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SPRIN & SUMMG TRAVELER ISSUE

Rooted in history CHANGEOUT SC SCE NE

The legacy of author Pat Conroy

APRIL 2019

Explore the state’s eight sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail

SC RECIPE

Meals in 30 minutes


DISCOVER AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY IN SOUTH CAROLINA Explore compelling stories of African-Americans in the Palmetto State with the Green Book of South Carolina at GreenBookofSC.com. This new online travel guide serves as a directory to more than 300 culturally and historically significant sites, including museums, markers, districts, churches, cemeteries schools and more. Together, these places illustrate the African-American legacy in South Carolina – from colonialism and civil rights to triumphs in the arts, science and technology. Each entry comes with a summary of its historic significance, travel directions to the site and opportunities to share your experience on social media.

BEGIN YOUR JOURNEY AT BlackHistorySC.com


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 73 • NUMBER 4 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 595,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

2019 | april SPRIN & SUMMG TRAVELER ISSUE

18 Walking in Pat’s footsteps Celebrate the enduring legacy of writer Pat Conroy, South Carolina’s beloved “prince of scribes.”

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

18

25 South Carolina’s

Civil Rights Trail

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

Trace the struggle for equality across South Carolina with this travel guide to our state’s eight locations on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler

6 AGENDA

COPY EDITORS

Jennifer Jas L. Kim Welborn

Horry Electric Cooperative pays tribute to lineman Kevin Gore with a scholarship endowment at Horry-Georgetown Technical College.

CONTRIBUTORS

Abby Berry, April Coker Blake, Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Hastings Hensel, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, David Novak, Sydney Patterson, Lynn & Cele Seldon, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen

10 DIALOGUE Restoring hope for another day The dedicated volunteers of S.C. WIRE (Women Involved in Rural Electrification) work year-round to assist their neighbors in need.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

12 ENERGY Q&A Breaking down seven energy-saving claims

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

14 SMART CHOICE Travel companions Life on the road, be it for work or pleasure, comes with its own unique challenges. Take the hassle out of travel and enjoy the journey more with these handy gadgets.

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2019. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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17 STORIES Establishing a rhythm Retired educator Betty McDaniel is preserving traditional Appalachian music one student at a time.

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SPRING & SUMME TRAVEL R ISSUE

Rooted in history

CALENDAR

Explore the state’s eight sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail

HUMOR ME

Godzilla vs. the Mistress of Mess Celebrity organizing expert Marie Kondo may have met her match in humor columnist Jan A. Igoe.

APRIL 2019

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

25

Our efficiency experts take on multiple questions to help you separate fact from fiction.

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181

PHOTOS, FRO M TO P: U N I V ERS IT Y O F G EO RG I A PRESS; RE V. RO B ERT CH I N A BY TI M H A NSO N; G I N A M OO RE

SC SCE NE

The legacy of author Pat Conroy SC RECIPE

Meals in 30 minutes

Cecil Williams shares his memories of photographing the aftermath of the 1968 Orangeburg massacre. A memorial to the tragedy is now part of the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. Photo by Tim Hanson


SC | agenda

PH OTOS COU RTESY O F H GTC

Pay it forward THROUGHOUT HIS 30-YEAR

COU RTESY OF H ORRY E LEC TRIC CO - OP

career as a line t­echni­cian at Horry Electric Coopera­tive, Kevin Gore earned the admiration of his co-­workers and co-op members. When he was Gore passed away from diagnosed with stage 4 his illness in March 2019, shortly after the endowpancreatic cancer, his cooperative family ment was announced. found a fit­ting way to Horry Electric created honor his service​​—a the fund to honor Gore’s $25,000 endowment to LASTING LEGACY Kevin Gore’s dedication to the job and cooperative family is honoring his professional demeanor, the e­ lectrical lineman his 30 years of service as a says Pat Howle, CEO and technician program line technician by creating a executive vice president of at Horry‑Georgetown scholarship endowment at Horry Electric Cooperative. Technical College. Horry-Georgetown Technical College. “Kevin was always the The fund will be used first person I saw as I pulled to grant scholarships into our parking lot,” he says. “He always to students in the certificate program had a smile on his face, a positive attithat prepares them for apprentice training with electric utilities. tude, and started your day making Gore was “overcome by the news you glad to be a part of Horry Electric of the endowment and the scholarship Cooperative.” that will be awarded on an annual basis The endowment will make a differ­ in his honor,” says Burroughs Nobles, ence in the lives of future electrical manager of operations for Horry Electric ­lineworkers, says HGTC professor Scott Cooperative. “Kevin asked me to be sure Shoemaker. to tell everyone what a privilege it is to “Some of our students are challenged be able to work for a company like Horry with the cost of the program and the Electric Cooperative where everyone ­required tools. Because of donations cares about each other like family and like this, students are able to begin their where the leadership values each per­career debt-free,” he says. “It is very heartwarming … that Horry Electric chose to son’s contribution to the organization.” 6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

