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Foundation Gives Hope $375,000 Grant H o p e College h a s been a w a r d e d a $ 3 7 5 , 0 0 0 g r a n t b y the Alfred P. S l o a n F o u n d a t i o n a s p a r t of a p r o g r a m seeking to stem the decline of science e d u c a t i o n in the n a t i o n ' s small liberal arts colleges. Hope is one of 2 0 colleges n a m ed to s h a r e $7.5 million in g r a n t s r a n g i n g f r o m $250,000 to $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 . President C a l v i n VanderWerf flew to New York this week to accept H o p e ' s g r a n t . I N A N N O U N C I N G the g r a n t s , the f o u n d a t i o n pointed out that small liberal arts colleges are losing m a n y of their prospective sci-

ence m a j o r s to l a r g e r universities. The f o u n d a t i o n is seeking to initiate p r o g r a m s at each of the recipient colleges which would imp r o v e s c i e n c e c u r r i c u l u m s a n d faculty, a n d thus " d e m o n s t r a t e m e a n s by which other colleges m a y i m p r o v e theirs." X o n e of the m o n e y is to be used for buildings. M R . E V E R E T T C A S E , the f o u n d a t i o n ' s president, s t r e s s e d that the decline in science education in the s m a l l e r colleges is p a r t i c u l a r l y s e r i o u s because nearly half of all the high school science teachers a r e educated in them.

Rentier Will Present Recital Tuesday Morning Next T u e s d a y at 10:30 a.m. pianist David Kenner will present a recital in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. This will be a n all-college

a s s e m b l y for which classes will be dismissed. The p r o g r a m will include a Sonata by Beethoven, Op. 101, a n d " S y m p h o n i c F t u d e s " by Schuma nn. Mr. Kenner received his bachelor of music, m a s t e r of music, the p e r f o r m e r ' s certificate, a n d the artist d i p l o m a in p i a n o p e r f o r m ance f r o m F a s t e r n College. In 1962 he received a F u 1 b r i g h t (irant for two y e a r s ' study at the Hochschule f u r Musik in Munich, d e r m a n y , with p r o f e s s o r Friedrich Wuhrer. In 1963 he studied with Professor Curt N e u m u l l e r at the Mozarteum in S a l z b u r g , Austria.

DAVID RENNER

Mr. Kenner h a s given music concerts in F u r o p e and America. He is presently assistant p r o f e s s o r of p i a n o at Michigan State University.

Thus, inferior science e d u c a t i o n at these institutions would lead to depressed science e d u c a t i o n in the n a t i o n ' s school system. Mr. Case a l s o cited the s e p a r a tion between the sciences a n d the humanities which exists in colleges that t r a d i t i o n a l l y a r e dedicated to the a r t s a n d sciences. He also pointed to the high r a t i o of small college g r a d u a t e s w h o e a r n the Ph.D. degree.

without g r a d u a t e p r o g r a m s were considered. Dr. N o r m a n N o r t o n , c h a i r m a n of the faculty committee which p r e p a r e d Hope's p r o p o s a l , outlined the p l a n s for i m p r o v e m e n t of the science p r o g r a m at Hope. Of m a j o r i m p o r t a n c e , he said, i^ a new interdisciplinary studies p r o g r a m i n v o l v i n g the physics, chemistry, biology a n d math departments.

E A C H C O L L E G E submitted a p r o p o s a l s h o w i n g how it would c a r r y out a p r o g r a m a t t e m p t i n g to realize the g o a l s expressed by the f o u n d a t i o n . Only institutions

R E P R E S E N T I N G T H E S E de p a r t m e n t s on the committee will be Dr. H a r r y Frissel, Dr. Krwin Brink, Dr. D o u g l a s N o r t o n , a n d Dr. .lay Folkert.

COLLEGE

anc or

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

79th ANNIVERSARY -

Religious

13

REV. M U S T E , b o r n in the Net h e r l a n d s , was g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o p e College in 1 9 0 5 a n d e a r n e d his B.D. f r o m I ' n i o n S e m i n a r y in 1913. O r d a i n e d as a minister of the Reformed C h u r c h in America, he b e g a n his w o r k of pacifism in 1916 by j o i n i n g the Fellowship of Reconciliation, a n o n - d e n o m i n a tional g r o u p of which he is now secretary emeritus. The last 50 y e a r s h a v e seen him g o m a n y places a n d b r a v e m a n y d a n g e r s for his cause. He protested a g a i n s t n u c l e a r testing in Moscow's Red S q u a r e , a g a i n s t the w a r in Vietnam o n the White H o u s e lawn, a n d a g a i n s t the a r m s race in New York City. He h a s been a r r e s t e d for climbing over a b a r b e d - w i r e fence into a United States missile b a s e a n d chased f r o m a press conference in S a i g o n by eggs, t o m a t o e s a n d curses hurled by a n g r y Vietnamese students.

Chapel w a s the p r i m e concern of the Religious Life Committee in its meeting b e f o r e the v a c a t i o n . Dr. Elton Bruins, c h a i r m a n of the committee, h a d asked each m e m b e r to p r e p a r e a statement outlining the p u r p o s e of m o r n i n g chapel services to be discussed at the meeting.

of r e t u r n i n g g o o d for evil, a n d 1 c a n n o t see the b a s i s for the line people d r a w between i n d i v i d u a l a n d collective action, s a y i n g that a m o r a l code is valid on one side and not on the o t h e r . " On the basis of what he o b s e r v e d in Vietnam, he a l s o feels that the Vietnamese people want to stop the w a r now. " F v e r y b o d y is sick of w a r . They h a v e no ideological interest. They just w a n t to live." He expressed the belief that the Viet C o n g feel the s a m e w a y .

H E S T I L L R E M A I N S active in the driVe for peace on earth. Beside his a s s o c i a t i o n with the Fellowship of Reconciliation, he is c h a i r m a n of the Committee f o r N o n v i o l e n t Action a n d c h a i r m a n o n the editorial b o a r d of Liberation m a g a z i n e . His office vividly illustrates the n a t u r e of his w o r k . Almost superi m p o s e d o n a s m a l l office b u i l d i n g in m i d t o w n M a n h a t t a n , the l a r g e , p a r t i a l l y s u b d i v i d e d r o o m is the h o m e of the Student Peace U n i o n ,

REV. A. J. MUSTE t h e War Registers League, t h e Catholic Peace l-'ellowship a n d the Teachers Committee for Peace in Vietnam. L O O S E P A P E R S A R E strewn on the b o o k s h e l v e s , a n d the b a r e wood floor is cluttered with b o x e s p a c k e d with b o o k s . U n k e m p t , b e a r d e d y o u n g w o r k e r s sit o n b r o k e n chairs. The walls a r e wallp a p e r e d with posters r e a d i n g : " S t o p U.S. Dirty War i n Vietn a m , " " M r . J o h n s o n Didn't Ask Us!" a n d " B l e s s e d are the Peacemakers." The last s l o g a n is the g u i d i n g principle of Rev. M u s t e ' s w o r k . He w o r k e d with Trotskyites d u r i n g the Depression, but was not politically s w a y e d by them. " 1 h a v e no i d e o l o g y , " he said. " M y general orientation is in p a r t socialist, but I b e l o n g to n o p a r t y a n d p a y no dues. I a m a pacifist." H I S S T A N D A G A I N S T the Vie t n a m w a r is in p a r t religious. " I c a n n o t reconcile it with the S e r m o n o n the Mount o r the idea

January 6, 1967

Members State Chapel Purposes

Still Active Pacifist at 82 The p l a q u e on the wall describes him well: "Presented to A..I. Muste -- Disturber, C a t a l y s t a n d Stimul a t o r of the Peace Movement, Pioneer F x t r a o r d i n a r y . " Despite the fact that he is 82 y e a r s old, Kev. A b r a h a m J o h a n nes Muste is now in H a n o i , N o r t h Vietnam, t r y i n g to s h o w the Vietn a m e s e people that " t h e r e a r e a l s o Americans w h o h a v e g r e a t d o u b t s a b o u t the w a r and w a n t it s t o p p e d . "

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

Life Committee:

Alumnus A. J. Muste;

By T o m H i l d e b r a n d t

This p r o g r a m will include a section for science m a j o r s , a basicc u r r i c u l u m for non-science m a j o r s a n d a n i m p r o v e d s e c o n d a r y education c u r r i c u l u m . Dr. N o r t o n expressed e n t h u s i a s m with the possibilities of the p r o g r a m and its wide a n d l o n g r a n g e scope. AMONG T H E OTHERcolleges receiving a w a r d s were Antioch College, K a l a m a z o o College a n d Oberlin College, all m e m b e r s of the C.reat L a k e s Colleges Association. Other highly rated schools receiving g r a n t s were H a v e r f o r d C o l l e g e , Mt. H o l y o k e College, Smith College a n d W a s h i n g t o n a n d Lee t ' n i v e r s i t y .

H E G A V E E X A M P L E S of where A m e r i c a n r e a s o n i n g in reg a r d to Vietnam is w r o n g . First, the U.S. feels that it s h o u l d protect the c o u n t r y f r o m the C o m m u nists. " B u t w h y , " he a s k s , " s h o u l d we decide to w h a t they s h o u l d be e x p o s e d ? The C o m m u n i s t Vietc o n g a r e the natives while the A m e r i c a n s a r e the foreigners. We h a v e no right to p u s h them o u t . " His solution is for the United States to w i t h d r a w its s u p p o r t f r o m the Ky regime, a military dic tator s hip d e p e n d e n t on U.S. s u p p o r t which does not accurately represent the Vietnamese people, he said, a n d negotiate a peace settlement with the N a t i o n a l Liberation Front. REV. M U S T E D O E S N O T feel that a coalition f o r m e d in this w a y would be C o m m u n i s t controlled. " T h e people would be s t r o n g l y behind the n o n - C o m m u nist faction because it b r o u g h t peace where neither the Viet C o n g n o r the I nited States c o u l d . " liev. Muste's a d v i c e to the youth of t o d a y w o u l d be to follow the p a t h of pacifism he h a s walked. He refused to register for the d r a f t d u r i n g World W a r 1, for which he w a s not prosecuted. He pointed to the status of conscienscious objector as a m o v e the student should make. NOTING T H A T IN( OMEand excise taxes a r e used to finance (Continued on P a g e 3)

Before work was b e g u n , however, the committee delayed action on r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s by M i s s J a n tina H o l l e m a n a n d the Student Life Committee r e g a r d i n g S u n d a y activities on c a m p u s because the c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s felt themselves u n p r e p a r e d to discuss the issue fully. Wes Michaelson rec o m m e n d e d that a subcommittee be a p p o i n t e d to s t u d y S u n d a y activities. This was a p p r o v e d . A L S O T A B L E D w a s a request by Dr. J o h n Barlow, b r o u g h t to the committee by Rev. William C. Hillegonds, that meetings conducted in the m a n n e r of t h e F r i e n d s be permitted in the chapel basement. The consistency of Quaker w o r s h i p in a Reformed Church institution and the o p i n i o n held by a few m e m b e r s that Q u a k e r ism is " o u t s i d e Protestant Christ i a n i t y " was b r o u g h t out. It bec a m e evident that m o r e study w a s needed. A n u m b e r of different points of view on chapel were b r o u g h t out in the statements. A c c o r d i n g to Priscilla I nkpen, " H a v i n g chapel is one of the w a y s in which the C h r i s t i a n school reminds students that its c o m m i t m e n t is not only to a c a d e m i c truth, but a l s o to truth as it is f o u n d in C h r i s t . " R E F L E C T I N G A different point of view, J a m e s Tallis wrote, " C h u r c h related colleges are m o r e and m o r e d i s c o v e r i n g that their church-relatedness implies m a n y other things -- a n d p e r h a p s m a n y m o r e i m p o r t a n t things -- than req u i r i n g all students to come a n d " w o r s h i p " a g a i n s t their will. . . It a l s o creates a n even m o r e likely possibility that a negative reaction will result -- a resentment

f r o m which he might never recover." S p e a k i n g of the m o r n i n g services, J e r r y P o o r t i n g a stated, "It s h o u l d be concerned with w o r s h i p a n d a d o r a t i o n of Cod, and with such ques tions as p e r s o n a l purpose, g o a l s a n d m a n n e r of living. It s h o u l d be a type o f ' e x p o s u r e ' -- e x p o s u r e t o s e r i o u s q u e s t i o n i n g , a n d then the a n s w e r of Christian ideas a n d w o r s h i p a n d the e x a m ple of C h r i s t i a n lives." "If t h r o u g h o u r teaching a n d e s p e c i a l l y t h r o u g h o u r daily e x a m p l e s we a r e d o i n g o u r j o b s p r o p e r l y , we will h a v e worshipers with us in c h a p e l . " COMMITTEE C H A I R M A N Bruins wrote, " A t t e n d i n g morning chapel at least twice a week, therefore, is the acceptance of one aspect of the m a n y disciplines involved in the e d u c a t i n g process in a C h r i s t i a n , church-related, liberal a r t s college. F v e r y m e m b e r of the college c o m m u n i t y is recognizing the necessity to g a t h e r in w o r s h i p in r e s p o n s e to the Word of C o d . " The other student m e m b e r , Wes Michaelson, expressed his opinion by s a y i n g , " C o n c e r n i n g chapel, then, the present a n d justifiable position is that required attend a n c e is at present necessary and does m o r e g o o d t h a n h a r m as the college attempts to provide, in concrete w a y s , a C h r i s t i a n liberal arts e d u c a t i o n . " The final m e m b e r , Russ Devette stated simply, " C h a p e l services s h o u l d attempt to constantly conf r o n t the student with the fact that k n o w l e d g e is set in the confines of o u r C h r i s t i a n f a i t h . "

Alumni Fund Receives Bequest of $10,000 A s 1 0 , 0 0 0 bequest f r o m the estate of Wilhelmina Bos H u g h e s h a s been received by Hope College for its 1966 A l u m n i F u n d a c c o r d i n g to a n n o u n c e m e n t m a d e by L a r r y Ter Molen, Director of the F u n d . Mrs. Hughes, a H o p e g r a d u a t e of the Class of 1926 a n d a n a t i v e of C h i c a g o , was c h a i r m a n for the N o r t h C h i c a g o a r e a 1965 Alumni F u n d at the time of her d e a t h a y e a r a g o . Mrs. H u g h e s h a d

p l a n n e d to continue as c h a i r m a n for this year. Her son, H o w a r d B. Hughes, of River Forest, 111., h a s taken o v e r in her stead a n d is currently c h a i r m a n of the 1966 Fund for the N o r t h C h i c a g o a r e a . A Hope g r a d u a t e , he is now associated with W a y n e H u m m e r & Company. So f a r the a l u m n i c a m p a i g n for f u n d s h a s netted $ 1 2 0 , 0 0 0 of its $166,000 goal.


