Page 1

VanWylen may be named president by Trustees by Bob Rocs

/ Volume 84— 13

Hope College, Holland, Michigan 4 9 4 2 3

January 1 7 , 1 9 7 2

Congress joins study

More structure input sought by Mary Houting The Administrative Affairs Board voted Monday to send the question of government structure review to the faculty and the Student Congress for their consideration. THIS WAS THE A d A B s second action in their review of the board and c o m m i t t e e structure. Their first was to solicit faculty suggestions for improving the present system. Chancellor William Vanderlugt, who moved the proposal, said he saw a lack of faculty interest in the affairs of the college as the greatest failure of the present structure. ' T h e faculty is out of it," he stated. DR. ALV1N Vanderbush, chairman of the AdAB, agreed with Vanderlugt that more faculty input on the issue was needed. "A faculty meeting on this subject would definitely bring the faculty out and generate some interest," he added. In order to discover student reactions to weaknesses in the

SCMC seeking editor

applicants

The S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a tions Media C o m m i t t e e has set back the deadline for receiving applications for the anchor editorship to Tuesday n o o n . The post is being vacated by Garrett DeGraff. Letters of applications should include the s t u d e n t ' s grade point average, his major, reference t o prior journalistic experience, his reasons for seeking the post and his plans for the newspaper. Applications should be sent to Dr. Richard Vandervelde, chairman of the SCMC, Physics-Math 209.

present structure. Student Congress President Bob Scott suggested that the Congress address itself to the problem. His complaint with the system, he said, is the frustration of many s t u d e n t s bvcause they have no power. 4

T D O N T even k n o w why we hold Congress meetings anym o r e , " Scott said. "We have no power - the boards have it all." The board began its meeting by discussing possible directions to take in its review of Hope's c o m munity government. Vanderbush remarked that many good suggestions had been received from individual faculty members, but now the board " m u s t decide how t o proceed in considering these suggestions." " T H E NOTES can give us direction," said Dean of S t u d e n t s Robert DeYoung, " b u t first we must determine how far we want to go in studying the c o m m i t t e e system." Scott cited as a prior question whether the board planned t o change the whole structure or just portions of it. DeYoung suggested an examination of the boards and committees to see if they were fulfilling their tasks. S E V E R A L board members suggested the f o r m a t i o n of an ad hoc c o m m i t t e e t o investigate the present system and d e t e r m i n e how t o proceed in revising it. After some discussion, the board decided to first bring the question of structure before the

EDITOR'S NOTE This special issue of t h e anchor has been published t o present the most recent developments in the presidential search. A n o t h e r special issue of the anchor will be published if the Board of Trustees selects a new president Friday.

Selective Service announces proposed regulation changes The Selective Service System has proposed changing regulations regarding personal appearances and appeals. One of the proposed changes released Wednesday guarantees the registrant's right to request an appeal following an adverse decision at his personal appearance with his local board. Another proposed change allows a registrant who receives a long p o s t p o n e m e n t of induction to receive consideration from his local board for d e f e r m e n t and e x e m p t i o n requests, including a claim for conscientious objector status. T h e revisions set a 15-day time limit in which a registrant must

request a personal appearance or an appeal, but they permit t h e local board t o grant an extension of this period when a registrant demonstrates that his failure t o respond within the 15-day limit was due to reasons beyond his control. T h e policy proposal that a local board give a registrant at least 15 days notice of a pending personal appearance also was included. T h e proposed changes are expected to b e c o m e effective in mid-February. Until they b e c o m e effective, Selective Service will continue its m o r a t o r i u m policy on all personal appearances and appeal board actions.

faculty and Student Congress before forming a special c o m m i t t e e . "1 can see a c o m m i t t e e formed to study this in the f u t u r e , " said DeYoung, " b u t we should begin with the faculty meeting."

Hope's aging presidential search may end this week when the Board of Trustees meets to discuss the possible a p p o i n t m e n t of Dr. G o r d o n VanWylen, dean of the engineering school at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. VANWYLEN will come t o Holland for the Thursday and Friday meetings, where time may be spent discussing other candidates as well as VanWylen. However, p o s t p o n e m e n t of a definite decision on VanWylen is unlikely, according to board secretary Willard Wichers. VanWylen is one of t w o presidential candidates who visited Hope's c a m p u s last O c t o b e r at the invitation of the trustees. Wichers and board chairman Hugh DePree asked VanWylen in November whether he would be interested in the presidential post if it were o f f e r e d to him. AT T H A T time VanWylen was considering possible presidential o f f e r s f r o m other schools, and promised t o indicate in January w h e t h e r he was seriously interested in Hope, Wichers said. Early this month VanWylen told Wichers and DePree that he would seriously consider an o f f e r f r o m Hope, Wichers said, and his presence at the board meeting was agreed upon at that time. ASKED WHETHER he feels all the trustees favor VanWylen, Wichers said that several of the members d o n ' t know enough about him yet to have developed a preference.

William Stone selected for development post William K. Stone has been appointed Director of Planned Giving at Hope College, Executive Vice President Clarence J. Handlogten a n n o u n c e d Tuesday. In his new position Stone will have primary responsibility for instituting and operating a deferred-giving program at the college, and will assist in efforts to complete a $10 million f u n d raising campaign started in 1966. Prior t o assuming his duties at Hope, Stone was a development associate at Albion College where he was involved with alumni and parent fund-raising efforts. Stone has held various positions with a securities firm, a bank trust d e p a r t m e n t and a consulting firm. He has also worked as a free-lance writer. Stone, 35, received his A.B. degree f r o m Harvard College in 1958.

