i v e d t o b e c o m e o n e of t h e g r e a t e s t m e n of h i s o r a n y a g e , w h o s e p a s s i n g will s a d d e n t h e w h o l e w o r l d .

T h o u g h C h u r c h i l l was a poor student, h e had c o u r a g e a n d integrity, a n u n q u e n c h a b l e thirst for knowledge, boundless energy a n d a lifelong desire t o b e a d o e r a n d n o t a n o n l o o k e r . By t h e t i m e h e w a s 2 6 y e a r s o l d , in 1900, h e h a d t a k e n p a r t i n m i l i t a r y c a m p a i g n s in C u b a , I n d i a , E g y p t a n d S o u t h A f r i c a , b o t h as a n o f f i c e r a n d as a r e p o r t e r . He h a d c o l l e c t e d a p h e n o m e n a l n u m b e r of m e d a l s for d a r i n g in a c t i o n , w r i t t e n t w o b e s t s e l l e r s , s w e p t the U n i t e d States on a highly p r o f i t a b l e speaking t o u r , a n t a g o n i / e d t h e I m p e r i a l G e n e r a l S t a f f , res i g n e d his c o m m i s s i o n in t h e a r m y a n d w o n election to the British P a r l i a m e n t .

D

U R I N G N E A R L Y (i0 y e a r s i n B r i t i s h p o l i t i c a l l i f e C h u r c h i l l s e r v e d in a l m o s t e v e r y c a b i n e t post, f r o m u n d e r - s e c r e t a r y for c o l o n i e s at the a g e of H2 t o t h e p r i m e m i n i s t e r ' s p o s t a l t e r h e h a d p a s s e d h i s ()5th b i r t h d a y . As o u t s p o k e n in p o l i t i c a l l i f e as h e h a d b e e n in t h e a r m y , C h u r c h i l l was never a party man. In fact, h e soon b e c a m e "a t r a i t o r to his class." l e a v i n g the C o n s e r v a t i v e party t o b e c o m e a L i b e r a l a n d d u r i n g m o s t of t h e i n t e r w a r p e r i o d h e w a s r e g a r d e d as a n o u t s i d e r , a n u n c o m f o r t a b l e c r i t i c , a n d a d e f e n d e r of u n p o p u l a r causes.

I n a n y c a s e , a m a n w h o l e a r n e d t o fly b e f o r e t h e First W o r l d W a r a n d i n v e n t e d the t a n k , played p o l o a n d w o r k e d as a b r i c k l a y e r , a n d g a i n e d a r e p u t a t i o n as a p a i n t e r a n d h i s t o r i a n h a r d l v f i t t e d i n t o t h e n a r r o w m o l d ol t h e " a v e r a g e " B r i t i s h p o l i t i c i a n .

—that despite the g r o w i n g emphasis on greater a n d g r e a t e r specialization w h a t we need most a r e m e n of b r o a d i n t e r e s t s , v e r s a t i l i t y a n d vision. In t h e best s e n s e of t h e w o r d W i n s t o n C h u r c h ill's l i f e is t h a t ol a R e n a i s s a n c e m a n w h o c o m b i n e s a n i n t e r e s t in a r t a n d m u s i c , w a r a n d p h i l o s o p h y , history a n d politics, social r e f o r m a n d loyalty to his king, p r o f o u n d scholarship and good food, a n d w h o is c a p a b l e of l o l l y i d e a l i s m a n d d o w n t o e a r t h r e a l ism. " M r . C h u r c h i M ' s t a s t e s a r e s i m p l e , " s a i d L o r d B i r k e n h e a d o n c e , " h e is e a s i l y c o n t e n t e d w i t h t h e best ol e v e r y t h i n g . "

