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OPE COLLEGE

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OLLAND, MICHIGAN

Hope College. Holland, Michigan

r7th ANNIVERSARY - 13

January 8, 1965

Unveiling Sunday

Hope To Gain Dutch Painting On S u n d a y , J a n . 10, at 2 p . m . in Van Zoeren l i b r a r y an original painting by Dutch artist Kecs Sabee will be presented to Hope College by H. A. Hoogendoom, counselor of E m b a s s y for P r e s s and Cultural Affairs, in c e r e m o n i e s in Netherlands E m b a s s y , Washington, D. C. Mr. Willard Wickers, m e m b e r of the Board of Trustees of t h e college and d i r e c t o r of Netherlands Information in Holland, did the contact work in obtaining the painting and is responsible for bringing it to Hope College.

Mr. Hoogendoom petitioned the Dutch legislature in behalf of Mr. Wickers and the College, a n d a f t e r it had passed the proposal, the Ministry of Ne t h e rl a n d s E d u c a tion handled the p a r t i c u l a r s . The g o v e r n m e n t of N e t h e r l a n d s m a d e the actual decision to give a painting to Van Zoeren l i b r a r y ; the Ministry of Education c o m m i s sioned Kees Sabee, a 31-year-old Dutch a r t i s t , to do t h e painting. Mr. Sabee studied Art A c a d e m y in The 1957 to 1961. One of was displayed in

at the Royal Hague f r o m his paintings the " G r o t e

n

K e r k , " an exhibition of religious art in T h e Hague in 1961. He was asked to submit a religious oil painting to the Bonifacius Commemoration Exhibition in 1962. Also in 1962 he had a one-man art show in The Hague at " L i e r n u r , " a large a r t shop. His work app e a r s also in private collections.

*

The painting which will h a n g in Van Zoeren library is titled "The M a r c h to t h e F e a s t of the Whits u n t i d e . " Sabee w a s inspired by the account of the Pentecost in the second c h a p t e r of the Acts of the Apostles.

\

Explication of Symbolism

Winter Carnival Plans Require 'Hope For Snow' E x t e n s i v e activities a r e being planned for the Winter Carnival to be held next weekend, J a n . 15 and 16. Co-chairmen of the carnival, Libby Davies and D a v e Baas, announced that the theme for t h e week end activities is " H o p e for Snow." Without snow a n u m b e r of t h e events planned will be canceled. On J a n . 15 the f r a t e r n i t i e s will compete in a sled race on a planned course around the c a m p u s . The r a c e will begin at 5 p.m. A " S l a t e r S p e c i a l " will be served at 5:45 p.m. in the dining halls. F r a t e r n i t i e s must build their own sleds at a cost under $5 and they m u s t be able to carry a rider of 140-150 pounds. A trophy will be given to t h e winning f r a t e r n i t y . F r i d a y night t h e r e will be a hootenanny at 9 p . m . in the Student Union. It will be informal and s t u d e n t s will be free to come and go as t h e y please. A group led by Ken Feit, A m v Wilson and Evonne Taylor will provide the entertainment. R e f r e s h m e n t s will be served. Also on F r i d a y night will be an

all-college snowball fight at 8 p.m. with the students f r o m t h e E a s t v e r s u s the students f r o m t h e West. P l a n s for S a t u r d a y include the construction and judging of the snow sculpturing contest. The t h e m e for the snow sculptures will be " A F a n t a s y in S n o w . " Dormitories, cottages, and f r a t e r n i t i e s and sororities (working t o g e t h e r ) will be e r e c t i n g sculptures. Construction will t a k e place f r o m 10 a . m . to 1 p . m . on S a t u r d a y and judging will be f r o m 1 to 2 p.m. Sculptures will be judged on the basis of construction, originality and effective use of colors. P e r m a n e n t trophies will be given at t h e d a n c e Saturday night to the winners in each of t h e three divisions: sorority-fraternity, dormitories and cottages* S a t u r d a y night following the Hope-Kalamazoo g a m e t h e r e will be an all-college d a n c e at t h e Civic Center. Music will be provided by t h e T r e b l e m a k e r s and t h e admission will be 75 cents per couple and 50 cents stag. Half-time ent e r t a i n m e n t at the g a m e will be provided by t h e d a n c e band with a special winter carnival p r o g r a m .

Central College Begins New Student Center Central College, the R e f o r m e d Church college in Pella, Iowa, h a s broken ground for a new student c e n t e r , a c c o r d i n g t o the student n e w s p a p e r , the Central R a y . The n e w s p a p e r reports that t h e building will have dining facilities for 200 in o r d e r to " a l l e v i a t e the existing c r a m p e d eating quarters."

This will include a dining hall for 100 students and a

coffee shop for an additional 100 students. The new building will cost $300,000.

The p r e s e n t union facili-

ties a r e being renovated and e x p a n d e d and will be connected to the f o r m e r p r e s i d e n t ' s h o m e which also will be r e n o v a t e d . Student offices for publications and r e c r e a t i o n a l facilities s u c h as bowling lanes and pool tables will be included in the new building.

In addition, a bookstore will occupy a portion of the building. F u n d s for the construction of the C e n t r a l College s t u d e n t cen-

t e r a r e e x p e c t e d to come f r o m s o m e n a t i o n a l g o v e r n m e n t g r a n t s as well as alumni funds. The plans w e r e s u b m i t t e d to t h e a l u m n i in o r d e r to gain g r e a t e r support for t h e f u n d r a i s i n g drive.

1

Explaining the symbolism of his painting, Sabee c o m m e n t e d , . . I want it to be V^hitsunside throughout 365 d a y s of the y e a r ; 365 days during which God w a n t s to trouble Himself with u s . " Of the painting itself he s t a t e d , " I h a v e placed the symbol of God like an altar in the church. The symbol of God and the crowd a r e both symbolic and connected by t h e ichtyo (fish) and the Holy Spirit (tongues of f i r e ) . " Mr. Sabee concluded. "This is my Whitsuntide vision . . . a festival r h y t h m in honour of our C r e a t o r . "

£ PICTURE UNV FILING — Dutch painter Kees Sabee poses In front of his painting, 'The March to the Feast of Whitsuntide.' which is being donated by the Netherlands government to Van Zoeren library.