CLASS ACT Students at Horry-Georgetown Technical College (top left and above) learn the basic skills needed to hire on with cooperatives and other utilities as an apprentice. Future students will benefit from an endowment given by Horry Electric Cooperative to honor line technician Kevin Gore.

“It is very heart-warming … that Horry Electric chose to honor Mr. Gore’s legacy in this way.” — HGTC PROFESSOR SCOTT SHOEMAKER

honor Mr. Gore’s legacy in this way.” The electrical lineman technician program at HGTC is a one-semester ­certificate program that prepares graduates for on-the-job training. Students must be at least 18 years old and hold a valid driver’s license to enroll. For more program details, contact Shoemaker at (843) 349-5339 or visit hgtc.edu.


Easy DIY projects to save energy Winter weather can have a big impact on your energy bills, hitting your pockets a little harder than usual. Now that spring is here, it’s the perfect time to tackle a few DIY efficiency projects for your home. The good news: You don’t have to be an energy expert to do this!

EN ERGY.GOV

INSULATE YOUR WATER HEATER Insulating a water heater that’s warm to the touch can save 7 to 16 percent annually on your water heating bills. You can purchase a pre-cut jacket or blanket for about $20, and you’ll probably need an extra set of hands for this project. u Turn off the water heater before you start. u Wrap the blanket around the water heater and tape it to temporarily keep it in place. u Use a marker to note the areas where the controls are so you can cut them out before final installation. u Once the holes are cut and you’ve repositioned the blanket, tape it permanently in place, then turn the water heater back on.

SEAL AIR LEAKS WITH CAULK The average American family spends $2,000 annually on energy bills. Unfortunately, much of that money is wasted through air leaks in the home. Applying caulk around windows, doors, electrical wiring and plumbing can save energy and money. There are many different

types of caulking compounds available, but the most popular choice is silicone. Silicone caulk is waterproof, flexible and won’t shrink or crack. u Use a putty knife to remove any old caulk, and clean away old paint with a brush and solvent. u Let the area dry completely before you apply the new caulk. u Apply the caulk in one continuous stream, and make sure it sticks to both sides of the crack or seam. u Use a putty knife to smooth out the caulk, then wipe the surface with a dry cloth.

ONLY ON SCLiving.coop Prepping pork tenderloin Before cooking a pork tenderloin, you’ll need to remove the silver skin membrane. A butcher can do this for you, but it’s also an easy do-it-­yourself job. Chef Belinda shows us how at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Register to win $100 Mark your calendar—summer vacation season is just around the corner! Sign up today for your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card in our April Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes. We’ll draw the names of three lucky readers from all eligible entries received by April 30. Turn to Page 16 for more details or register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

WEATHER STRIP EXTERIOR DOORS One of the best ways to seal air leaks is to weather strip exterior doors. This can keep out drafts and help you control energy costs. Weather stripping materials vary, but you can ask your local hardware or home store for assistance if you’re unsure about the supplies you need. When choosing weather stripping materials, make sure they can withstand temperature changes, friction and the general “wear and tear” for the location of the door. Keep in mind, you will need separate materials for the door sweep (at the bottom of the door) and the top and sides. u Clean the moulding with water and soap, then let the area dry completely. u Measure each side of the door, then cut the weather stripping to fit each section. Make sure the weather stripping fits snugly against both surfaces so it compresses when the door is closed. —ABBY BERRY

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

APRIL 16 10:31 4:31 4:31 10:46 17 5:01 11:16 5:16 11:16 18 5:16 11:46 — 6:16 19 12:01 5:46 7:01 12:16 20 12:31 6:01 7:46 1:01 21 1:01 6:31 8:46 1:31 22 1:46 6:46 9:46 2:16 23 2:16 7:01 11:01 2:46 24 3:01 7:16 — 3:46 25 7:01 12:46 — 4:46 26 — 2:16 — 6:16 27 11:46 2:46 — 7:31 28 9:31 3:16 2:16 8:31 29 9:46 3:31 3:16 9:16 30 10:16 3:46 4:01 10:01