Words of Winston ChurchiJll As prime minister. Sir Winston Churchill stfrrojfthe people of his nation and the world with the powerinf his oratory. The following are a few excerpts y f / h / most famous speeches. . . T h e r e can never be friendsl/i/) b e t w e e n the British democracy a n d the Nazi n i O f t r , that Power which s p u r n s C h r i s t i a n ethics, f ' M c h cheers its o n w a r d c o u r s e b y a b a r b a r i o u s {Vagji/nsm, w h i c h v a u n t s t h e s p i r i t of a g g r e s s i o n a n d aoj/nucst, which d e r i v e s s t r e n g t h a n d p e r v e r t e d ulcnafiTe f r o m p e r s e c u t i o n , a n d u s e s , as w e h a \ e / s o t f « , w i t h p i t i l e s s b r u t a l i t y t h e t h r e a t of m u r d e r o u s / C h u r c h i U ' s c r i t i c i s m of.CIVaiVii p o l i c y in 1938: [

unn's Munich

" A n d d o n o t s u p p o s e tlliff t h i s is t h e e n d . T h i s is o n l y t h e b e g i n n i n g of i f h e r e c k o n i n g . T h i s is o n l y t h e first sip, t h e f i r s / f o r e t a s t e of a b i t t e r c u p w h i c h will b e p r o f f e r e d M o u s y e a r b v y e a r u n l e s s by a s u p r e m e r e c o v e r y c/f m o r a l h e a l t h a n d m a r t i a l v M ' o u r . w e :»rise a < r ; n n / m d t a k e o u r s t a n d f o r f r e e d o m as in t h e o l d e n t / m e . "

" A s h a d o w h a s K d l e n u p o n t h e s c e n e so l a t e l y Ii,i|hied b y t h e A l l i m v i c t o r y . . . . F r o m S t e t t i n in t h e B a l t i c t o T r i e / i e in t h e A d r i a t i c , a n i r o n c u r tain has d e s c e n d e / across the C o n t i n e n t . "

It w a s n o t u n t i l B r i t a i n f a c e d a l m o s t c e r t a i n t o t a l d e f e a t t h a t C h u r c h i l l e m e r g e d as t h e a b l e s t , m o s t d e t e r m i n e d a n d e l o q u e n t l e a d e r of t h e W e s t ern W o r l d d u r i n g the Second W o r l d W a r . After the w a r he a g a i n t u r n e d f r o m m a k i n g history to w r i t i n g it a n d l i v e d o n t o b e c o m e o n e of t h e p r i n c i p a l a r c h i t e c t s of t h e N e w E u r o p e .

I S 1 N G A B O V E t h e c i r c u m s t a n c e s in w h i c h he lived, W i n s t o n C h u r c h i l l p r o v e d : —f/u/t in an dire of m a s s s o c i e t y t h e r e is s t i l l r o o m f o r t h e u n c o m m o n m a n of i m a g i n a t i o n , courage and individualism, —thnt in a world w h i c h p l a c e s a h i g h p r e m i u m o n s e c u r i t y a n d c o n f o r m i t y it is p o s s i b l e t o seek a d v e n t u r e a n d g a i n i m m o r t a l i t y , —that in a society w h i c h a c c e n t s y o u t h a n d rejects t h e old a m a n c a n h a v e his finest h o u r alter others have retired, —thnt

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VOL) RE tj6ELE$5 00 V00 KNOLd THAT?

" E v e n t h o u g h a l a r g e t r a c t of E u r o p e a n d m a n y old a n d f a m o u s states liave f a l l e n or m a y fall i n t o t h e g r i p o l t h e G e s t a p o a n d all t h e o d i o u s a p p a r a t u s of N a z i r u l e , w e s h a l l n o t flag o r f a i l . W e shall go on lo the end. W e s h a l l fight in F r a n c e , w e s h a l l fight o n t h e seas a n d o c e a n s , w e s h a l l fight w i t h g r o w i n g ( o n f i d e n c e a n d g r o w i n g s t r e n g t h in t h e air, w e shall d e f e n d o u r island, w h a t e v e r t h e cost m a y be.

