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Anchor

the

So...you get that from Santa.? January I 996

Hope College • H o l l a n d , Michigan • A n independent n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • Serving the H o p e College C o m m u n i t y f o r 109 years

check it out.

Q %

> 'Friends': For keeps or a passing fad? InFocus, page 3.

P l e d g i n g p r o p o s a l passes u n a n i m o u s l y JODI MC FAR L A N D staff r e p o r t e r

Hours of deliberation, debate and discussion have come to an official close following a unanimous vote to adopt the Proposal to Restructure Pledging. The Campus Life Board approved the proposal at its D e t . 12 meeting. The new proposal takes effect this Spring, and in theory will make the way pledging used to be done a thing of the past. T h e proposal o u t l i n e s new g u i d e l i n e s for structuring pledging so that it is more educational and less hazing-prone. The four-hour meeting to vote was dedicated to the lengthy process of reviewing the document and m o d i f y i n g it into one on which all Board members could agree. The proposal in the hands of Board members was literally hot off the presses, and was the latest in a series of everevolving versions of the proposal.

The Board rushed the document so that the final copies could be distributed to Greeks to review over the break, so that they will be ready to i m p l e m e n t c h a n g e s this semester. At the m e e t i n g , t h e Board reviewed length of pledging time, the iss u e of c a l i s t h e n i c s in p l e d g i n g and accountability. " T h e c o n c e r n that I have about these smaller matters is that it will be a document I haven't even read," said Board member Ron Wolthuis. "We are literally rewriting the document." But the last-minute changes were still "in the spirit of the document," Board chair Jim Allis said. One of the most apparent changes wrought

by the proposal will be a longer pledging period. The time frame shifts up from two weeks, three weekends to three and a half weeks, four weekends. Total hours for pledging and related activities will b e 85, a l l o w i n g Greeks a m a x i m u m of 2 5 h o u r s per w e e k to enculture their new recruits. As part of the new deal, Greek o r g a n i z a tions will be required to submit a detailed listing of their pledging activities, including a description of the activity and the time and place it will occur. For each event, the organizations will be required to have one or more alumni present, and will be subject to spot checking, when Col-

There have been injuries... and not all have been handled appropriately. —Janet Andersen, Campus Life Board

more PLEDGING on 2

H a n d s clasp for Dr. King JENN DORN cam pus beat editor

Safe from parietals w r i t e u p s for another hour. CampusBeat, page 2.

r Intermission's newest critic likes his salad row: Tony's Salad Bowl. Intermission page 7.

Lady D u t c h eat O l i v e t for lunch with 42 point road victory. Sports, page 6.

«-% Best places to ski, sled, and skate. Spotlight, page 5.

Members of the community joined Hope students and faculty to pay homage Martin Luther King Jr. A packed Dimnent Chapel housed the service, which has taken palce annually for the past five years, Monday, January 15 at 7 pm. The evening began with a commemorative slide presentation, w h i c h featured photos of Martin Luther King and of the civil rights stuggle. A litany of commemoration was read by members of Hope faculty and students, and included verses read in Cherokee, Laotian, and Spanish. "We are here to celebrate the life and teaching of Martin Luther King Jr. and to c o m m e m o rate his dream," said Lamell McMorris, who was the featured guest speaker at this year's service. McMorris spoke passionately about the theme of the service, " R e m e m b e r i n g the Past to Better the Future." He urged the audience to position themselves in the present, yet still recall the past and anticipate the future. "Martin Luther King embodied the theme of tonight's service," McMorris said. "He held onto the present, but still had hope for the future. We cannot remember the past or better the future until we grasp the present. There is hope for a better tomorrow by working for a better today. Our call is to remember the past; what it was and how it used to be in order to create a new tomorrow." McMorris urged the audience to accept the challenge to better America, a struggle which has been fought since King's time and before. "The dreamer woke up and saw the nightmare of t h e s o c i a l a n d e c o n o m i c s i t u a t i o n s , " McMorris said. "You, the youth, are standing in the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. You are the creators and initiators of social change. You must stand up to re-build and re-unite America." Throughout the service, the Gospel Choir sang songs of praise and remembrance and involved the audience in their singing of spiritual anthems. They started out with the national Negro Hymn "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and also included a rendition of "We Shall Overcome." Audience members and speakers alike were moved by the emotional and driving performance of the choir. "I am fired up, thanks to the Gospel Choir!" McMorris said. Admission to the service was free, though donations were accepted. Each year, donations are accepted at the service and all proceeds go to a local organization that works to help satisfy the community needs. This year the recipient of the donations was the St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church, which recently suffered over $1 million in damages due to a fire. "This year the choice for the organization was fairly obvious," said John Yielding of the Education Department. "The parish at St. Francis is one of the most culturally diverse in the area. Every cent that we collect will go to St. Francis to help them get back on their feet, to build back and to move forward."

i

I

>Anc/7or p h o t o b y Jill F i s c h e r

Building Hope: Katherine Kruse ('97), a Habitat for Humanity volunteer, works to reconstruct a home on 14th St. and Columbia for a Holland family Saturday afternoon. The on-going project should be completed by May.

Take a deep breath... L a w allows on-the-spot JODI MC FAR L A N D staff reporter

The rules of the underaged drinking game are changing, and Public Safety and Dean Frost want students to know about it—before they get arrested. State legislators passed a policy effective last September that allows police officers to slop any minor they believe may have consumed alcohol and administer a preliminary breath test ( P B T ) on t h e s p o t . Blowing a .02 percent in the PBT will result in a citation for underaged drinking. The level of intoxication punishable for drivers is a significantly higher .1 percent. Any person refusing the PBT will be cited for a civil i n f r a c t i o n and fined $164. "There's a real strong emphasis on zero tolerance," said Dean of Students Richard Frost. "My concern is for students who go to a party and have had one beer, two beers." Frost and officers at Public Safety are teaming up to educate students about the law to avoid confusion similar to that which sprung up last fall regarding several citations for "frequenting a house of ill fame." The citations were handed out by city police at an off-campus party, and recipients cried out about the unfairness of this "obscure" infraction.

alcohol

testing

of minors

"It's one of those laws like the house of ill f a m e law," Frost said. " S t u d e n t s need to be aware that officers have that as part of their protocol." " I ' m afraid that there's going to be quite a few people that could be arrested under this new law," said Duane Terpstra, Director of Public Safety. While Public Safety officers are also equipped with the PBTs, officers have decided against checking students for alcohol consumption on c a m p u s because they fear it could make students hesitate to call for assistance when an intoxicated student needs medical attention. "Most all of our alcohol complaints will be h a n d l e d in t h e s a m e m a n n e r , " Terpstra said. "We want people not to be afraid to call us when there is a medical problem because of this law." P u b l i c S a f e t y will continue to handle alcohol complaints by referring them to Student Development. "Our responsibility is more to the College and the students, and not to get statistics on how many people we could arrest," Terpstra said. Terpstra and Frost hope that informed stud e n t s will play it smart w h e n it c o m e s to underaged drinking and the new policy. There will be an informational meeting regarding the new alcohol policy tonight at 7 pm. in the Maas Conference Room.

I'm afraid that there's going to be quite a few people that could be arrested under this new law. —Duane Terpstra, Director of Public Safety


theA

C a m p u s Beat:

Local m a n dies in D o w

M I C H E L L E PIEL staff reporter

A 36-year-old Zceland c o m m u nity m e m b e r died in the D o w M o n -

the police, the fire d e p a r t m e n t , and an a m b u l a n c e also arrived o n the

day, D e c e m b e r 11, 1995.

scene.

Keith Van Peursen w a s p l a y i n g wallyball w h e n he c o l l a p s e d f r o m

C P R w a s p e r f o r m e d on Van Peursen. He w a s then taken to Hol-

an a p p a r e n t heart attack, said G r e g

land C o m m u n i t y Hospital w h e r e he w a s p r o n o u n c e d dead on arrival.