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

M AY 1 5:07 11:22 11:22 5:37 2 5:22 11:52 11:52 6:22 3 — 5:37 6:52 12:22 4 — 6:07 7:37 12:52 5 1:07 6:22 8:22 1:22 6 1:37 6:52 9:07 1:52 7 2:07 7:07 10:07 2:37 8 2:52 7:37 11:22 3:22 9 3:52 8:07 12:37 4:22 10 5:37 8:52 — 5:37 11 10:37 2:07 — 6:52 12 9:22 2:52 1:22 8:22 13 9:52 3:37 3:22 9:22 14 10:37 4:07 4:22 10:22 15 4:22 11:07 11:07 5:22

Streaming content with electronic equipment that has earned the Energy Star rating will use 25 to 30 percent less energy than standard equipment. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV

SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS APRIL 15–MAY 15

BLUE RIDGE FEST MAY 3

WA LTER A LLRE A D

AIKEN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE’S TOUCHSTONE ENERGY RUN UNITED

Hosted by the employees of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative to raise funds for local charities, Blue Ridge Fest is back for another year of toe-tapping music, food, fun and one of the Upstate’s largest classic car cruise-ins. This year’s ­headliners include The Oak Ridge Boys (above), The Tams, Jim Quick and Coastline, and Magic. Don’t forget to buy a raffle ticket (or five) for your chance to win up to $10,000 in prize money. The fun takes place at Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative’s office in Pickens. For full details see the festival website. (800) 240-3400; blueridgefest.com

APRIL 27

Lace up your jogging shoes for fun, fitness and to support a really good cause during Aiken Electric Cooperative’s Touchstone Energy Run United event. This popular springtime event features a 13.1-mile half marathon, a 5K race and a Kids’ Fun Run on a scenic course that winds through historic downtown Aiken. Get some exercise, take in the sights and feel good knowing that all proceeds benefit United Way of Aiken County.

TARA HALL PADDLEFEST APRIL 27

Grab a paddle and strap on a life jacket for a four-mile float down Black Mingo Creek in Georgetown to benefit Tara Hall’s School for Boys. This celebration marks the school’s 50th year helping young boys from troubled homes grow into well-adjusted adults. Following the kayak tour is a day of fun, food and music featuring award-­winning country music artist Jimmy Wayne.

(803) 649-6245; aikenco-op.org/RunUnited

KINETIC DERBY DAY APRIL 27

The thrills of soapbox derby racing combined with the artistry of human-­powered parade floats—that pretty much sums up West Columbia’s Kinetic Derby Day. If you’ve never seen a burrito on wheels, this kinetic sculpture parade is your chance to cross that item off your bucket list while you nosh on festival food and bask in a sunny spring day. Stick around for the soapbox derby races as kids and adults test the bounds of physics to see just how fast they can go on four wheels and a whole lot of gravity. (803) 791-1880 ext. 623; kineticderbyday.com

GET MORE

For more happenings, turn to our Calendar on Page 44, and see expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.

8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

(843) 546-3000; tarahall-events.com/paddle-fest

BLESSING OF THE FLEET APRIL 28

In a time-honored tradition, the residents of Mt. Pleasant gather each spring at Memorial Waterfront Park for the solemn blessing of the shrimp boats at the start of another fishing season. And then they stay to party the day away. Don’t miss the fun of the boat parade, live music, delicious seafood and a shag dancing competition. (843) 884-8517; experiencemountpleasant.com/events/blessing-of-the-fleet