• A c c o r d i n g t o L e w i s B r o a d in " T h e Y e a r s of A c h i e v e m e n t , " H a w t h o r n B o o k s , Inc.*, p . 5 9 6 - 5 9 7 : " I I w e a d h e r e l a i t h l u l l y t o t h e C h a r t e r ol t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s a n d w a l k f o r w a r d in s e d a t e a n d sober strength seeking n o one's land or treasure, s e e k i n g t o lay n o a r b i t r a r y c o n t r o l u p o n t h e t h o u g h t s of m e n ; if all B r i t i s h m o r a l a n d m a t e r i a l forces a n d convictions are joined w i t h your o w n in f r a t e r n a l a s s o c i a t i o n , t h e h i g h r o a d s of t h e f u t u r e will b e c l e a r , n o t o n l y f o r u s b u t f o r a l l , n o t o n l y for o u r time, b u t f o r a c e n t u r y to c o m e . "

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

W e s h a l l fight o n t h e b e a c h e s , w e s h a l l fight o n t h e l a n d i n g g r o u n d s , w e s h a l l fight in t h e fields a n d in t h e s t r e e t s , w e s h a l l fight in t h e h i l l s : w e s h a l l n e v e r s u r r e n d e r , a n d e v e n if, w h i c h I d o n o t f o r a m o m e n t b e l i e v e , t h i s i s l a n d o r a l a r g e p a r t of it were subjugated and starving, then our E m p i r e b e y o n d t h e seas, a r m e d a n d . g u a r d e d bv t h e B r i t i s h F l e e t , w o u l d c a r r y o n t h e s t r u g g l e , u n t i l , in G o d ' s Liood t i m e , t h e n e w w o r l d , w i t h all its p o w e r a n d miLdu, stens f o r t h to the rescue a n d t h e l i b e r a t i o n of t h e o l d . "

T o d a y C h u r c h i l l h a s h i m s e l f b e c o m e p a r t of o u r h i s t o r y a n d h e r i t a g e . H i s life, I t h i n k , s t a n d s as a s h i n i n g l i g h t a n d c o n s t a n t c h a l l e n g e t o all of us, l o r h e t a u g h t us t h a t , w i t h t h e h e l p ol G o d , m a n c a n b e tlie m a s t e r of h i s f a t e a n d m o l d h i s t o r y , t h a t h e d o e s n o t h a v e t o b e t h e h e l p l e s s v i c i m of circumstances.

R

I e x p e c t t h a t t h e B a t t l e of B r i t a i n is a b o u t t o begin. U p o n t h i s b a t t l e d e p e n d s / t h e s u r v i v a l of Christian (ivili/ation. U p o n it d e p e n d s o u r o w n B i i t i s h l i f e , a n d t h e l o n g c o n t i n u i t y of o u r i n s t i t u tions and our Empire. T h e wl/)le fury and might of t h e e n e m y m u s t very s o o n b e t u r n e d o n u s . H i t ler k n o w s t h a t h e will h a v e t o b r e a k u s i n t h i s i s l a n d o r lose t h e w a r . II w e c a n s t a n d u p t o h i m , a l l E u r o p e m a y b e f r e e a n d t h e l i f e of t h e w o r l d may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But i! w e f a i l , t h e n t h e w h o l e w o r l d , i n c l u d i n g t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s , i n c l u d i n g all t h a t w e h a v e k n o w n a n d c a r e d f o r . w i l l s i n k i n t o t h e a b y s s of a n e w D a r k Age, m a d e m o r e sinister, a n d p e r h a p s m o r e p r o t r a c t e d , by t h e l i g h t of p e r v e r t e d s c i e n c e . Let us t h e r e l o r e b r a c e o u r s e l v e s t o o u r d u t i e s a n d so b e a r o u r s e l v e s t h a t , if t h e B r i t i s h E m p i r e a n d its C o m m o n w e a l t h last f o r a t h o u s a n d y e a r s , m e n w i l l siiv. " T h i s w a s t h e i r finest h o u r . "

UMAT HAV'E W EVER 00ME TO

help advance civilization ?

"Aheacly we n u m b e r W i n s t o n Churchill amongst t h e i m m o r t a l s ol o u r r a c e , b u t o n l y w h e n h e h a s crossed the river can he be joined w i t h the c o m p a n y ol h i s p e e r s . . . . T h e m a n w h o , i n t h e i r d i r e s t p e r i l , h a d b e e n e x a l t e d in f r e e d o m ' s c a u s e t o g i v e t h e m t h e i n s p i r a t i o n of l e a d e r s h i p in t h e i r finest h o u r — h i s f a m e a n d t h e m e m o r y of t h o s e t i m e s w i l l s e r v e clown t h e a g e s t o k i n d l e t h e C h u r c h i l l s p i r i t in g e n e r a t i o n s t o c o m e in t h e l a n d s of t h e f r e e . "

Reprinted

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THE RESULTS OF (jl)HAT I HAVE DONE (jl)ILL BE KNOldN ONLV TO FUTURE GENERATIONS!