W T H S t e m p o r a r i l y falls silent Students m a y not have been w a k ing u p to the n o r m a l s o u n d s of 89.9 W T H S this past w e e k . Instead the s r a t c h y s o u n d s o f s t a t i c is w h a t e m e r g e d f r o m their r a d i o s to w a k e

lanuary

I 7, I 9 9 6

G r a n t allows t h e a t r e face-lift

campus briefs

O l g e r s of Public Relations. Public S a f e t y w a s notified, and

nchor

T h i s past s u m m e r a radio station in K a l a m a z o o d o n a t e d s o m e furniture to W T H S at no c h a r g e . T h e production studio was remodeled this past s u m m e r and the on-air stu-

T h e theater d e p a r t m e n t d o e s n ' t have to worry about c r a m p e d space any longer. A recent grant has helped the d e p a r t m e n t with the final f u n d i n g for a m a j o r renovation and e x p a n s i o n project that will begin in S e p t e m b e r of 1996. H o p e C o l l e g e has recently been a w a r d e d the final $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 n e e d e d

building p r e v i o u s sets." T h e new scene shop will add

nol ogy that will b e a d d e d to the theater," said Kevin E d l e f s o n ( ' 9 8 ) .

q u i t e a bit of w o r k i n g s p a c e f o r those building the sets. It will ex-

" T h e lighting s y s t e m will be upd a t e d w h i c h will b r i n g the technol-

pand in size f r o m 1200 s q u a r e feet

ogy up to that of m o d e r n t h e a t e r

to a p p r o x i m a t e l y 5 4 0 0 s q u a r e feet. "In the past, the sets for p r o d u c tions w o u l d h a v e to be built out o n the main s t a g e b e c a u s e the s p a c e in the s h o p w a s too s m a l l , " said Jen J e n k i n s ( ' 9 8 ) . " T h e e x p a n s i o n of

T h e $ 5 2 0 , 0 0 0 project will include

w o r k s p a c e for c o n s t r u c t i o n will give the p e r f o r m e r s m o r e p r a c t i c e lime on stage." R e n o v a t i o n s in the t h e a t e r will

e x p a n s i o n of t h e s c e n e r y d e s i g n s h o p and restoration of the theater.

include n e w doors, r e f u r b i s h i n g the seals throughout the auditorium,

by the A r t h u r Vining D a v i s F o u n dation out of Jacksonville, Florida.

lighting s y s t e m s , " said Erik Alberg, visiting p r o f e s s o r in theater. T h e r e n o v a t i o n a n d construction for e x p a n s i o n in the t h e a t e r will b e g i n next fall f o l l o w i n g the season of Hope S u m m e r Repertory T h e a t e r . T h e p r o j e c t s h o u l d be near c o m p l e t i o n in t h e s p r i n g of 1997. T h e theater, w h i c h has ben virtually u n c h a n g e d s i n c e 1971, will not b e used for p r o d u c t i o n s d u r i n g the 1 9 9 6 - 1 9 9 7 school year. Instead, directors, students, and production

" T h e addition will be off the

c h a n g e s in the lighting s y s t e m , bet-

T h e s t u d i o at the station is g e t -

dio is c u r r e n t l y b e i n g r e - d o n e . " T h e n e w f u r n i t u r e will g i v e the

n o r t h w e s t side of the s c e n e s h o p

c r e w s will find o t h e r p l a c e s to pre" P e r f o r m a n c e s p a c e s for n e x t y e a r ' s s h o w s could possibly include

them f r o m their slumber. ting a m a k e - o v e r and the c u r r e n t

studio a more professional look,"

and m o v e toward the alley in a stair

ter accessibility to the theater for people with disabilities, a n e w s t a g e

c h o a s is only t e m p o r a r y . T h e sta-

said E r i c H u l t g r e n ( ' 9 6 ) , g e n e r a l

step f a s h i o n " said Paul A n d e r s o n ,

floor, and r e p l a c i n g the c a r p e t i n g .

tion is s c h e d u l e d to go back on the air T h u r s d a y , J a n u a r y 18 at 6 a.m.

m a n a g e r at W T H S .

h e a d of t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n s h o p . " W h e n the project is finished the

" O n the technical side, the c h a n g e s in the theater will be p o s i -

s h o p will be a w h o l e n e w building

tive b e c a u s e the s t u d e n t s will get an

t h e s t u d i o t h e a t e r l o c a t e d in t h e

p l a c e c o m p a r e d to t h e c r o w d e d space w e ' v e been w o r k i n g in w h i l e

accurate feel of m o d e r n theater through the greatly e n h a n c e d t e c h -

b a s e m e n t of D e W i t t , " c o m m e n t e d

S t u d e n t Congress ups activities fee S t u d e n t s will h a v e to f o r k o v e r a little m o r e cash next y e a r for student activities. Student C o n g r e s s passed a m o tion that will raise the S t u d e n t A c -

e r s , p r i n t e r s , s c a n n e r s , and o t h e r technical e q u i p m e n t for s t u d e n t org a n i z a t i o n s . An a p p r o p r i a t i o n s committee decides which groups

pare and p e r f o r m their p r o d u c t i o n s .

M a s s A u d i t o r i u m , L u b b e r s Hall and

Alberg.

PLEDGING from I lege o f f i c i a l s c a n d r o p in on their events to assure that they are indeed

with f e a r of penally. T h i s will put

there h a v e been injuries, and all the

get h o w m u c h m o n e y , b a s e d o n

an e n d to t h e c a r r y i n g o f p l e d g e

i n j u r i e s h a v e had to d o with calis-

need and r e q u e s t . T h e S A P has been increased three

f o l l o w i n g their p r o g r a m .

b o o k s and the e x t e n s i v e e x e r c i s e of

Disregard for agreed pledging par a m e t e r s , or the s u b m i s s i o n o f a

m e m o r i z i n g i n f o r m a t i o n in p r e p a ration for q u i z z i n g .

t h e n i c s , a n d n o t all h a v e b e e n h a n d l e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y " said Janet

provable false pledging program

Level Two infractions include the

capital e q u i p m e n t , su ch a s c o m p u t -

will land on the s h o u l d e r s of the or-

use of t h r e a t e n i n g or i n t i m i d a t i n g

D e W i t t custodian suffers h e a r t attack

ganization as well as on t h o s e indi-

interrogations, assigning pledges

A l s o a s a part of t h e n e w pro-

v i d u a l m e m b e r s w h o s i g n e d the

degrading nicknames, requiring

g r a m , all s t u d e n t s w h o rush will be

pledging program.

u n c o m f o r t a b l e or inappropriate

required to attend a n i n f o r m a t i o n a l

dress, prevention or deprivation of sleep or study l i m e , or u s i n g b l i n d -

p l e d g e e d u c a t i o n s e s s i o n that will i n f o r m t h e m of t h e i r rights a s stu-

folds without approval f r o m A n n e Bakker-Gras, director of student

d e n t s and p l e d g e s at the C o l l e g e . Despite the B o a r d ' s extensive l a s t - m i n u t e scrutiny of the policy,

tivity Fee $ 3 a s e m e s t e r , s t a r t i n g in the Fall of 1996. T h e additional m o n e y will g o tow a r d s the p u r c h a s i n g of a d d i t i o n a l

A night c u s t o d i a n in the D e W i t t C e n t e r had a heart a t t a c k in the Kletz Friday, J a n u a r y 5, 1996. Larry L e F e v e r w a s o n b r e a k in the m o r n i n g w h e n he b e g a n to exp e r i e n c e chest p a i n s . A c o - w o r k e r called 9 1 1 and P u b l i c S a f e t y arrived. T h e p o l i c e d e p a r t m e n t , the fire d e p a r t m e n t and an a m b u l a n c e arrived s o o n a f t e r w a r d s . L e F e v e r

times in the past five years, for a total increase of $ 1 2 s i n c e 1991.

nity Hospital. He e x p e r i e n c e d a slight heart attack, w h i c h did no d a m a g e to his heart, and a c o l l a p s e d left lung, acc o r d i n g to G o r d Hulst, of the c u s todial staff. "Larry is h o m e already. He is still w e a k , but can c o m e back to w o r k w h e n he f e e l s that he c a n , " Hulst said.

w a s then t a k e n to Holland C o m m u K E A R E E V

N E

U S

^WALKm CLOUDS From "Like

the director

of

Water For Chocolate"

" T h a t p r e s i d e n t , or that p l e d g e educator could be suspended," Frost said. " O r it m a y m e a n that they are put o n a w a r n i n g o r p r o b a t i o n . " T h e r e will definitely be s o m e personal a c c o u n t a b i l i t y for m e m b e r s

up the p r o p o s a l .

w h o sign their n a m e s to p r o g r a m s

activities, and Shelly S p e n c e r , the Greek Coordinator. The most severe infractions,

that deviate f r o m paper to reality. " T h e r e should b e s o m e responsibil-

s u m p t i o n of drugs, f o o d or a l c o h o l ,

of h o w it w o r k s this Spring, there m a y need to be c h a n g e s again.

unapproved calisthenics anywhere but the D o w Center, a b a n d o n i n g o r

revisited and w e ' l l add s o m e of

k i d n a p p i n g , paddling, or not a l l o w -

t h o s e revisions," W o l t h u i s s a i d .