WILLIAM STONE

" S o m e of the trustees haven't met him y e t , " he said. " T h e meeting should give all of them a chance t o ask questions of VanWylen and learn more about him." WICHERS' reticence about the probability of VanWylen's app o i n t m e n t is not shared by Presidential Search C o m m i t t e e member Dr. Paul Fried, professor of history. " A s far as 1 k n o w , " he said, " t h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n f r o m the Executive C o m m i t t e e was unanimous, and they constitute about one f o u r t h of the board. 1 think the chances that he will be chosen are g o o d . " T h e possibility of p o s t p o n i n g a decision on VanWylen was dealt with more directly by Wichers, however. "We don't really have the o p t i o n of delay now that VanWylen's appearance at the meeting is being publicized," he said. "I D O N ' T see how he could possibly accept a p o s t p o n e m e n t other schools are interested in him, and he has to say something to t h e m , " Wichers added. Wichers also said that a virtually u n a n i m o u s decision on the part of the trustees is needed in order to appoint VanWylen. " T h e board votes by secret ballot, but we need a nearly overwhelming conc u r r e n c e , " he said. "If there is d o u b t , we won't appoint h i m . " V A N W Y L E N ' S plans to come to Holland were kept confidential until late last week because of his and the board's desire to prevent p r e m a t u r e discussion of the issue in the Hope c o m m u n i t y . The candidate also felt that publication of his plans might cause difficulties for him in his present position. However, the secrecy was shattered when the U of M's student newspaper, the Michigan Daily, published a story in its Jan. 13 issue saying that VanWylen had decided t o "resign his post at the university to assume the presidency of Hope College in Holland, Mich." NEWS O F T H E story f o u n d its way to the anchor, and the resulting investigation failed to corroborate it. However, the anchor's inquiries led to a disclosure of VanWylen's plans to meet with the trustees. T h e anchor was unable to determine the basis for the story in the Daily. According t o Wichers, VanWylen revealed the status of his negotiations with Hope to U of M President Robin Fleming soon a f t e r he decided he was seriously interested in Hope. HOWEVER, VanWylen did not inform the Michigan Board of Regents of his plans, according to Continued

on page 4, column

3

Includes seven films

Bergman festival planned Seven films by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman will be presented Feb. 7-29 in the theater of the DeWitt Cultural Center. T H E S E R I E S will c o m m e n c e Feb. 7 at 7 : 3 0 p.m. with the showing of " T h e Seventh Seal." Bergman's Oscar-winning classic " T h r o u g h a Glass D a r k l y " will be presented Feb. 9. "Wild Strawberries" will be s h o w n Feb. 15, "Winter Light" Feb, 17, " T h e Magic i a n " F e b . 21, " T h e Silence" Feb. 23, and " T h e Devil's E y e " Feb. 29.

Ingmar Bergman, a prolific writer and director, is recognized universally as a giant a m o n g film makers. Bergman produced 26 films in 20 years after making his debut in 1945 with "Crisis." He has brilliantly explored the crises e n c o u n t e r e d by man in search of meaning and faith. BERGMAN HAS received many international awards including prizes at the Cannes Film Festival for " T h e Seventh Seal" and "Smiles of a Summer N i g h t , " the Best Director Award for

"Brink of Life," as well as numerour " O s c a r s . " T h e film series is presented by the Society for the Educated Eye, a c a m p u s group reorganized this fall by the late Dr. Robert Melka. All seven films will be shown at 7 : 3 0 p.m. in the DeWitt Cultural Center theater. A S E R I E S ticket may be purchased for all seven films at $3. Admission t o individual showings will be o f f e r e d on a space-availability basis at $1 per person. Series tickets are available at the s t u d e n t activities office.

THE DANCE OF DEATH from Ingmar BergmatTs award winning film "The Seventh Seal/


January 17,1972

H o p e College a n c h o r

Two

President picking The closure

Michigan

Daily's

premature

dis-

that

Gordon

VanWylen

was

Dr.

fears m a y have some s h o u l d be m i n i m i z e d .

foundation,

Is he conservative?

V a n W y l e n ' s denial o f s t r o n g d e n o m i n a -

they

tional

identification

partially

e x p e c t e d last F r i d a y t o a n n o u n c e his resign a t i o n has f o i l e d the B o a r d o f T r u s t e e s '

One c r i t i c i s m o f V a n W y l e n centers o n his defense of t h e presence o f classified

a l l e g a t i o n of n a r r o w - m i n d e d n e s s . B u t i t d o e s n ' t erase t h e r u m o r t h a t n o n - C h r i s t i a n s

careful

m i l i t a r y research o n c m a p u s . A t M i c h i g a n ,

on

VanWylen's engineering school u n d e r t o o k

others hired. If it is assumed V a n W y l e n w o u l d desire

efforts

to

conceal

the

names o f

presidential candidates and made possible p u b l i c pressure f o r or against t h e dean o f U of M's S c h o o l o f Engineering. F o r this reason Secretary o f t h e B o a r d of Trustees W i l l a r d Wichers and V a n W y l e n regret

the

Daily's

announcement.

And

defense research w h i c h t h e dean p u b l i c l y defended. While t h i s p o s i t i o n m a y be o f f e n s i v e t o some s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y , as an o p i n i o n o f a president o f H o p e College, it w o u l d have

the

faculty

would

simply

workings

of

t h e college.

In

ever b e f o r e , a n d s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y m e m bers have personal ties w i t h n o n - C h r i s t i a n f a c u l t y m e m b e r s t h a t w o u l d be h a r d t o sever. A n y a t t e m p t t o p r o h i b i t t h e h i r i n g of

a b o u t V a n W y l e n and o t h e r candidates, and the r u m o r s are m u l t i p l y i n g .

m u n i t y , VanWylen's support of on-campus

t o religious t o l e r a n c e .

m i l i t a r y research w o u l d n o t have m u c h real A n o t h e r o f t - h e a r d r u m o r regarding V a n -

the i n f o r m a t i o n and personal c o n t a c t refor

Logistics

evaluation

currently

are

unattainable.

dictate

reliance u p o n

the m e m b e r s of the Board.