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Page 7

Hope College anchor

January 22, 1965

Where Do We Go from Here?

A

A M L ' T T I N G w i t h t h e d e a n s of t h e c o l l e g e last n i g h t , n i n e of t h e 2 2 resid e n t a d v i s o r s in m e n ' s d o r m i t o r i e s w e r e a s k e d t o g i v e ii|) t h e i r p o s i t i o n s a t t h e e n d of the semester.

AS

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1 h e r e a s o n l o r t h e a c t i o n w a s t h a t n o n e ol t h e n i n e c o u l d s i g n a p l e d g e w h i c h r e a d , in p a r t , "1 h a v e n o t k n o w i n g l y o r d e l i b e r a t e l y violated the H o p e College d r i n k i n g regulation or o t h e r college r e g u l a t i o n d u r i n g this semester." A c c o r d i n g t o D r . [ a m e s H a r v e y , d e a n of s t u d e n t s , a l e w ol t h e n i n e a l s o r a i s e d q u e s t i o n s a b o u t t h e v a l i d i t y of t h e t h i r d p a r a g r a p h ol t h e p l e d g e , w h i c h r e a d , "I a l s o a g r e e to d o e v e r y t h i n g w i t h i n my p o w e r s t o m a i n l a i n t h e d i g n i t y a n d i n t e g r i t y of all r e s i d e n t a d v i s o r s bv d e a l i n g f o r t h r i g h t l y w i t h a n y v i o l a t i o n s of c o l l e g e r e g u l a t i o n s by s t u d e n t s a n d / o r resident advisors which come to my attention."

HERE a

THE'IN'KIT FOR THE 'IN' CUTS j GMS ON THE

0MKI®O3

FAN FUM CLIQUE t I T .' YOU'VE M l RflVtls ABOUT i O - ! LflrtST PLUTIMUri PLOTTEK: 'SLOW DOWN W R LIFF (AMD Wfl/T FOR

rtt)—*

Dean Harvey added, however, that, upon t h e re(|iiest ol i n d i v i c l u a l R . A . s , e a c h of t h e cases will b e r e v i e w e d o n a p e r s o n a l basis, with the linal decision o n t h e m a t t e r to b e m a d e 1)\ a n a d n i i n i s t r a t i \ e ( o i m n i t t e e .

K1©CR3 be a hit- get

THE UT.

THIS KIT !(JCLUt)E? •'

T

ill. C T R R K N T P R O B K into the drinking s i t u a t i o n on c a m p u s has b r o u g h t u p a few facts w h i c h h a v e m a d e a c o m p l e t e " r e - t h i n k i n g ol t h e p r e s e n t r e g u l a t i o n s a p p e a r to be necessary. Several resident advisors h a v e c l a i m e d t h a t t h e p e r c e n t a g e of o v e r - 2 1 year-olds w h o h a v e b r o k e n the d r i n k i n g rule a p p r o a c h e s HO p e r c e n t , a r e l a t i v e l y h i g h e r figure than previously estimated.

5 PERSWflLIZtD TEE SHIFTS

(wttH zipper poctrers) Cfwe^ J o . SOHG. BOOK CF WEST HITS

1

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Pmo6S C6ROSS !)

W A u e T 5i2eD

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i GET

A c c o r d i n g to Dean H a r v e y , such a perc e n t a g e . t h o u g h it m i g h t a p p e a r a b i t l a r g e , would a p p r o a c h the n a t i o n a l estimate on ol a g e c o l l e g e d r i n k e r s .