Page 2

Hope College anchor

January 6, 1967

Senate Discussion:

How Effective Is the Senate?

CLUB & CAMPUS FASHIONS BY CHIP TOLBERT ESQUIRE'S FASHION EDITOR

The Return of the Natives

a f t e r t h e C h r i s t m a s holidays and t h e c a m p u s comes back to life a g a i n . As t h e new y e a r s h i f t s into h i g h g e a r , y o u ' r e glad to be back to the f a m i l i a r f a c e s , back i n t o t h e s w i n g of t h i n g s , back to e v e r y t h i n g a t school e x c e p t the w o r k . Bef o r e you get s n o w e d u n d e r t h e books, let's t a k e t i m e out to add a f e w c r e d i t s to y o u r w i n t e r w a r d r o b e . . .

SPRUCE UP

y o u r weekend w a r d r o b e w i t h a bold Black S p r u c e ( r i c h blues, m u t e d g r e e n s and b l a c k ) s p o r t j a c k e t a n d a p a i r of c o o r d i n a t e d slacks. A n o t h e r good i n v e s t m e n t is a d i a g o n a l twill o r tweed j a c k e t a n d a p a i r of plaid o r p a t t e r n e d slacks.

Wide Tracks go to Town

on t h i s s e a s o n ' s s h i r t s . Blue s t r i p e s on a lime b a c k g r o u n d , b r o w n s t r i p e s on blue help to p u t a little s p r i n g in y o u r w i n t e r w a r d r o b e . One s h i r t idea t h a t ' s s t a r t i n g to snowball is t h e b u t t o n d o w n s h i r t t h a t d o e s n ' t b u t t o n . Collar p o i n t s a r e s l i g h t l y l o n g e r , the b u t t o n s a r e g o n e a n d t h e b u t t o n d o w n less b u t t o n d o w n m a y be w o r n w i t h or w i t h o u t a p i n .

S p O t S bofOTB JfOUr 6 y 6 S — D o n ' t r u n to y o u r doctor j u s t b e a t a p a t h d o w n t o w n a n d tie on t h e n e w e s t look in n e c k w e a r . W h e n i t comes to ties, e v e r y t h i n g ' s c o m i n g u p polka d o t s . Choose t w o color c o m b i n a t i o n s , b i g d o t s or s m a l l ones y o u ' r e a w i n n e r e i t h e r w a y .

GO

WeSt

and follow t h e t r e n d s e t t i n g r u g g e d look f r o m c a m p u s to c a m p u s all a c r o s s t h e c o u n t r y . One of t h e b e s t i t e m s to come out of t h e w e s t is t h e suede w a i s t c o a t . T h e rich s u e d e t e x t u r e and r a n c h e r s s t y l i n g m a k e you f e e l special and coeds g e t t h e m e s s a g e . Also in t h e c o n v e r s a t i o n piece d e p a r t m e n t a r e flannel v e s t s in red or gold and r e v e r s i b l e v e s t s — f l a n n e l on one side, checked or p a t t e r n e d on t h e o t h e r . A n y way you look a t it v e s t s a r e a g r e a t w a y of dressing up!

You'll get a kick out of

t h e new slip on ankle h i g h boots f o r c a s u a l w e a r . B o o t s a r e e n j o y i n g a h e a l t h y p o p u l a r i t y as a n a t u r a l e x t e n s i o n of t h e W e s t e r n look. In s h o r t : e v e r y o n e ' s w e a r i n g them during the winter months. The footwear n e w s f o r sun w o r s h i p p e r s is s a n d a l s to be w o r n w i t h b e r m u d a s . To round out t h e c a s u a l w e a r p i c t u r e s p o r t a z i p p e r - f r o n t golf style j a c k e t in an all p u r p o s e processed f a b r i c . And w h e n w i n t e r w i n d s chill t h e a i r , color c o o r d i n a t e c a r d i g a n s or sleeveless pullovers w i t h y o u r s p o r t s jacket.

By Tom Hildebrandt The r e p u t a t i o n a n d effectiveness of the Student Senate w a s examined at length at its M o n d a y meeting before the v a c a t i o n . The m a j o r concern of the m e m b e r s w a s the esteem of the student b o d y . S e n a t o r Steve L a r k i n r a i s e d the q u e s t i o n as to how effective the Student Senate h a s been this y e a r . In a n s w e r to this, Hob D o n i a noted that the structure is a m b i g u o u s a n d that the oft-noted " p r o p e r c h a n n e l s " often wind f o r e v e r a n d this needs c h a n g e . This is not to s a y , however, that the S e n a t e h a s d o n e n o t h i n g , he said. OPPOSING DONIA w a s Senator (Hen Pontier who s a i d that " i think the Senate h a s n ' t d o n e m u c h this y e a r . " lie pointed to the number of m o t i o n s that h a v e been tabled, indicating a lack of action. He s a w the Senate's m a j o r accomplishment h a s been to c h a n g e Satu r d a y m e a l s at Slater a n d scoffed at " p r o p e r c h a n n e l s , " s a y i n g that the w o m e n in Voorhees c a n ' t get fire escapes in this way. Rebutting this, President d e n e P e a r s o n stated that the Senate's biggest deed w a s p e r m i s s i o n for senior w o m e n to eat off c a m p u s a n d that m a n y other c h a n g e s a r e waiting in the wings.

A n e x p e r i m e n t a l non-Western history r e a d i n g s senior s e m i n a r h a s been a p p r o v e d by the Educ a t i o n a l Policies Committee a n d will be a v a i l a b l e next semester, u n d e r the direction of Dr. J o h n W. H o l l e n b a c h , c h a i r m a n of the English d e p a r t m e n t .

F o r his report. President Pearson g a v e the floor to J o h n Mulder, anchor editor. N o t i n g that it is no s h a m e that the Senate m a k e s a s m a n y m i s t a k e s as a n y a d m i n i s t r a t i v e b o d y , he s a i d that the anchor c o v e r a g e of Senate meetings were meant to s h o w ail

D l t H O L L E N B A C H h a s suggested that a l t h o u g h Western civilization and society a r e studied to a g r e a t extent, the non-Western world is s o m e w h a t i g n o r e d , a n d "these a r e the a r e a s that p o s e the c r u c i a l p r o b l e m s of t o d a y a n d tomorrow."

Foundations Give Hope Funds Totaling $5,500 I he J o h n s o n Wax F o u n d a t i o n , the Shell Oil Co., a n d the Research C o r p o r a t i o n h a v e g r a n t e d f u n d s to Hope College, t o t a l l i n g $5,500.

stitutional use, the f o r m of this to be decided by President C a l v i n VanderWerf. A n o t h e r $ 5 0 0 must be used for g e n e r a l faculty imp r o v e m e n t u n d e r the direction of Dean Mathis. The r e m a i n i n g $ 5 0 0 will be used jointly by the chemistry, m a t h e m a t i c s , and physics dep a r t m e n t s u n d e r the direction of P r o f e s s o r s Irwin Brink, J a y Folkert, a n d H a r r y Frissell. The $ 3 , 0 0 0 f r o m the Research C o r p o r a t i o n will be p a y i n g for r e s e a r c h being d o n e by Dr. J e r r y R. M o h r i g .

MODEL LAUNDRY LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANING

Daily Stop at All Dorms 9 7 East 8th Street

S E N A T O R BOB THOMPSON, in a m o t i o n s u p p o r t i n g the presence of a n anchor reporter in S t u d e n t - F a c u l t y C o m m i t t e e meetings, p r o p o s e d that the Senate ask for a statement of policy in t h i s matter f r o m the p r o p e r sources. This, of course, would not infringe u p o n a committee's right to executive session, s a i d T h o m p s o n . The motion was passed. S e n a t o r L a r k i n m o v e d that the m o t i o n to institute a p l a n of c o u r s e e v a l u a t i o n be r e m o v e d f r o m the table. It was noted the A m e r i c a n Assn. of University Professors, h e a d e d by Dr. E z a r G e a r h a r t , w a s i n v e s t i g a t i n g a p l a n of c o u r s e a n d teacher e v a l u a t i o n . The Student Faculty Relations Co m m ittee was then directed to look into this plan.

Non-Western Reading Seminar Offered Next Semester

The course will be limited to 15 students, will deal with Middle F a s t e r n issues, a n d m a y be used to satisfy the senior religion req u ire men I.

The Shell Assist, $ 1 , 5 0 0 , w a s given to Hope College with the stipulation that $ 5 0 0 be for in-

On the comeback trail

PEARSON T H E N defended his actions in the Student Life Committee meeting which w a s criticized in an anchor editorial. He said that student representatives c a n n o t be inflexibly b o u n d to the wishes of the students a n d must be free to m a k e decisions on his own. He explained his c h a n g i n g a Senate r e c o m m e n d a t i o n to h a v e v o t i n g representation on the Educ a t i o n a l Policies Committee in this light.

HK ALSO O B S F R V E D that the Senate serves the students' interests. including m i n o r a s well as m a j o r projects. A d d i n g to this, Senator Don Luidens s a i d that t a b l i n g a m o t i o n that needs study is not a n e g a t i v e action.

T h e p o r t i o n g r a n t e d by the J o h n s o n Wax F o u n d a t i o n , 8 1 , 0 0 0 , which w a s received by the C h e m i s t r y D e p a r t m e n t , will be used to p u r c h a s e scientific app a r a t u s , b o o k s , or periodicals.

and m a k i n g it b i g t h i s season is t h e double b r e a s t e d j a c k e t . The " N o w " look r e s e m b l e s the u n i f o r m of t h e 30's in n a m e only. T h i n lapels, n a r r o w o v e r l a p and n a t u r a l s h o u l d e r s m a k e t h e new double b r e a s t e d b l a z e r s a f a s h i o n first t o follow. If i n t e r - s e s s i o n will find you headed f o r w a r m e r climes, t h e s t r i p e d s e e r s u c k e r j a c k e t is j u s t the t h i n g to see you h a n d s o m e l y t h r u t h o s e t r o p i c a l evenings. M a d r a s e n t h u s i a s t s t a k e h e a r t . . . t h e bold g u a r a n t e e d - t o - b l e e d m e l a n g e of colors is still very m u c h I N . T h e final stop on o u r j e t t o u r of w a r m w e a t h e r w e a r is t h e s m a r t , silky-looking b l a z e r . I t s t i m e l e s s good looks m a k e it an excellent a d d i t i o n to y o u r w a r d r o b e .

that went on, i n c l u d i n g the foibles. They were not intended to m a k e light of the s e n a t o r s ' j o b s , s a i d Mulder, who a p o l o g i z e d to a n y one w h o was offended b y the articles. He p r o m i s e d that in the future n o attempts at h u m o r would be m a d e .

Phone EX 1 - 3 6 3 5

T h e present a n d f u t u r e of the F a r Fast, N e a r F a s t a n d Africa will be e x a m i n e d in the light of n a t i o n a l i s m , the cold w a r , Christian-Moslem tensions, f a m i n e a n d so forth. T H E P U R P O S E OF the c o u r s e is to help p r e p a r e the student for practical q u e s t i o n s a n d p r o b l e m s of a world-wide n a t u r e when he leaves college. E m p h a s i s will be o n p e r s o n a l i n v o l v e m e n t a n d decision, s a i d Dr. H o l l e n b a c h . Beside e x a m i n i n g p r o b l e m s , students will attempt to suggest a policy to face the p r o b l e m a n d p r o v i d e for f u r t h e r , a n d a s yet unseen, p r o b l e m s of the f u t u r e in these a r e a s of the w o r l d . E a c h student will take the role as a top a d v i s o r in s o m e c o u n t r y : E n g l a n d , F r a n c e , United States, Russia, Israel, o r E g y p t , a n d will h a v e to a n s w e r to a certain question such as, " N a s s e r h a s just nationalized the Suez C a n a l . What should your country's response be?"

VanderWerf Named Science Academy Fellow Dr. C a l v i n V a n d e r W e r f , President of H o p e College, h a s Just been elected a Fellow of T h e New York A c a d e m y of Sciences. T h e A c a d e m y ' s letter states that "election to Fellowship is a distinguished h o n o r c o n f e r r e d u p o n a limited n u m b e r of M e m b e r s w h o , in the estimation of the Council, h a v e d o n e o u t s t a n d i n g w o r k tow a r d the a d v a n c e m e n t of Scie n c e , " and that the certificate of recognition c a r r i e s a privilege s i m i l a r to that of the h o n o r a r y degree g r a n t e d by a university. F o u n d e d in 1817, The New York A c a d e m y of Sciences is p r o b a b l y the oldest of the a c a d emies in the United States a n d one of the most o u t s t a n d i n g . In recent y e a r s it h a s been selecting 5 0 Fellows a y e a r f r o m its memb e r s h i p but this y e a r h a s increased the n u m b e r to 100. Of its 2 2 , 0 0 0 m e m b e r s , 1 , 6 0 0 h a v e so f a r been selected f o r this h o n o r .