ity to s i g n i n g y o u r n a m e , " Frost

Showing: 7:00, 9:30 & midnight Fri. & Sat. Son at 3pm

A n d e r s e n , Board m e m b e r and chair of the A d - h o c C o m m i t t e e that d r e w

said. T h e p o l i c y d i v i d e s h a z i n g into

Level T h r e e , prohibit f o r c e d c o n -

it passed u n a n i m o u s l y . M a n y m e m b e r s c o m m e n t e d that in the review

" T h i s d o c u m e n t m a y need to be

three levels. Level O n e i n f r a c t i o n s

ing p l e d g e s to w e a r c l o t h i n g a p p r o -

" I n e v i t a b l y there are g o i n g to be

include f o r c i n g p l e d g e s to use s p e -

s o m e g a p s that a p p e a r , " A n d e r s o n

cific d o o r w a y s or sit o n the floor in

priate to w e a t h e r c o n d i t i o n s . C a l i s t h e n i c s limited to the D o w

c o t t a g e s or d o r m s , requiring g r e e t -

w e r e a s u b j e c t of discussion at the

ings other than " m i s s , " "sir," etc. at any t i m e , r e q u i r i n g p l e d g e s to

m e e t i n g , but w e r e not a l t e r e d . M e m b e r s reasoned that at the D o w

m e m o r i z e and recite w o r d s and

there w o u l d b e a person trained to

p h r a s e s with no u s e f u l purpose, or r e q u i r i n g p l e d g e s t o carry i t e m s

h a n d l e i n j u r y o n site. " E v e r y y e a r as far as I a m a w a r e

agreed. If the policy fails to impact the w a y G r e e k s run things, their existe n c e is t h r e a t e n e d . " T h e r e ' s a very real possibility that if things d o n ' t i m p r o v e , they c o u l d b e s t o p p e d , " Allis said.

Change in parietals allows one more hour of visiting Proposal gets unanimous approval to push parietals back to 10 a.m. LAURA MIHAILOFF staff reporter

s e n t e d b e f o r e the R e s i d e n c e L i f e C o m m i t t e e . T h e proposal w a s re-

ment has proposed d i m i n i s h i n g pa-

only one d e p a r t m e n t tries, [a p r o -

for Kollen Hall said, "I am t e m p t e d

rietals,

posal] usually w o n ' t pass."

to s l o p m a l e s t u d e n t s t r a v e l i n g

t u r n e d to S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s a n d

according

to

Nina

more l i m e with that special s o m e -

m o u s l y by R e s i d e n c e L i f e a n d

one in their life. Chapel g o - e r s m a y escort their f r i e n d s without e x p e r i -

a g a i n at ihe C a m p u s Life level. " T h e l o n g term goal is to elimi-

Bieliauskas ( ' 9 7 ) , President of S t u T h i s time, however, n u m e r o u s redent Con- _ . . quests were sub•5 i $ ftA ALPHA i thm/k milled, namely g r e s s . In reGiPLS STILL /Aj T H F Poom f r o m the P h y s i / cent years, it'S 12.01 . GoiaJGiaJ./ c a l Plant, the request

e n c i n g the a g o n y of f r o s t y n o s e s d u r i n g Iheir l o n g wait o n the cold

nate p a r i e t a l s c o m p l e t e l y in c o t tages and a p a r t m e n t s , leaving only

sented to the

d o o r s t e p s of residence halls.

residence halls s u b j e c t to parietal

T h i s is d u e to a recent c h a n g e in the parietals rule, w h i c h will a l l o w

rule," L e w i s s a i d . " B u t for now, we

S t u d e n t s can n o w s p e n d a little

s t u d e n t s to enter a r e a s p r e v i o u s l y o f f - l i m i t s an extra hour earlier in the mornings. P a r i e t a l s will n o w b e : S u n d a y through T h u r s d a y 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. a n d F r i d a y t h r o u g h S a t u r d a y 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. O n O c t o b e r 26, 1995, the idea o f

p a s s e d . It w a s a c c e p t l y u n a n i -

a r e happy." T h e task of c h a n g i n g parietal h o u r s b e g a n w h e n a select g r o u p of the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n requested a proposal of Student C o n g r e s s . " A t first we w e r e hesitant," a d m i t s Katy Whitfield ( ' 9 8 ) , m e m b e r of Student C o n g r e s s and the Residential Life C o m m i t t e e . It m a y not have s e e m e d

c h a n g i n g parietals w a s i n t r o d u c e d by Kevin Lewis, ( ' 9 7 ) Student C o n -

like a p r o b a b l e request, but Student C o n g r e s s representatives decided to

gress Representative. O n e week later, a f o r m a l p r o p o s a l w a s pre-

take a l e a p for it, she s a i d . T h i s is not the first t i m e a d e p a r t -

has b e e n pre-

/

fromboth housek e e p i n g and m a i n -

t h r o u g h the w o m e n ' s side, but then I realize that it is perfectly allowed." O n e m o r e parietal-free hour e a c h day m a y not s e e m like m u c h of a c h a n g e for s t u d e n t s , but the d i f f e r e n c e is a l r e a d y f e l l by the m a i n t e n a n c e and custodial c r e w s , w h o can

tenance T h e proposal w a s div i d e d into t w o s e p a -

start their w o r k a little earlier now,

dents and

rate r e q u e s t s : o n e w a s

is f e m a l e , they used to h a v e to wait

f a c u l t y to

for all r e s i d e n c e hal l s

until 11 a . m . b e f o r e c l e a n i n g the

r e d u c e and even abort

and the o t h e r w a s for

m a l e r e s i d e n c e h a l l s , " said R i c h a r d Frost, D e a n of S t u d e n t s .

S t u d e n t Board by both

stu-

p a r i e t a hours, but failed. "This time was different," W h i t f i e l d said, " b e cause we received requests f r o m several d i f f e r e n t d e p a r t m e n t s . If

wft

cottages and a p a r t m e n t s . T h i s strategy w a s d e v i s e d to ensure that the proposal passed in both the R e s i d e n c e L i f e a n d C a m p u s Life b o a r d s . T h e c h a n g e , w h i c h w e n t into effect J a n u a r y 9, has m a d e little or n o d i f f e r e n c e in student traffic. Ellen A w a d , R e s i d e n t D i r e c t o r

t h a n k s to the c h a n g e . " S i n c e most o f the custodial staff

T h e extra hour also eliminates the i n t e r f e r e n c e of r e q u i r e d b r e a k s , s o ihe staff m a y c o m p l e t e m o r e w o r k in the s a m e a m o u n t of time. " A l m o s t o n e - h a l f of e a c h w o r k day is s a v e d with the c h a n g e , " said Mike McClusky, Maintenance Supervisor.


lanuary

(fa-Anchor

I 7, I 9 9 6

In F o c u s

Age of Aquarius? Heather Bosch T h e b l u c - j e a n clad h i p s t e r s w a d e t h r o u g h m u d and m u c k and pile into their rusty van a d o r n e d

J

with paintings of pink and yellow d a i s i e s and p s y c h e d e l i c s w i r l s . Amid the s m e l l s o f b u r n i n g incense, the flower children crusade a c r o s s the- n a t i o n , d i s c u s s i n g peace, h a r m o n y , a n d revolution. Destination—Washington, D.C. The Washington Monument rises b e f o r e them a n d t h o u s a n d s of youth s u r r o u n d t h e m , c h a n t i n g anti-war s l o g a n s , c a r r y i n g p l a c ards, and h o l d i n g h a n d s . T h i r t y y e a r s later, a c o l l e g e s o p h o m o r e c l i m b s into the new T o y o t a her father bought for her. Meticulously wiping a small c h u n k of dirt o f f her n e w J . C r e w h i k i n g b o o t s , s h e d r i v e s to the

Top-rated

mall. A f t e r c h a r g i n g a few i t e m s on her Visa, she drives to her best f r i e n d ' s h o u s e w h e r e six other

HEATHER BOSCH in-focus editor

f r i e n d s are already g a t h e r e d . T h e r e they d i s c u s s the hippest T V s h o w s and their m a n y

For s o m e , T h u r s d a y

plaguing problems, including their w e a r i n e s s of a t t e n d i n g the

night television is a r e l a x i n g ritual

c o l l e g e that their p a r e n t s pay for. I f i r m l y b e l i e v e that I a m at-

of c o u c h potato glory. For others, it's an evening of slack-jawed drool-

t e n d i n g c o l l e g e 3 0 y e a r s too late. S t u d e n t s in the s i x t i e s w e r e

ing at m o d e l e s q u e m i d r i f f - b a r i n g babes. A n d all can r e c o g n i z e that it

swept u p in a spirit of revolution.

is indeed a national p h e n o m e n o n .

sitcom sucks in college students take real-life situations and m a k e

can b e t r a n s f o r m e d i n t o a s h a g -

t h e m funny."

s p o r t i n g "Friends"

Beau Batten ('98), another "Friends" fan, says that "Everyone's good looking.