Six Scholarships For Study In Vienna To Be Granted

Unveiling Program Taking place in Van Zoeren lib r a r y , the p r o g r a m will include an invocation a n t h e m , " H o p e Thou in G o d " by Haydn Morgan, sung by Hope College Chapel Choir, the presentation by H. A. Hoogendoom, and the unveiling by Dr. G. J. Van Zoeren.

Six scholarships of $500 each ed two years of college work with will again be available this y e a r an a c a d e m i c a v e r a g e of 3.3 ( c u m for " o u t s t a n d i n g " Hope students laude level) prior to t h e i r d e p a r wishing to participate in tne Hope ture for Europe «i.d must plan to Dr. Calvin A. V a n d e r Werf, College Vienna S u m m e r School, r e t u r n to Hope College for t h e P r e s i d e n t of the College, and according to Dr. Paul F r i e d , diyear following their study in ViBruce N e c k e r s , President of the rector of the p r o g r a m . enna. Student S enat e, will T*h e main purpose ; .Tin accept the Uiu puipv/ot of wi the uic scholaratnuidls In 1964 five $500 and two $250 gift. I n t e r p r e1t a t i v e c o m m e n t s will h i p is to enable superior Hope nn V\i» C • #. 1 . tt * . a « c * 1 1 1 s J / v * > 4 r * i _i_ A . . A i « « scholarships w e r e a w a r d e d for the be given by Stanley H a r r i n g t o n , of students, who might not be -able Vienna S u m m e r School. Recipients the art d e p a r t m e n t . A p r a v e r of to travel and study a b r o a d withincluded Sandra Cady, William dedication will be offered by Rev. out aid. to gain a significant culC a t h c a r t , J e a n Frissel, Arlene Allan B. Cook, Hope College Pastural e x p e r i e n c e and to add an Deitz, ' Carla R e i d s m a , LAJUIIJ a r r y Havtor, and the anthem " O Clap Your •international wvv.. wciiwnai dimension UII11CIIMUI1 to IU their mCir c H a n d s " by the Hope College Chapliberal a r t s training, the director r c a m p and P a u l Hesselink. C n i rJ — . said. el Choir, will close the p r o g r a m . Students wishing to apply for In order to qua'ify for a scholarscholarships for t h e s u m m e r of A reception will follow. ship. students must have complet1965 should first discuss their

Mortar Board To Present Film On Russian Medieval Warfare "Alexander Nevsky," a "class i c " motion picture portraying w a r f a r e in medieval Russia, will be shown tonight at 7 and 9 p . m . in Snow Auditorium. The film, t e r m e d a "vigorous and undeniably impressive pict u r e " by the New York Times and a high point in all s c r e e n pagerpa n• it r y " by • the New York HeraldIf thp"™ 1S ( e l p g P r e ® e n t e d a s P a r t (f the M o r t a r Board film series. According to a publicity release, " A l e x a n d e r N e v s k y " t a k e s place in 1242, when Russia was invaded by t h e powerful O r d e r of Teutonic Knights who swept a c r o s s the Baltic provinces. T h e y w e r e met by the people of the f r e e citv-state of Novgorod under their prince, Alexa n d e r Nevsky. A f i e r c e and decisive battle w a s foueht on t h e frozen L a k e Peinus, w h e r e Nevsky won a brilliant victorv. Of 1938 vintage, the film w a s written and directed bv Sergei E i s e n s t e i n . who also d i r e r t e ^ •' Russian films " I v a n the T e r r i b l e " e n

DayS

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WnriH " rv . . , . # , Original music for t h e picture,

including t h e " A l e x a n d e r Nevsky C a n t a t a , ' w a s written by Sergei Prokofiev, who has been r a t e d one of fhn - r all 20th the most popular of century composers. A biographical sketch of Prokofiev states, Because of the esthetic quality his music e m b r a c e d . . . a g r e a t e r n u m b e r of his works h a v e established t h e m s e l v e s as classics t h a n those of any other of bis cont e m p o r a r i e s s a v e Stravinsky " , , works ..d Prokofiev a r e P e t e r ami the Wolf S y m p h o n y " ^ ^ l l b r e t t o o n Tolstoy's " W a r Peace." " E i s e n s t e i n ' s collaboration with P r o k o f i e v , " as stated in the publicity release, "was particularly u f r u i t f u l , b e c a u s e h e r e he realized m a n v of his theories about the relationship of sound and i m a g e . " C o m m e n t e d Carole Timkovich, c h a i r m a n of M o r t a r Board foreign films, " T h e film is a classic—a m u s t for evervone interested in t h e film m e d i u m and especially for

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who" have an historical y interest in the Middle

s u m m e r plans w i t h their a c a d e m ic a d v i s e r who must support the application, Dr. Fried said. In addition to the r e g u l a r application for t h e Vienna p r o g r a m scholarship. applicants a r e asked to write a personal letter to the scholarship c o m m i t t e e in which they outline t h e i r a c a d e m i c and professional plans, the relationship betw e e n the proposed foreign study p r o g r a m to their overall objectives a n d their economic c i r c u m stances. Application f o r m s for the Vienna S u m m e r School p r o g r a m m a v be obtained from D r . F i e l d ' s office (second floor, Admisisons Building). All scholarship applications must be r e t u r n e d to Dr. F r i e d no later t h a n Feb. 10. Deadline for r e g u l a r applications is M a r c h 15.

Inside This Issue Donia on the State of the U n i o n / ..

p. 3

Z e a s Reports f r o m P u e r t o Rico p. 4 F i n a l e x a m schedule Editorial ..