N e x t m o n t h we'll be back w i t h a complete r u n d o w n on s p r i n g o u t e r w e a r and l i g h t w e i g h t top coats. See you t h e n ! © C o p y r i g h t , 1967, E s q u i r e , I n c .

In N e a r b y SAUGATUCK I f i

Chip Tolbert Column is Presented

IL FORNO'S For the Best in Food and Dining Atmosphere

by

AMBASSADOR Shop

famous pizza

gourmet table

b a n q u e t a n d party accommodations

OPEN YEAR 'ROUND Just a Quick 15-Minute Hop Down 1-196


January 6, 1967

Page 3

Hope College anchor

Receives $30,250 Grant

Hope to Have Science Interns Hope College h a s been selected a s one of six of the twelve Great Lakes Colleges Association schools to p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e G L C A T e a c h i n g Intern P r o g r a m , announced President Calvin A. VanderWerf. S u p p o r t e d by the N a t i o n a l Science F o u n d a t i o n , the intern prog r a m m a k e s a v a i l a b l e to Hope College a g r a n t of $ 3 0 , 2 5 0 . J u d g e s h a v e a w a r d e d the college three internships in the p r o p o s e d d i s c i p l i n a r y p r o g r a m in b i o l o g y , " chemistry, a n d p s y c h o l o g y .

•j

THE INTERNSHIP program h a s been implemented at Hope College since 1964. Dr. Allan B r a d y , the college's first intern, t a u g h t z o o l o g y . The p a s t year Dr. J o h n Read w a s H o p e ' s chemistry intern; this year Dr. Nancy T o o n e y is w o r k i n g an experiment-

SAFE—One of the Voorhees co-eds who have complained of late about the inadequate fire escape provisions in Voorhees tries out the old, bul now repaired, fire escape.

Remodeling, Enlarging Of Voorhees Planned T h e ^irls of V o o r h e e s Hall h a v e one w o r k i n g fire escape, and their d o r m i t o r y will p r o b a b l y be refurbished and perhaps enlarged d u r i n g the s u m m e r . It w a s a l s o revealed b y Director of Business Affairs, Clarence H a n d l o g t e n that p l a n s h a v e been d r a w n up for a n e x p a n s i o n of (Ulmore Hall. In the s h a p e of a s q u a r e , the addition will house 2 2 6 co-eds on three floors behind the present building. T H F V O O R H E E S F I R F escape is a cylindrical tube s t a n d i n g vertically behind the building. It h a s a n e n t r a n c e on b o t h the second a n d third floors, a l l o w i n g the girls to descend sliding d o w n a circ u l a r chute. T h e escape h a s been there for m a n y y e a r s a n d m i n o r r e p a i r s were m a d e to bring it b a c k to w o r k i n g condition. Five weeks a g o the girls protested h a z a r d o u s fire conditions by p a r a d i n g outside the Presid e n t ' s h o m e after c l o s i n g hours. N o d i s c i p l i n a r y action w a s taken a g a i n s t the d e m o n s t r a t o r s , whose a c t i o n s p r o d u c e d s o m e concrete results. ALTHOUGH THEY NOW h a v e one escape, the girls a r e still dissatisfied. J u n i o r Sue Albers said that " n o one feels we'll all be able to get o u t . " Sophom o r e Ann G u n k l e r described the s i t u a t i o n as "definitely inadequate." Mr. H a n d l o g t e n traced the hist o r y of the p r o b l e m of the fire escapes. A p l a n for o u t d o o r fire e s c a p e s had been p r e p a r e d for V o o r h e e s this s u m m e r and was a b o u t to be implemented when it w a s discovered that the p l a n h a d never been a p p r o v e d by the fire m a r s h a l l . I N S T E A D OF S U B M I T T I N G the p l a n to the fire m a r s h a l l , the o r d e r which h a d been m a d e w a s cancelled because the razing of V o o r h e e s to m a k e w a y for a new g i r l s ' d o r m was considered, acc o r d i n g to Mr. H a n d l o g t e n . Since then, however, sentimental a n d financial c o n s i d e r a t i o n s for the c a m p u s l a n d m a r k h a v e combined to c a u s e a shift f r o m this p o s i t i o n . Instead of d e s t r o y i n g V o o r h e e s , " a tentative decision h a s been m a d e to r e f u r b i s h the

d o r m i t o r y by a committee of members of the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d B o a r d of T r u s t e e s . " A COMPLETE REMODELING could be d o n e for less t h a n $ 2 , 0 0 0 a student bed while a n entirely new d o r m i t o r y costs $ 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 per student bed, Mr. H a n d logten estimated. He a l s o noted that the b u i l d i n g does " n o t t a k e t h e best a d v a n t a g e of the site" a n d that an a d d i t i o n w a s architectually feasible and w a s being considered. He noted that "if we're g o i n g to r e f u r b i s h the building, it w o u l d n ' t be wise to spend several t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s for fire e s c a p e s . " He said that if the remodeling is done, it would take place " a s fast as p o s s i b l e , " p r o b a b l y during " t h e s u m m e r m o n t h s . " The modernized Voorhees would p r o b a b l y c o n t a i n inner protected stairwells s i m i l a r to those in the newer b u i l d i n g s . MR. H A N D L O G T E N RECOGN I Z E D the d a n g e r d u r i n g the interim period a n d s a i d that he u n d e r s t o o d the feelings of the coeds. D u r i n g the week before C h r i s t m a s , the old fire escape w a s r e n o v a t e d . Mr. H a n d l o g t e n does not foresee a n y other c h a n g e s until the s u m m e r . He h a s looked into the possibilities of r o p e ladders such a s the girls requested a n d reported that the fire m a r shall "will not a p p r o v e their use." The H o l l a n d fire m a r s h a l l is g o i n g to m a k e a n inspection of the b u i l d i n g d u r i n g the next several weeks a n d m a k e recommendations for the b u i l d i n g ' s fire safety. He noted that " t h e entire b u i l d i n g needs r e m o d e l i n g . "

George Cook Critically Injured In Accident C e o r g e Cook, j u n i o r i r o m Schnectady, N.Y., w a s critically Injured in a n a u t o m o b i l e accident d u r i n g the C h r i s t m a s vacation. C o o k suffered a fractured pelvis in the accident on F r i d a y , Dec. 23, a n d a c c o r d i n g to his b r o t h e r William, a 1966 Hope g r a d u a t e , he will be in traction for seven weeks. After that he will be confined to a wheel chair a n d then to crutches. The accident occurred when the d r i v e r of the V o l k s w a g e n in which Cook was riding attempted to p a s s a n o t h e r car. The driver lost control and went off the r o a d , the V o l k s w a g e n rolling over several times. Cook w a s t h r o w n free f r o m the front seat. N o n e of the other p a s s e n g e r s w a s hurt. Cook is being hospitalized in Fllis Hospital in Schnectady and hopes to return to Hope d u r i n g late F e b r u a r y .

Muste Continues Struggle For Peace Throughout World (continued from page 1) the w a r effort, he r e c o m m e n d e d that these not be paid. ( He said this under a poster u r g i n g payment of o n l y 90 per cent of telep h o n e bills, because a 10 per cent t a x has been added to the bill since the w a r has e s c a l a t e d . ) P R A C T I C I N G W H A T he preaches. Rev. Muste h a s not paid federal income tax since 1948. F a c h year he sends in only a Bible, a c o p y of "Civil Disobedience" by H e n r y David T h o r e a u , a n d a three-page typewritten letter stating that " h e c a n n o t a n d will not contribute to the w a r effort b y p a y i n g his t a x e s . " In an article in Liberation, he suggested that, "As is the case with people afflicted with certain f o r m s of mental disease, we m a y

be firmly convinced of o u r sanity, as we are of o u r righteousness, and m a y in fact in the general context of o u r diseased state be able to p e r f o r m a m a z i n g l y logical o p e r a t i o n s . But we m a y nevertheless be living in a world which does not exist." FOR H A L F A CENTURY, Rev. A. J. Muste h a s tried to b r i n g a b o u t the world he still sees in his m i n d , a n d readies his h a n d , t r e m b l i n g with age, to begin " b e a t i n g s w o r d s into p l o w shares."

Half-prive

Aid Deadline Set for Jan. 15 By State Agency

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The Michigan Higher Fducation Assistance A u t h o r i t y has a n n o u n c e d that the d e a d l i n e for all applications for f i n a n c i a l aid for students b e g i n n i n g the fall of 1967 as f r e s h m e n or s o p h o m o r e s is J a n . 15. The student financial aid prog r a m of tuition g r a n t s is intended to p r o v i d e greater o p p o r t u n i t y of educational choice for Michig a n college students. The g r a n t s are a v a i l a b l e to a n y full-time f r e s h m a n o r s o p h o m o r e student enrolled at a private, non-profit college o r university in Michigan. Grants r a n g e f r o m $ 5 0 to $ 2 5 0 per semester. The a m o u n t depends u p o n the income of the a p p l i c a n t ' s family. To a p p l y , a student must obtain a state of Michigan Tuition (irant P r o g r a m a p p l i c a t i o n which is a v a i l a b l e f r o m the College.

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At last count, we had m o r e t h a n 3,800 newsp a p e r e d i t o r s on our list of s u b s c r i b e r s to The C h r i s t i a n Science Monitor. E d i t o r s f r o m all over t h e world. T h e r e is a good reason why these 4< pros" read t h e M o n i t o r : t h e Monitor is the w o r l d ' s only daily i n t e r n a t i o n a l n e w s p a p e r . Unlike local p a p e r s , t h e M o n i t o r focuses exclusively on world news — t h e i m p o r t a n t news. The Monitor selects t h e news it considers most significant a n d r e p o r t s it, i n t e r p r e t s it, analyzes it — in depth. It t a k e s you f u r t h e r into t h e news t h a n a n y local p a p e r can. If t h i s is t h e kind of p a p e r you would like to be r e a d i n g , we will send it to you r i g h t a w a y at half t h e r e g u l a r price of $24.00 a y e a r . Clip the coupon. F i n d out why n e w s p a p e r men t h e m s e l v e s read t h e Monitor — and w h y they i n v a r i a b l y n a m e it as one of the five best p a p e r s in t h e world.

HOPE CHURCH

THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE . c v«^,o

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FOCUS

INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP

I

11 A.M. Morning Worship Service 6:45 P.M. School of Christian Living

I

Four Adult Courses O f f e r e d : Christianity and Culture; Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra The Christian Lite; Dr. James I. Cook W h a t Present Day Theologians a r e Thinking; Glenn O. Peterman Phillippians, A Depth Bible Study; Mrs. Bill Hillegonds

I I I

Glen O . Peterman — Pastor Charlotte Heinen — Dir. of Chr. Ed.

VEURINKS

Hope's new p r o g r a m (seven professors in b i o l o g y , five in psyc h o l o g y in addition to a parttime teaching psychiatrist, and seven in c h e m i s t r y ) will serve in a consultative role to the three interns with one faculty m e m b e r in each d e p a r t m e n t specifically assigned the task. The Hope College p r o p o s a l was c o o r d i n a t e d a n d d r a w n up by Dr. Robert De H a a n , c h a i r m a n of the education d e p a r t m e n t at Hope a n d f o r m e r director of the GLCA P r o g r a m m e d Instruction Project.'

al biochemistry c o u r s e a s its third intern. The p u r p o s e of the p r o g r a m is two-fold: Y o u n g post-doctoral interns, w h o h a v e h a d n o teaching experience, a r e placed in g o o d t e a c h i n g positions with half of their time reserved for research or teaching e x p e r i m e n t a t i o n ; the college benefits by the addition of new courses, a r e s t r u c t u r i n g of old courses, by h a v i n g the opportunity for d e p a r t m e n t s to achieve a size a p p r o p r i a t e to s c h o l a r l y stimulation, a n d by b r i n g i n g to its faculty the newest ideas a n d techniques with which g r a d u a t e schools a r e w o r k i n g . T H E GL( A-NSFinterdisciplina r y intern p r o g r a m is new a n d follows a b r o a d e r p a t t e r n t h a n did its p r o t o t y p e , t h e C L C A Kettering intern p r o g r a m . All members of the faculty involved in

James Tallis Organist a n d Choir Dir.

Church Located on 11 th Between River and Pine Across from Centennial Park

I •.H. Kwaiv; Hfeet-#«*»4 Jm*?

The C h r i s t i a n Science Monitor 1 N o r w a y S t r e e t , Boston, M a s s a c h u s e t t s 02115 Please e n t e r a Monitor subscription f o r the n a m e below. 1 am enclosing $ ( U . S. f u n d s ) f o r the period checked. • 1 y e a r $12 • 9 m o n t h s $9 • 6 m o n t h s $6 Name Apt./Rm. #

Street City • College s t u d e n t Q Fatuity member

State

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Page 4

January 6, 1967

Hope College anchor

a n c l j o r

To Our Critics R

E C E N T L Y T H E ANCHOR has bec o m e t h e o b j e c t of criticism f r o m a v a r i e t y of sources. S o m e of it c o m e s f r o m p e o p l e o u t s i d e the c a m p u s , s o m e f r o m t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n , a n d s o m e f r o m the stud e n t s . T h e a t t a c k s r e a c h e d a p e a k the week b e f o r e t h e C h r i s t m a s recess. T h e vacation has calmed some spirits and smoothed some f e a t h e r s , b u t we a r e not r e a d y t o see the subject d r o p p e d .