Culture


|

SC   dialogue

Restoring hope for another day

10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

WA LTER A LLRE A D

MUCH MORE THAN FOUR WALLS and a roof, the concept of home evokes deep feelings of safety and security. Just the simple image of light glowing in the window creates a sense of welcome and calm. But when the security of home is taken away either by forces of nature or traumatic life events, the world can become a frightening and uncertain place. It often takes a community to help ­families restore life to normal after diffi­ cult life changes. A group known as S.C. WIRE (Women Involved in Rural WIRE volunteers fill Kids Closet care bags with personal hygiene items during a packing session at Electrification) understands that meeting Newberry Electric Cooperative. the s­ implest needs can often mean the most to those in a state of transition. personal supplies for displaced nursing home residents. These With a long history of helping families served by electric residents, who are wholly dependent upon their nursing cooperatives, WIRE has 14 local chapters across the state, with homes for care, are particularly unsettled when homes are anywhere from 10 to 200 members in each. Founded in 1981 closed suddenly due to safety regulations or Department of as a nonprofit organization and the charitable arm of many Health and Environmental Control compliance issues. WIRE local electric cooperatives, the organization includes co-op volunteers fill large duffel bags with personal supplies, includmembers, employees, wives of employees, co-op retirees, trustees, and wives of trustees. ing blankets, clothes and toiletries. “WIRE is a natural extension of the co-ops’ community The S.C. Office on Aging then stores and distributes the commitment,” says Peggy Dantzler, vice president of loss bags in response to need around the state. Dantzler says the control and training for The Electric Cooperatives of South simple gift often amazes the elderly recipients. Carolina, who serves as WIRE liaison and administrator. “They have nothing,” she says. “When they’re told it’s Two of WIRE’s ongoing outreach efforts—Kids Closet and theirs to keep, they’re just stunned.” In addition to these ongoing outreach programs, WIRE Co-op Closet—provide tangible relief to vulnerable populachapters provide a wide range of services and assistance to tions in need. South Carolinians in need of calm assurance that life will Kids Closet works with the state Department of Education someday go back to normal. to help alleviate the growing problem of homeless students. Whether it’s helping storm victims, providing linens to It’s estimated that more than 11,000 South Carolina students migrant workers, partnering with local fire departments after experienced homelessness last year. For these children, each house fires, or serving in homeless shelters, the women of S.C. new day brings new uncertainty about where they will WIRE are fulfilling their mission to help improve the quality sleep and where they will wake up, eat, bathe and do their of life in rural areas. homework. To learn more about S.C. WIRE and the local chapter in Since 2017, WIRE chapters from across the state gather your area, visit ecsc.org/wire. annually to assemble drawstring backpacks filled with soap, toothpaste, toothbrushes, deodorant, shampoo, lotion, feminine hygiene products and laundry detergent. The Department of Education then discreetly distributes the bags to youth in need, allowing students to tend to their personal needs no matter where they sleep at night. The Kids Closet program was modeled after WIRE’s MIKE COUICK President and CEO, annual Co-op Closet effort, which since 2012 has provided The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina


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SC   energy Q&A

Breaking down seven energy-saving claims BY PAT KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Forget doing dishes by hand. You’ll have more leisure time and save on energy bills when you use an efficient dishwasher to clean up after dinner.

IN THIS MONTH’S COLUMN,

our efficiency experts take on multiple questions to help you separate fact from fiction.

keep the doors closed to trap the heat. Is this true?

Q A

Is it true that turning lights off and on uses more energy than just leaving them on?

Would replacing my old windows with new, more efficient ones really cut my energy use in half?

No. While replacing inefficient windows with new, energy-efficient windows can cut the heat loss through windows in half, windows typically account for only about 25 to 30 percent of your space-­ heating costs. The amount of energy you use for heating and cooling is likely onethird to one-half of your total energy use, so replacing your old windows might only reduce your total energy costs by about 10 percent. When you consider the high cost of new windows, you may not recoup your investment for 15 or 20 years, or even longer. Burning wood in my fireplace should save on my heating costs, right?

Possibly, but certain conditions need to be met. The wood should be dry and 12

It’s true. Efficient dishwashers use less water than washing dishes by hand.

W H I R LPOO L

Not true. Turning off lights definitely reduces energy use. Turn off LED and incandescent bulbs every time you leave the room. The situation is a little different with compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs). Turning them off does save energy but can shorten the life of the bulb. The rule of thumb for CFLs is to turn them off any time they won’t be used for 15 minutes or more.

It’s possible to save money with an electric space heater if you use it only a few hours a day and reduce your home’s thermostat setting by a couple degrees. Space heaters can cause fires, so they need to be used wisely and should never be left unattended. Which brings us to the next question.

burned efficiently in a properly installed, properly placed, high-efficiency wood stove or fireplace insert. Otherwise, it’s likely you’ll lose as much heat through your chimney as you’re distributing throughout the house. My kids claim using the dishwasher is just as efficient as washing dishes by hand. Are they right?

Yes, they are. Properly used, dishwashers actually use less water while doing a better job, and as a bonus, they will save you about 200 hours of labor a year. For maximum energy savings, make sure your water heater is set to about 120 degrees and use the most efficient wash/ dry settings. I’ve heard it’s better to heat individual rooms with an electric space heater and

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

Should I close the vents in rooms that aren’t being used?

Most experts advise against this because closing supply registers forces your furnace or A/C unit to work harder. They advise keeping all your vents and doors open. If your system supplies too much heat to some rooms and too little to other rooms, you should talk to a heating and air conditioning professional about modifying your ductwork.