J e n n i f e r A n i s t o n is g o r g e o u s . " Dr. Ted Nielsen, p r o f e s s o r of

explanation of the s h o w ' s in-

justices and q u e s t i o n e d authority.

p e o p l e as w e can into o u r r o o m and

Uprisings, e n l i g h t e n m e n t , sit-ins,

w a t c h 'Friends,'"says Strehler ( ' 9 8 ) . " T h e r e ' s no t a l k i n g al-

credible success. " T h e key

W s . T h e vast m a j o r i t y of p e o p l e are m o r e c o n c e r n e d about the

cials." "Usually w e ' r e so en-

A b e r c r o m b i e a n d Fitch s p r i n g line or R o s s a n d R a c h e l ' s f l u c t u -

thralled that no o n e s a y s any-

a t i n g r e l a t i o n s h i p than they a r e about the p r o b l e m s in o u r c o m munities and the w o r l d .

to b e q u i e t . " A b o o b tube marvel that premiered September 22, 1994,

Today, n a t i o n s live with traditions of turmoil and b l o o d b a t h . H u m a n rights are denied and innocent people are oppressed. T h e r e are i s s u e s a p l e n t y t o d a y

thing, but if they do they're told

"Friends"

has picked up eight

E m m y n o m i n a t i o n s and rocketed up the Nielsen T V ratings, grabbing

such broad appeal? And, beyond t h a t , w h y h a s it b e c o m e s u c h a

nineties c o u l d n ' t c a r e less. It's not that I ' m c o n d o n i n g the hippie lifestyle. But w h a t 1 find so a d m i r a b l e about the y o u t h protest m o v e m e n t of t h e sixties w a s that they had a cause. A p a s sion. Something beyond themselves that they were energetically devoted and c o m m i t t e d to.

Needing

widespread obsession? " T h e i r lives and situations are very real and so you have a c o n n e c tion to t h e i r c h a r a c t e r s " Strehler said. "I think the s h o w is big because the characters are really f u n , " said Ann Byland ('99). "They

"I t h i n k that i t ' s kind o f g e t t i n g o u t of h a n d , " said v

A n n a R e s e l e (*98). "All the h y p e is just m a k i n g it c h e e s y .

Frequently Asked Questions page, where your

, .

heart's heaviest q u e s t i o n s

"I g u e s s t h e y ' r e supposed to be people you can identify with,

but r e a l l y — t h e y ' r e not," Aslanian ( ' 9 9 ) s a i d . " N o n e o f t h e m really h a v e j o b s o r s e e m to really work, but they have t h e s e g o r g e o u s

can b e r e s o l v e d .

a p a r t m e n t s . . . t h e y just h a n g o u t on

"Friends" sweatshirts. "Friends" posters. A n d the o h - s o -

t h e i r couch. one

"Television sets s t y l e s a m o n g a certain age g r o u p , a n d "Friends*

dispute that w i t h

Jennifer Aniston fix? One only

Nielsen said. " T h e spin-off merc h a n d i s i n g has really b e e n s u c c e s s -

n e e d s to t r e k to

ful."

more

FRIENDS on 8

p e p p y t h e m e s o n g that e v e r y o n e k n o w s b y heart.

targets the 18-34 age b r a c k e t , "

m u g on every-

B e f o r e , it w a s just a good show, and n o w t h e y ' r e killing it."

"

a

view her

and "Seinfeld."

frenzy involves

m u c h , much m o r e than a T h u r s d a y evening T V show.

the third p l a c e spot last week, just

those h i p p i e s into d r a m a t i c a c A n d yet the youth of the

"Friends"

trailing "ER"

W h y d o e s this T V s h o w have

tion.

W h a t e v e r it m a y be, this

the nearest 7E l e v e n to

that w o u l d h a v e j u s t i n f l a m e d

They're like everyone's ideal life. -Jen Aslanian ('99)

is that the w r i t i n g is very well done. It's really crucial."

its likability.

Jennifer Aniston Home Page and The "Friends

h e r e at H o p e , has a different

J u s t ask Lori Strehler. "Every week, w e c r a m a s many

lowed except during c o m m e r -

Even w a n d e r e r s in c y b e r s p a c e can b e h a u n t e d by m o r e than 1 0 0 "Friends" internet sites. A s s o r t e d w e b g e m s are the

the broadcast news courses

C o n v i n c e d they c o u l d c h a n g e the world, they loudly protested in-

and protests m a r k e d the usual day. A n d , well, here we are in the

And

Still, s o m e say m e r c h a n d i z i n g the s exy sextet s t r i p s the s h o w o f

clone.

You have to find out if Ross and Rachel are ever going to get together. -Ann Byland ('98)

(

thing f r o m "People" t o "Tiger Beat." Or wander into your local BoRic's and you too

W h e n w e look back at those years, we see insurrection and idealism.

Dramatic

f l o o d e d the nation.

change

And these

history-changing events happened all b e c a u s e of a f e w moti-

C a m p u s Pulse / V ^ W h e n a s k e d their t h o u g h t s o n the T V s h o w "Friends,"

^A-^AWUw

H o p e S t u d e n t s said...

vated y o u t h . T h e prevailing attitude of the nineties youth c o u l d n ' t b e f a r t h e r f r o m that of the sixties. T h e y o u n g generation that lived in that turbulent t i m e tried to m a k e a diff e r e n c e , and as a result left a huge mark in history. A s for t h e nineties, a p a t h y and w h i n i n g s e e m t o reign a s the s u p r e m e traits. What will it take to get us off of o u r L a z y - B o y s and get i n v o l v e d ? W h a t do w e really c a r e about? W h a t will we, the youth of the nineties, be r e m e m b e r e d for?

" I t ' s a g o o d s h o w that actually m a k e s m e laugh." — S c o t t VanderBeek ( ' 9 6 )

" I t ' s a g o o d s t r e s s reliever." —Missy Greydanus ('97)

"People

make

their

schedules around 'Friends.*" —Stacie Richards ('97)


rteAnchor

Opinion

January

an

o u r voice.

I 7, I 9 9 6

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR.

M a k i n g t h e d r e a m a reality T h e energy at the Martin L u t h e r King c o m m e m o r a t i v e celebration M o n d a y night w a s amazing. The Gospel C h o i r lit u p the stage with songs of praise, Hope College students and Holland c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s g a v e m o v i n g t e s t i m o n y in s e v e r a l l a n g u a g e s on t h e importance and impact of K i n g ' s actions. Then t w e n t y - t w o year old Lamell M c M o r r i s addressed the difficulties of K i n g ' s tough love peace policy and the need to f u l f i l l the d r e a m b e g u n f i v e d e c a d e s ago. M c M o r r i s received a standing ovation. And at the end of the hour, participants stood hand-in-hand to sing " W e Shall O v e r c o m e . " It w a s a scene surely King, too, w o u l d have applauded. But a s M c M o r r i s s a i d . K i n g ' s d r e a m of f r e e d o m and equality for all still has a long way to g o before being fulfilled. Sadly, the stories told in 1996 are just as heartbreaking as those told in 1956. T h e y are not tales of bloody lynchings or of " C o l o r e d " signs barring the entry of blacks in public places. Racism remains o m n i p r e s e n t , today however, and rears its ugly head in more subtle w a y s . The blows dealt in our modern day are often verbal or c o m e in the f o r m of ignorance in a society that often forgets the struggle for equality continues: • In 1996, people of color are allowed to enter any store they please, yet m a n y report they are o f t e n followed by sales clerks to ensure m e r c h a n d i s e is not stolen. • T h o u g h the practice of redlining is outlawed, many people of color say they find themselves shunned at the neighborhood W e l c o m e W a g o n and school board meetings. • T h o s e c l i m b i n g the corporate ladder, w h e n promoted, say they find t h e m s e l v e s q u e s t i o n i n g the reasoning behind their