P e r s i s t e n t l y t h r o u g h o u t all of t h e discussion t h e o n e d i s t i n g u i s h i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c was a c o m p l e t e f a i l u r e of the critics t o d e f i n e t h e issues w h i c h they b e l i e v e d to be i n v o l v e d . W e h e a r d s o m e v a g u e talk a b o u t t h e anchor misq u o t i n g p e o p l e , m i s r e p r e s e n t i n g facts, d a m a g i n g t h e C o l l e g e , a n d t h a t f a v o r i t e catch-all, being irresponsible. Now that the vacation has r e m o v e d s o m e of t h e e m o t i o n a l i s m f r o m t h e discussion, it is l i m e t h a t p e o p l e c a m e f o r t h w i t h w h a t they believe t o b e w r o n g a n d state it in specific terms. W e are tired of talk of c u r b i n g t h e anchor's power when n o one will spell o u t t h e r e a s o n s for such r a d i c a l action.

'Just thought I'd stop by and see how I'm progressing in your class, Prof.'

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H U S , W E P E T I T I O N t h e S t u d e n t Sena t e to p r o p o s e to t h e S t u d e n t C o m munications Board that the charges w h i c h h a v e b e e n b r o u g h t a g a i n s t us b e inv e s t i g a t e d . W e feel t h a t w e will b e n e f i t f r o m a d i s c u s s i o n s u c h as this; m o r e o v e r , w e h o p e t h a t such a n i n v e s t i g a t i o n will finally b r i n g

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f o r t h s o m e d e f i n i t e s t a t e m e n t s o n w h a t is to b e C o l l e g e policy r e g a r d i n g t h e anchor. T h i s p o l i c y is l o n g o v e r - d u e . F o r t h e past six years t h e H o p e C o l l e g e anchor h a s g r o w n steadily — i n size, f r o m r e g u l a r f o u r - o r sixp a g e issues t o r e g u l a r e i g h t - p a g e issues; in c i r c u l a t i o n , t h i s year r e a c h i n g 2,500; a n d in i n f l u e n c e . T h i s h a s h a p p e n e d p r i m a r i l y bec a u s e a few s t u d e n t s w e r e i n t e r e s t e d in s e e i n g t h e anchor g r o w , a n d t h e y received e n c o u r a g e m e n t f r o m a h a n d f u l of f a c u l t y m e m b e r s .

H

I S T O R I C A L L Y , the Student Publications Board, now t h e C o m m u n i c a t i o n s • B o a r d , h a s b e e n m i r e d in i n a c t i v i t y ; last year w e saw s o m e r e v i v a l of it, b u t in general the members on this committee and o t h e r s d i d n o t c o n s i d e r t h e w o r k seriously, and therefore their responsibilities were never realized. T h i s m u s t c h a n g e . W e will n o t s t a n d by a n d see t h e q u a l i t y of o u r p r o d u c t q u e s t i o n e d , t h e p u r i t y of o u r m o t i v e s s u s p e c t e d , a n d t h e veracity of o u r r e p o r t i n g d e n i e d . T h e c h a r g e s m u s t be m a d e a n d d o c u m e n t e d a n d p r o v e d before t h e p o w e r a n d i n f l u e n c e w h i c h we h a v e e a r n e d is c u r b e d . W e c a n n o t a n d will n o t be all t h i n g s t o all p e o p l e , a n d to a l t e r w h a t S h a k e s p e a r e h a s said, w e a r e n o t h i n g if we are not c r i t i c a l . W e u r g e , t h e r e f o r e , t h a t t h e S e n a t e ask t h a t t h e i n v e s t i g a t i o n b e g i n at o n c e . T h e anchor will n e v e r be d a m a g e d n o r its staff d e n i g r a t e d by h a v i n g t h e t r u t h k n o w n .

On Speaking Out The Christianity the

issue

following Today of Oct.

with permission 1966, Christianity

S

TUDENT

Coming Events January 6 Cosmopolitan F o r m a l . January 10 All-College Assembly; Chapel: 10:30 a . m .

David

Renner

r sc ita l;

Dimnent

Memorial

editorial

is reprinted

and originally IJ,

appeared

1966. It is printed

of the Today.

from

magazine,

in here

copyright

T h e b o a r d gives s t u d e n t f u l l e d i t o r i a l control a n d tells t h e m they h a v e a " r e s p o n s i b i l ity

to r e p o r t s t u d e n t o p i n i o n a n d criticize

the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h u s a r m e d , the Falcon w e n t to w a r on c a f e t e r i a f o o d , a d m i n i s t r a t i v e

N E W S P A P E R S at C h r i s t i a n

colleges t o o o f t e n carry t h e m u s t y smell

red

tape, wages p a i d

the

desirability

of

to student

pool

tables

employees, on

campus,

of y e s t e r d a y ' s h o m i l i e s or t h e b l a n d taste

academic freedom, and the philosophy b e h i n d daily c h a p e l s .

of a u t h o r i z e d p u b l i c i t y . W h e n they h a v e b e e n

It is s i g n i f i c a n t t h a t t h i s F r e e M e t h o d i s t

less t i m i d , s o m e p u b l i c a t i o n s h a v e b e e n sus-

college w a n t s g o o d j o u r n a l i s m a n d

p e n d e d , a n d e d i t o r s h a v e been fired o r even

q u i r y a n d , m o r e , takes p r i d e in t e l l i n g t h e

t h r o w n o u t ol s c h o o l ( n o t always, we a d m i t , lor j o u r n a l i s t i c reasons).

old g r a d s a b o u t it. O t h e r C h r i s t i a n colleges

f r e e in-

s h o u l d b o r r o w S e a t t l e Pacific's policies. Col-

So we are p l e a s e d t h a t t h e a l u m n i maga-

leges, as c e n t e r s lor a l e r t q u e s t i o n i n g , m u s t

zine ol Seattle Pacific C o l l e g e says "a b u r s t of

w e l c o m e a s s e s s m e n t of t h e i r practices, n o t in-

c r e a t i v e v i t a l i t y in s t u d e n t p u b l i c a t i o n s " was

hibit

a h i g h l i g h t of t h e school's seventy-fifth a n n i -

t h i n g . A n d s u c h f r e e d o m will c o n t r i b u t e to

versary year. T h e P u b l i c a t i o n s B o a r d h a s de-

C h u r c h a n d society, b o t h w h i c h n e e d t r a i n e d

c i d e d t h e weekly F a l c o n is not a "tool of p u b lic r e l a t i o n s . "

writers e q u i p p e d with evangelical ment and intelligent candor.

January 11

it. A d m i n i s t r a t o r s

might

learn

some-

commit-

Basketball: Hope vs. Adrian; Civic Center.

The Fifth Column

January 13 K a p p a Chi f o r m a l . M o r t a r Board F i l m : " B r i d g e on the R i v e r K w a i " ; Snow Auditorium; 7 and 9 p.m. Sorosite f o r m a l .

Sam Caesar By G o r d y K o r s t a n g e

The anchor wishes to offer its sinc?re apologies to Gene Pearson for the overly personal way in which we criticized his actions at the Student Life Committee meeting. We have never questioned Pearson's integrity or character and we regrat that our criticism of his actions have been taken by some as an attack on his char-

acter. We hope for further debate on the responsibility of student leaders to the student body. To the extent that we have hindered such debate by dealing in personalities, we offer our genuine

regrets.

COLUOI

anchor

OLIAND, MKtdOAN

Published wttkly during tht college year except vacation, noliday ana exam inatiop periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Board. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland. Michigan, 49423, at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 110* of Act of Congress, Od. 3. 1917, and authorized Oct. 19, 1917. Subscription: Member:

S3 per year. Printed:

Associated

Collegiate

leeland

Recorri.

Zetland.

Mirntgat'.

Press.

Office: C,round Floor of ('.raves Hall. Phone: 396-2122: 3%- 4611, rxt. 28.r) EM™

. . . .

John M. Mulder

With a p o l o g i e s to W.S.: F r i e n d s , A m e r i c a n s , c o u n t r y m e n , lend m e y o u r e a r s . I c o m e to p r a i s e T n c l e S a m , not to b u r y h i m . T h e evil that c o u n t r i e s d o is k n o w n to the w o r l d ; the g o o d is oft interred with their b o n e s . S o let it be with S a m ' s country. T H E N O B L E J O H N S O N hath told y o u t h a t S a m is a peacel o v i n g m a n . If it is s o it is n o t a g r i e v o u s f a u l t , a n d S a m h a t h not a n s w e r e d g r i e v o u s l y for it. He d o t h d e c l a i m his p e a c e f u l intent i o n s l o u d l y to the w o r l d a n d s u r e ly n o o n e h a s b e e n h u r t b y h i m . F o r S a m is p e a c e - l o v i n g ; s o a r e his l e a d e r s all, all p e a c e - l o v i n g men. He h a t h u p h e l d a c o m m i t m e n t in V i e t n a m , f o r h e is a n h o n o r a b l e m a n . A n d h e is s a v i n g t h e m f r o m the d r e a d Ked M e n a c e ; w h a t m a t t e r be it t h a t 6 , 0 0 0 of his m e n h a v e d i e d ? t h a t 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 Viet citizens die a y e a r b e c a u s e he is p r o t e c t i n g t h e m ? t h a t I n d i a is n e a r s t a r v i n g ? What m a t t e r , for S a m h a t h told y o u t h a t h e is peacel o v i n g , a n d s u r e l y S a m is a n honorable man.

THE IGNOBLE CASTROhath b r a y e d t h a t S a m is a Y a n k e e w a r monger. N a y , nay, I say, for S a m l o v e s his p e o p l e a n d his friends. He hath made m a n y ships, planes, guns, bombs a n d missiles in A m e r i c a w h o s e p r o f i t s did the g e n e r a l c o f f e r s f i l l - s o m u c h t h a t if he d o t h s t o p a g r e a t dep r e s s i o n will r u i n his c o u n t r y . \\ h e n t h a t the p o o r h a v e c r i e d , S a m h a t h wept--so l o n g as t h e y cry n o t l o u d a n d m a k e not t r o u ble. T r u l y all t h a t he d o e s is f o r the e c o n o m i c g o o d of his p e o p l e . W a r - m o n g e r i n g s h o u l d be m a d e of s t e r n e r stuff, f o r J o h n s o n h a t h s a i d t h a t S a m is a p e a c e l o v e r , a n d - l o h n s o n is a n h o n o r a b l e man. Y o u all d i d see h i m in M a n i l a a n d at the U n i t e d N a t i o n s w h e r e he c o n t i n u a l l y seeketh to s t o p w a r . If o n l y o t h e r s w o u l d listen to h i m a n d n o t w a t c h his a c t i o n s . It h a s b e e n s a i d t h a t he s e e k s peace only t h r o u g h war, and h a s r e f u s e d to t r y a n y o t h e r m e a n s , b u t h a s h e n o t m a n y times d e n i e d the k i n g l y c r o w n of p r o t e c t o r of the w o r l d ? Is this a m b i t i o n ?

1 SPEAK N O T t o disprove what I nele S a m h a s s p o k e n . But here a m 1 to s p e a k w h a t I d o k n o w . You all d i d l o v e h i m o n c e - n o t without c a u s e . Why then d o y o u find fault with him n o w ? W h y d o y o u not s u p p o r t his p e a c e efforts in V i e t n a m ? W h y d o y o u n o t believe w h a t he s a y s ? Hut y e s t e r d a y the w o r d of S a m m i g h t h a v e s t o o d a g a i n s t the w o r l d . N o w , b e c a u s e of you w h o d o u b t his w o r d , lies he there, a n d not even t h e p o o r d o him r e v e r e n c e . You h a v e all seen S a m o n Savi n g s B o n d Posters, his s l e e v e rolled up in defense, his p l a n e s , s h i p s a n d g u n s r e a d y to s a v e y o u r lives. You h a v e seen h i m f i g h t i n g a r o u n d the w o r l d to p r o t e c t w h a t he believes in. Wrhy then, d o y o u persist in criticizing n o w , y o u w h o have never said a word about war before? O J U D G M E N T , t h o u a r t fled to b r u t i s h b e a s t s , a n d m e n h a v e lost their r e a s o n ! - B e a r w i t h me, m y c o u n t r y ' s h e a r t is in V i e t n a m with S a m , a n d I m u s t s t o p till it c o m e b a c k to me.