ONE TODfly/ l -A

o

o

O

c

In seeking to uphold a code, the :tdm nistration is willing to sacrifice an essential part of s t u d e n t s ' psychological and moral lives. Th.s is a sacrifice we should r e f u s e to m a k e . Two things r e m a i n : ' 1' The school has a code; '2» it does not work. This is unfortunate and though advoc ting reform we should obey the present ruling. But in so doing, we owe the adm nistration our capacities as h u m a n be ngs and our consciences. We do not owe them our souls Rob Werge

The anchor editorial of last week failed to a n s w e r the question which was raised. The quest on was not the validity of the law. it was the validity of the pledge. The question was not the ethics of enforcing tho Ic.w, but the ethics of the m e a n s of e n f o r c e m e n t . And t h e r e is a difference. We a r e not concerned with the student's right to d r i n k ; that is settled for us in the c r e a m colored p a g e s of the. Bulletin. We a r e concerned with the student's right to think and with his right to m a k e a qualitative decision. By committing himself to report " a l l " cases, the R.A. gives up his right to m ak e a judgement in the m o r a l uniqueness of each situation. The administration would m ' k e moral a u t o m a t i o n s of its employees. By robbing him of his capacity to m a k e a j u d g e m e n t , the administration would rob him of an essential part of his humanity, i.e.. his responsibility as a f r e e agent.

In a n i n t e r v i e w t h i s w e e k , c o l l e g e p r e s i dent D r . C a l v i n V a n d e r W e r f .labeled t h e situation u n w h o l e s o m e for t h r e e reasons. First, he said, the d r i n k i n g situation on c a m p u s q u i t e clelmitely p u t s t h e d e a n s , r e s i d e n t advisors a n d o t h e r s in a n e q u i v o c a l p o s i t i o n . H e s a i d t h e r e g u l a t i o n is v i r t u a l l y i m p o s s i b l e to e n l o i e e w i t h o u t w h o l e h e a r t e d c o o p e r a t i o n and c o m p l i a n c e to an h o n o r code.

anchor editorial

S e c o n d l y , s i n c e t h e r u l e is b e i n g v i o l a t e d w i t h i m p u n i t y , a d i s r e g a r d f o r all l a w m i g h t r e s u l t w h i c h w o u l d u n d e r m i n e t h e e n t i r e system. t h e president said. I hirdly, the d r i n k i n g s i t u a t i o n has beM)ine a m a j o i i s s u e a n d t h e e m p h a s i s u p o n it h a s u n n e c e s s a r i l y s w o l l e n o u t of p r o p o r t i o n . T h e p r e s i d e n t a d d e d t h a t t h e r e is a t r e m e n d o u s o p p o r t u n i u a n d c h a l l e n g e for t h e witness ol f a i t h , a n d w h e n e n e r g i e s a r e d i r e c t e d elsewhere, t h e t i m e has c o m e to m o v e in o n e diiec t i o n o r a n o t h e r .

O

NK P O S S I B I L I T Y for a new direction, according to Dr. V a n d e r W e r f , w o u l d be to work toward a stronger h o n o r code. A n o t h e r possibility, he said, would be to work tor a c o n s t r u c t i v e a n d u n i f o r m l y e n f o r c e a b l e

set ol r u l e s a n d r e g u l a t i o n s . The president stressed, however, t h a t any c h a n g e in t h e d r i n k i n g r u l e w o u l d b e a c h a n g e ol r e g u l a t i o n o n l y ; t h e c o l l e g e p o l i c y d i s c o u r a g i n g d r i n k i n g w o u l d s t a n d as i n t h e past.

o

Dear Editor

T

(Editor's note: The pledge simply states that the resident adv.sor will "deal forthrightly" with any violations which come to his attention. According to Dean of Students James Harvey, resident advisors do not have to report all violations to the administration, if the violations are not major and the R.A. tries to correct the situation.)

II t h e c l a i m t h a t SO p e r c e n t of t h e over-21y e a r - o l d s t u d e n t s at H o p e h a v e b r o k e n t h e r u l e d o e s h a v e at t h e l e a s t s o m e v a l i d i t y , t h e n w h a t e v e r y s t u d e n t h a s a l w a y s k n o w n is t r u e ; t h a t a g r e a t d e a l m o r e occ u r s t h a n s t u d e n t s a r e in t h e h a b i t of a d m i t t i n g t o t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . A n d o n e cjan r a i s e s e r i o u s q u e s t i o n s as t o w h e t h e r or n o t t h e n u m b e r of r e s i d e n t a d v i s o r s w h o c o u l d h o n e s t l y s i g n t h e p l e d g e is not in fact c o n s i d e r a b l y l o w e r t h a n t h e n u m b e r w h o d i d s i g n it.