P. 5 P. 5

Bosworth signs with K a n s a s p. 6


I

J a n u a r y 8, 1965

Hope College anchor

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January 8, 1965 Page 3

Hope College anchor

Four Students To Perform In Recital On Jan. 14

O// The Cuff

State of the Union , by Robert Donia Whether in the lives of individuals or in the life of a nation, t h e r e is s o m e t h i n g about prosperity t h a t c a u s e s an uneasiness to set in a m i d s t the general tone of optimism and confidence. In an indivioual life this m a n i fests itself as a spiritual e m p t i n e s s and longing for c o m m u n i o n . In the life of a nation, it comes forward a s a restless desire to regain the independence and self-reliance of the individual. This uneasiness m a y even come to the point w h e r e people a r e willing to abandon m a t e r i a l comforts to feel that they h a v e again attained their h u m a n dignity. In 1964, we h a v e seen a v e r y obvious manifestation of that uneasiness. Behind the story of one presidential c a n d i d a t e is the dilemm a of millions of people who feel e n t r a p p e d in a m a t e r i a l society and robbed of their essential hum a n dignity—and m o r e i m p o r t a n t , see in others a lack of dign.ty and self-reliance as well. Johnson Is Optimistic P r e s i d e n t Lyndon B. J o h n s o n ' s State of the Union m e s s a g e repres e n t s a total t r i u m p h over those people who have openly expressed their f r u s t r a t i o n s by supporting a candidate who revolted against the social state of the nation. It reflects the opposite of that feeling of f r u s t r a t i o n ; its tone is one of g r e a t e s t optimism and confidence in ourseives as a people. This optimism is one of the corn e r s t o n e s of A m e r i c a n political and social life, and indeed the tension between this o p t i m i s m and the e t e r n a l m a ? e of p r o b l e m s f a c i n g our nation is one f a c t o r that k e e p s us vital and alive. Still, too m u c h of this confidence can cause us to overlook the foreboding felt by so m a n y people this p a s t y ear . In analyzing the President's speech, it is impossible to classify it as materialistic only, for the goal he presents, a spiritually and materially strong nation, few people will contest. Yet one gets the impression that even when r e f e r ring to the spiritual aspect of life, Mr. Johnson interprets this at the

r a t h e r c r a s s level of p r o g r a m s and policies designed to " i m p r o v e the quality of American l i f e . " The tone of his speech can p e r h a p s best be c a p t u r e d by the sentence. "Ahead now is a s u m m i t where f r e e d o m f r o m the wants of the body can help fulfill the needs of the s p i r i t . " Neglect of Spiirtual Wealth Th:s is not to say that the f u t u r e of A m e r i c a belongs to t h e right wingers. T r u e . Mr. Johnson has neglected in his speech the need for individualization and deep spiritual satisfaction. Yet m a n y other m e n in this country feel w h a t he h a s failed to g r a s p , n a m e l y that even in our national life t h e r e is a need to fulfill our spiritual destiny as well as our m a t e r i a l one. Governor George Romney, in his inaugural a d d r e s s on New Y e a r ' s Day. cited the need for buttressing our spiritual rescources as individuals and a nation. He called for s t r o n g e r individual and f a m i l y Jife; while frankly admitting t h a t no g o v e r n m e n t can p r o g r a m those n e e d s to any lasting satisfaction. T h e lesson of the 1920's is that it isn't possible to legislate m o r a l i t y : that outward acts, even when they a r e the honest expression of an inw a r d conviction, cannot be forced «> upon others. It should be even m o r e obvious that moral fortitude and spiritual attitudes c a n n o t be f o r m e d by the acts of government. Individual Monal Rigor A d m i r a b l e as the State of the Union m e s s a g e m a y be in t e r m s of the goals it outl nes, in it M r . Johnson h a s failed to e x p r e s s the d y n a m i c s of a very significant A m e r i c a n reaction—the uneasiness

that has accompanied our m a t e r i a l success. He has failed to recognize that government, while it can m a k e conditions better for human beings, can never fully satisfy their sp ritual and m o r a l needs. It can raise the s t a n d a r d of living of the nation, but it cannot, as he a s s u m e s , " i m p r o v e the quality of life for all." The moral rigor of o u r nation is no g r e a t e r than that of the individuals who m a k e it up. and that can be d e t e r m i n e d only by those individuals t h e m s e l v e s .

Math Lecturer To Visit Hope Dr. P r e s t o n C. H a m m e r of the University of Wisconsin will visit Hope T h u r s d a y . J a n . 14, and F r i d a y , J a n . 15. Dr. Hamm e r is p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t ics and n u m e r i c a l analysis and is c h a i r m a n of the n u m e r i c a l analysis d e p a r t m e n t at the University of Wisconsin. On T h u r s d a y , J a n . 14, at 3 p.m., he will l e c t u r o on ''Computing and M a t h e m a t i c s . " L a t e r that evening at 7:30 p.m., he will l e c t u r e on " T h e Role and N a t u r e of M a t h e m a t i c s . " This lecture is open to the public. On F r i d a y , J a n . 15. at 9:30 p.m., his lecture will be on " T h e Continuity C o n c e p t . " After 10:30 he will be available for c o n f e r e n c e s with faculty and students.

Hope College h a s been given a g r a n t of $4,000 f r o m the Du Pont Company for use in t e a c h e r education in science and m a t h e m a t i c s . The announcement was m a d e by John J . Ver Beek of the education d e p a r t m e n t . The g r a n t will be used for scholarship funds for Hope students wish ng to go to s u m m e r school to t a k e courses which would e n a b l e them to teach science or m a t h e m a t i c s in secondary schools. Hope College was a w a r d e d a g r a n t last y e a r and h a s been affiliated with this p r o g r a m since 1958. G r a n t s a r e usually a w a r d e d for a p p r o x i m a t e l y $450 to $500 for study at an approved s u m m e r school. G r a n t s a r e also available to s t u d e n t s g r a d u a t i n g in June, provided that they a r e going to school in p r e p a r a t i o n for teaching science and m a t h e m a t i c s

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Holland, Mich. EX 2 - 2 2 3 0

Sophomore o " g a n : s t Gloria Langst^aat will conclude the p r o g r a m by p e r f o r m i n g Hindemith's " S o n a t a No. 1" in two parts.

in 1962 and is the director of the college band. The p r o g r a m will open with Mr. Aschbrenner playing Beethoven's " S o n a t a in F m i n o r " in t h r e e m o v e m e n t s and Debussy's " E s t a m p e s " in three m o v e m e n t s . Mr. Cecil and Mr. A s c h b r e n n e r will conclude the p r o g r a m by perf o r m i n g Hindemith's " S o n a t a for Horn and P i a n o " in t h r e e movements.