January 6. 1967

Page S

Hope College anchor

Tournier Developes Faith From Conflicts in Life By Keith T a y l o r Paul T o u r n i e r ' s " T o Resist o r to S u r r e n d e r " t a k e s the o b s e r v a b l e p h e n o m e n o n of conflict in h u m a n life a n d p u s h e s it into a n o n - i n t e l l e c t u a l d e p i c t i o n of faith. T o u r n i e r d e f i n e s his p r o b l e m a s the p e r s o n a l d i l e m m a of w h e t h e r to resist o r to s u r r e n d e r in a n y given situation: " W H E T H K R IT IS a f a r m e r selling a c o w at the f a i r o r two theologians discussing doctrine, a n a d o l e s c e n t w h o is t r y i n g to e x t r a c t a p r i v i l e g e f r o m his unwilling p a r e n t s o r d i p l o m a t s w h o a r e n e g o t i a t i n g w a r or peace, there a r e a l w a y s two interests, t w o conv i c t i o n s , a n d in the last a n a l y s i s , two wills w h i c h c o n f r o n t e a c h other." But, b e c o m i n g m o r e explicit, T o u r n i e r a s k s if a p e r s o n ' s c h o i c e to resist o r to s u r r e n d e r is even a free c h o i c e ; a n d he a n s w e r s t h a t if free m e a n s r a t i o n a l , t h e n t h e r e is no free choice: " R e a s o n in n o w a y directs m e n a s it u s e d to be believed . . . R e a s o n s e r v e s o n l y to j u s t i f y , within the field of full c o n s c i o u s n e s s , the b e h a v i o r which o b s c u r e n a t u r al forces d i c t a t e to us, f o r c e s s u c h a s the instinct of p r e s e r v a t i o n , of p o s s e s s i o n o r of a g g r e s s i v e n e s s , of s e x u a l desire, or the instinct for power or for fulfillment." AT T H I S P O I N T , T o u r n i e r p u r p o s e l y m u d d i e s the w a t e r s b y d i s c u s s i n g v a r i o u s p r o b l e m s of individual subjectivity - " W h e n we a d m i r e s o m e b o d y , we d e s c r i b e his f i r m n e s s a s b r a v e r y a n d exe m p l a r y f a i t h f u l n e s s . If we d o not like h i m , h o w e v e r , we see in the s a m e f i r m n e s s o n l y s t u p i d thickh e a d e d n e s s a n d sinful p r i d e . " a n d b y m a k i n g the o b s e r v a t i o n that t h o u g h t m a y l e a d to i m p o tence r a t h e r t h a n to a c t i o n . T o u r n i e r ' s p o i n t is t h a t to entrust the p r o b l e m of r e s i s t i n g o r s u r r e n d e r i n g to the r a t i o n a l intellect is futile, b e c a u s e the intellect is i n c a p a b l e of h a n d l i n g s u c h a q u e s t i o n , in it u l t i m a t e l y falls a p a r t in p a r a d o x a n d o b s c u r i t y . On the o t h e r h a n d , to e n t r u s t oneself to the m e c h a n i c a l determ i n i s m of i m p u l s e is e q u a l l y futile, f o r s u c h a c c e p t a n c e of instinct b e c o m e s a n e g a t i o n of the p e r s o n a l i t y - a n e g a t i o n of freedom. TOURNIKR USKStheproblem of f r e e d o m t h a t to let C.od in the b ack d o o r of his d i s c u s s i o n , f o r since a b s o l u t e f r e e d o m in c h o o s -

Hope Debaters Win Four Out Of Six Debates Hope College debaters w o n four out of six d e b a t e s S a t u r d a y , l)vc? 10, at the i n v i t a t i o n a l d c b a t i S t o u r n a m e n t held at Wester/i Mich- ) igan I niversity. \ D e b a t i n g o n the subje(M " R e solved t h a t there b e a s u b s t a n tial r e d u c t i o n in o u r f o r e i g n policy c o m m i t m e n t , " H o p e ' s a f f i r m ative t e a m , c o m p r i s e d of A l a n Ver S c h u r e a n d D a v i d Rigg, w o n d e b a t e s o v e r A l b i o n a n d Olivet C o l l e g e s b u t lost to Western Michigan I n i v e r s i t y . Hope's negative team, comprised of r . l e n n P o n t i e r a n d Robert B o s n i a n , a l s o d e f e a t e d the A l b i o n a n d Olivet t e a m s , l o s i n g out to Western M i c h i g a n . D e b a t e t e a m s f r o m s o m e twelve M i c h i g a n colleges p a r t i c i p a t e d in the t o u r n a ment.

i n g to resist o r to s u r r e n d e r is not p o s s i b l e b e c a u s e of the shor tc o m i n g s of the intellect a n d the i r r a t i o n a l s u b j e c t i v i t y of the hum a n p e r s o n a l i t y ( w h i c h a r e the s a m e thing), one must depend upon something beyond one's o w n c o n t r o l ; this, of c o u r s e , is ( i o d . The q u e s t i o n of r e s i s t i n g o r s u r r e n d e r i n g now b e c o m e s the p r o b l e m of s e e k i n g the will of C.od. As s o o n a s T o u r n i e r m e n t i o n s the will of ( i o d , he feels i m m e d iate p r e s s u r e to define w h a t he is t a l k i n g a b o u t . His d e f i n i t i o n event u a l l y b o i l s d o w n to a n a f f i r m a tion of the d y n a m i c c r e a t i v i t y of the h u m a n p e r s o n a l i t y . FIRST. HE WARNS against a n y s i m p l e reference to the Bible a n d a g a i n s t n o t i o n s of " C h r i s tian non-resistance": " T h e m a n w h o f e a r s to e x p r e s s his h a t r e d is a l s o i n c a p a b l e of t r u e l o v e ; " a n d t h o u g h the Bible m a y den o u n c e r e v e n g e , it d o e s not condemn combativeness. Further, c o n s i d e r the f i g u r e of the crucified . l e s u s - h a s he s u r r e n d e r e d o r h a s he f o u g h t a n d t r i u m p h e d " ' T h e q u e s t i o n is not s o neat o r clear-cut.

T h e a n s w e r to the p r o b l e m is not s o l v e d b y d e p e n d i n g o n a m o r a l c o d e - " The s t o r y of the Fall is v e r y c l e a r : M a n ' s g r e a t t e m p t a t i o n is to w a n t to k n o w by himself w h a t is g o o d a n d w h a t is evil. He w a n t s to k n o w w h e t h e r he s h o u l d w i t h s t a n d o r not, but without n e e d i n g a n y c o u n s e l f r o m C.od," i.e. w i t h o u t faith; the answer is a m a t t e r of d e p e n d i n g u p o n the p e r s o n of J e s u s . B U T W H A T DOES this m e a n ? In c o n v e n t i o n a l t e r m s , it is "divine inspiration" that b r e a k s t h r o u g h that m e c h a n i s m of irrat i o n a l i m p u l s e which u n d e r m i n e s logical t h o u g h t ; it is " d i v i n e ins p i r a t i o n " that g r a n t s to m a n his m e a s u r e of f r e e d o m ; it is " d i v i n e i n s p i r a t i o n " that a c c o u n t s f o r crea t i v e c h a n g e in h u m a n life. F o r T o u r n i e r , C h r i s t i a n i t y is not a b o d y of p r i n c i p l e s - i t is, r a t h e r , a c o m m i t m e n t to the pers o n ol J e s u s . T h i s is a c o m m i t ment p o s s i b l e o n l y o n a p e r s o n a l level a n d h a s n o direct m e a n i n g lor n a t i o n s , society, o r e v e n the institutionalized c h u r c h - t h i s is no c o n d e m n a t i o n of the n a t i o n , of society, o r of the c h u r c h ; r a t h e r .

IS

and d i v i n e i n s p i r a t i o n ; " but it need not u n l e s s o n e i g n o r e s Tournier's o w n c o n f e s s i o n of f a i t h - w h i c h is a n existential a s c a n be expected f r o m a n eminent C h r i s t i a n p s y c h o - t h e r a p i s t ; that is, if e x i s t e n t i a l i s m is to be the c r i t e r i o n u s e d by o u r g e n e r a t i o n in j u d g i n g a n s w e r s to all the " b i g q u e s t i o n s of life." T h e b o o k s h o u l d be c o m f o r t i n g to all w h o l o o k f o r a m o d e r n definition of " o l d t r u t h , " u n l e s s they h a p p e n to a s k d i s t u r b i n g q u e s t i o n s a b o u t the d y n a m i c pers o n a l i t y a n d w h e t h e r o r not ' d i vine i n s p i r a t i o n " r e a l l y d o e s h a v e a m o n o p o l y o v e r it. T h e b o o k m a y b e r e f r e s h i n g to those s e a r c h i n g f o r a w a y of putting to g o o d use all their irrational, n o n - i n t e l l e c t u a l , illogical abilities--but o n l y until they remember what Tournier says a b o u t the t a s k - c i r c u m s c r i b e d t h o u g h it m a y b e - o f the intellect. IF A S T A M P O F a p p r o b a t i o n were to be put o n this b o o k , perh a p s the best r e a s o n o n e c o u l d give f o r s u c h a d i s p l a y of enthusi a s m w o u l d be t h a t it is a hopeful b o o k , t h a t it l e a v e s m o r e d o o r s o p e n t h a n it closes.

Happy Birthday, Dear Beethoven E d i t o r ' s note: T h i s w e e k ' s F a c ulty F o c u s is written b y Dr. Ant h o n y K o o i k e r , p r o f e s s o r of m u sic t h e o r y a n d p i a n o . Dr. K o o i k e r r e c e i v e d h i s B.M. f r o m N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y a n d his master's and doctoral degrees f r o m t h e E a s t m a n S c h o o l of Music. By Dr. A n t h o n y K o o i k e r Last m o n t h all s o r t s of e x c i t i n g t h i n g s h a p p e n e d on o u r c a m p u s , including the e x o d u s f o r the C h r i s t m a s h o l i d a y . On the v e r y d a y of o u r d e p a r t u r e - D e c e m b e r l b , to b e e x a c t - w a s a l s o the (lay all m u s i c l o v e r s c e l e b r a t e d Beeth o v e n ' s b i r t h d a y . B e e t h o v e n is n o w 197 y e a r s o l d , w h i c h is o n e w a y to l o o k at it, if y o u t h i n k only chronologically (a method of t h i n k i n g f o r w h i c h m o s t stud e n t s c a n b e e x c u s e d ) o r if y o u think s o m e w h a t prosaically (a m e t h o d of t h i n k i n g f o r w h i c h m o s t f a c u l t y c a n n o t be e x c u s e d ). I F E L T A C E R T A I N loss of d i g n i t y on the m o r n i n g of the Kith w h e n I s a l a l o n e a n d quietly in the Kletz e a t i n g the c a k e I h a d s o c a r e f u l l y o r d e r e d f o r the b i r t h d a y p a r t y to w h i c h all were i n v i t e d a s l o n g a s the c a k e la ste d. I w a s still e a t i n g a l o n e a n d quietly at f o u r that a f t e r n o o n . N o w that the o c c a s i o n a n d the h o l i d a y a r e p a s t , I h a v e sufficiently r e c o v e r e d to s h a r e with y o u , n o t the r e m a i n s of the c a k e , b u t the r e m a i n s of m y t h o u g h t s o n that somewhat depressing day. I a m a l w a y s d e p r e s s e d w h e n all the s t u d e n t s l e a v e the c a m p u s f o r their h o m e s , F l o r i d a o r N a s s a u , b u t 1 w a s e x p e c t i n g to b e s o m e w h a t cheered by the p r o s p e c t of Beethoven's birthday party. B e e t h o v e n , like s o m a n y of us, h a d a difficult c h i l d h o o d . He w a s m a d e to l e a r n the p i a n o a n d v i o l i n by his f a t h e r , a s t e r n m a n w h o w a s interested m o s t l y in exhibit-

ing his s o n ' s t a l e n t s in p u b l i c for profit. IT IS D I F F K U L T t o s a y why Beethoven's interest in m u s i c continued during his b o y h o o d , but h a p p i l y he received e n c o u r a g e ment a n d friendship f r o m several fine teachers. In addition, Beeth o v e n knew a n d l o v e d B a c h ' s " T h e Well-Tempered C l a v i e r , " a t h o r o u g h k n o w l e d g e of w h i c h is n e c e s s a r y to a n y c o m p o s e r ' s education. In 1 7 8 7 , he w a s taken to Vie n n a w h e r e he c a m e u n d e r the influence of the a l r e a d y f a m o u s a n d g r e a t H a y d n a n d where he p l a y e d for Mozart, eliciting from Mozart the oft-quoted exclam a t i o n : " T h i s y o u n g m a n will l e a v e his m a r k o n the w o r l d . " I d o not k n o w if it is signific a n t o r not, but a f t e r this enc o u n t e r with Mozart, B e e t h o v e n ' s father, whose name was J o h a n n , t u r n e d totally to d r i n k . M O Z A R T WAS, a s u s u a l , totally right. W h a t is this m a r k that B e e t h o v e n left o n the w o r l d ? Is it e n o u g h to s a y (I refer to a (1 n o t a t i o n f r o m o n e of m y lectures) that B e e t h o v e n is the " c o m p o s e r w h o r e p r e s e n t s the fullest m a t u r i t y (in e m o t i o n a l scope, in f o r m a l c o n s t r u c t i o n and in i n s t r u m e n t a l t r e a t m e n t ) of the allied classic f o r m s of the s o n a t a , c o n c e r t o , s t r i n g q u a r t e t a n d the symphony?" T h a t s a y s a lot to those knowl e d g e a b l e in m u s i c , but d o e s it s p e a k to o t h e r s ? I doubt it. But B e e t h o v e n ' s m u s i c c a n reach alm o s t a n y o n e willing to b e reached. a n d I think I c a n tell y o u how. To g r a s p the m e a n i n g in Beethoven's m u s i c , m y s u g g e s t i o n is to d o lots of listening. T h a n k s to g o o d musicians a n d technology, numerous recordings a n d record p l a y e r s are a v a i l a b l e to us t o d a y .