professors c o u l d be de-

T h i s e d i t o r i a l is n o t i n t e n d e d t o endorse The

anchor

does n o t

the i n t i m a t e k n o w l e d g e o f

the candidate

assertion is n o t p a t e n t l y clear. In an i n t e r -

is m e r e l y an a t t e m p t t o view a m a n and the j o b he m a y a c q u i r e w i t h reason and t o l e r -

r e l y i n g o n the B o a r d ; t h e y f i n d t h e trustees

than

V a n W y l e n , generally b r a n d e d as a conserva-

w o u l d hire as a f a c u l t y m e m b e r a self-pro-

tive, w i l l w i n b o a r d a p p r o v a l , thus f o r m i n g

fessed J e w or a g n o s t i c , V a n W y l e n paused

a c o a l i t i o n of c o n s e r v a t i v i s m at t h e very t o p of Hope's a d m i n s i t r a t i v e p o w e r struc-

and said t h a t t h e q u e s t i o n c o u l d n o t be

ture. S o m e foresee d i r e results f o r " l i b e r a l -

deserved m o r e c a r e f u l c o n s i d e r a t i o n t h a n

i s m " if t h i s c o a l i t i o n is f o r m e d . W h i l e such

c o u l d be given in a t e l e p h o n e i n t e r v i e w .

denominations."

When

asked

if he

an e n d o r s e m e n t

possess

that

t o be t o o conservative. A n d t h e y fear t h a t

What is his position on...

We'll have to wait and see. Personally, I think we're taking quite a chance.

t e c t e d a n d t h w a r t e d by p e o p l e w h o adhere

W y l e n is t h a t he is an i n t o l e r a n t religious sectarian. T h e degree o f t r u t h in t h i s v i e w w i t h t h e anchor S a t u r d a y , V a n W y l e n stated he is " m o r e c o n c e r n e d w i t h p e o p l e

M a n y persons w i l l f i n d l i t t l e c o m f o r t in

non-Christian

VanWylen.

e f f e c t o n H o p e College.

We can't tell

because he w o u l d have h a d l i t t l e

g e n e i t y e q u a l l e d t h e status quo, T o d a y t h e f a c u l t y is far m o r e r e l i g i o u s l y diverse t h a n

internal

Is he liberal?

this, c o u l d he p u l l it o f f ? Five years ago a president w h o w a n t e d a r e l i g i o u s l y h o m o geneous f a c u l t y m i g h t have succeeded,

s h o r t , besides b e i n g p o l i t i c a l l y u n p o p u l a r w i t h a c e r t a i n p o r t i o n of t h e Hope c o m -

quisite

no

defense d e p a r t m e n t t e c h n o l o g i c a l research;

the

on t h e basis of t h e c u r r e n t s p e c u l a t i o n , and

and

o p p o s i t i o n . A t t h a t t i m e t h e s t a f f was r e l a t i v e l y free o f religious d i v e r s i t y ; h o m o -

radical e n o u g h t o t u r n t h i s issue i n t o a c o n t r o v e r s y t h a t c o u l d seriously d i s r u p t

It is impossible t o judge any c a n d i d a t e

fired

l i t t l e real s i g n i f i c a n c e . H o p e College is n o t a b o u t t o b e c o m e a center f o r C I A or H o p e s i m p l y does n o t have t h e tools. N o r are the s t u d e n t s or f a c u l t y at H o p e

wisely so. A l r e a d y r u m o r s are w i d e s p r e a d

be

We don't know.

refutes t h e

s h o u l d presuppose.

Oh it's always that way when there's a new anchor editor.

N o r is it a c o n d e m n a t i o n o f V a n W y l e n . It

ance. A t fiable.

present,

nothing

m o r e is justi-

answered in one or t w o sentences, t h a t it

Tilt

Structure debate

b y Art Buchwald C o p y r i g h t Š 1 9 7 1 , L o s Angeles Times S y n d i c a t e

The

Administrative

Affairs

B o a r d has

f a u l t s of t h e present s y s t e m of g o v e r n m e n t

begun its review o f t h e b o a r d and c o m m i t -

is

tee s t r u c t u r e b y s o l i c i t i n g suggestions f o r

the

impotence

of

Student

Congress.

and stu-

F r u s t r a t e d Congress m e m b e r s f i n d t h e m selves serving n o useful p u r p o s e , since t h e

dents, a n d , m o s t r e c e n t l y , by d e c i d i n g t o

t h r e e boards c o n t r o l all issues r e l a t i n g t o

send t h e q u e s t i o n o f s t r u c t u r e r e v i e w t o

student

t h e f a c u l t y and t h e S t u d e n t Congress f o r

A c t i v i t i e s C o m m i t t e e has assumed responsi-

their consideration.

b i l i t y f o r p l a n n i n g t r a d i t i o n a l events such

improvements

from

the faculty

T w o things are e v i d e n t as a result o f last

government,

and

the

Student

as H o m e c o m i n g a n d t h e W i n t e r C a r n i v a l .

M o n d a y ' s A d A B m e e t i n g . T h e f i r s t is a lack

It

is essential

that

the

AdAB,

in

its

of f o r e s i g h t and clear-cut goals o n t h e p a r t

review

of the A d A B in its present u n d e r t a k i n g ; t h e

nance, consider

second

S t u d e n t Congress and d e t e r m i n e its f a t e .

is the

sad state

of

the

Student

Congress.