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An invitation is e x t e n d e d to college students to enroll in one or two of these courses. HOPE CHURCH announces the beginning on January 10 of a second quarter of study in the School of Christian Living.

OF HOLLAND

At 9 : 3 0 — The Mighty Acts of God • (Bible Study), M r . Frank Sherburne, instructor.

Christians in Families D r . Lars Granberg, instructor.

At 6 : 4 5 — Making Ethical Decisions

Fris WESTERN MICHIGAN'S LARGEST GREETING CARD DEPARTMENT Featuring: Contemporary and Studio Cards, Ring Books, Papers, Pent

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Sophomore trombonist William Nicholson will p e r f o r m G i ' l i a r d ' s "Sonata No. 1" in five m o v e m e n t s . He w 11 be accompanied by sophomore Gregory Hulse.

Charles Aschbrenner, pianist, and Robert Cecil, hornist, will present a joint faculty recital Sunday, at 4 p.m. in Snow Auditorium. Mr. Aschbrenner. a g r a d u a t e of the University of Illinois and Y a l e Univers ty. taught for s e v e r a l y e a r s at Stevens College in iMissouri before joining the Hope faculty in 1963. Mr. Cecil, a g r a d u a t e of Jui.liard School of Mus e and Yale University, joined the Hope staff

MODEL LAUNDRY

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Elijah and S c h u m a n n ' s " T h e Two G r e n a d i e r s . " He will be accompanied by jun or Robert F o r m s m a .

Faculty To Present Recital

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On Pont Grants College $4,000 For Scholarships

F o u r students of the music dep a r t m e n t will present a student recital J a n . 14. at 7 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The recital will be the second in a s e r i e s of recitals to be p r e s e n t e d the first T h u r s d a y of each month. Senior pianist Betty Lou Dietch will open the p r o g r a m by p e r f o r m ing H a y d n ' s " S o n a t a in D M a j o r . " Senior baritonist Richard Koers e l m a n will p e r f o r m Mendelssohn's a r i a "Lord God of A b r a h a m " f r o m

"EVERYTHING FOR SCHOOL" Downtown — Next to Penne/s

* And at our River Avenue Store Office Furniture and Office Supplies

M r . Gary Vanden Bos, instructor.

The Gospel in Literature M r . W i l l i a m Bloemendaal, instructor.

You and Your Community M r . Roger MacLeod, moderator.

The Mighty Acts of God (Bible Study), M r s . John Klaaren, instructor. M r . Hillegonds will preach at the 9:30 and 11:00 a . m . services of corporate worship on January 10.

HOPE CHURCH 7 7 W . l l t h Street


January 8, 1965

anchor report: Puerto Rico Conference

jatin American Countries Face Problems (Editor's note: The Inter-American University of San German, Puerto Rico, was the site of a seminar on Latin American Afra'rs on Dec. 18-23. In the following article, Hope delegate Jaimle Zeas reports on the conference. T h r e e Hopeites, J a c k i e Joseph, Joyce Caulfield, and myself, accompanied by Dr. P a u l F r i e d , c h a i r m a n of the history department. joined a delegation of about two hundred s t u d e n t s f r o m different colleges and universities of the U. S. at the I n t e r - A m e r i c a n Universitv of San G e r m a n . P u e r t o Rico, to take part in the s e m i n a r about Latin A m e r i c a and t h e Alliance for P r o g r e s s . The lectures w e r e delivered by four distinguished s p e a k e r s : D r .

VV. VV. Rostow, a well known economist. author of books in economics and c o u n s e l o r - c h a i r m a n of the State D e p a r t m e n t Policy Planning C o m m i t t e e ; Dr. Richard Schroeder, acting co o r d i n a t o r for the Alliance for P r o g r e s s I n f o r m a t i o n T e a m of the Pan A m e r i c a n Union; Senator Luis A. Sanchez, a professor and politician f r o m P e r u ; and Manuel de la Rosa from P u e r t o Rico. T h e concept of the Alliance for P r o g r e s s has been misunderstood often times, a c c o r d i n g to Dr. Rostow; it is not a bilateral aid prog r a m . The Alliance is a commitment m a d e by Latin A m e r i c a n g o v e r n m e n t s to Latin A m e r i c a n peoole that t h e s e g o v e r n m e n t s will strive in t h e f u t u r e to improve economic and social conditions of

these peoples, he stated. The prog r a m would be taken c a r e of financially in the following w a y : 80 per cent Latin A m e r i c a n funds, 20 per cent U. S. and public and private forces. Dr. Rostow divided the countries of Latin A m e r i c a into t h r e e categories: Categories of Latin America (A) The largest proportion of the population is c a u g h t u p in those countries which have had an initial industrial take-off and a r e now suffering a period of stagnation due to s t r u c t u r a l inefficiencies. E x a m p l e s a r e Brazil. Argentina. Chile. Columbia and Mexico. Their c o u n t r y s i d e h a s been neglected, the small f a r m e r w h e n u n f a v o r e d in t r a d e h a s moved to cities to fill s l u m a r e a s and has become unemployed, he explained. These countries need to modernize their countryside, to develop skills, to d i v e r s : f y their exports, and to reduce high t a r i f f s and prices of exports. ( B ) The second r a n g e of countries e n c o m p a s s Central A m e r i c a . E c u a d o r and P e r u , he said. These countries a r e moving in an e a r l i e r g r o w t h process and a r e less industrialized. They must get into the habit of tax collection and low t a r i f f s for their exports, according to Dr. Rostow. (O In the third c a t e g o r v a r e the e x t r e m e s ; Venezuela with a verv high income per capita, primarily b e c a u s e of its oil; Haiti and Bolivia, on t h e ot^er hand, with a verv low per canita income. A g e n e r a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of all these countries is the e x i s t e n c e of two countries within a c o u n t r y ; for e x a m n l c . tho citv of Sao Paulo, with a high income per capita, while the countrvside is poor. Alliance for Progress

COMMUNITY CONCERT—The De Paur Chorus under the direction of Leonard De Paur will present the third in the Holland Community Concert series on Tuesday, Jan. 12. The concert will be held at the Civic Center and will begin at 8:15 p.m.