Does the age of my home determine how energy-efficient it is?

Newer homes tend to be more efficient because energy codes have improved, but every home can have hidden energy ­issues, no matter its age. If you want to evaluate the efficiency of your home, it’s best to schedule an energy audit with a professional. Ask your electric cooperative for recommended energy auditors, or visit the Building Performance Institute website at bpihomeowner.org. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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13


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SC   smart choice

Travel companions Life on the road, be it for work or pleasure, comes with its own unique challenges. Take the hassle out of travel and enjoy the journey more with these handy gadgets.  BY DAVID NOVAK

EYE IN THE SKY

Want spectacular footage of your travels or help scoping out the perfect fishing spot? The carbon-fiber Parrot ANAFI Quadcopter Drone is equipped with a wide-angle camera, HDR, and up to 2.8 times digital zoom, capturing spectacular 4K videos and snaps from above. Bonus: It folds to slip in your backpack. $900. (877) 972‑7768; parrot.com.

LET’S ROLL

End the fruitless search for charging ports with the Away Carry-On roller bag. A built-in rechargeable battery pack lets you top off your mobile devices on the fly. This hard-shell case also comes standard with a TSA-approved combination lock, 360-degree wheels, an interior compression system and a hidden laundry bag. $225. (888) 428‑2118; awaytravel.com.

GAME ON

If you’re a gamer and can’t stand to be without your console while traveling, check out Gamevice, a detachable controller with a classic D-pad, twin triggers, A-B-X-Y buttons, and dual analog sticks, which turn your iOS mobile phone or tablet into a sophisticated arcadestyle, zero-lag mobile gaming system. $75 to $100 depending on device. (888) 997‑4544; gamevice.com.

OFF THE GRID

Designed to keep Android or iOS devices connected even when there is no cellular service, goTenna Mesh lets campers communicate while off the grid. This pocket-sized device uses Bluetooth-LE to pair with a smartphone, enabling users to share messages and locations up to 4 miles. $180. (718) 360‑0957;  gotenna.com.

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BABY TALK

It’s never easy leaving a new baby at home, but you’ll travel with far less separation anxiety with the Miku Smart Baby Monitor. It wirelessly tracks your infant’s breathing, sounds and sleeping patterns while it streams real-time HD video and audio to your phone. And when it’s nap time, the device allows you to play lullabies, soothing sounds and whisper “good night” to your precious little one, thanks to a two-way talk function. $399. (833) 275‑6458; mikucare.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

LOOK SMART

Travelers will love Snapchat’s second-gen, water-­resistant Snap Spectacles 2 eyewear line. They look like classy sunglasses, but these Wi-Fi-enabled devices can capture up to 4GB of high-definition photos, videos and audio—even underwater. Save the best shots to your Snapchat account or smartphone. The included case doubles as a battery charger. $200. spectacles.com.

Tech journalist David Novak is editor of GadgetGram.com. Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.


All Aboard for Blue Ridge Fest! May 3, 2019 • Downtown Pickens, SC Featuring

THE OAK RIDGE BOYS also and

THE TAMS

JIM QUICK & COASTLINE 5:30 pm -10 pm Blue Ridge Electric Co-op 734 W. Main St., Pickens, SC • ADULTS $25 • CHILDREN (ages 7-12) $15 6 & Under FREE

“Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate”

Come in a classic car (1989 or older) and $30 admits a carload of up to four! Line-up begins at 2 pm. Gates open at 3 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars. Proceeds benefit Upstate charitable organizations. For more information, call 800-240-3400 or visit online at blueridgefest.com.

Annua 22nd l


REGISTER TO WIN $100

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Plan your next getaway now—there’s so much to choose from this year! And think how much sweeter it would be with an extra $100 in your pocket. Register today for this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and you could win a $100 Visa gift card. Like summer vacations, this offer won’t last forever. We’ll draw the names of three lucky readers from all the eligible entries received by April 30, 2019. Sign up today at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the coupon below, then start packing! R E A D E R R E P LY T R AV E L S W E E P S TA K E S

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SC   stories

Establishing a rhythm

Betty McDaniel AGE:

71.

Pickens. Founder of Young Appalachian Musicians (YAM), a nonprofit teaching kids to play and appreciate traditional bluegrass and mountain music. HIGH HONORS: Her work was recognized in 2015 with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award. WORDS TO LIVE BY: “I’ve always been big on passing on the traditions of the past.” CO-OP AFFILIATION: Member of Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative.