There

T h e board's r e c o m m e n d a t i o n t h a t

the

of

the

college's s y s t e m of govert h e present state of t h e

are t w o

actions

the

board

could

take:

f a c u l t y consider t h e q u e s t i o n of s t r u c t u r e -

at a f a c u l t y m e e t i n g is unnecessary; f a c u l t y m e m b e r s have already had s u f f i c i e n t opportunity

to

contribute

suggestions

for

i m p r o v i n g the s y s t e m . T h e A d A B has t o date received o n l y e i g h t suggestions f r o m f a c u l t y m e m b e r s . Rather t h a n p r o c r a s t i n a to

receive

directions

for

pro-

cedure, t h e A d A B s h o u l d clearly d e f i n e its task a n d goals: just w h a t it i n t e n d s t o d o

could

Congress. T h e

establish

a committee

to

c o m m i t t e e could consider

s p e c i f i c a l l y Congress' r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s i n a board-committee

system

of

government

and t h e q u e s t i o n o f s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i o n . -

ting and waiting until the February faculty meeting

It

e x a m i n e t h e role and f u n c t i o n o f S t u d e n t

Or

the

Student

Congress c o u l d be

abolished, as a useless organ o f s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t . T h i s w o u l d be t h e easiest and m o s t logical step t o t a k e .

and h o w far it plans t o go in r e v i e w i n g t h e

Regardless of w h a t a c t i o n the A d m i n i -

present s y s t e m . Once t h e b o a r d m e m b e r s

strative A f f a i r s B o a r d takes i n its present

themselves b e c o m e aware o f w h a t t h e y are

task, and h o w

trying

process

i n p u t it receives, its f i r s t step m u s t be t o

s h o u l d proceed s m o o t h l y and e f f i c i e n t l y , a v o i d i n g wasted m e e t i n g t i m e a n d u n u s e d

c l a r i f y and o u t l i n e its plans f o r r e v i e w i n g and b o a r d - c o m m i t t e e s t r u c t u r e o f the col-

suggestions.

lege. A n d those plans m u s t i n c l u d e s o m e

to

do,

the

entire

review

As B o b S c o t t p o i n t e d o u t at last M o n day's

AdAB

meeting,

one

of

the major

provision

for

m u c h f a c u l t y and s t u d e n t

the

fate

of

the

Student

Congress.

Readers speak out

Blanton praised This will be a short letter meant not t o state and carefully defend a position on t h e issue of black and white, but meant only t o express a little c o n t e m p t . My c o n t e m p t is for myself, for my o w n white race and for my school. BOB B L A N T O N ' S articles have given me h o p e during the past year-and-a-half, and their reception in t h e minds of anchor readers has caused me t o despair. T h e last " r e b u t t a l " of Blanton was the most reason-

dear editor able and the best phrased of t h e m a n y " r e b u t t a l s , " b u t , more than all the others, it caused me t o want t o give up h o p e , Hope, or b o t h . Bob Blanton is beautiful. He alone represents a movement on this c a m p u s ; at many colleges and universities Blanton's cause is upheld by a unified coalition of proud black students and teachers w h o have achieved a c o m m u n i t y which by its very n a t u r e gets results. ... .r

P E R H A P S B L A N T O N ' S aloneness is what makes him so b e a u t i f u l ; perhaps his aloneness c o n c e n t r a t e s his blackness, allowing him t o be a m o v e m e n t on H o p e ' s campus all by himself. But his aloneness also makes him t h e target for all of the opposition t o his cause on this campus. And under this b u r d e n almost anyone else would give up. 1 believe that Blanton is right in saying that the average white is racist, and I k n o w f r o m experience t h a t those of my fellow white men w h o try t o overcome their racist tradition are d o o m e d by the nature of our white culture. BUT WE WHITES should at least be able to see t h e b e a u t y of blackness. Why can't we see the i m p o r t a n c e of Blanton on this c a m p u s and the sheer beauty of blackness. A n d why can't we push through our petty intellectual objections t o Blant o n ' s s t a t e m e n t s t o see t h e real force of his character, which has caused him t o sacrifice the peace of mind that comes so easily on this c a m p u s in favor of the agony which necessarily comes f r o m sincere and lonely devotion t o a cause. ...

..

Joseph D. Filonowi^z.

The revelations concerning the United States' role in t h e India-Pakistani war, as told by columnist Jack Anderson, explained everything except why the Americans chose t o s u p p o r t Pakistan instead of India. WE KNOW FROM T H E Anderson papers that the President was f u r i o u s because he felt he wasn't getting enough support f r o m the State D e p a r t m e n t on " t i l t i n g " toward Pakistan. And we also k n o w that Henry Kissinger said he was catching hell f r o m the President because we weren't strong enough in expressing our feelings of antagonism t o w a r d the Indians. But neither the Anderson papers nor a n y t h i n g the Administration has said gives us a clue as to why the President " t i l t e d " the way he did. T h r o u g h sources I cannot reveal at this time, I can disclose how the United States made its fatal choice to go with the military d i c t a t o r Yahya Khan of Pakistan who, as with most leaders the United States supports, is now under house arrest. A FEW D A Y S B E F O R E hostilities broke out between India and Pakistan, the President's National Security Council met at the White House. Here are the minutes of that meeting: 1 - T h e CIA r e p o r t e d that they expected war t o break out at any time in East Bengal between India and Pakistan. 2 - T h e President asked the council m e m b e r s which c o u n t r y they t h o u g h the United States should support. 3 - T H E J O I N T CHIEFS of Staff said they could go either way. If the President wished t o s u p p o r t India they would send the United States fleet to Pakistan. If, on the other hand, the President wanted to s u p p o r t Pakistan they would send the fleet t o India. In any case, they would a n n o u n c e t h e y were doing it to protect American lives.

4 - T h e United States I n f o r m a t i o n Agency said it was prepared t o charge either Pakistan or India with aggression as soon as it got the word as to which way the President wanted to tilt. 5 - T h e President said he was prepared to tilt, but since neither c o u n t r y had football teams he could not get emotionally involved. 6 - H E N R Y KISSINGER said that since the Chinese were s u p p o r t i n g Pakistan and the Soviets were s u p p o r t i n g India, he t h o u g h t it would be a nice gesture before the President's Peking visit to c o m e out for Pakistan. 7 - T h e State D e p a r t m e n t objected on the grounds that India was a democracy and if the President tilted toward Pakistan, the United States could lose all its influence in Asia. 8 - T h e President asked if there were any legal precedents for s u p p o r t i n g either one of the countries. 9 - D R . KISSINGER SAID there were: Lyndon J o h n s o n , when he was Vice President of the United States, had given his word t o a camel driver in Karachi that if ever India and Pakistan got into a fight, the United States would back Pakistan. 1 0 - T h e State D e p a r t m e n t objected to this interpretation of f o r m e r President J o h n s o n ' s c o m m i t m e n t . They said all Mr. J o h n s o n had done was to give the camel driver a pickup truck. 1 1 - D R . K I S S I N G E R SAID a pickup truck was as good as a c o m m i t m e n t . Since it was made in the previous Administration, President Nixon had no choice but to h o n o r it because the United States' credibility was at stake. 1 2 - T h e President agreed and started tilting toward Pakistan. As a m a t t e r of fact he tilted so m u c h , he fell off his chair.