GLCA Sponsors Plane Charters For Summer Trips To Europe The G r e a t Lakes College Assn. is o f f e r i n g low cost fi ghts to students interested in traveling to Europe this summer. The flights, scheduled through Canital Airwavs, will leave New York for London on J u n e 25 and r e t u r n Sent. 3. N o r m a l cost for a round trio ticket is $480. U n d e r t h e GLCA nlan. s t u d e n t s m a y t r a v el for *250. GLCA is a s s u m i n g onlv the role of nraani7er. leaving the student on his own for study or f r e e - l a n c e

exploration once he has a r r i v e d in E u r o p e . These travel a r r a n g e ments are being m a d e to aid faculty and m e m b e r s of the association; GLCA will not accept responsibility or liabilitv in connection with the flights for any reason. A waiver will be required of all p a r t i c i p a n t s . F u r t h e r information and annlication blanks m a v bo obtained from Dr. F r i e d . The anoiicptions and a *50 deposit must be submitted bv J a n . 15.

Dr. Rostow felt confident of the success of the Alliance for Progress b e c a u s e the new g e n e r a t i o n in Latin A m e r i c a , he said, is no longer interested in "making s p e e c h e s . " but r a t h e r in passing resolutions, and is technically trained. S o m e of the p r o b l e m s facing Lntin America in t h e f u t u r e a r e illiteracv, inflation, a need for better public a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , and t h e

Radiiff To Give Speech Program A p r o g r a m of oral interpretation entit'ed "Dimens-ons of the Human Voice" will be civen in the Little T h e a t e r F r i d a y . J a n . 15. at 8 p.m. The p r o g r a m will cons-st of two s?ct ; ons. In the first section senior Sue IWIUff will do i n t e r p r e t a t i v e readings of a play by Samuel Beckett, a ooem by Carl Sandburg and an adaptation f r o m J.D. Salinger's hook. " F r a n n y and Zooey." In the second part of the prog r a m an oral cho : r conducted by Sue Radliff will present a radio s c n o t w n U e n by Archibald M a c LeNh. a poem by Vach^i L'ndsay and a poem by Walt Whitman.

The Best of Peanuts I HATE TO LIE AUAKE AT N16HT!

M ^ / M I N U E T S TO (JANDERINS, A N D I BECOME TROUBLED

need for i m p r o v e m e n t of the countryside. Mr. Schroeder gave s o m e interesting statistical d a t a ; the present population of Latin America is 200 million with MO million expected by the end of t h e c e n t u r y . Population explosion is one of the most critical problems, he said. Illiterates n u m b e r five million, and s u b s t a n d a r d living is at 80 per cent. T h e r e h a s been an inc r e a s e of five per cent in t h e gross national product in the t h r e e y e a r s of action of t h e Alliance for Progress with s e v e n years r e m a i n i n g , he a d d e d .

J AIM IE ZEAS ization of t h e slow progress of the d e m o c r a t i c process. Rich but Poor' Senator Sanchez explained t h e sentence " W e a r e rich but we a r e p o o r . " He said the national inc o m e in Latin A m e r i c a countries is high, and yet the per capita incom e is low b e c a u s e cotton, coffee. oil, b a n a n a s , s u g a r cane, and other p r o d u c t s a r e exploited by foreign countries. ( H e r e , I would like to a d d that a n o t h e r reason for this low p e r capita income is t h e high population growth of Latin America and that foreign inv e s t m e n t s a r e needed but with a fair s h a r e of profits.) Senator Sanchez also said t h a t the exa m p l e s of Nixon and Kennedy show that P e r u is not against the U. S., although it m a y be against some policy of a d e t e r m i n e d U. S. politician.

Reform Ahead Mr. S c h r o e d e r continued, " L a t i n America has discovered the ' w o r d s ' and it will never be the s a m e again. Land r e f o r m is being executed in E c u a d o r , P e r u and Chile. T h e r e is an increasing power of Latin American voices." Mr. Schroeder said. The r e f o r m s needed a r e to come either t h r o u g h a violent revolution—Cuban, Mexican or Brazilian style—to destroy four hundred years of f e u d a l i s m , hunger and s t a g n a t i o n , or through a peaceful revolution with national development plans and the organ-

GLCA Joint Student Seminar To Be Held in Yugoslavia Aug. 13 C o m p a r a t i v e aspects of m o d e r n American a n d Yugoslav life and thought will be the concern of a joint student s e m i n a r between the Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) and the University of L j u b l j a n a . Yugoslavia, a c c o r d i n g to Dr. Paul frried, Hope coordinator. Hope College has been design a t e d as GLCA a d m i n i s t r a t i v e agent for the p r o g r a m . A m e r i c a n p a r t i c i p a n t s will assemble in Vienna Aug. 13 for a three-day orientation period and will leave for L j u b l j a n a (located in Slovenia in w e s t e r n Y u g o s l a v i a ) Aug. 16. r e t u r n i n g to Vienna Sept 12. R e m a i n i n g time b e f o r e t h e return to Vienna will b e devoted to a studv tour of t h e host countrv. A r r a n g e m e n t s for a r e t u r n flight to N e w York Sept. 15 a r e being m a d e bv GLCA. E a c h GLCA college h a s agreed to send one student r e p r e s e n t a tive. Annlicants will be judged on the basis of a c a d e m i c distinction. proven abilitv in h u m a n relations and intercultural e x p e r i e n c e , prpfornhlv a b r o a d , or with underprivileged grouns. S t u d e n t s with no previous experience a b r o a d will h e e x o e c t 'H to ^ n ^ n d t h e s u m m e r in a f o r e i g n e ^ u e a * ; o n a 1 Pro-

g r a m soph as Hope's Vienna Summer School. C o m p e t e n c e in a foreign language is desirable, but not a prerequisite. since s e m i n a r discussions will be conducted in EngMsh. American facultv m e m b e r s a r e being selected f r o m GLCA colleges. v Students who will not spend the

Reprinted

TO LIE ALdAKE AT N16HT A N D THINK ABOliT LIFE'S PROBLEMS 1$ TERRIBLE,..

fall s e m e s t e r of 1965 on c a m p u s a r e ineligible for the p r o g r a m . A follow-up s e m i n a r is tentatively scheduled for October. E x p e n s e s for student r e p r e s e n t a tives a r e not expected to e x c e e d $750, including round trip f a r e from New York to Vianne. Student e x p e n s e s in Yugoslavia will be paid by a state d e p a r t m e n t grant to GLCA. Applications may be obtained from Dr. F r i e d , Van Raalte 308. and must be r e t u r n e d before F e b . 7.