The Best of Peanuts IM \ M

it is a n honest a p p r a i s a l ol their respective l i m i t a t i o n s , b e i n g external a s s o c i a t i o n s of p e r s o n s as c o n t r a s t e d with the p o w e r of a living p e r s o n a l i t y itself. The s u b s t a n c e of this c o m m i t ment is o b s c u r e d b y the v e r y m y s tery . of h u m a n existence itself. T h e r e is no a b s o l u t e c o m m i t m e n t - a m a n c a n c o m m i t himself o n l y to the d e g r e e that he is capa b l e of c h a n g i n g his h a b i t s . T H E MOST BASK questions of life (if o n e is to be so pretentious a s to c o n c e r n oneself with such q u e s t i o n s ) a r e not s o l v e d on a strictly intellectual level. Man's irrationality and capacity for c h a n g e h a s left r o o m f o r faith a n d , t h e r e b y , for C.od ( a g a i n , if o n e m a y be s o p r e t e n t i o u s . ) F a i t h itself is not e a s y to define a n d . indeed, s h o u l d , to be d e s c r i p t i v e , include its v e r y o p p o s i t e , d o u b t ; which is but to illustrate h o w ina d e q u a t e the intellectual c a t e g o r ies of faith a n d d o u b t a r e to describe w h a t it is that m o v e s a man. Tournier's book m a y dishearten s o m e b e c a u s e of its a s s u r e d tone when s p e a k i n g of s u p e r n a t u r a l p h e n o m e n o n s u c h a s C.od

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W H E N 1 WAS in c o l l e g e there were a b o u t twelve r e c o r d e d w o r k s of Beethoven available on r e c o r d s , often b a d l y r e c o r d e d a n d of c o u r s e p l a y e d o n m a c h i n e s which c a n n o t c o m p a r e with t h o s e of t o d a y . Record c a t a l o g s n o w list o v e r 6 0 0 r e c o r d i n g s of Beeth o v e n ' s w o r k s . T h i s is a n adv a n t a g e not d r e a m e d of e a r l i e r a n d it is o n e of the m a n y blessi n g s of life which we accept in such a cavalier fashion today. Such l a r g e s s . I e n c o u r a g e y o u to listen to recordings and in a d d i t i o n I would u r g e y o u to a t t e n d a s m a n y live p e r f o r m a n c e s of B e e t h o v e n ' s music a s y o u c a n m a n a g e . It's true that o n o c c a s i o n y o u m a y hear some poor performances. Well, p e r f o r m e r s h a v e a h a r d lot, too, but don't be turned off, s o to speak. Beethoven will come t h r o u g h . One of the r e m a r k a b l e things a b o u t great m u s i c is that it c a n s u r v i v e e v e n b a d performances. T H E R E IS A S P I R I T of inde^ pendence, of c o u r a g e in the face of hardship, intensity a n d fervor of subjective e m o t i o n that m a r k Beethoven's music. What greater hardship c o u l d a c o m p o s e r suffer than d e a f n e s s ? Yet most of Beeth o v e n ' s greatest w o r k s were comp o s e d after he w a s totally deaf. As early a s 1 8 1 6 he h a d to use a n ear-trumpet a n d b y 1 8 2 2 his deafness w a s total. B e e t h o v e n ' s music a l s o reflects his spirit of independence a n d his l o v e of freed o m for w h i c h his f a m o u s encounter with N a p o l e o n need o n l y to be recalled. There is a m o o d of p r o f o u n d s u b j e c t i v i t y , of p o w e r f u l soul-exp r e s s i o n , t h a t s e p a r a t e s Beethoven's music from the classical w o r k s of Bach, H a y d n a n d Moz a r t , o p e n i n g the e r a of " r o m a n tic" c o m p o s i t i o n .

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.I.W.N. S U L L I V A N , the English p h i l o s o p h e r - m a t h e m a t i c i a n , h a s written p r o f o u n d l y a b o u t Beethoven in his b o o k "Beeth o v e n : His S p i r i t u a l Developm e n t . " In this b o o k S u l l i v a n writes: " The g r e a t e s t f u n c t i o n of a w o r k of a r t is to p r e s e n t us with a h i g h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n of experience. It is o n this t h a t its claim to g r e a t n e s s ' d e p e n d s . It d o e s not seem that the ' g r e a t n e s s ' a n d the ' b e a u t y ' of a w o r k of art a r e identical. That B e e t h o v e n ' s m u s i c is m o r e b e a u t i f u l t h a n a n y o t h e r m u s i c we a r e not inclined to a s s e r t ; that it is g r e a t e r t h a n a n y o t h e r m u s i c h a s been, o n the w h o l e , the general o p i n i o n ever since it a p p e a r ed. Its g r e a t n e s s d e p e n d s o n w h a t we h a v e called its s p i r i t u a l content, a n d this is s o m e t h i n g that the listener p e r c e i v e s directly, alt h o u g h he m a y be entirely u n a b l e to f o r m u l a t e it. B e e t h o v e n w a s a m a n w h o experienced all t h a t we c a n experience, w h o s u f f e r e d all t h a t we c a n suffer. If, in the e n d , he s e e m s to r e a c h a s t a t e ' a b o v e the battle' we a l s o k n o w t h a t n o m a n ever knew m o r e bitterly w h a t the battle is . . . . F r o m the d e p t h s of this m a n r o s e t h a t s o l e m n , p u r e and profound s o n g of t h a n k s g i v i n g to the C . o d - h e a d . " IN M O D E R N T E R M S , the cartoonist Schulz h a s S c h r o e d e r , the p i a n i s t of his s t r i p , lay c l a i m to the i m m o r t a l i t y of B e e t h o v e n b y d e c r y i n g t h o s e n o t in t h e " k n o w , " as c a n be seen in the a c c o m p a n y ing c a r t o o n . M o n u m e n t s a r e erected to B e e t h o v e n in his b i r t h p l a c e in B o n n a n d in V i e n n a , but his g r e a t e s t m o n u m e n t is his music, as it will e v e r be. S o let us sing a belated " H a p p y Birthday, dear B e e t h o v e n " a n d p a y him the h o m a g e of l i s t e n i n g to s o m e of his music.

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Page 6

January 6, 1967

Hope College anchor

anchor Interview

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Dean Mathis On Hope and Its Students

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By George Arwady Who m a k e s the decisions at Hope College? What kind of relationship exists between the students a n d the Administration? What does the f u t u r e hold for Hope College? These were s o m e of the questions discussed in an interview recently with Dean for Academic Affairs, William S. Mathis. The Dean w a s asked whether he t h o u g h " a g o o d relationship exists between th' students a n d A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . "

'This college operates from the bottom up. The faculty makes decisions on the recommendations of committees of which students are always a part.'

'I'm in college teaching and administration because I respect the college student as an individual. A relationship of mutual respect is called for.'

'Hope is not small enough anymore to be one happy family. While it is a community, there ere sub-committees and sub-loyalties within the larger community.'

ulty. A faculty decision o r a student-faculty committee r e c o m m e n d a t i o n is usually just passed a l o n g by the A d m i n i s t r a tive Council because it " d o e s n ' t skirt the limits of policy."

"Students h a v e u n d e r e s t i m a t e d their power on committees. T h e committee membership of students is not taken seriously e n o u g h . This college o p e r a t e s f r o m the bottom up. The faculty m a k e s decisions on the r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s of committees of which students a r e a l w a y s a p a r t . "

routines to eliminate the busy w o r k of A d m i n i s t r a t i o n c a n m a k e it possible to establish p e r s o n a l relationships. We would be able to allow m o r e time for p e r s o n a l contact."

Role of Administration

The Church and Hope

Student-Administration Relations Dean Mathis replied, " M y own feeling is that the r elations hip is strained because the students h a v e p e r h a p s misinterpreted the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s role. The students h a v e a picture of the Administration as a n all-powerful god. Hopefully, it s h o u l d n ' t be that, but the very antithesis." " T h e essential element of a g o o d adm i n i s t r a t i o n is a ' c o m e let us r e a s o n together' attitude on the part of both student a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . At Hope, students seem to come to me with a desire for a final a u t h o r i t a r i a n decision. 1 don't like this. I'm in college teaching a n d administration because I respect the college student as a n individual. A relationship of m u t u a l respect and interdependence is called for. I c a n ' t possibly see all the sides of even a single student's problems." Dean Mathis noted that students often do not know who m a k e s the decisions which influence them a n d underestimate their influence. Who Makes Decisions? In reply to a q u e r y of who is the Administration, Dean Mathis listed the members of the newly created Administrative Council. He described this council as " a pool of ideas and p r o b l e m s , a session at which a l o n g look at the interrelationship of all aspects of the College is taken." The Dean said that the chief decisionm a k i n g b o d y on c a m p u s was the fac-

" The role of the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is to implement faculty decisions where possible. T h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n reviews faculty decisions in r e g a r d to Hoard of T r u s tees policy a n d the s c h o o l ' s fiscal a n d physical policies a n d s i t u a t i o n , " the dean said. " T h e role of the H o a r d of Trustees is to f o r m u l a t e the o v e r a l l general policy of the school. The b o a r d sets the f r a m e w o r k within which the College operates. T h e H o a r d p r o v i d e s a continuity to school policy which is not f o u n d in other campus institutions." Dean Mathis described the President's j o b as extremely difficult. The President must keep one foot in c a m p u s life itself and one foot in the w o r l d of the people concerned with H o p e College. He must act as l i a s o n between the Hoard of T r u s tees a n d the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . He m u s t also be sensitive to attitudes of the c h u r c h , the c o m m u n i t y a n d the a l u m n i , he said. Senate and Students THE N E E D S OF T H E student can best be expressed t h r o u g h the Student Senate, a c c o r d i n g to Dean Mathis. " 1 would like to see the Senate f u n c t i o n i n g as a representative b o d y reflecting a consensus of student o p i n i o n - the very best of student thinking. The students a s s i g n e d to r e g u l a r committees should b e c o m e a liaison between the faculty a n d the students, g i v i n g detailed reports b a c k to the Senate a n d t h r o u g h them to the student body.

SHIRTS 25c Each For 4 Or More With Dry Cleaning Order. Folded Or On Hangers

Personal Relations Needed Dean Mathis expressed regret that there seemed to be a lack of p e r s o n a l relations between students and A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . He called the development of such a relationship H o p e ' s " m o s t desperate n e e d . " He c o m p l a i n e d that he almost feels "insulated f r o m the s t u d e n t s " a n d wishes to " e s t a b l i s h a relationship that is missing." Dean Mathis tied this lack of r a p p o r t in with the size of the College. He said that Hope "is not s m a l l e n o u g h a n y m o r e to be one h a p p y f a m i l y . While it is a c o m m u n i t y , there a r e s u b - c o m m u n i t i e s a n d sub-loyalties within the l a r g e r comm u n i t y . " He e m p h a s i z e d that " w e need to hear each other o u t " for the g o o d of the whole College. The Dean pointed out one w a y that the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is attempting to m o v e t o w a r d the attainment of a m o r e ideal situation. "We're h a v i n g a t r a n s i t i o n in the Administration. T h e College itself is d e v e l o p i n g a system, a routine. T h e imp r o v e m e n t a n d m o d e r n i z a t i o n of m a n y

The Dean was a l s o asked a b o u t the r elations hip of the College and the Church a n d asked whether we can rem a i n affiliated in a period of rising costs of education. He said that it is " h a r d to k n o w w h a t will h a p p e n . At the present time the adv a n t a g e s of affiliation outweigh the disa d v a n t a g e s . " Dean Mathis felt, however, that " a redefinition of the r e l a t i o n s h i p is imperative." He noted that it is p r e f e r a b l e to h a v e " a college-related c h u r c h r a t h e r t h a n a church-related college. The C h u r c h h a s never been this," the Dean said. Healthy Relationship " W e ' v e never lived t h r o u g h times like these in higher e d u c a t i o n . 1 d o n ' t think a breach is impossible, but it would t a k e some l o n g thinking and evaluation for Hope to g o without the church. There is a healthiness in the r elations hip between the Reformed C h u r c h a n d Hope, a relaxed attitude which y o u d o n ' t find in m a n y other s c h o o l s , " Dean Mathis concluded.

Loses Year Long Battle

Western Student Drafted Hope a l u m n u s Mike L a u g h l i n , class of 1966, h a s been drafted after a fight with the Selective Service f o r m o r e t h a n a year. He was a t t e n d i n g Western Theological Semi n a r y when he received his induction notice. L a u g h l i n will report after over a year of a p p e a l s to obtain a reclassification. In October 1965, he w a s classified 1-A while finishing the last semester of his work at Hope. He pre-registered at Western S e m i n a r y for the q u a r t e r b e g i n n i n g M a r c h 1966, but was d r a f t e d for the first time in Febr u a r y . His a p p e a l w a s accepted after his c o n g r e s s m a n intervened, but his 1-A classification w a s never c h a n g e d . Subsequent a p p e a l s sent the c a s e to W a s h i n g t o n ; however, his draft s t a t u s remained 1-A even while he w a s a fulltime divinity student at Western S e m i n a r y this fall. A l t h o u g h Western's Dean of Admissions H e n r y Ten Clay s u p p o r t e d L a u g h l i n ' s a p p e a l s , L a u g h l i n received his induction notice in e a r l y December. He e x p l a i n e d that even t h o u g h he ap-

pealed to the h i g h e r courts, " t h e local b o a r d is p r a c t i c a l l y a u t o n o m o u s . 1 h a v e n o w a y of k n o w i n g whether the h i g h e r courts s u p p o r t e d my a p p e a l since they a r e c h a n n e l e d b a c k to the local b o a r d and are only advisory opinions." H e stated t h a t he a n d his wife, the f o r m e r M a r j o r i e W i e g m a n , h a d resigned themselves to the situation. " W e ' v e been fighting it for so l o n g , " he s a i d , " t h a t we just reached the point where it's a relief to k n o w when. I'm just g l a d I h a d a c h a n c e to complete one q u a r t e r at Western." As for now, he s a i d , " I ' m c o n s i d e r i n g enlisting s o that I c a n h a v e m o r e choice. I'd like to be a s s i g n e d as a c h a p l a i n ' s assistant, a n d the S e m i n a r y h a s told me that they would accept that a s fulfilling my internship r e q u i r e m e n t . " His wife, who is t e a c h i n g at H o l l a n d C h r i s t i a n High School, will finish the y e a r in H o l l a n d , a n d then either join her h u s b a n d o r continue her w o r k f o r her m a s t e r ' s degree, d e p e n d i n g o n where he is located.

Cash & Carry

THE STUDENT CHURCH Sunday, January 8 Corporate Worship at 10:45 a.nv in Dimnent Chapel SHIRT LAUNDRY

Organist: Mr. Roger Davis Preacher: Chaplain Hillegonds College at 6th

IfANECS HOLLAND, MICH.