I OPE COLLEGE

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Published during the college year except vacation, holiday and e x a m i n a t i o n periods b y and for t h e students ot H o p e College, Holland, Michigan, u n d e r the a u t h o r i t y of the S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t t e e . Subscription price: 17 per year. Printed by t h e C o m p o s i n g R o o m , G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. M e m b e r , Associated Collegiate Press, United States S t u d e n t Press Association. O f f i c e located on g r o u n d floor of Graves Hall. T e l e p h o n e 3 9 2 - 5 1 1 1 , Extension 2 3 0 1 and 2 2 8 5 . T h e opinions on this page are not necessarily those of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , faculty or administration of H o p e College. Editor

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• January 1 7 , 1 9 7 2

Three

H o p e College anchor

anchor review -

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'The Empty Space : new openings into theatre E d i t o r ' s n o t e : This week's anchor review is w r i t t e n by critiques edit o r Kay H u b b a r d and senior theater major Joanne K o r n o e l j e . T h e y

' m o d e r n ' because it is only when the audience comes i n t o direct contact with the plays' t h e m e s that time and convention vanish. " E Q U A L L Y , WHEN we approach the modern theatre, in whatever f o r m , whether the play with a few characters, the happening, or the play with hordes of characters and scenes, the problem is always the s a m e - w h e r e are the equivalents to the Elizabethan strengths, in the sense of range and s t r e t c h . " T h e only limitations Brook acknowledges are the limits of his o w n imagination. He has gone so far as to say, "I can take any e m p t y space and call it a bare stage."

review The Empty Space by Peter B r o o k ( A t h e n e u m Publishers and A v o n Books, $ 1 . 6 5 ) .

" I n everyday life, ' i f is a fiction, in the theatre 'if is an e x p e r i m e n t . In everyday life, ' i f is an evasion, in the theatre ' i f is the t r u t h . When we are persuaded to believe in this truth, then the theatre and life are one. This is a high aim. It sounds like hard work. T o play needs much work. But when we experience the work as play, then it is not work any more. A play is play." SO ENDS The Empty Space by Peter Brook. He has spent the major portion of his career playing with plays. By making ' i f the t r u t h , he has established himself as one of the leading figures of the theatrical world. His major concern for c o n t e m porary theatre p r o d u c t i o n s is that they avoid becoming what Brook terms "deadly t h e a t r e . " Deadly theatre takes good actors w h o use the proper m e t h o d s and w h o are placed in lively, colorful settings and costumes - the result is that the audience is bored stiff. The b o r e d o m is especially deadly because the audience considers it necessary for a " w o r t h w h i l e " production. There is a safety involved in b o r e d o m . PETER B R O O K ' S own experience in directing follows up his theories of drama. His recent a d a p t a t i o n of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream was a risk Brook and his c o m p a n y were willing t o take. The p r o d u c t i o n has never been accused of being " d e a d l y . " A circus was t h e setting. T h e actors swung f r o m trapezes, juggled balls, and twirled plates on sticks. The potential of

Shakespeare's energy and spirit is realized r a t h e r than disguised by this unconventional a p p r o a c h . "In the second half of the t w e n t i e t h c e n t e r , " says Brook, "in England where I am writing these words, we are faced with the infuriating fact that Shakespeare is still o u r model. In this respect, our work on Shakespeare production is always t o make the plays

peeopd peview E d i t o r ' s n o t e : This week's W T A S record review is w r i t t e n by music d i r e c t o r Bud T h o m p s o n . He reviews Fragile b y Yes on A t l a n t i c records.

T h e word " Y e s " is an affirmation of what something is or m a n y things are or are yet t o be. T o say " y e s " t o something is to accept it, proclaim its t r u t h and worth, and affirm the reality of its existence. WHAT YOU JUST read is a lot of philosophical crap about understanding what the word " y e s " means. Actually it's just saying, in short, "I can dig it." The fact that one digs it is really all t h a t ' s important. It is a rare and pleasant event when one comes across an album that can make you forget t h e past mistakes of a group and wrap you up in its beauty. It's rare because most groups are reaching for the artistic and "mind-blowing" achievements in music w i t h o u t ever taking time out to be what they are musically. We hear a lot about t h e artistry of the Beatles, but h o w m u c h did we actually hear a b o u t t h e Beatles? Who are the people we're listening to? Yes is giving us a chance to find out. F O R G E T Your Move and the Yes Album. T h e y ' r e not important or relevant when listening to Fragile, Yes' new album. What

Fragile is that is i m p o r t a n t is a musical look at Yes. Each of the five m e m b e r s has recorded a cut that is purely his own. Rick Wakeman adapted a piece by Brahms, arranging it so that the g r o u p ' s i n s t ru m en t s played the parts which were originally written for classical musical ins t r u m e n t s . "We Have H e a v e n " is Jon A n d e r s o n ' s track in which he weaves a vocal tapestry (all sung by himself) that makes the vocal arrangement on Your Move look as complicated as a straight line. " F I V E P E R C E N T of N o t h i n g " is a 16-bar tune written by Bill Bruford, w h o had never before written a song for a Yes album. Chris Squire creates an entire musical n u m b e r f r o m different sounds that can be made on a bass guitar in " t h e fish." Steve Howe concludes the album with a threeminute guitar solo called " M o o d for a D a y . " The only really poor Yes album is t h e Yes Album, which u n f o r t u n a t e l y drags Your Move into s o m e rather bad c o m p a n y . Yes is a good group. (I guess if they w e r e n ' t , t h y e ' d have t o change their name t o " N o . " ) If y o u ' r e not afraid of dealing with the individual m e m b e r s of " Y e s , " then listen t o Fragile. T h e y have a lot t o say for themselves and will teach y o u t o say " Y e s . "