Religion And Science Dr. Norman Rieck, associate professor of biology at Hope College, will present the issues involved in the subject, "Science and Religion: Conflict or Harmony?" in a talk Monday at 8 p.m. in the lecture room of Graves Auditorium. Dr. Rieck earned his A.B. at Hope College and his M.S. and Ph.I) at the University of Michigan. in human anatomy. Before com ng to Hope he taught at Temple University Medical School in Ph : ladelphia, and the U. of M. Medical School in Ann Arbor. The campus is invited to the talk, one of several talks arranged by the Student Christian Assn. during the year.

by permission

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PIZZA 15 INTOLERABLE!

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Tribune


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January 8, 1965

Hope College anchor

Page 5

New Year Resolutions T

H K NKVV Y K . l!S t r a d i t T o n a l l y t h e t i m e lor m a k i n g resolutions a n d plans, a n d in t h i s first i s s u e ol I M f ) t h e a n c h o r h a s a l e w r e s o l u t i o n s ol its o w n t o m a k e . T h e r e l o r e , it is h e r e b y r e s o l v e d t h a t i n I <)(')•>: • I he a n c h o r will ( o n t i n u e t o strive t o p r e s e n t t h e n e w s ol i m p o r t a n c e t o H o p e C o l l e g e in a n o h j e c l i v e a n d d e a r m a n n e r .

• I h e a n c h o r will c o n t i n u e to o f f e r a d d i t i o n a l a r t i c l e s a n d c o l u m n s ol i n f o r m a t i o n a n d ( o m m e n t which the newspaper believes to h e ol v a l u e t o t h e s t u d e n t s of a l i b e r a l a r t s (ollege.

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• T h e a n c h o r will actively s u p p o r t the National Student Assn. committee on campus, .is its m e m b e r s w i t h o u t a d o u b t h a v e g i v e n m o r e v a l u a b l e service to the college t h a n h a v e t h e m e m b e r s ol a n y o t h e r s t u d e n t g r o u p . • I h e a n c h o r w i l l c o n i i n u e t o m a k e as m a n y m i s t a k e s each week as a r e necessary to p r o v e t h a t its stall m e m b e r s a r e v e r y h u m a n .

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h k ANCHOR W I L L C O N T I N U E to cooperate with the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n whene v e r p o s s i b l e , b u t will r e s e r v e a n d e x e r cise its I r e e d o m t o o p p o s e a n d c r i t i c i z e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n p o l i c i e s w h i c h it l e e l s a r c w r o n g or o u t m o d e d .

• As t h e s t i i d e m n e w s p a p e r , t h e a n c h o r will g i v e its e d i t o r i a l s u p p o r t t o t h e m a t u r e a n d r e s p o n s i b l e a c t i o n s a n d c a u s e s of a n y m e m b e r ol t h e s t u d e n t b o d y a n d o f s t u d e n t organi/ations.

anchor editorial

• I h e a n c h o r will c o n t i n u e to s u p p o r t a n y ellorts to m a k e t h e n e w s t u d e n t c u l t u r a l so(i;il c e n t e r a r e a l i t y i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e . •

• T h e a n c h o r will c o n t i n u e t o s u p p o r t i ( ' s p o n s i b l e S t u d e n t S e n a t e p l a n s , b u t in t h e ( o m i n g y e a r will p r e s s f o r s t r o n g e r a n d m o r e x o c a l e x p r e s s i o n s ol s t u d e n t o p i n i o n s b y t h e I he a n c h o r believes that the Stud e n t S e n a t e , as t h e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o r g a n i z a t i o n ol t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , s h o u l d o f f e r m o r e s u p p o r t t o a n d c r i t i c i s m of v a r i o u s s t u d e n t o r g a n i/ations a n d academic areas.

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i l l . A N C H O R W I L L SI P P O R T the Stud e n t C o u r t in its s t r u g g l e s t o e s t a b l i s h a solid l o u n d a t i o n lor s t u d e n t sell-discipline.

• I he a m hoi will take a m o r e active int e r e s t in t h e r e l i g i o u s s i t u a t i o n o n c a m p u s i n the ( o m i n g semester a n d will a t t e m p t to l a k e in a c t i v e a p a n as p o s s i b l e in p r o m o t i n g w o r t h w h i l e religious activities. • I he a n c h o r will a t t e m p t t o offer as i i i i u h s u p p o r t as p o s s i b l e t o t h e s o c i a l a c t i v i ties oi v a r i o u s c a m p u s o r g a n i / a i i o n s , b u t n o t in t h e l o r m ol t h e " G r e e k W e e k " c o l u m n p r i n t e d in p a s t y e a r s .