On the main stage at the 2018 South Carolina State Fiddling Championship, 10 middle school-aged kids—all of them picking banjos, strumming guitars or mandolins, and one plucking an upright bass—are jamming along to the traditional fiddle tune “Old Joe Clark.” Known collectively as the Sweet Potato Pie Kids, they are part of the Young Appalachian Musicians (YAM) program founded by Betty McDaniel, who watches proudly from the audience. McDaniel launched the program with 32 kids at Holly Springs Elementary School in 2008. Modeled after the Junior Appalachian Musicians program, YAM now teaches more than 300 kids in 14 South Carolina schools how to play traditional old-time music. “The odd thing about my dedication to mountain music is that I can barely play ‘Three Chords and a Capo’ on the guitar, and I definitely can’t sing,” she says. “And, since I grew up in Raleigh, I can’t claim it as my heritage. I did, however, come from a music-loving and appreciating family.” Enthralled with mountain music and dance traditions, McDaniel directed a clogging team at Holly Springs Elementary School, where she taught for 37 years. When her knees began to give out, she focused her efforts on music. Playing traditional music, she believes, makes kids better musicians and builds relationships across generations. “I feel like a lot of them find a real home with traditional music,” McDaniel says. “They find something they can do for the rest of their lives.” —HASTINGS HENSEL | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

HOME TURF:

CLAIM TO FAME:

GET MORE Learn more about the Young Appalachian Musicians program at yamupstate.com.

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STE V E LEI M B ERG

P

Walking in At’s footsteps Celebrate the enduring legacy of writer Pat Conroy, South Carolina’s beloved ‘prince of scribes’ BY LYNN & CELE SELDON

“To describe our growing up in the Lowcountry of South Carolina, I would have to take you to the marsh on a spring day, flush the great blue heron from its silent occupation, scatter marsh hens as we sink to our knees in mud, open you an oyster with a pocketknife and feed it to you from the shell and say, ‘There. That taste. That’s the taste of my childhood.’ I would say, ‘Breathe deeply,’ and you would breathe and remember that smell for the rest of your life.” —FROM THE PRINCE OF TIDES PAT CONROY COULD DO THAT TO YOU.

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S E LDO N I N K

In 89 well-crafted words, South Carolina’s most-­celebrated modern author could create a world so vivid that it engaged all the senses. He could make you taste that oyster, smell the salt air and feel the squish of pluff mud between your toes. And he made it look easy. In a life lived out across seven decades and 12 iconic books, Donald Patrick “Pat” Conroy made South Carolina his home and his muse. Many of his works read like love letters to the Palmetto State. Some delved into autobiographical themes—a rocky father-and-son relationship (The Great Santini), his experiences as a cadet at The Citadel (The Lords of Discipline), his years teaching on Daufuskie Island (The

Water is Wide). All of them delighted countless readers, leaving an endearing legacy that those of us lucky enough to call him a mentor and a friend will long cherish. Since Conroy passed away in 2016, his family and friends have begun curating and sharing his legacy at the Pat Conroy Literary Center in downtown Beaufort, and with a new book of remembrances from fellow authors, Our Prince of Scribes: Writers Remember Pat Conroy. Founded soon after the author’s untimely death, the nonprofit Conroy Center is “a living legacy to Pat, continuing his work as a teacher, mentor, friend, and advocate for readers and writers,” says director Jonathan Haupt.


J EN N I FER H ITCHCOCK

p From left to right, Cele Seldon, Pat Conroy, Cassandra King Conroy and Lynn Seldon during a visit to the author’s home overlooking Battery Creek. t Jonathan Haupt, director of

the Pat Conroy Literary Center, welcomes visitors to take a seat behind the desk Conroy used to write Beach Music and many other titles. SE LDON I N K

SE LDON I N K

u The bookstore in the Pat Conroy

Visitor Center includes many signed first editions of Conroy’s novels.