T H E A T R E FOR Brook is a self-destructive art. It is being constantly rewritten by the influences at play on the actors and audience. Television, movies and current events should prod the director into new and imaginative t r e a t m e n t s of any play. The new media should not be allowed to lull him into passivity. A warning that Brook interjects at this point is to beware of the division of " t r u t h " from the superficial variations of style in each play. THE G E N I U S of The Empty Space is that Brook delves deeper than the superficial gimmicks of self-indulgent theatre to the creative processes that t h e a t r e requires in order t o be alive, not deadly. Brook examines the holy theatre, the rough t h e a t r e and the i m m e d i a t e theatre in his search for a u t h e n t i c " p l a y i n g . " Modern

theatre no longer has as its basis the magic of the Dionysian rite or of the footlights. " T O D A Y , IT IS the other way a r o u n d . The theatre is hardly wanted and its workers are hardly trusted. So we cannot assume that the audience will assemble devoutly and attentively. It is up t o us t o capture its a t t e n t i o n and compel its belief." T o regain the faith of the audience, t h e a t r e must prove that there is no re " t r i c k e r y " involved in its presentations. It should be a n o t h e r world, presented as honestly and directly as the director and actors k n o w h o w . This world may not always coincide with the world met with in everyday life, but even in its a t m o s p h e r e of "playing" it is a t r u t h . IT IS A T T A C K I N G those petty problems which engulf man

Robert Ritsema awarded decree from U. of M. Robert Ritsema, chairman of the d e p a r t m e n t of music, has been awarded his Ed.D. degree in music education f r o m the University of Michigan. Ritsema has been a member of the Hope faculty since Sept. 1967, serving as chairman of the department the past three years. He received his B.A. degree f r o m Hope in 1957 and an M.M. degree f r o m the University of Michigan.

each day f r o m a d i f f e r e n t point of view. Theatre, then almost blatantly points out - m u c h to our dismay - that these problems which we consider to be uniquely ours, are not unique at all. Shakespeare suffered them; Sophocles suffered t h e m ; and we continue to suffer. We have created new psychological terms for them, but the action remains the same. And t h a t ' s what theatre is all a b o u t .

Modern opera to be presented The music d e p a r t m e n t ' s production ot the opera The Medium will be presented Thursday at 4 p.m. and F ; riday at 7 p.m. in Wichers Auditorium and not in the DWCC's theater as stated in last week's anchor. The opera by Giano-Carlo Menotti is the story of a distraught spiritualist w h o becomes the victim of her own fraud and fear. T h e work was called "a masterpiece of m e l o d r a m a " by J. S. Hackett in Saturday Review. Victoria G r a n z o w , s o p h o m o r e contralto, will sing the title role of Baba, the medium. J u n i o r soprano Lois Veenhoven will play Monica, and j u n i o r Sheila Schuller will play Mrs. Nolan. Phyllis Accocella, a junior, and Chris Liggett, a s o p h o m o r e , will portray Mr. and Mrs. Gobineau, members of a seance. J u n i o r Dave Leetsma has the part of T o b y , a deaf-mute.

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What should it mean for Hope College to be a Christian college? This is one of the most i m p o r t a n t questions I have heard my teachers struggle to answer during my f o u r years here. I HAVE NOT O N L Y heard t h e m struggle together to answer it; I have also seen their answers t o it lived, in their sensitivity t o their students as persons, in their concern for the larger questions of their disciplines, and in their relationships with each other. Yes they do not all answer this question in the same way. They do not even all use the same a p p r o a c h in finding their answer to it. A n d I suppose there are those w h o d o not have an answer t o it, and even some who do not even raise the question. BUT WHETHER OR NOT Hope College learns t o be more and more Christ's college does not depend so m u c h on those w h o do not raise the question. It depends more on those w h o do. As a s t u d e n t , it does not disturb me that t h e r e is such a diversity of answers to the question. But what deeply disturbs me is that different ways of approaching the question at times seem to be in danger of turning their points of disagreement i n t o occasions for personality clashes which tragically destroy the climate necessary for a constructive, dialogical way of working together. As a s t u d e n t who owes so much t o my teachers, this disturbs me because when it happens it is so m u c h more t h a n just divergence of intellectual opinion. I SAY THIS TO T H O S E of you who are not merely teachers, but Christian teachers. When you disagree as teachers, my intellect is challenged. But when you divide as Christian teachers, you d o not merely divide yourselves. F o r s t u d e n t s it is like a child seeing his parents quarrel and never be reconciled: it is to be internally torn apart. Diverse approaches to a problem can be an asset t o e n q u i r y ; they do not need t o be its stumbling

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AS I H A V E T H O U G H T about this, it has seemed t o me that Christian s t u d e n t s at Hope have, in their own way and over their own questions, c o m e to see this question as crucial t o the health of their life together. And it seems t o me that one of the things we are learning is that what makes Christian climate of dialogue possible is the Presence of Christ. And f u r t h e r , it seems that we have learned that we shut out His Presence among us most o f t e n when we forget t o begin o u r work t o g e t h e r with a two-fold c o m m i t m e n t to learning t o love one a n o t h e r and t o pray together. THIS SEEMS SO SIMPLE that I fear it borders o n being simple-minded. Then I will be simpleminded. When we begin to try t o explore together questions a b o u t how our Christian faith comes t o bear upon s o m e area, we are not merely beginning as t h o u g h t f u l men. We are beginning as concerned Christians. A n d thus, o u r ability to begin does not depend merely upon our c o m m i t m e n t to good thinking. It depends even more upon o u r c o m m o n faith in Christ. At the least, learning t o pray t o g e t h e r reminds us not t o take for granted the One on w h o m our faith, and our unity, depend f r o m beginning t o end. At the most, it opens us together t o the living Presence of the One w h o teaches us h o w t o love each other, when we need it the most but have it t h e least. Without this, I fear we are t h r e a t e n e d by an irony w h i c h . o n l y Satan can a f f o r d t o smile at: the question of what it should mean to be a Christian college can somehow be used t o destroy the very thing which it seeks to clarify.