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FINAL EXAM SCHEDULE

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I he a n c h o r will actively press lor needed l e g i s l a t i o n , e s t a b l i s h i n g a n a t i o n a l h o l i d a y ( o n i i u e m o r a t i n g t h e b i r t h d a y ol L a w r e n c e X . Cronknortschel. (Grouknortschel w a s , of c o u r s e , t h e v a l i a n t h e r o ol t h e B a t t l e of D o r p h e h u e i s t e r ' s Hill in 1 7 9 1 , a n d e v e r y o n e k n o w s h o w b a d t h e s t a t e ol t h e u n i o n w o u l d b e h a d not that decisive victory b e e n e k e d o u t for o n c e a n d l o r all on o u r n a t i v e shores.) • lu t h e c o m i n g s e m e s t e r t h e a n c h o r will ( a l l l o r i n c r e a s e d s t u d e n t e v a l u a t i o n of t h e a c a d e m i c a r e a s ol t h e c o l l e g e a n d g r e a t e r stud e n t p a r t i c i p a t i o n in efforts to i m p r o v e the g e n e r a l l v a l r e a d y h i g h s t a n d a r d s of t h e college. • I he aiu hor will s u p p o r t the Inter-Fraternity C o u n n T s efforts for m o r e responsible s e l l - r e g u l a t i o n a n d w i l l call l o r g r e a t e r u s e of I r a t e r n i t y s t r e n g t h t o p r o m o t e c a m p u s religious a n d intellectual activities. • I he a n c h o r will c o n t i n u e to strive to p r o v i d e t h e s t u d e n t s of H o p e C o l l e g e w i t h a w a y ol e x p r e s s i n g r e s p o n s i b l e s t u d e n t o p i n i o n and comment.

COMING EVENTS FRIDAY, JAN. 8 MortarBoard Film, "Alexander Nevsky," 7 and 9 p.m.. Snow Auditorium. Chi Phi Sigma Winter Formal, 6:30 p.m.

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SATURDAY, JAN. 9

JAN. 27—WEDNESDAY EDITOR

- CHARI.F*

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Hope vs Kalamazoo, Civic Center. Winter Carnival dance, Civic Center, after the g a m e .


January 8, 1965

Hope College anchor

Page 6

Lose to Wheaton

Dutch Split Vacation Games by James Mace In a p a i r of non-conference tussles over the C h r i s t m a s b r e a k , Hope broke even with a 90-84 win over Aquinas, but then the Dutch were defeated by a classy Wheaton five, 104-80. Hope and the T o m m i e s battled through a torrid first half with both s q u a d s holding leads at one t i m e or another. The t e a m s exchanged t h r e e b a s k e t s in a row until G a r y F e w l e s s hit just before the half t i m e buzzer to give Aquinas a 39-37 intermission bulge.

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Hope opened up quickly in the second half, and when Chris Buys and Floyd B r a d y hit for consecutive buckets, the Dutch went off to a 49-45 lead t h a t they never relinquished. Sophomore center J i m Klein c a m e in and scored four quick points as did co-captain Clare Van Wieren. and the Dutch widened their lead to 10 points, 59-49. Aquinas m a d e a belated bid to catch the Dutchmen and pulled to within four points at 88-84, but only seconds r e m a i n e d , and Hope added a final basket before the buzzer to ice the contest. Van Wieren again led all s c o r e r s with 25 m a r k e r s , while Brady also reached the 20 bracket with 21 counters. Buys and Carl Walters also hit double figures with 18 and 16 points respectively. Klein and Roy Anker with four and Bill Pott e r with two points rounded out the scoring for the Dutch. Hope again led the contest in rebounding. hauling down 63 to 51 for the T o m m i e s . Van Wieren was the high m a n with 18 while Brady was right behind him with 16. Dennis Alexander led the Aquinas s c o r e r s with 23 m a r k e r s , while F e w l e s s took second honors with 20 points, as the T o m m i e s dropped their fifth g a m e in 10 starts.

Lose T o

LAY-UP窶認reshman Floyd Brady drives the baseline and goes up for a lay-up against an Albion defender in Wednesday night's loss to Albion.

Dutch Cagers Defeated By Albion Britmis 84-79 by James Mace A t t e m p t i n g to gain sole possession of first place in the MIAA, Hope's Flying D u t c h m e n invaded Kresge G y m n a s i u m in Albion on Wednesday night, but the Dutch fell before a d e t e r m i n e d Briton five, 84-79. Albion f e a t u r e d a concerted attack that saw five Britons end up in double figures, and its fa^t break was m o r e that the Dutch could handle. Albion moved off to a 15-6 lead, and the Britons kept the lead a r o u n d .seven or eight points for the entire f i r s t half. With the m a r gin at 39-31 and only seconds rem a i n i n g in the half, Carl W a l t e r s took an inbound pass and sent a 65-footer swishing through the cords to cut the intermission deficit to six points. Hope took the battle into Albion t e r r i t o r y in the second half but the Britons continued to score in s p u r t s , and t h a t w a s enough to keep the Dutch at bay. Hope c u t the lead to 57-54, but L a r r y Dows and Don Genson led a quick a t t a c k that widened the Briton lead to 67-57. Hope finally cut the m a r g i n to t h r e e again a t 80-77 but it was too late. Don Genson sank two f r e e t h r o w s a f t e r the final buzzer to account for the five-point s p r e a d . Floyd B r a d y led the Dutch with 22 points t h a t included 10 f r e e throws, while Chris Buys and C l a r e Van Wieren w e r e close behind with 18 and 17 m a r k e r s respectively. Carl Walters finished with 14 points, while Roy Anker with five arid* Dean O v e r m a n and Bill Pott e r with two apiece w e r e the other Dutch m a r k s m e n .

Dave Anspaugh. Downs and Genson were the high point g e t t e r s for the Britons with 14 points apiece, while Bruce Brown added 13 and Roger Moliere chipped in with II markers.

Vi h e a t o n

Bothered by a zone press in its battle a g a i n s t the C r u s a d e r s , Hope dropped behind from the s t a r t and never once moved into the lead. Led by C r u s a d e r c o a c h ' s son John P f u n d , Wheaton moved off to a lO-point lead which they s t r e t c h e r to 15: 60-54 at the half. Hope m a d e a move in the second blanza and cut Lhe m a r g i n to 6964. but Brady and Walters encountered foul trouble and the offense bogged down. Wheaton widened its lead to 9478. and when the D u t c h m e n tried a press, the C r u s a d e r s rattled off 10 s t i a i g h t points to coast to the final 24 point m a r g i n . Van Wieren was a g a i n the g a m e ' s high s c o r e r with 22 points, while