Julie Blair Yessiree. T h i s is the semester. O n e - h u n d r e d percent class attendance. An " A " in " G e o l o g y 108: T h e Evolution of Plate Tectonics." No c a f f e i n e . No fat. A pledge to change the sheets every four weeks. Happy 1996 and w e l c o m e back. We hope you all had a break filled with meaningless reruns and Christm a s leftovers. We here at The Anchor are gearing u p for another 12 mega-issues of Stuff T h a t ' s Informative, Stuff T h a t ' s Fun and Stuff T h a t ' s Sporty. This semester's Anchor is written in part by our three new scrappy section editors, Jenn Dorn, Melissa Herwaldt and Heather Bosch. Like many of the C a m p u s B e a t e d i t o r s w h o have c o m e t h r o u g h ranks at The Anchor, Jenn is training to go into the profession of print journalism. A second-year student with junior standing and a French major and english/communication c o m p o s i t e , Jenn b e g a n b y - l i n i n g this fall under Jodi McFarland. A gutsy reporter, Jenn is known to dig up sources like a hungry kid looking for chocolate. Melissa, a sophomore english major, began writing for The An-

Anchor

photo

by Jill F i s c h e r

Fresh blood: Jenn Dorn ('98), Melissa Herwaldt ('98), and Heather Bosch ('98) move up the ranks to editorships. chor last s p r i n g u n d e r S u f j a n Stevens in the Arts and Entertainment section. S h e returned to The Anchor this fall to write for the new Intermission section, reporting on threatre and art and pounding out the occasional c o l u m n . Melissa says she plans to m a k e her mark on the section by shifting coverage to include more p o p culture—movie reviews and restaurant reviews, items she says hold appeal to the weekend crowds. Heather, a staff reporter since the fall of '95, succeeds Jim Riekse as the office political science junkie. A s o p h o m o r e on the law s c h o o l track. Heather d e b u t s as InFocus editor with a trend story and c o m m e n t a r y o n t h e hit c o m e d y "Friends" Read her c o l u m n and

you may think twice about flipping on the b o o b tube Thursday night. Let Jenn, Melissa and Heather k n o ^ of breaking stories concerning c a m p u s news, the arts and politics, and they'll look into them. Also, do to the o v e r w h e l m i n g n u m b e r of d i a m o n d s w e ' v e spotted glittering across c a m p u s this January, w e ' v e a d d e d a n e w c o l u m n called "For Keeps," a weekly profile section on newly engaged couples. D r o p us a line via e-mail, or give us a call. We'd love to help you celebrate your news. Best of luck as you gear u p for another semester. We hope you'll have success in keeping those lofty New Year's resolutions.

promotions. • Every Walgreens, M e i j e r ' s and K-Mart in A m e r i c a still sells B a n d - A i d s in only o n e color: white. Martin Luther King, Jr. had a d r e a m . We must carry forth this d r e a m and challenge o n e another to bring it to fruition. S o m e d a y , m a y b e our society will recognize injuries c o m e in more than o n e color.

j/f Grand Slam 'Romance freshmen

meet the press editor-in-chief operation manager campusbeat editor spotlight editor infocus editor intermission editor sports editor graphics editor' photo editors

jiykerk Cup Competition then year. She had a chocolate shake and fries. He had two eggs over easy, toast and a side order of hash browns.

They shared a meal at

s after the

Four years later they've decided to share dinner together—forever. Jeremy p r o p o s e d to Kathy on January 5, 1996. She said

"yes."

Julie Blair Arin Neucks Jenn Dorn Amy-Lytin Halverson Heather Bosch Melissa Herwaldt Greg Pap laws ky Jacob Roesch Jill Fischer

photographer copy editor business mgr./ad rep page designers

Zach Johnson Matt Sterenberg Julie Harris Nina Bieliauskas Dave Schrier Angie Strey ad creator Becky Hollenbeck distribution manager Dan Oderkirk faculty advisor Dennis Renner

*

Glyn Williams • Becky Hollenbeck • Ally son Pickens Sandra Funk • Nicole McClain • Peter Emery Michelle Piel • Laura Mihailoff9 Ben Swets

Jeremy Van £k <§• cJCathy Qreclaw forPTKffl December 30, 1996.

The Anchor is a p r o d u c t o f s t u d e n t e f f o r t a n d is f u n d e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e C o l l e g e Student C o n g r e s s A p p r o p r i a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e . Letters t o the e d i t o r are e n c o u r a g e d , t h o u g h d u e t o s p a c e l i m i t a t i o n s the Anchor r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t . T h e o p i n i o n s a d d r e s s e d i n t h e e d i t o r i a l a r e solely t h o s e o f t h e e d i t o r - i n chief. Stories f r o m t h e H o p e C o l l e g e N e w s S e r v i c e a r e a p r o d u c t o f t h e Public R e l a t i o n s O f f i c e . O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o the Anchor a r e available f o r $ I I. W e r e s e r v e t h e r i g h t t o a c c e p t o r r e j e c t any a d v e r t i s i n g .

Anchor

the

If you've just decided to tie the knot, let us help you spread the news. Drop us a line at The Anchor and tell us your story. We'll put a picture of you and your fiance' in our new f o r ^ ^ j w c o l u m n . _ _

After all,

grand

slams

c o m e but

once

in a lifetime.

__


January

Anchor

I 7, H 9 9 6

Spotlight

Chilly thrills for the beginner and expert

C

ltÂťy

a

m

y

l

y

m

x

l i a - l v e r s o n

abin fever

e d i t o r

Yearning to shed wool socks and feel the cool green grass poke between your toes? Braving the cold

winas vinds vwhich sweep off Lake Michingan in only a fleece because you refuse to wear that winter coat one more day? Staring out the window at the gray surroundings, feeling groggy and sluggish from the minute you rise from bed? Winter starts t o cause sane people t o act insanely. Stephen King made this idea a reality in "The Shining." W e all saw what happened t o Jack Nicholson when he spent too much time under the influence of artifcial light. Before you repeat Nicholson's actions on your roomate. step outside. Michigan holds within its boundries a mulititude of snowy actvities. From taking a walk to spending hundreds of dollars on proper ski clothing, there are

activities for all. Start out

at a used sporting goods store and buy cheap goods, to test out your new winter hobby. Then, if interest grows, head over to Reliable Ski Haus or any other local ski bunny hangouts and check out their line of winter clothing and hardware. Lucky for you The Anchor did thler own price check based on stock at Reliable Ski Haus. Whether you stake out the slopes and head off to the 1998 Winter Olympic games, or just put up with the bunny hill for a season, at least you're not basking under those florescent bulbs.

softwear:

ss

W a r m layers and possibly a pair of sun-

S O f t w e a r S While surfing the slopes, boarders should cover their skin with jackets and rein-

glasses are what one should take on a cross country skiing

forced pants t o protect their knees and butts from multiple falls.The advantage to owning these

experience. It's like crazy NordicTrack outside in the fresh air.

threads is increased mobility while turning and jumping. Unlike skiing, snowboarding requires a good

Talk about a w o r k out! Skiing outside in the fresh air at a slow

solid pair of boots t o hold one in place while jetting down the slopes.

pace is a the way to get the body is shape for Spring Break.

0 &

h a r d w a r e : Try a second-hand pair of skis. N o t all

beginning: $155 M Boots

</> beginning: $150 Burton

i n t e r m e d i a t e : $ 159 K2 Clicker a d v a n c e d : $160 B u r t o n

lE i n t e r m e d i a t e : $200 M o r r o w ^

a d v a n c e d : $ 2 3 5 K2

h a r d w a r e : Whether yourVe just starting out or

are a veteran pro, a good board is a mustTry

several different brands to get a feel for what best fits your needs and wants. (/)

Q

beginning $300 Burton

2

beginning: $ 129 Burton

<

intermediate: $365 M o r r o w

S

intermediate: $ 150 Morrow

§

advanced: $400 K2

3

advanced$ 156 Lo-Back Burton

h O O k - i i p : Michigan might not have the Rockies, but that does not mean the hills here aren't great for riding. Spend time practicing here, and when you get to Colorado, you can show off your Mid-West moves. place: Crystal Mountain cjty:Thompsonville 31 North t i m e : 2.5 hours lift tickets: $35 weekend board rental: $25 all day base: 5 to 7 feet conditions: 100% open cool stuff, half pipe hours: weekend 9 am-10 p.m. contact: 378-2000

place: Cannonsburg city: Grand Rapids, Ml t i m e : 45-60 min l i f t t i c k e t s : $24 weekend b o a r d r e n t a l : $12 weekend base: 3 to 4 feet c o n d i t i o n s : 100% open cool stuff: half pipe hours: weekend 9 a.m.-10 p.m. c o n t a c t : 874-671 I

can handle the great o u t d o o r s during the cold. Make sure your boots fit well t o stop the place: Pigeon Creek Park city: Holland, Ml t i m e : 15-20 mins. level: beginner & up length: 15k layout: Forrest and woods surrounding area bonus: sledding hills marked trails restrooms c o n t a c t : Ottawa Recreation 846-8117

softwear:

f o r m a t i o n of blisters, place: Riley Trails c i t y : Holland, Ml t i m e : 15-20 mins. level: beginner & up l e n g t h : 7k layout: rolling terrain of open and forrest bonus: marked trails maps available restrooms contact: Park Township 399-4520