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block. Even points of real conflict can be fruitful in a Christian climate of dialogue, by p r o d d i n g the enquiry past superficial and glib agreement t o a deeper h a r m o n y of c o m m o n understanding and purpose. But what will give us that "Christian c l i m a t e ? "

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January 1 7 , 1 9 7 2

Hope College anchor

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Dutch topped by Aquinas, Olivet by Merlin Whiteman T h e D u t c h m a n varsity h o o p sters e x t e n d e d their current losing streak to three games this past week, in losing t o Aquinas and Olivet College quintets. ON WEDNESDAY evening Hope lost their second game of the year to the Aquinas College Tommies, in their meeting in the Grand Valley tourney Hope lost 80-74. This time Hope came out on the short end 92-79, although the game was actually a lot closer than the score indicates. G o r d o n VanderSlice, starting in place of the injured Dave Harmelink, n o t c h e d Hope's first t w o points, a f t e r Aquinas had gone ahead 5-0. A f t e r that, H o p e ' s points seemed t o come few and far between, as Aquinas led by as many as 16 points. The first half ended with the score 48-33. MARTY SNOAP and Dan Shinabarger's outside shooting kept Hope in the ball hame in the first part of the second half. Then came a charge, led by guards Doug Smith and Shinabarger, and big men Snoap, Jack H a n k a m p and T o m Wolters, that saw the Dutch close the gap t o three points, 80-77, and a few minutes later 82-79. However, this was as close as Hope could get. Needing the ball, the D u t c h m e n began to foul; Aquinas took advantage of their free throws, hitting six of seven attempts, while connecting on two field goals, a f t e r hurried field goal a t t e m p t s by Hope. S H I N A B A R G E R led all scorers with 33 points, on 11 field goals and 11 of 1 2 f r o m the line. He did

not hit his first field goal until 8 : 5 6 was left in the first half. Marty Snoap had his best game of the year, hitting for an even 20 points. T o m Wolters had nine points for Hope, as well as leading the Dutch in rebounding with 13. Aquinas was led in scoring by guard Paul Gnepper w h o had 27 points. The T o m m i e s sported a balanced scoring attck, as Dennis Spaulding, Charles Matthews and Gary Savey had 18, 16 and 10, respectively. Matthews led b o t h teams in rebounding by pulling d o w n 18 missed shots. PACED BY the 27-year-old Matthews, Aquinas built up a reb o u n d i n g edge of 50-42, while o u t s h o o t i n g the Dutch 47 percent to 45 percent. Saturday night, Hope College e x t e n d e d their losing streak t o three games, as they were defeated at the Civic Center by the Olivet C o m e t s , 93-82. For the Comets, the win was their ninth in a row, and their third w i t h o u t a defeat in conference play. The Dutch now stand 3-7 overall, and 1-2 in the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. THE F I R S T H A L F was extremely close. Neither team could break the game open, and the biggest lead either team enjoyed was a six-point bulge Hope had with six minutes elapsed in the game. T w o free throws by Comet ace Mike Maciasz in the closing seconds gave Olivet a 44-42 halftime lead. T h e second half showed why Olivet is a great team. With 13 minutes t o go in the game, and the C o m e t s leading by three.

Grapplers outpoint Calvin

a biography

During his graduate s t u d y , VanWylen was engaged in industrial engineering with the DuPont C o m p a n y for one year. He served with the U.S. Navy f r o m 1943 t o 1946. VanWylen has been a consultant for General Motors and the National Science F o u n d a tion, and has d o n e consulting

work for several other industrial firms. Following a two-year teaching stint at Pennsylvania State College f r o m 1946-48, he joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 1951 and was a p p o i n t e d a full professor in 1957. VanWylen assumed the chairmanship of the engineering d e p a r t m e n t in 1958, a post he held until 1965, when he was named dean of the Engineering College. He is a m e m b e r of several technical societies and associations, and has published a b o o k . Thermodynamics. Van Wylen is affiliated with the Christian R e f o r m e d Church, in which he serves as an elder. He is married and has five children.

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Gordon VanWylen: Dr. G o r d o n VanWylen was born Feb. 6, 1920, in G r a n t , Mich. He received his A.B. degree f r o m Calvin College in 1942 and a B.S.E. f r o m the University of Michigan the same year. VanWylen also holds an M.S. degree f r o m Michigan. He earned a Sc.D. degree f r o m the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1951.

Maciasz picked up his f o u r t h foul and was replaced by a n o t h e r big man w h o had four fouls. IT COULD have been the turning point of the game, but it wasn't. T h e reason was the extreme d e p t h of the Olivet bench. On the night, 35 of Olivet's points were scored by their bench. An interesting figure which may have been the key t o the game was the Hope non-starters picked up only nine points. H o p e did close the gap t o seven with three and a half minutes left on a sweeping hook by Wolters, but this was as close as Hope could get. HOPE WAS once again paced by senior guard Shinabarger, w h o collected 24 points on seven field goals and 10 out of 11 f r o m the charity stripe. Following Shinny were Hope's other f o u r regulars - S n o a p , KanKamp, Howard and Wolters - who had 14, 13, 12 and 10, respectively. In addition, H a n k a m p snared 14 r e b o u n d s while Wolters latched on t o six. Hope hit 4 2 percent f r o m the field, 77 percent f r o m the foul line, had 42 r e b o u n d s and c o m m i t t e d 20 turnovers. O L I V E T WAS led in scoring by all-MIAA Mike Maciasz w h o garnered 25 points to lead both teams. J o h n Martin followed with 18, and substitute Larry Walker had 12. The Comets hit 43 percent f r o m the field, 87 percent f r o m the foul line, had 50 reb o u n d s and c o m m i t t e d 24 turnovers. H o p e j o u r n e y s to Trinity Christian Wednesday and t o MIAA foe Alma on Saturday in search of their f o u r t h win of the season.