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January 6, 1967

Hope College anchor

Page 7

Deadline Jan. 15

Japan Study Open to Students Applications for the H o p e College S u m m e r P r o g r a m in J a p a n will be accepted until J a n . 15, a n n o u n c e d Dr. 1). Ivan D y k s t r a , the faculty director. Dr. D y k s t r a explained that the early closing was due to orientation s e m i n a r s being p l a n n e d for p r o g r a m p a r t i c i p a n t s d u r i n g the second semester. These s e m i n a r s will offer a n introduction to J a p anese culture a n d a brief taste of the J a p a n e s e l a n g u a g e . All lectures in J a p a n , however, will be in Knglish. i)K. DYKSTRA NOTKI) that there were several aspects of the p r o g r a m which needed clarification. " The e x p e n s e , " he noted, "will be r o u g h l y c o m p a r a b l e to

t h a t of t h e Vienna S u m m e r s c h o o l . " He a d d e d that there will be a possibility of students working for a m o n t h in J a p a n . " I he c o u r s e s at Meiji ( l a k u i n I 'niversity in T o k y o will deal with the h i s t o r y , literature and p h i l o s o p h y of J a p a n . Hope students will be able to e a r n five or six credit h o u r s in the p r o g r a m . Dr. D y k s t r a e m p h a s i z e d that this f a r - e a s t e r n experience was a " r a r e o p p o r t u n i t y " to study at a center of i n t e r n a t i o n a l education not n e a r l y as e x p l o r e d as Kurope h a s b e c o m e . " HK N O T E D T H A T J a p a n e s e students were " v e r y a n x i o u s " to increase contact with students of other l a n d s a n d that Hope students could c o u n t on " t h e Jap-

Dr. Brink Receives NSF Grant For Research at Michigan Dr. Irwin Brink, w h o is chairman of the d e p a r t m e n t of chemistry at Hope College, h a s been designated a s a recipient of a \ a t i o n a l Science K o u n d a t i o n Sdence Kaculty Kellowship. A p r o f e s s o r of a d v a n c e d physical c h e m i s t r y , Dr. Brink will p u r s u e c o u r s e s in q u a n t u m mechanics and statistical t h e r m o d y namics at the I'niversity of Michigan. He will j o i n a research g r o u p headed by K d g a r Westrum that is presently concerned with s o l i d state t h e r m o d y n a m i c s . This pro-

g r a m is designed to b r o a d e n and deepen Dr. B r i n k ' s r e s e a r c h c a p a cities a n d to keep a b r e a s t of new research in the field for his work as the director of u n d e r g r a d u a t e research at 1 lope. I he N a t i o n a l Science Koundation Science Kaculty l-'ellowship P r o g r a m w a s b e g u n in 1956. Its p r i m a r y p u r p o s e in g r a n t i n g the a w a r d s is " t o p r o v i d e a n o p p o r tunity for j u n i o r college, college, a n d university science teachers to e n h a n c e their effectiveness as teachers."

anese rolling out the red c a r p e t . " Dr. Dykstra pointed out that the university's location in T o k y o will offer e x t e n s i v e c u l t u r a l o p p o r tunities d u r i n g the p r o g r a m ' s academic weeks. The p a r t i c i p a n t s in the p r o g r a m will then be placed in J a p a n e s e h o m e s for two weeks of living in a less industrial a r e a a n d will then be allowed a week of independent travel.

Washington Christian Herter. Sr., 71, f o r m e r Secretary of State, died s u d d e n l y last week. Vietnam Both Vietnam truces were, reportedly, b r o k e n a n u m b e r of times by the Viet C o n g . The VC b r o k e the truces by m a n y small a t t a c k s and by r e g r o u p ing a n d s t r e n g t h e n i n g their positions. D u r i n g the second truce, the I'.S. l a n d e d 7,()()() t r o o p s to strengthen o u r position to 3 8 0 , 0 0 0 t r o o p s in Vietnam, sent B-52's f r o m C.uam during the truce to be o v e r targets shortly after the truce ended, a n d continued its r e h a b i l i t a t i o n activities in V.C. villages captured s h o r t l y before the truce began. A m b a s s a d o r H e n r y Cabot L o d g e reported to President J o h n s o n a l o n g with Defense Secretary Robert M c X a m a r a , A m b a s s a d o r - a t - L a r g e Averell Harriman and UN Ambassad o r A r t h u r G o l d b e r g . Lodge s a i d later that he s a w " n o sign of peace t a l k s " with the Communists in the next few m o n t h s . Lodge, recently r e t u r n e d f r o m Saigon for the holidays, squelched r u m o r s of his prep a r i n g to resign by s a y i n g he intended to return to Vietnam

" s h o r t l y after the first of the year." A f o r m e r R o m a n Catholic priest f r o m C h i c a g o declared in Sweden that he held no regrets alter his three-month defection to the Soviet I 'nion to protest A m e r i c a n policy on Vietnam. H a r o l d M. Koch, Jr., 35, said he hoped to return to C h i c a g o after C h r i s t m a s , visit his sick lather, settle d o w n a n d p e r h a p s get m a r r i e d . Koch stated that he w a s " a n American with a great love for m y c o u n t r y . But when you love s o m e b o d y you a r e apt to criticize. I only hope that I h a v e not been too n e g a t i v e . " When he first a r r i v e d in Moscow he s a i d that I'.S. g o v e r n m e n t har a s s m e n t of Vietnam w a r opponents led him to defect. An open letter to President Johnson signed b y student leaders f r o m 100 colleges and I'niversities h a s q u e s t i o n e d the C.S. role in V i e t n a m . The students noted " a p p a r e n t contrad i c t i o n s " between I'.S. statements a n d actions, a n d slated in part; " I ' n l e s s this conflict can be eased, the I'.S. will find s o m e of her most loyal a n d c o u r a g e o u s y o u n g people c h o o s i n g to g o to jail rather t h a n to b e a r their c o u n t r y ' s arms." In a C h r i s t m a s Kve s e r m o n , Krancis Cardinal Spellman stated: "We d o h o p e a n d p r a y . . .we shall s o o n h a v e the victory for which all of us in Vietnam a n d all o v e r the world a r e p r a y i n g and h o p i n g , for less t h a n victory is inconceivable." The Soviet n e w s p a p e r Izvestia said such " m i l i t a n t s e r m o n s a r e in s h a r p d i s s o n a n c e with recent statements of Pope Paul, w h o a p p e a l e d for a n end to the b l o o d y killing." There h a s been no c o m m e n t f r o m the Vatican but indications of great

Two p l a y s , " R i d e r s to the S e a " by J o h n Millington Synge a n d " S o m e t h i n g I ' n s p o k e n " by Tennessee Williams will be presented next T h u r s d a y a n d S a t u r d a y at H p . m . in the Little Theater. " R i d e r s to the S e a , " u n d e r the direction of J a n e Riso, is a t r a g e d y centering a r o u n d the life of a n Irish fishing family. M a u r y a , port r a y e d by Vicki Detlefs, is an elderly w o m a n who is robbed of

Lack of Funds Limit Women's Competition H o p e College women are inv o k e d in the M1AA (Michigan Inter-collegiate Athletic Assn.) only in a limited way. Presently, the MIAA offers a r c h e r y , basketball, bowling, field hockey, tennis a n d volleyball for women. Hope College competes in only two of these s p o r t s : a r c h e r y a n d tennis. Hope t o o k second place in tennis last s e a s o n . Since the w o m e n compete in MIAA leagues in tennis a n d archery, why d o they not compete in the other MIAA s p o r t s ? Why s h o u l d they? A c c o r d i n g t o Miss D a u g h n Schipper, the director of the Athletic a n d Recreation f e d e r a t i o n of Michigan Colleges for Women on Hope's c a m p u s , Hope a l r e a d y p l a y s most of the colleges a n d universities that a r e m e m b e r s of MIAA, including the I niversity

Review of the News Germany While L o o k m a g a z i n e has agreed to cut sections of its p u b l i c a t i o n of William Manchester's " D e a t h of a Presid e n t , " Henri Xanan, declared that his " D e r S t e r n " m a g a z i n e would not cut anything out. "If there w a s anything that would g o too far . . .1 w o u l d n ' t print it." The cuts requested by Mrs. Kennedy, he c l a i m e d , were for "political r e a s o n s . T h e crux of the m a t t e r is a n i m o s i t y between the K e n n e d y s a n d President J o h n s o n . "

Students Prepare Plays By Synge and Williams

concern h a v e been noted and the r e p e r c u s s i o n s continue. C a r d i n a l S p e l l m a n , after hearing a b o u t the w i d e s p r e a d reaction, stated that he stood by his statement.

of Michigan, Wheaton, Western and K a l a m a z o o . The only difference in their p l a y is that it falls u n d e r the federation instead of the league. The w o m e n at Hope are a f r a i d , to s o m e extent, to enter into league competition in a n y great c a p a c i t y , she said. MIAA league competition involves m o r e serious p l a y a n d m a n y schools, including Hope, d o not h a v e the facilities and f u n d s to a c c o m m o d a t e the events.

her strength by the loss at sea of five of her sons and her husband. The action revolves a r o u n d her only s u r v i v i n g son Bartley, played by Dave Carlett. Bartley takes his m a r e to a horse fair, but in o r d e r to d o so she must travel by sea. M a u r y a , to no a v a i l , begs Bartley not to go. Bartley dies d u r i n g the trip and the p l a y ends with M a u r y a ' s acceptance of what has h a p p e n e d . S u p p o r t i n g roles, as N o r a a n d Cathleen, d a u g h t e r s of M a u r y a , are played by Beverly Greer a n d I )iane Parker. Tennessee Williams' p l a y is directed by BerniceVan Kngen. Miss Cornelia Scott, a rich, e l d e r l y s outher n l a d y ( C a r o l Osterink) is r u n n i n g for a high office in a local social club. Miss Grace Lancaster, her secretary ( B a r b Phail) helps her in her c a m p a i g n . The p l a y , a p s y c h o l o g i c a l study, s h o w s t h e c l a s h Miss Scott's old-fashioned ideas with her secret a r y ' s m o r e m o d e r n o u t l o o k on life. The two p l a y s a r e the last to be presented this semester in connection with George R a l p h ' s s e m i n a r in p l a y directing.

Students Will Perform Mozart, Brahms,Schubert A student recital will be held next T h u r s d a y at 7 p.m. in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel. T h e f i r s t selections will be " S c h o n s t e r Herr J e s u " a n d " A r i e mit V a r i a t i e n " by Hermann Schroeder, p l a y e d by o r g a n i s t Diane H y m a n s . Dianne H a g l e will a c c o m p a n y ( arol \\ ilterdink, s o p r a n o , in her s i n g i n g of " A l m a del C o r e " by A n t o i i o C a o d a r a a n d "Vergebliches S t a n d c h e n " by J o h a n n e s Brahms. Violinist David T u b e r g e n will be a c c o m p a n i e d by Dianne H a g l e in the p l a y i n g of the " C o n c e r t o

in 1) Minor, Op. 4 4 " by Max Bruch. Robert Joseph, a pianist will present the " I m p r o m p t u in A-flat M a j o r , Op. 90, No. 4 , " by F r a n z Schubert. S o p r a n o A n d r e a Martin, tenor Timothy Liggett, b a r i t o n e Dirk W a l v o o r d and pianist W i l l i a m Wilson will present "'Terzett: G r a i e agl' i n g a n n i t u o i " a n d "Terzett: Das B a n d e l " by W o l f g a n g A m a deus Mozart. I he recital will be concluded with Eugene Gigout's " T o c c a t a in B M i n o r , " played b y o r g a n i s t Carl V a n N o o r d .

China Two rebel r a d i o s a r e now broadcasting inside C h i n a a g a i n s t Lin Piao, active leader of C h i n a ' s f o r m a l p a r t y structure and the a r m y , a n d Mao Tse-Tung, f o u n d e r of the People's Democratic Republic. Red G u a r d s h a v e been o r d e r e d into Peking a n d all m a j o r cities by M a o in efforts to sciuashopposition to Lin's policys within the C o m m u n i s t p a r t y and a m o n g high r a n k i n g officers of the Army. .lord on Tensions a r e a g a i n rising in the N e a r Last as A r a b fights A r a b and Jew. The Palestine Liberation L r o n t , s u p p o r t e d by I'.A.R. president N a s s e r , s a y s that it will e n d e a v o r to oust pro-western K i n g Hussein as s h o o t i n g continued for the f o u r t h s tr aight d a y S y r i a and Israel.

between

Great Britain Two to f o u r million d o l l a r s in art was stolen in L o n d o n . Thieves b r o k e into L o n d o n ' s Dulwick Art G a l l e r y a n d stole eight p a i n t i n g s including three R e m b r a n d t s a n d three Rubens valued between 2.8 a n d 4.2 million d o l l a r s . Also stolen was one Klscheimer a n d a G e r r a r d Don painting. Dallas J a c k Ruby died of cancer amidst a g r o w i n g c o n t r o v e r s y o v e r alleged c o n t r a d i c t i o n s a n d omitted evidence in the W a r r e n ( ommission's investigation a n d report.

.V

HARK, THE HERALD ANGELS SINGI—Senior Harvey Lucas leads the festive Yuletide celebration at the AW3 Carol Sing held in Phelps lounge on Dec. 11. For the fourth Christmas the hardy group of Hope students, faculty and Holland townspeople carolled at faculty homes after this warm-up session. They were rewarded wilh donuts and hot chocolate when they returned.

Finals Schedule January £5, Monday 7:45 a.m. - 1 MWF 10:15 a.m. — 1 TT 2:00 p.m. - G MWF January ?i, Tuesday 7:45 a.m. - 2 MWF 10:15 a.m. — 6 TT 2:00 p.m. — Languages January 25, Wednesday 7:45 a.m. -

4 MWF

STICK AROUND After the Game Saturday Night for a Swingin' Sophomore Dance in the Civic Center

10:15 a.m. — 5 TT 2:00 p.m. — 7 I T January 26, Thursday 7:45 a.m. — H MWF 10:15 a.m. — 2 TT 2:00 p.m. — 5 iVJ vVF January 27, Friday 7:45 10:15 2:00 2:00

a.m. a.m. p.m. p.m.