A

l l Ol" T H I S P O I N T S to one inevitable ( o n c l u s i o n ; the' p r e s e n t d r i n k i n g r e g u l a t i o n s a r e u n e n l o r c c a b l e . In e l l e c t , t h e m e n a n d a l a r g e n u m b e r ol t h e w o m e n at l l o o e C o l l e g e c a n d r i n k it t h e v w i s h , a n d a l m o s t n o o n e w i l l m a k e m u c h ol a n e f f o r t t o stop them. I ' n f o i t u n a t e t h o u g h thev m a v be, are the facts. T h e v a r e u n a v o i d a b l e .

these

The Student Lile C o m m i t t e e has been g i v e n t h e task of r e c o n s i d e r i n g t h e c o l l e g e ' s d r i n k i n g r e g u l a t i o n s a n d d r a w i n g u p a prop o s a l e i t h e r loi o r a g a i n s t c h a n g i n g t h e m . I n t h e l i g h t of p r e s e n t c i r c u m s t a n c e s , it is h i g h l y u n l i k e l v t h a t a n y r e v i s i o n s h o r t of c h a n g i n g the r u l e to a l l o w s t u d e n t s to m a k e t h e i r o w n c h o i c e s will h a v e a n v d e g r e e of s u c c e s s . 1 h e m o s t p r a c t i c a l c o u r s e of a c t i o n at t h e picsent would he to c h a n g e the college reguh n i o n t o l e a d " I h e c o l l e g e will e n f o r c e t h e laws ol t h e s t a t e of M i c h i g a n . " Measures should then be taken to tighten curbs on m i n o r s w h o b r e a k t h e s t a t e l a w . At t h e s a m e time, the college should initiate an educat i o n a l p r o g r a m t o i n f o r m t h e s t u d e n t s o n its r e a s o n s lor a d v o c a t i n g a b s t i n e n c e . So f a r , t h e college has not p r o m o t e d w i t h a n v conviction or e n t h u s i a s m a n y such p r o g r a m on ii ( . m i n u s - w i d e s c a l e .

COMING EVENTS SATURDAY, JAN. 23 Concordia College at Hope, Civic Center.

WEDNESDAY, F E B . 3 F r a t e r n ty rash begins. Hone at Concordia College. IRC meeting.

PAO

anchor

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

PRESS

Published

weekly

ination Mich., Entered

of

periods under

the hy

the

as second

college arid

class

gress.

1, 1917, and

Oct.,

Subscription:

Associated

Represented Office:

$3 per

for

Ground

Floor

the

Printed: Press,

advertising

EDITOR

Hall.

post

of

Senate

office

Oct.

College.

Holland Hoard.

Mulligan,

1103 of Act

Zeeland,

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Press

Advertising

196-2122. MENNING

DR.

exam-

Publications

of Holland.

Record,

Michigan

Phone

and

at

SATURDAY. JAN. 30 E l m h u r s t College at Hope. CivicCenter.

of Con-

THURSDAY. EFB. 4 Soanish Club meeting. Student RecHal. Dimnent Memorial Chapel. 7 p.m.

FttTDAY, FEB. 5 Kollen 1-A p a r t v . Golden 8 Ball. MortarBoard F i ' m . Snow Auditorium, 7 and 9 p.m. Cosmopolitan Winter F o r m a l . E m e r s o n i a n Winter F o r m a l .

19. 1918.

Zeeland

by

holiday

Hope

for in section

- CHARLES ADVISOR-

vacation.

Strident

authorized

of Graves

FACULTY

students

provided

Collegiate

national

the

at the

of postage

year.

except

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matter

rate

year

for

authority

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Member:

THURSDAY, JAN. 28 Community Concert, Pagnnini String Q u a r t e t , Civic Center. 8:15 p.m.

E. E. BRAND

Michigan. Ass.

MONDAY, F E B . 1 SCA Hay Ride and T a f f y Pull. 7:30 p.m.

Service.