Bosworth Becomes Bonus Baby For Kansas City Athleties Celebrating C h r i s t m a s two days e a r l y . George (Joe) Bosworth signed a contract to pitch for the K a n s a s City Athletics for a bonus r e p o r t e d to be in the neighborhood of $35,000. Under the watchful eye of A's owner Charles O. Finley and gene r a l m a n a g e r P a t F r i d a y , Bosworth was inked with three other collegiate ballplayers in a packa g e deal worth about $150,000. Bosworth, a 19-year old righth a n d e r f r o m Palos Heights, 111., led the Flying D u t c h m e n to the MIAA baseball championship last season, and was selected as the h u r l e r for the MIAA All-Star t e a m . He was 5-0 in league competition and compiled an overall 7-1 record. Bosworth also led the loop in e a r n e d - r u n a v e r a g e with a 0.23 m a r k , and in strikeouts with 88 in 40 innings of pitching. Recently he w a s p a r t of a 20-man a m a t e u r t p a m t h a t toured J a p a n and Korea in conjunction with the Olympic G a m e s . Bosworth continued his excellent hurling in the Orient as he built a 4-0 l e d g e r for

himself. Finley m a d e it known that the A's had outbid the Chicago White Sox for Bosworth's services. Last season it was reported that the Detroit T i g e r s were i n t e r e s t e d in the young fireballer. This past s u m m e r Bosworth pitched in the Bas n League and i m p r e s s e d coaches J a c k Stallings of Wake F o r e s t and Rod DeDeaux of the University of Southern California. Bosworth also hurled for a Louisiana team in the National Semi-pro tourney during the summ e r . Although he was offered am a j o r league contract a f t e r the t o u r n a m e n t , he didn't sign because he wanted to go on the J a p a n e s e trip. 窶「 Bosworth's signing c a m e as a bit of a s u r p r i s e to Hope coach Daryl Siedentop, who was counting on the righthanded s l a n t s of Bosworth to give Hope another MIAA crown. In addition to the lass of Bosworth, Siedentop also lost Glenn Van Wieren and G e r r y S c h a a p , two of his other h u r l e r s , due to graduation.

Buys was the only other Dutchm a n in twin figures with 12. J o h n Simons with eight, Roy Anker, Carl Walters and Brady with seven apiece. Dean O v e r m a n with six and Potter with five finished off the Dutch m a r k s m e n . Hope took rebounding honors but the Dutch couldn't stop the hot shooting C r u s a d e r s . Hope hauled down 58 rebounds, while Wheaton had 35. P f u n d led the C r u s a d e r s

with 20 m a r k e r s , while Bill Provinse with 16 a n d . K e r r y O t t e r b y with 14 w e r e in double figures for the winners. In t h e junior v a r s i t y contest, Wheaton topped the Dutch, 73-72, to hand the Dutch their fourth loss in six g a m e s . Don K r o n e m e y e r led the Dutch with 22 points, while J i m T h o m a s had 20. Dave Bruininks scored 14 and Jeff Hollenbach chipped in with 11.

Hope leading Scorers For Eight Games Scorer

Points

Average

Clare Van Wieren

174

21.8

Floyd Brady

130

16.3

Carl Walters

87

10.9

Chris Buys

56

7.0

Bill Potter

53

6.6

Dean Overman

36

4.5

John Simons

21

2.6

Dutch Score Victories Over Olivet, Alma Cagers by James Mace Hope gained a s h a r e of first place in the MIAA with victories over Olivet and Alma the week before C h r i s t m a s vacation began. Paced by s t r o n g shooting and o u t s t a n d i n g rebounding, the Dutchm e n trounced the Comets, 82-75. and the Scots. 103-73. before crowds of 1.700 and 2.000 in the Civic Center. Although the score didn't indicate it. the Dutch thorough.y outplayed Olivet, and it w a s n ' t until the final few m i n u t e s of the contest that the Comets were able to pull within less t h a n 10 points. Due mainly to the a c c u r a t e shooting of f r e s h m a n Floyd Brady and the board work of junior center Hoy Anker. Hope jumped off to a quick eight-point lead, which was stretched to 38-21 at the half. Coach Russ DeVette put in his second s t r i n g for the better part of the second half, and Olivet m a d e its comeback while the s t a r t i n g five were on the bench. Co-captain C l a r e Van Wieren re-entered the g a m e in the waning minutes and added four points to keep the Dutch safely a h e a d . Brady led all scor er s with 25 points and pulled down 22 rebounds to lead in that d e p a r t m e n t also. Van Wieren with 18 m a r k e r s in the second half finished with 23 points, and he also was a big m a n under the boards w.th 19 rebounds. Anker with 12 points and 21 rebounds was also a dominating factor in the g a m e . All told the Dutch outrebounded the Comets 83-44. and shot for a

37 per cent average. J i m E v e r e t t led the Olivet m a r k s m e n with 21 points, while r e s e r v e guard D a v e Gossel n, who tallied 16 points in the second stanza, had 20 m a r k e r s . Mike R a b b e r s was also in double figures for the Comets with 12 points. Putting on a d e v a s t a t i n g offensive show, the Dutch trounced Alma, who is playing without t h e services of all-MlAA most valuable p l a y e r . Bud Acton. Van Wieren led the onslaught t h a t saw the Dutchmen move off to a fast 12-point lead which kept ri^ht on growing until the final buzzer. Bes.des Van Wieren, who led all s c o r e r s with 25 points, Hope disp ayed an all-around balanced attack that completely d o m i n a t e d all the offensive and defensive action. Carl Walters and Bill P o t t e r had 13 points each to fol.ow Van Wieren for scoring honors. Hustling Chris Buys chipped in with 12 points, while Anker with n ne. J o h n Simons and Dean Overm a n with eight, and Brady with seven m a r k e r s rounded out the scorers. Simons, however, s c o r e d all of his points in the middle of the second half and led an outstanding offensive a t t a c k by t h e second string. Brady, although held to his lowest po.nt total of Lhe season, w a s ever p r e s e n t under the b a c k b o a r d s , and along with Van Wieren. A n k e r and P o t t e r gave the Dutch a 76-55 edge in reboundinK. Bill Pendell. who is enjoying a fine season with a weak A l m a team, led the Scots with 23 po.nts.

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01-08-1965  

01-08-1965  

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