— — — —

7 4 5 8

MWF TT TT MWF


Page 8

January 6, 1967

Hope College anchor

Victory Over Kazoo Gives Hope Lead By James Mace Hope u n l o a d e d the b o m b s e a r l y in the second half and then s t a v e d off a K a l a m a z o o rally to register its fourth straight MIAA basketball win with a n 82-70 t r i u m p h over the visiting Hornets last Wednesday night. The F l y i n g Dutchmen r e b o u n d ed f r o m a 9 5 - 6 9 defeat they suffered at the h a n d s of the W h e a t o n C r u s a d e r s to pick up their sixth victory in nine g a m e s . The loss was the second for the H o r n e t s and leaves their ledger at 5-2. Hope gets b a c k into action tom o r r o w night at the Civic Center with a n o n - l e a g u e g a m e against L a k e Forest. BOTH TFAMS S T R U G G L E D t h r o u g h a s l u g g i s h first half of play a n d the Dutch c a m e off the floor with a 35-34 edge due to a last minute b a s k e t by Carl Walters. J u n i o r center Floyd B r a d y , the l e a d i n g scorer for the Dutch, remained true to f o r m a n d p o p p e d in 16 m a r k e r s in the first twenty minutes to pace the sporadic Hope attack. Bob T r e n a r y , classy j u n i o r g u a r d for the Hornets, led the visitors with 13 points in the first half, while t e a m m a t e Ralph Wellington a d d e d 12 m o r e points. Hope h a d the height a d v a n t a g e but its cold p e r f o r m a n c e f r o m the floor n e a r l y nullified the w i n n e r ' s

rebounding advantage. DON KRONEMEYER and B r a d y led the locals off the bench in the second half a n d scored 12 points between them in the first Hve minutes to m o v e the Dutch out to a 5 2 - 3 7 lead. Bruce Van Huis a n d B r a d y d o m i n a t e d both b a c k b o a r d s d u r i n g tile spree and the Dutchmen l o o k e d well oi\their way to a n impressive victory. However, a s so often h a s been the case, the Dutch b e g a n to lose the touch f r o m the floor a n d Trena r y a n d Wellington b r o u g h t the Hornets back into the g a m e with s o m e fine outside s h o o t i n g . Wellington hit a basket with seven minutes to g o to cut the Hope m a r g i n to 6 2 - 5 7 but that w a s as close as the visitors could get. GARY RYPMA entered the g a m e in the b a c k c o u r t for the Dutch and tallied eight quick points on a p a i r of s h o r t j u m p e r s a n d two pretty d r i v e s to put the Dutch out of reach. T r e n a r y tried in v a i n to catch the Dutch express but when center J o e Muenzer fouled out of the b a l l g a m e the Hornets lost a g o o d deal of their r e b o u n d i n g strength. B r a d y led all s c o r e r s a n d turned in his high point p e r f o r m a n c e of the s e a s o n with 3 6 m a r k e r s , while T r e n a r y led the losers with 28 points. Wellington a l s o hit the

2 0 - m a r k for the visitors with 2 2 points, while K r o n e m e y e r , Walters- a n d H y p m a were also in twin figures for the Dutch with 15, 12 a n d 10 points respectivelyT H E VICTORY leaves the Flying Dutchmen in first place in the l o o p with a n unblemished 4-0 record. The Dutch h a v e to p l a y the d a n g e r o u s Olivet Comets a n d A d r i a n before the first semester comes to a n end. Hope will tangle with a r c h - r i v a l Calvin, who recently d r o p p e d a 7 6 - 6 9 victory to league d o o r m a t s A d r i a n , in the first league g a m e of the seco n d semester on Feb. 8. C a l v i n h a s lost the services of s o p h o m o r e center Bill D e l l o r n for at least a week t h a n k s to the Calvin Chapel Committee. It seemed that "Wild Bill" had a ailment c o m m o n to m a n y students that of c h a p e l u m cutilis. The loss w i ^ the second in three l e a g u e starts for the defending MIAA c h a m p s a n d they will h a v e a long, t r o u b l e s o m e r o a d to travel if they h o p e to catch the present league leaders. Whether D e l l o r n will miss m a n y m o r e g a m e s is as yet undecided.

THROUGH THF] NET!—Floyd Brady is pictured in one of his two dunks ift the game against Kalamazoo Wednesday night. Sparked by the center's 36 points, the Dutch won its fourth straight, 82-70, which put them in first place.

Norlliweslern Wins Title

Hope Third in Dutch Classic

4)i»

J

* MAT STRUGGLE—Freshman wrestler Gary Cook grapples with an opponent from Grand Rapids Junior College. Cook was the only winner as the wrestling team, coached by Sid Huitema, was defeated 33-10.

Dutch Grapplers Pinned In First Two Competitions The F l y i n g Dutchmen wrestling team, u n d e r the direction of Sid Huitema, opened its 1966-67 season on Dec. 10 with a loss to G r a n d Rapids Jr. College, 35-10. The team, which h a s been officially in existence for three y e a r s , compiled it's points by a pin a n d a forfeit. G a r y C o o k , a f r e s h m a n from Niles, Mich, pinned his m a n in the second period for five points. The r e m a i n i n g points resulted f r o m a forfeit to Bud Tille r m a n , who wrestles in the 145 lb. class. Seeking to even their record following the loss to G r a n d Rap-

ids J.C., the F l y i n g Dutchmen met the V a l p a r i s o C r u s a d e r s on Dec. 14 a n d were defeated 36-3. A g a i n it w a s f r e s h m a n G a r y Cook w h o lead H o p e ' s single score of three points with a 7-0 decision o v e r H a r l e y Hett of V a l p a r i s o . C o o k now is undefeated in activity this y e a r , a n d a p p e a r s as the b r i g h t spot in Hope's d i s m a l record of 0-2. Youth a n d inexperience certainly account for the r a t h e r p o o r start to 1966-67 wrestling season. However, C o a c h Sid Huitem a hopes that precious experience will i m p r o v e the record of H o p e ' s F l y i n g Dutchmen.

Second Half Surge Downs Albion, 81-74 The Hope College F l y i n g Dutchmen won their third MIAA contest by defeating Albion College 81-74 in the g a m e p r i o r to the Dutch Classic b a s k e t b a l l t o u r n a ment. Hope now leads the league with a 3-0 record, followed by K a l a m a z o o with a 2-0 record. T h e Hope victory o v e r Albion leaves the Britons without a win in the MIAA, h a v i n g g o n e d o w n three times in defeat. T H F FIRST H A L F ended with Albion a h e a d 4 1 - 3 9 after l e a d i n g t h r o u g h most of the half. After halftime the Britons hit for three points to lengthen their lead to 44-39. Hope finally got hot a n d took o v e r the lead as they p u m p ed in ten points to Albion's two.

Hope never trailed after this but Albion did c o m e within two points twice with the score at 72-70 a n d 74-72. F l o y d B r a d y led in both the s c o r i n g a n d r e b o u n d i n g departments a s he collected 21 p o i n t s a n d g r a b b e d 2 0 r e b o u n d s . Sopho m o r e Bruce Van Huis scored 15 points a n d pulled in 15 reb o u n d s . G a r y H y p m a hit for 14 while Don K r o n e m e y e r recorded 12 points f o r the night. Ten of R y p m a ' s p o i n t s c a m e f r o m the free t h r o w line as a result of the press used b y Albion. F R E S H M A N RICK ZIEM entered the g a m e late but m a n a g e d to put in 18 points f o r the Britons to b e c o m e their high scorer. Jim Bell w a s next h i g h with 12 points.

Northwestern College of O r a n g e City, Iowa, c a p t u r e d the title in the first Dutch Classic b a s k e t b a l l t o u r n a m e n t in the Civic Center held December 2 8 a n d 29. The Red Raiders won the title by d o w n i n g Michigan L u t h e r a n College of Detroit, 82-74. After being winless in five r o a d g a m e s Northwestern won two in the t o u r n a m e n t to give them the wooden shoe t r o p h y . The f l o p e College Flying Dutchmen n a r r o w l y defeated Central College of Iowa 9 2 - 8 9 for third place in the c o n s o l a t i o n g a m e . F O U L T R O U B L E enabled senior Dave Kleis of Northwestern to get in only ten minutes of p l a y i n g time a g a i n s t Hope but he w a s still able to p u m p in 21 points a l o n g with impressive reb o u n d i n g a n d defensive p e r f o r m ances. Rick V a n d e Berg scored 13 points in the first half a g a i n s t Hope a n d won h o n o r s in t h e championship game with 24 points. In the c h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e b o t h V a n d e Berg a n d Kleis were res p o n s i b l e for c o n t a i n i n g Michigan

L u t h e r a n s t a n d o u t Leroy Haywood. H a y w o o d had been averaging m o r e t h a n 27 points a g a m e . H a y w o o d did put in" 21 points for the Saints but it w a s n ' t e n o u g h to b r i n g them the victory. IN T H E F I R S T SIX minutes I.uth'Tan led 18-9 with H a y w o o d s c o r i n g ten. Northwestern then m o v e d into a press a n d forced the Saints to lose the ball several times. The Red Raiders c a u g h t fire a n d proceeded to score 15 s tr aight points with eight points collected by g u a r d Krv Melema to give them the lead with the score 27-22. The half e n d e d with Northwestern c o m m a n d i n g a sizeable lead at 4 5 - 3 5 but when the g a m e res u m e d J a m e s Scott a n d Tim J e h n led the Saints in a rally that b r o u g h t the Saints to a 5 8 - 5 5 adv a n t a g e . Northwestern c a m e b a c k quickly as baskets by Kleis, V a n d e Berg a n d Darwin De Vries put the Red Raiders a h e a d to stay. WITH 2:30 L E F T on theclock, b a s k e t s by J e h n and H a y w o o d put

Wheaton Crushes Hope By Strong Second Half I he Hope College Flying Dutchmen b a s k e t b a l l team went d o w n in defeat to W h e a t o n College last M o n d a y night 95-69 a s Wheaton hit for 5 9 p o i n t s in the second half. The Dutchmen were still in contention at the half time at which the score w a s 3 6 - 3 6 a n d stayed with the C r u s a d e r s until a b o u t ten minutes into the second hall. C p until then H o p e kept within eight points of the leaders. FLOYD BRADY, Hope's high scorer drew his fourth foul midw a y t h r o u g h the half a n d w a s taken out of the g a m e . Wnii'iut B r a d y ' s defensive help Wheaton quickly lengthened their lead to 15 points. B r a d y c a m e b a c k into the g a m e but Wheaton h a d gained loo m u c h m o m e n t u m a n d m o v e d the g a m e out of reach for the F l y i n g Dutchmen in the closing minutes. The Wheaton five hit 36 of 8 9 field g o a l attempts for 4 0 percent while H o p e m a d e 2 5 of 7 5 for 3 3 per cent. The Dutchmen h a d trouble connecting on their foul shots as they were o n l y a b l e to sink 19 of 37 free t h r o w s for a low 51 per cent. Wheaton hit 2 3 out of 34 f o r 6 8 per cent. HOPE CAME CLOSE to Wheaton in the r e b o u n d i n g contest as the c r u s a d e r s edged H o p e

t

55-51 a l t h o u g h most of their reb o u n d s c a m e in the second half, which g a v e them the a d v a n t a g e . B r a d y was high for the Dutch with 16 followed by Carl Walters with 12. Arlyn Westergren led the C r u s a d e r s in the s c o r i n g d e p a r t m e n t with 23. The loss g a v e Hope a n overall s e a s o n record of 5-3 with three of the wins c o m i n g in league action a g a i n s t Calvin, A l m a a n d Albion. W h e a t o n b e c a m e a 5 0 0 ball club a s they m o v e d their record to 4-4 with the win.

the Saints o n l y one point behind the N o r t h w e s t e r n five at 76-75. Northwestern put the final six points in a s they held the ball for most of the r e m a i n i n g minutes. N o r t h w e s t e r n won the r e b o u n d ing contest 63-55. N o r t h w e s t e r n hit 29 of 75 field g o a l s lor 3 8 . 7 per cent while Lutheran hit 2 8 - 7 9 for 3 5 . 4 per cent. L u t h e r a n lost the ball 22 times while the Red Raiders t u r n e d the ball o v e r to the Saints o n l y 12 times. In the c o n s o l a t i o n g a m e Hope won the contest after l e a d i n g the entire second half. I he F l y i n g Dutchmen's F l o y d Brady hit nine of 14 field g o a l s and Carl Walters hit eight of 13 to lead the team in scoring. BRADY COLLECTED 26 points tor the night lor a two g a m e total of 5 3 points to b e c o m e high scorer lor the t o u r n a m e n t . B r a d y a l s o led Hope in r e b o u n d s with 11. \\ alters scored 17 points for the night. S t a r t i n g lor the first time, freshm a n Bruce \ l c C r e a r y tossed in 14 points for Hope while s o p h o m o r e center Bruce Van Huis put in ten. Hope held the ball n e a r the end ol the g a m e for over a minute belore B r a d y put in the final two points to put the g a m e out of reach for the Central team. .MM S T O N E OF ( E N T K A L led his team in s c o r i n g with 23, center Lyle K o o i k e r scored 19 points followed by 1 1 p o i n t s f r o m Dave Witvoet and ten f r o m Dennis H e r e m a . Hope hit 3 7 of 72 field g o a l attempts a n d led 4 8 - 4 5 after shooting 6 6 . 7 per cent in the first half. Central m a d e 34 of 82 for 4 1.5 per cent. Hope b a r e l y won the contest of the b o a r d s a s they edged Central 37-36. The g a m e had the most ball control e r r o r s of the t o u r n a ment with H o p e c o m m i t t i n g 2 3 a n d Central 20.

See Exciting Semi-Pro Basketball

The HOLLAND CARVERS At The Civic Center Friday, Jan. 6 — Lansing Friday, Jan- 13 — Grand Rapids


01-06-1967