a long literary career; even a quilt made by Conroy’s sister Haupt and Conroy first got to know one another when Kathy that highlights many memories from his life. Pictures Haupt was working at University of South Carolina Press and, show Conroy as a cadet at The Citadel and depict his teaching later, its fiction imprint, Story River Books—with Pat serving days on Daufuskie Island. as a very active editor-at-large. The center also hosts a wide-­ranging schedule of events, “During the intensely productive last five years of his life, including book club discussions, writing workshops, and a Pat and I worked together as mentor and student, publishing visiting writers series that, to date, has featured top authors 22 remarkable titles,” Haupt says. “That experience changed including Mary Alice Monroe, Tim Conroy (Pat’s brother and my life and it’s that friendship that I strive to honor as direca renowned poet), Brenda McClain, C.J. Lyons, Wiley Cash, tor of the Conroy Center.” Ellen Malphrus, Jason Mott, Patti Callahan Henry, Dorothea Located at 905 Port Republic Street in downtown Beaufort, Benton Frank, John Warley, Marjory Wentworth, J. Drew the center is open to the public four days a week (Thursday Lanham and many others. through Sunday), and filled with mementos of Conroy’s life Each fall, over a long weekend close to Pat Conroy’s Oct. 26 and career. Visitors to the center can sit at the desk Conroy birthday, the center hosts the Pat Conroy used on nearby Fripp Island to write Literary Festival, one of the region’s much of Beach Music and many others. GET THERE top literary events. And each spring, The desk is situated in front of a large The Pat Conroy Literary Center is located on a weekend near the anniversary of mural by local artist Aki Kato, which at 905 Port Republic Street in Beaufort. Conroy’s March 4, 2016, passing, March appropriately depicts the kind of bucolic HOURS: Thursdays through Sundays, from Forth is an ever-­expanding literary celLowcountry scene that inspired Conroy’s noon to 4 p.m., and at other times by writing. ebration for area students. Most March appointment. Many other exhibits await, including Forth events take place at the nearby ADMISSION: Free a wall of books once housed in the voraPenn Center on St. Helena Island, which DETAILS: Call (843) 379-7025, held a special place in Conroy’s heart. cious reader’s massive personal library; visit patconroyliterarycenter.org or There is a bookstore, of course. Along one of the real “Great Santini’s” flight facebook.com/patconroyliterarycenter. with various editions of Conroy’s u u jackets; letters and manuscripts from SCLIVING.COOP  | APRIL 2019  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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T he Ring of Friendship  My name is Lynn Seldon, and I wear the ring. It’s not one of those diminutive rings from The Citadel. It’s a substantial chunk of gold from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI). I always loved comparing rings—and military school stories and nightmares—with Pat. We shared a love/hate relationship with our chosen colleges— especially our “initiation” rites as Citadel knobs and VMI rats—but wore our rings with pride as part of a unique brotherhood. I stand proudly in an overflowing platoon of people who were influenced by Pat’s words on paper and in person. We first met in the fall of 2009, the year South of Broad was released. Fittingly enough, it was in Charleston, just north of Broad. I’d planned to “interview” Pat with pithy questions about what he’d order for his last meal (incredibly, he paired each dish with a specific wine), but the lunch turned into more of a conversation between seemingly long-time friends who had once served in the trenches of a military school. Pat ordered Frank Lee’s famed shrimp and grits and, as he would do with me many times over many meals, he happily shared his food. Sometime during lunch, Pat wondered out loud why no one had written “The VMI Novel,” as he had done for The Citadel with The Lords of Discipline. I’ll never forget him looking me squarely in the eyes and saying, “I think you can do it, Lynn.” After lunch (I still have my scrawled and sauce-stained notes), we retraced our steps to the bar of the Mills House. Pat asked if I wanted to continue our chat over coffee. Duh. We talked about life, writing, travel, and, specifically, his love of Charleston, Beaufort, and the Lowcountry. He even brought up the VMI novel again before we finally parted and I made my way up Meeting Street in a daze. The next time I saw Pat, it was in the pretty Shenandoah Valley town of Lexington, Virginia, where he was scheduled to speak at VMI. Pat came north with his friend and Citadel classmate, the novelist John Warley. (I loved A Southern Girl and now call John a friend as well.) We met for dinner at the classic Southern Inn on South Main Street, along with their friend, Wyatt Durrette (VMI Class of 1961). Pat and I both ordered shad roe, which was in season. The next morning, we headed up the hill to VMI and Pat, as always, gave a great speech that was totally unrehearsed. Somehow, I’d ended up sitting next to VMI’s superintendent, Gen. Binford Peay, VMI Class of 1962. Pat began by saying he was wearing the “real” military school ring, holding his hand aloft, but he’d actually forgotten his Citadel ring and had borrowed John’s just before his speech. After the laughter died

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

BY LYNN SELDON

down, Pat then pointed up to me and said, “There’s a VMI graduate named Lynn Seldon that I’m trying to get to write a novel about VMI. I am as excited about that publication as I can be.” I can’t remember much more of what he said that morning. I was too focused on him making my work on the novel so public. But, between paying freelance assignments, lots of travel, and some monk-like stays back at VMI’s Moody Hall, where alumni can stay for free, the book Pat r­eferenced eventually saw the light of day about five years later. One of those paying gigs assignments was a feature about Pat and Sandra for Writer’s Digest. For the interview, Pat graciously invited my wife, Cele, and I down to their Fripp Island home. Of course, they gave us a great interview that would eventually become a cover story. But, the thing I remember most will always be heading back to their bedroom and adjacent library and writing room. To say that Pat collected books is a vast understatement. As outlined in My Reading Life, his lifelong love affair with books had led to a vast collection. The books would eventually be moved to their Beaufort home on bucolic Battery Creek, where I would spend many more memorable moments with Pat and Sandra.