Remember not t o wear a scarf. They have

been k n o w t o get caught in the lift and present all sorts of hazards. Reflection f r o m the s n o w can be intense. Pick up a pair of goggles t o deflect the rays and keep snow chunks o u t of eyes. Layer up. Although temps are low enough t o keep snow solid, body temps can rise. j f j beginning: S p o r t USA $139 & up

i o o s o f t w e a r : Just t h r o w on your w a r m pants t o protect you

^

i n t e n n e d i a t e : Columbia $160 & up

^

a d v a n c e d : Spyder $500 & up

f r o m the falls and r e m e m b e r t o wear a hat. Gloves are nice h a r d w a r e : In addition t o skis, you'll need bind-

t o shield hands f r o m ice. D o n ' t forget good socks t o stop the blisters.

ings, boots, and poles. Most ski outfiters have package deals

'

including, skis, bindings, and poles t o fit the needs of any skier.

h a r d w a r e : All this winter sport requires is a pair of skates. Figure skates are nice because they are lighter in weight, but

O b e g i n n i n j c $249 Head

hockey skates help you increase your speed. Jet over t o Play It

^

Again Sports carries skates starting at $ 15 & up.

^ advanced:$ S:

place: Smallenburg Park city: Holland, Ml l o c a t i o n : walking distance by D e W i t t Tennis Center cost: free

place: Lakeview Elementary city: Holland, Ml l o c a t i o n : 32nd & Lugers Rd. cost: free

s o f t w e a r : Fashion. W h a t fashion? Slip into comfy jeans and bundle up. Remember a hat and gloves. h a r d w a r e : Plastic sleds and discs can be picked up at Play it Again Sports starting a $8 & up.

place:Van Raalte Farms city: Holland, Ml t i m e : 5-l0min cost: free n i g h t : well lit

i n t e r m e d i a ^ : $375 Head Elan lace: Bittersweet : Otsego. Ml tin^e: 60 mins. lift t i c k e t s : $22 weekend ski r e n t a l : $ 16 weekend hours: weekend 9am-10pm base: 4 inch c o n t a c t : 694-2032


^Anchor

Intermission

Tony's Salad Bowl

January

I 7, I 9 9 6

THE ARTS PAINTED A MELISSA HERWALDX Intermission Editor

T O S S I N G UP T H E FRESHEST, G R E E N E S T A R T S E V E N T S FOR YOUR TASTEFUL PALATE. DIG IN! "Pushing Hands" the Knickerbocker Theatre J a n . 12-20. s h o w t i m e s 7:00 a n d 9:00 nightly film is u n r a t e d . C h i n e s e . E n glish. w i t h E n g l i s h s u b t i t l e s J u s t w h e n you consider renting Ang Lee's "The Wedding B a n q u e t " for m a y b e the thirc time, y o u fine o u t h i s ' 9 2 feature film in^ " P u s h i n g Hands." has come to t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r . Wei go s e e It a l r e a d y ! T h i s film r e solves a r o u n d a s t r a n g e b r o o d called t h e C h u f a m i l y , i n c l u d n g a y u p p i e v e g e t a r i a n novelst. a n d a C h i n e s e T a i - c h i m a s ter. Lee h a s a w o n d e r f u l knacl< "or p o r t r a y i n g h u m a n s a s s t r u g gling. silly, i n t r i g u i n g t h i n g s . And so we are.

Hands

The P l y m o u t h Trio, Hope College G r e a t P e r b r m a n c e Series Sat. J a n . 20. 8 p . m . . Dimnent Memorial Chapel W h a t d o y o u get w h e n you cross J o h n Mack on the oboe C h r i s t i n a Price a n d h e r s o p r a n c u n g s . a n d Elizab e t h DiMio on keyDoard? M u s i c so Deautiful It's flabDergasting: m u s i c so s t i r r i n g y o u will r orget a b o u t t h e lard seats and :he fact t h a t y o u r eet i t c h . Their music s p a n s baroque. classical. romantic, and contemporary works. T h i s p r e s t i g i o u s trio h a s a n m p e c c a b l e h i s t o r y of performances and experiences. "Visions From Vienna" Bxhibition D e p r e e Art G a l l e r y . J a n . 15Feb. 4 â&#x20AC;˘ Art e x h i b i t i o n s a r e d e l i c i o u s t h i n g s to go a n d s o a k u p . T h i s 3ne is a f a s c i n a t i n g t o s s e d s a l a d rf c e r a m i c s t o n e tile, e n g r a v ngs. etchings, lithographs. Dalnted silk, p h o t o g r a p h s , a n d more, f o c u s i n g o n t h e h i s t o r y a n d c u l t u r e of Vienna. Austria. All t h i s c o m e s f r o m t h e collection of Paul Fried, f o u n d e r of t h e Hope College Vienna S u m m e r School a n d p r o f e s s o r e m e r i t u s of h i s t o r y . The c l o s i n g r e c e p t i o n will b e a r t of t h e college's Winter H a p e n i n g . G o d r e s s e d in b l a c k , irl a f i n g e r s a n d w i c h o n y o u r inkie. a n d try t o look i m p o r nt.

ilk

Gospel songs thai rose out of a marching crowd. Painled rally posters stuck to all the trees in the old n e i g h b o r h o o d that read, " B r i n g your walking shoes." Poetry that bellowed the words, "Black is beautiful," and "Black is Power." Martin Luther King led a revolution where art was power. Dr. Stephen Hemenway, Professor of English who is teaching a course in African-American literature this semester, s^id, "Gospel music always gave strength to the people involved in the movement. It kept their minds on freedom and helped them endure the brutal harassment." King's undeniable power as a speaker moved the African-American masses to talk in poetry. "Part of the p o e t r y of Martin Luther King's speeches stemmed from his training in classical rhetoric, and also from a long African-American oral tradition," H e m e n w a y said, ' T h i s emphasized the sound.of the spoken word."

u â&#x20AC;˘

R o o t s r u n d e e p a n d b e a u t y f l o u r i s h e s : Germaine

Smith's collection of posters (top), batiks from Africa (bottom left), and her husband Franz's art {bottom right) feed the eyes and the spirit.

Dr. Hemenway During the civil rights movement of the sixties, literature took the language of hopeful revolution to new heights. "I remember reading a series of powerful essays by J a m e s Baldwin titled, 4 The Fire Next T i m e , ' " said Hemenway, "And being awakened in a literary way to the fact that African-Americans had been waiting for over onehundred years since emancipation for something to change." Martin Luther King led a revolution whose impact is stamped on the face of the arts forever. "The Afrfcan-American struggle for freedom is connected to the arts in the desire to be liberated from having to write, paint and sing a certain kind of way," Hemenway said. T h e s h e e r p o w e r of t h e s e things: poetry, art, music, is demonstrated by the story told by a man who worked closely with Martin Luther King. Andrew Young, the mayor of Atlanta during the Carter administration, wrote of participating in a march led by King, Young, and o t h e r l e a d e r s , and b e i n g brought to an abrupt stop by a line of armed police. Told by the police that they must turn back and disperse or be stopped by force, Young started singing the Christian anthem, "1 Want Jesus To Walk With Me." Soon all the marchers were singing, and they began to move forward again, despite the warnings of the police. Instead of stopping t h e m w i t h v i o l e n c e , the p o l i c e stepped aside and watched them march right on by, listening to the drones of the spiritual song.