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T h e Hope College grapplers chalked up their first c o n f e r e n c e dual meet victory in as many a t t e m p t s at h o m e Wednesday against the Calvin Knights. However, in a non-league meet against Ferris State College Saturday a f t e r n o o n , the Dutch were outploccnH 1^ HOPE W R E S T L E R S posted three pins, two wins by forfeit and a draw t o defeat the visiting Knights 30-23. Forfeit wins were h a n d e d t o freshmen Larry Balkema and Kevin Boerman to give H o p e a winning margin. Kevin Holleman c o n t r i b u t e d t w o points to the winning cause by wrestling to a 0-0 draw against his opponent. Most i m p o r t a n t were the three pins put on Calvin men. " F a s t " Eddie Chavez did the trick in 2 : 3 0 to wrack up his second pin of the season. Hope's second pin was t u r n e d in by veteran Ken Gralow, winner of the 134-pound match. The third pin was t u r n e d in by Rick Vanderlind, w h o improved his season record to 5-1.

S A T U R D A Y , Hope wrestled at h o m e against a strong and experienced Ferris State College. Only three D u t c h m e n won matches. Freshman Chavez opened the meet by decisioning his man, 5-1, and giving Hope their only team lead of the a f t e r n o o n . Ferris won three straight matches before Vanderlind trounced his 150-opound o p p o n e n t , 18-0. Hope's third win

Jayvees defeat Aquinas; V riesman pumps in 26 Hope's jayvees pulled off an upset Wednesday night, beating the Aquinas reserves 86-82. T H E TOMMIE back-up men, 8-1 going into the contest against Hope, were considered by m a n y t o be the best freshman basketball team in Western Michigan. T h e contest was close all the way, and the halftime score was 46-44, in favor of Aquinas. However, Hope out-scored the h o m e

team 42-36 in the second half enroute t o the victory. The big difference in the game was undoubtedly the free throw shooting of the Dutch jayvee t e a m ; the jayvees c o n n e c t e d on 34 out of 4 0 charity tosses for a torrid 85 percent. HOT-SHOOTING forward Brian Vriesman was, as usual, Hope's leading scorer. Brian canned 26 big points. However, Hope received very balanced scoring as four other freshmen posted double-figure totals. Jim Heckman paced this group with 18 markers, followed by Jim Nienhouse, Greg Slenk and Willie Cunningham with 2 1 , 1 1 and 10, respectively. Saturday the jayvees opened Wichers denied any suggestion their own Michigan Intercollegiate that the PSC's purpose was violaAthletic Association schedule against the Olivet C o m e t jayvees. ted because the trustees had carThe game was slow and close until ried on talks with VanWylen withHope began to break it open with out a positive r e c o m m e n d a t i o n 10:00 left in the first half. By f r o m the c o m m i t t e e . He said he halftime the Dutch had built up a d i d n ' t " t h i n k it was the c o m m i t 45-33 lead. The jayvees opened tee's role" to state a definite their lead u p even more in the preference t o the board regarding specific candidates. < second half, at times by as m u c h as 24 points. A f t e r Coach VanderHIS S T A T E M E N T S were echobilt cleared the bench the lead ed by Fried. " O u r j o b was t o dwindled s o m e w h a t , but Hope look, not v o t e , " he said. He restill wound up a winner, 89-79. marked that the PSC's original THE L E A D I N G scorer was charge had simply been to c o m e center Greg Slenk who p o p p e d in up with five names. Asked if he expected much 19 points. He was closely folcriticism of VanWylen f r o m facul- lowed by Vriesman who had 17 ty and students, Wichers said, "1 points and 7 rebounds, and Nienk n o w there are people w h o have house and Glenn Phiefer w h o had reservations, but many faculty 13 apiece. T h e latter also collecmembers are very enthusiastic. ted 11 caroms. " P e o p l e really d o n ' t k n o w him The jayvees will play the Alma very well, that's the p r o b l e m , " he Scots jayvee team next Saturday c o n t i n u e d . He added that " n o at Alma in a game preceding the president can completely satisfy varsity bout against the same everyone." Alma Scots.

Trustees may name VanWylen president Continued from page I Wichers. He was motivated by the trustees' wish that t h e plans remain confidential, Wichers said. Wichers also indicated that VanWylen is under pressure t o remain at Michigan, and he feared the pressure would be increased if his plans were made k n o w n . T h e role of the Presidential Search C o m m i t t e e in t h e recent negotiations with VanWylen has been negligible. At its O c t o b e r meeting in Detroit, the PSC was divided in its attitude t o w a r d VanWylen and was unable t o make a r e c o m m e n d a t i o n t o the trustees. The c o m m i t t e e has not met since. F R I E D SAID he and Dr. David Marker, the other faculty member on the PSC, were i n f o r m e d of the trustees' plans at a meeting Tuesday with DePree, Wichers, Dr. J o h n Hollenbach and Dr. A r t h u r J e n t z , faculty m e m b e r s on the b o a r d of trustees.

came on a pin by crowd-pleaser Keven Boerman, wrestling heavyweight. He took 3 : 0 1 to clamp his rival to the mat. Next match for the Dutch is this Wednesday when Hope travels to Kalmazoo for a c o n f e r e n c e match. Next Saturday the grapplers travel t o Adrian for a match against the defending c o n f e r e n c e champs.

01-17-1972