TUESDAY, FEB. 2 Reg'st^ation for second semest e r classes. Hope at Lake Forest College.

SATURDAY,F^B. 6 Adrian College at Hope, Civic Cerfer. Sibyline Winter F o r m a l .

SUNDAY, FEB. 7 F a c u l t y Recital, Snow Auditorium. 4 p.m.

TUESDAY, FEB. 9 IRC Banquet meeting. D u r f e e IDining Hall, 6 p.m.

W E D N E S D A Y , ' F E B . 10 Hope at Olivet College.

THURSDAY, FEB. 11 " C r u c i b l e , " Little T h e a t e r , 8:30 p.m. Joint Voice Recital, Snow Auditorium. 8:15 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 12 " C r u c i b l e , " Little T h e a t e r , 8:30 p.m. Dorian Winter F o r m a l . Alpha Phi Winter F o r m a l .

SATURDAY, FEB. 13 Knickerbocker Winter F o r m a l . Hope at Alma College. So^osis Winter F o r m a l . " C r u c i b l e . " Little T h e a t e r . 8:30 p.m.


•1 •

Page 8

Hope College anchor

January 22, 1965

ULCERITIS—Coaches (left to right) Lawrence Green. Daryl Siedentop and Kuss De Vctte arc eauprht in an apprehensive moment in the Kalamazoo g a m e .

85-81 Victory

Dutch Defeat Kazoo Hornets

i

hy James Mace

THE STRETCH—Forward Clare Van Wieren's reach is a bit longer than Kalamazoo's Boh Purcell (25) and Bob Tenary (23) in the Hope victory over Kalamazoo last Saturday.

Keeping their chances alive in the MIAA, Hope's Flying Dutchmen defeated the Kalamazoo Hornets, 85-81, in what was termed a " m u s t " g a m e for the Dutch last Saturday night at the Civic Center. Kalamazoo, who was considered to be a contender in early season ratings but who has failed to live up to those promises, decided to have a hot shooting night, but the Dutch had just enough to overcome the Hornets. Hope and the Hornets battled from the opening tip with Hope making two fast steals and moving out to a quick. 5-1, advantage. However. Kalamazoo c a m e right back and with two flicks of the hand Tom Nicolai tied the contest for the visitors.

m

v'

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THE TIP-IN—Clare Van Wieren (54) tips in a basket in the middle of his teammates and opposing Kalamazoo players. Hope won 85-81.

Although the g a m e continued on an even keel for the m a j o r i t y of the first half, it soon b e c a m e apparent that Kalamazoo was having difficulty missing many shots and by the half the Hornets led 44-41. Hope, however, was shooting above a v e r a g e and the work of Floyd Brady, Clare Van Wieren and Roy Anker on the boards kept the Dutch right with the hot shooting Kazoo five. When the shooting p e r c e n t a g e s w e r e announced for the first half. Kalamazoo had shot a phenomenal 69 per cent, while the Dutch had hit on 48 per cent of their shots. However. a decisive rebounding edge for the Dutch kept the margin close. However, as torrid as the pace was in the first half and as deadly as the Hornets were from the floor. Hope could easily have erased that a d v a n t a g e and built up one of their own had they been able to connect f r o m the foul line. The Dutch missed 13 of 19 shots f r o m the charity stripe, including m a n y bonus efforts. The Hornets refused to cool off in the second half but s o m e tremendous shooting by Clare Van Wieren

To,,

Hope Junior Varsity Cagers Win In Battle Against K College Team Hope's junior varsity recorded its fourth win in nine outings this season when it topped the Kalamazoo Hornets, 67-61, at the Civic Center last Saturday night. Tom Felon was once again the high scorer for the Dutch with 29 points. Hone led 27-21 at the half but the Hornets nulled close in the second half until Felon and Rich. Zondag on; the contest out of reach. Ch Qrall the Dutch made 25 shots from the floor for a 33

per cent shooting average. Zondag finished second in scoring honors for the Dutch with nine points, while Paul Wassenaar and Jim Thomas chipped in with eight markers and Craig Holleman added six. Raloh Wellington led the Hornets in scoring with 19 noints. Coach Siedentop and his caeers received some bad news when it was found that Jeff HoUe^bacb had iniuredjiis lee and would he sidelined for at least two weeks.