Anchor

p h o t o s by Jill F i s c h e r

House m u s e u m blessed w i t h visions of spirit, n o t just skin MELISSA HERWALDT Intermission Editor

Walking into the house of Germaine Smith, Hope College's community liason, is like walking into a veritable art museum. Smith and her h u s b a n d , F r a n z , have decorated their living space with batiks, drums, posters and authentically garbed dolls that c o m memorate their African-American heritage. "Much of what decorates our

house we've picked up on our trips to Africa," said Smith, "And some of it does come from the sixties when the civil rights m o v e m e n t was happening." One of the pictures displayed illustrates the back of an AfricanAmerican w o m a n ' s head. Franz Smith himself etched the portrait into metal and painted it. "That was done around the time Martin Luther King was shot," said Smith of her husband's work. When asked who the w o m a n in the portrait was, Franz Smith answered, "I sat be-

hind this sister on the Chicago train one day in 1968. She was wearing her hair in an afro; this was when African-Americans were just starting to wear their hair like that. I went home and painted her from memory." The Smith's cultural decorations reflect their deep commitment to the continuing struggle of the A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n c o m m u nity. "What we are is not just on our faces," said Smith, "And I mean all of us."


lanuary

theA

I 7, I 9 9 6

nchor

Sports

D u t c h m e n defuse C o m e t s

,

Transfers glow lend skills

GLYN W I L L I A M S

GLYN W I L L I A M S

staff reporter

staff reporter

T h e s t e r e o t y p e for the a v e r a g e

In front of their h o m e c r o w d for

basketball p l a y e r of the nineties

the first time s i n c e D e c . 9, w h e n

has b e e n s h a t t e r e d f o r e v e r by Hope College's two new transfer

they p l a y e d A u r o r a o f Illinois, t h e Hope College Flying Dutchmen s m a s h e d the Olivet C o m e t s 9 7 - 7 5

s t u d e n t s w h o both g a v e u p schola r s h i p s at their f o r m e r s c h o o l s to play ball at the a c a d e m i c a l l y su-

Saturday. T h e D u t c h m e n w e n t 3-1 over the w i n t e r b r e a k , d r o p p i n g a blowout to A q u i n a s , 9 7 - 5 8 . " T h e r e is n o t h i n g M i c k e y M o u s e a b o u t the t e a m s w e beat this winter," c o a c h G l e n n Van W i e r e n

perior H o p e . J a s o n Vander W o u d e ( ' 9 7 ) , formerly of the N C A A Division II N o r t h w o o d University, tossed his

5

said. "We beat some nationally r a n k e d t e a m s t h a t h a v e in t u r n

full ride s c h o l a r s h i p out t h e w i n d o w in o r d e r to b e c o m e an e d u c a tion m a j o r at H o p e C o l l e g e . In fact, the o f f - g u a r d shooter took last

beaten Division I s c h o o l s . It w a s f a b u l o u s to c o m e h o m e and beat a

y e a r off f r o m school c o m p l e t e l y

g o o d team like Olivet at h o m e . " H o p e ' s players enjoyed being

in o r d e r to split t i m e with his f a ther c o a c h i n g a ninth g r a d e b a s -

back at the H o l l a n d Civic C e n t e r and it s h o w e d early o n , as they tore

ketball t e a m at Forrest Hills C e n tral H i g h S c h o o l . "It w a s an o p p o r t u n i t y I

out of the s t a r t i n g b l o c k s to post a 21-13 lead with 13:11 left in the first

couldn't refuse," said Vander W o u d e . "It w a s a lot of f u n "

half. Olivet s h o t t h e m s e l v e s in t h e foot as the half p r o g r e s s e d . H o p e ' s lead j u m p e d a s high a s 18 p o i n t s

Anchor

p\-\o\.o by Zack J o h n s o n

RUNNIN'THE FLOOR: Kevin Brintnell ('96) #14 directs traffic whiie Duane Bosma ('96) #54 looks on in anticipation of a hoop during Hope's win against Olivet.

with 8 : 1 5 left in the half. It w a s a p parent early on that H o p e ( 1 2 - 3 , 3 0 ) w o u l d h a v e no h u r d l e s t o j u m p over o n their w a y past the C o m e t s .

T h e s e c o n d half turned out to b e

T h e f u t u r e high school S p a n ish t e a c h e r h o p e s that his c o a c h i n g j o b w i t h his f a t h e r will w o r k a s a s p r i n g b o a r d for his f u t u r e . "I

Van Hekken (*98) finished the night with 13 points off of 5/6 field goal

a s t u n n i n g 5 1 - 3 9 , as w e l l t h e y s h o u l d have. H o p e l e a d s the l e a g u e

really love c o a c h i n g a n d I h o p e to be a g o o d o n e in the f u t u r e , " said

shooting and a perfect 3/3 f r o m three point land. Joel Holstege ( ' 9 8 )

in r e b o u n d i n g by a g o o d + 1 5 . Van W i e r e n ' s only c o m p l a i n t w a s p o o r

Vander Woude. "I w a s g e t t i n g a lot of p l a y i n g

" W e got things g o i n g early o n

n o t h i n g but a s c r i m m a g e , as H o p e ' s lead g r e w t o 8 1 - 5 9 with 8:21 left,

d e f e n s e and o u r s u p e r i o r d e f e n s e

and then 9 2 - 6 1 with 4 : 4 0 left. T h e

led to g o o d o f f e n s e , " Van W i e r e n

g a m e s e e m e d t o e n d just as it be-

had n i n e points, n i n e assists, and

s h o o t i n g at times. "I think w e are

t i m e early o n in the s e a s o n , but not

g a n , with the f u t u r e of H o p e play-

p l a y i n g as w e l l n o w a s w e h a v e

ing hard, a s

five r e b o u n d s in 17 minutes of play. "We

a w h o l e lot lately; but I really d o n ' t m i n d , " said V a n d e r W o u d e . " I ' m

all t h r e e of the team's

had f o u r guys in

Fossan ( ' 9 6 ) c o m e s b a c k this w e e k w e s h o u l d b e a n even better t e a m

h a v i n g a lot of f u n a n y w a y a n d I

double figure scor-

than w e are now." At this point the t e a m f e e l s c o n -

couragement." Small forward

ing and that is just

fident that they a r e u n b e a t a b l e . " I keep telling these g u y s that t h e only

H e k k e n ' s ( ' 9 8 ) story is a d i f f e r e n t novel, but p o s s e s s e s a similar plot.

great," V a n

A l t h o u g h it w a s not a f u l l - r i d e s c h o l a r s h i p . Van H e k k e n did g i v e

said. " T h e main reason w e have been playing better a s a w h o l e is o u r d e f e n s i v e play and the a m o u n t that it has evolved." T h e l o n e sign of tiredness that

There is nothing Mickey Mouse about the teams we beat this winter. — Glenn Van Wieren

p l a y e d , " he s a i d . " A n d w h e n Van

the D u t c h m e n s h o w e d c a m e within

freshman p l a y e r s

the last f o u r minutes of the first half, a s H o p e fired b l a n k s over and o v e r again, f r o m both inside the paint,

w e r e o n the court. Duane

and f r o m l o n g r a n g e . N o n e t h e l e s s H o p e led 5 0 - 3 6 at h a l f t i m e .

( ' 9 6 ) led all s c o r e r s with 24 points

Wieren s a i d . " B o s m a had a great

t e a m that can beat H o p e C o l l e g e is H o p e C o l l e g e , " Van W i e r e n s a i d . T h e r e h a v e b e e n s o m a n y distrac-

" W e played very well especially

and 15 r e b o u n d s . Kris Merrit ( ' 9 8 )

g a m e and I w a s very pleased with

t i o n s this s e a s o n with injuries, high

in the first h a l f " Van W i e r e n s a i d . " W e m a n a g e d to get nearly e v e r y -

a l s o h a d a s o l i d g a m e , w i t h 17

o u r s o p h o m o r e starters. Brintnell

rankings, personnel problems,

points and 11 boards, on 5/7 field

w a s just g r e a t . He t o o k t h e right

b o d y in there in the first h a l f . E v -

goal shooting. Kevin Brintnell ( ' 9 6 )

s h o t s at the right t i m e . " Despite r e b o u n d i n g lapses, the

w h a t e v e r ; a n d it has all just b e for the w o r s e . W e really need to get

Bosma

e r y o n e but three g u y s f i n i s h e d t h e

had 14 points and shot an i m p r e s sive 4 / 7 f r o m b e h i n d the arc. D a n

g a m e with d o u b l e f i g u r e m i n u t e s .

SPOUTS O N

"

rn

ROAD...

D u t c h m e n o u t r e b o u n d e d O l i v e t by

Offsides

by Jeff B r o w n

style, a s he has started the past six

got

games f o r H o p e at small f o r w a r d .