Scorers PTS. AVG.

Clare Van Wieren

230

20.9

Floyd

Brady

182

16.5

Carl

Walters

109

9.9

Chris

Buys

100

9.1

Bill Potter

80

7.3

Roy Anker

74

6.7

Dean Overman

38

4.2

J o h n Simons

23

2.9

Don Kronerneyer

22

4.4

Jim Klein

17

2.4

coupled with excellent luck, kept the Dutch even. Finally, with only two minutes r e m a i n i n g in the contest, and Hope down by five, its g r e a t e s t m a r g i n since the first half, the Dutch, spear-headed by co-captain Van Wieren ran off nine straight points to nail down the verdict. Van Wieren tallied five of the nine m a r k e r s , while Carl Walters and Don Kroncmeyer had a basket apiece. With the m a r g i n nowr at 83-79 in favor of the Dutch, the Hornets finally collapsed and m a d e ony one out of five shots in the warvng moments. J i m P e t e r s missed the last Hornet shot on a turn-around j u m p e r

and Walters grabbed*the rebound. Walters was fouled and converted two foul shots with a second remaining to clinch the game. Van Wieren once again led the Hope s c o r e r s with 23 points, while Brady was again right 'behind him with 11 m a r k e r s . Bill Potter and the newly-reinstated Kroncm e y e r were also in double figures for the w i n n e r s with 15 and II points respectively. Roy Anker. 5, Carl Walters,. 4. Chris Buys. 3, and Dave Bruininks with 2 were the other Hope scorers. Tom Nicolai led all s c o r e r s With 29 points. Jick Bark en bus tallied 13 and P e t e r s added 12 more points for the losers.

EMU Grapplers Win Win Over Dutch Matmen by James Mace Hope traveled to Vpsilanti last S a t u r d a y to engage in its second wrestling match of the season willi ;I'.L* E a s t e r n Mich : gan UnivcrsiU f r e s h m e n , and dropped its secjiid encounU'r by a s c o r e of 29-3. This time Danny Howe, wrestling m the 147-pound class, was the lone winner for the Dutch as he decisionei Rich Steele, 4-2. In the previous meet against Adrian. Hal lluggms had been the only Hope victor. Hug'jins. however, met d e f e a t in his match as Dave Crawford topped him. 5-0. luacli m a t c h cons i s k d of three two-minute time periods which were p r e - a r r a n g e d by both squads before the m a t c h began. Coach Kldon (Ireij had four men who should have wrestled in the i.V'-|)0und class, but because they u on id have forfeited if they hadn't they w e r e forced to wrestle in higher weight brackets. Muggins was. decisioned in the 157-pound division, while Ron Kronerneyer was pinned by Lee Stoll in the second period of the 177-pound class, and John Wormuth was pinned by Mike Srock in the unlimited heavyweight bracket.

In lighter divisions, J i m Hardy was b e a t e n . . 8-0 by J i m Todd in the 123-pound class, while Dave Lubbers was pinned by Abe Chamie iu the 137-pound division. Hope lost in the 130-pound class via forfeit. Hope's next match will be on Feb. 2 against the Kalamazoo Hornets in the Carnegie G y m n a s i u m .

WAA Baskethall Team Defeated Hope's WAA girl's basketball squad dropped its second g a m e of the season J a n . 13 to Calvin at the Knollcrest c a m p u s , 48-20. Previously the Hope girls had been defeated by Alma 26-24 in their initial g- m e of the campaign. Sally Kooistra led the losers with nine points as she had to c a r r y the brunt of the attack with Delia Kuiper sidelined with an ankle injury, Joyce Flipse. who played defense, turned in a strong effort although she was unable to contain the bigger Calvin girls. Last Saturday the Hope coeds suffered their third consecutive defeat at the hands of Kalamazoo, losing 40-28 in Carnegie Gymnasium. Sally Kooistra was high s c o r e r with 11 points.

A & W ROOT BEER Good Food To Go W i t h An Already Famous Drink

Just past the corner of 8th and Columbia

Profile for Hope College Library

01-22-1965  

01-22-1965  

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