VanLonkhuyzen d o u b l e digit s c o r i n g f r o m Allison ( ' 9 8 ) w h o c h i p p e d in 12. T h e D u t c h also o u t r e b o u n d e d Olivet 5 0 - 3 9

T h e starting role is not n e w for Van H e k k e n , a s he w a s a c o n s i s t e n t

and w a s paced by J e n n i f e r O o s t i n g ( ' 9 8 ) w h o snared ten b o a r d s . W o m e n ' s S w i m m i n g - T h e w o m e n ' s s w i m t e a m c o m p e t e d against

starter f o r his previous school, w h i c h H o p e d e f e a t e d 8 2 - 6 9 last

Eastern M i c h i g a n University this past Friday and w a s s o u n d l y d e f e a t e d 2 3 5 - 5 5 . Eastern M i c h i g a n took gold in all the events except the 1000

season. " I ' l l d o a n y t h i n g to m a k e the t e a m win," Van H e k k e n said. "I am

f r e e s t y l e in w h i c h captain Kristen H o v i n g ( ' 9 6 ) g r a b b e d the top spot with a t i m e of 10:31.89. U p next for the Dutch is a meet at W h e a t o n ,

quiet and I really d o n ' t talk m u c h o n a n d off the c o u r t , but I like to

Illinois in which M I A A f o e K a l a m a z o o C o l l e g e will also b e c o m p e t i n g .

Spriig Break Off-Boad Bfldig Getaway!

Cosby's Pick of t h e W e e k .

t o M O A B , UTAH

It's 1996 and it is t i m e f o r m e to get a f r e s h start. T h i s year I feel really g o o d a b o u t m y s e l f and I will not be d e n i e d p e r f e c t i 6 n . I w a s Mouth, Weird Harold, and h a n g i n ' with Fat Albert, M u s h the rest o n N e w Year's and I w a s e r a b l e r e c o r d . Fat A l b e r t in the f o r m of a parable.

telling t h e m about my misgave m e s o m e s o u n d a d v i c e He said he w a s on a diet

o n c e but he still c o u l d eat c a u s e they w e r e m a d e of w h i c h are healthy. W h a t he m e a n t w a s sweet lining. S o my t r i u m p h a l first pick

Malted Milk Balls bemalted a n d milk, both of every c l o u d has a sugary of the year is for both the

Pistons and the W i n g s to g o u n d e f e a t e d this w e e k .

tive d e c i d e d to c o m e h o m e not just for the superior academics, but d u e

m u c h better basketball t e a m . " Van H e k k e n ' s g a m e is b e g i n n i n g t o a d j u s t t o Van W i e r e n ' s

t o w n and finalso

H e k k e n . " T h e y just sort of g a v e a

and I m i s s e d m y t o w n , " said Van riekken. " A n d b e s i d e s H o p e has a

L a G o r e Hope

College. "It w a s n ' t a f u l l - r i d e , " said Van

to g o o d old f a s h i o n e d h o m e - s i c k n e s s . " H o p e has better a c a d e m i c s

the half and never looked b a c k . H o p e ' s attack w a s paced by excellent a re: shot t h r e e point s h o o t i n g . As a t e a m t h e D u t c h r ^ y ^ n d w a s led m a r k a b l e 12-20 f r o m b e h i n d the arc,

ished with a g a m e high 15 points. <r

up a large a m o u n t o f m o n e y w h e n he left the N A I A level C o n c o r d i a

they just g a v e it to m e . " T h e H o l l a n d H i g h S c h o o l na-

W o m e n ' s B a s k e t b a l l - T h e F l y i n g D u t c h took their s h o w o n the road

^

D a n Van

f e w t h o u s a n d dollars at a t i m e . I ' m not really sure h o w m u c h it w a s ,

f o c u s e d on u s . "

Saturday and s q u a r e d off against the C o m e t s of Olivet. H o p e g r o u n d e d the C o m e t s in i m p r e s s i v e f a s h i o n , 9 7 - 5 5 . H o p e led the g a m e 4 4 - 3 1 at

in t h e d e p a r t m e n t b y J o h a n n a ('98) who was 3-3 from down-

a m g i v i n g the p l a y e r s a lot of en-

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think that I lead by e x a m p l e . " Both p l a y e r s s e e m to be fitting in well t o H o p e ' s a t m o s p h e r e . "I love it here and I will definitely be b a c k next year," s a i d Vander Woude. Van W i e r e n a p p e a r s j u s t a s happy to h a v e his n e w p l a y e r s as they are to be h e r e . " E v e r y team n e e d s a J a s o n Vander W o u d e and Dan Van H e k k e n on their roster," Van W i e r e n said. " T h e y are very valuable a d d i t i o n s to our t e a m . "


the A

Back strictly' classified. 1991 H O N D A C R X , Excellenl: 3 1 , 0 0 0 miles, dark red metallic, 5 spd., air, cassette. Rus proofed. original owner, $7,000. 3 9 4 - 9 5 9 2 ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS: Friday, 4 p.m., Jan. 19th, 4th Floor Lubbers Hall (loft). English courses next semester will be almost entirely 4 hours each. C o m e talk about how this c h a n g e will a f f e c t y o u . Enjoy pizza and soft drinks and the good c o m p a n y of the English faculty while you do!

24-hour compassion wanted

w I z

Welcome to Apt. # A 3 , Sarah!! We love having you with us!! To Jill, Katy, Kathleen, Erin, A n n a , Tracy, C a r y l , Katy, Kara, Brian, Matt, Beau, Jeff, Jon, and everyone else w h o made my 20th birthday the BEST EVER: what would I do without you guys? I am so thankful for each and ever o n e of you. I love you, Lori Dear Billy B o b — H e y , pretty girl! It's a new semester and World Lit is over. V R O O M ! V R O O M ! W a r m up o l ' John Deere. It"s time to run over Dante. I ' m sad w e d o n ' t have any classes together but I'll be over to play at Kleinhexsel. Good luck in Ancient Philosophy, (long live A g a m e m n o n ! ) and shoot m e s o m e 3 ' s in basketball. — F r o m you aspiring Children's Literature Authoress. Griffin: All is well w h e n you are by my side. Sabine

lanuary

, e

I

X

r

eal w o r l d .

real

Volunteers: • develop communication and problem solving skills • learn to respond effectively to those in crisis • help people who are desperate, confused or lonely.

w

I 7, I 996

I t looks like t h e real w o r l d .

Volunteers are needed for HELP LINE, a 24-hour telephone crisis intervention and referral service.

Introducing C L U B D A N C E Tuesday night at C A l y p s o ' s with host DJs D - B o <fe Spitters. C a l y p s o ' s is located on the corner of U.S. 31 and 24th (inside the Holland Holiday Inn). You must be 21 years old with a valid ID to get in. BE A F R I E N D ! If you know s o m e one w h o needs help c o p i n g with an unplanned pregnancy, do her a favor. M e n t i o n B e t h a n y ' s H o l l a n d Office, where options can be discussed in confidence, and decisions are respected. Have her call 1-800Bethany or (616) 396-0623. We listen! World Wide Web: http:// w w w . bethany.org/ and Internet email: info@bethany.org

nchor

\ Unreal.

Training begins Jan. 22 nd in Holland.

For more information, call: 396-HELP

Interviewing on C a m p u s F e b r u a r y 18 , h M a r k Gurley, C L U , C U D (616) 7 7 4 - 2 0 3 1

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Where are the Beck pants, now? D O R I A N S : You rock my world! — Barb S:

Love vs. Lust Beer Goggles pick up lines....

Evil Twin: I c a n ' t wait to see the d e m o n on you. — S i s

Third Reformed Church W o r s h i p Services

Coming Soon to a TfieCps near you.

8:30 & 11:00 a . m . C o r n e r of 12th a n d P i n e It's a short walk 3 blocks west of campus

College S t u d e n t G r o u p fun, food, focus on Bible study and issues Sunday, 9:45 a.m. 76 E. 13lh St., Apt. 6

of the hype and publicity, "Friends" has indeed been wildly successful. But a s w e ' v e s e e n w i t h t h e twentysomething hits " 0 0 2 1 0 " and 'Melrose Place," w e all know what goes up must c o m e down. "It will be interesting to see how long this will last...or if it's just a fad," Nielsen said.

52-2 1/1

- 3

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Tin

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F t a-

PEPSI PISTONS CHALLENGE

COME JOIN US! FRIENDS f r o m 3

Kletz this Friday at 8:30pm

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> * j

WIN A ROUND TRIP PACKAGE TO THE PISTONS GAME FEB. 7 t h

FIRST PRIZE: SONY DISCMAN PLUS MANY MORE PRIZES

11

IT A L L HAPPENS FEB. 1 s t

K* J

Stay tuned for furtfter details


01-17-1996  
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