After lunch (I still have my scrawled and sauce-stained notes), we retraced our steps to the bar of the Mills House. Pat asked if I wanted to continue our chat over coffee. Duh. During one of our subsequent phone calls, Pat told me about his somewhat regular Thursday lunches with friends at Griffin Market in downtown Beaufort. He said, “You should come.” I’ll never forget those lingering lunches with Pat and “the boys.” He was typically joined by Citadel classmates John Warley and Scott Graber, best friend (and wonderful writer in his own right) Bernie Schein, artist Jonathan Hannah (now Bernie’s son-in-law), Aaron Schein (Bernie’s brother), and occasional others. The concept of the University of South Carolina Press’s Story River Books was even hatched when then-USC Press director extraordinaire Jonathan Haupt [and, now, director of the Pat Conroy Literary Center] came for lunch. During these lunches, tours of town with Pat (from the Great Santini’s grave to the house where they filmed The Prince of Tides),


u u books

S E LDO N I N K

Lynn Seldon autographs a copy of Our Prince of Scribes: Writers Remember Pat Conroy during an event hosted by the literary center in Beaufort.

and time back at Pat and Sandra’s house, Pat never failed to ask about progress on my novel. Despite my plodding he was always encouraging. In 2013, four years after we’d first met in Charleston. I placed a printout of what I thought was the completed manuscript on Pat’s writing desk, ominously atop what appeared to be a first edition of Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms. The then-title of my short novel was Of Rats & Rings, at which Pat laughed his unique laugh, saying, “Rat Seldon, never name a novel after a rodent!” I quickly countered with Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, but Pat would have none of it—and, he was right, of course. Just a few days later, I received a call from Pat, which caller ID relayed was “Donald Conroy” and I briefly thought the Great Santini himself was somehow on the other end of the line. Paraphrasing what James Dickey had once told him, Pat started the phone call with, “I read your book, bubba. Now the real work begins.” He then proceeded to succinctly outline the problems with my plot and how I might fix them. He also gave me the right title: Virginia’s Ring. It took another year and the real work—and bloodletting—that Pat suggested, but Virginia’s Ring was released in 2014. The compelling cover art was completed by Pat’s longtime cover artist, Wendell Minor. Pat graciously referred me to him, and Wendell (which, ironically, is also my given name) was kind enough to give me the “Pat Conroy rabbinical discount” for his wonderful work and time. Pat also graciously provided a short cover blurb (“A triumph and a tour de force.”) and a longer plug inside, which has surely led to more sales of Virginia’s Ring than my mere words. Virginia’s Ring is simply a physical reminder of Pat’s influence on my writing and life. It’s the memories I’ll cherish more. The meals. The calls. The time with Pat and Sandra in Beaufort and beyond. I stand at attention in that overflowing platoon and salute Pat and everything he did for so many. After all, we wear the ring.

SE LDO N I N K

This excerpt of Lynn Seldon’s essay from Our Prince of Scribes: Writers Remember Pat Conroy is used courtesy of University of Georgia Press. Carolina’s Ring, Lynn Seldon’s sequel to his first novel, is ­scheduled for release later this year.

(including several signed first editions), there are titles from the Story River Books imprint; books about Conroy; books by his widow, Cassandra King Conroy, his ­daughter Melissa, and brother Tim; and art prints of Conroy book covers, most by Conroy’s long-time cover artist, Wendell Minor. Many visitors are now leaving with a copy of Our Prince of Scribes: Writers Remember Pat Conroy, published in late 2018. Edited by Haupt and author Nicole Seitz (both contributed essays, along with 65 others), the book is a tribute to Conroy’s legendary graciousness toward other writers, says his widow, Cassandra King Conroy. “Pat Conroy was the most generous man imaginable to other writers, especially in providing blurbs and support for beginning writers,” she says. “A lot of people don’t realize how unusual that is for an author of Pat’s stature.”

Grateful fans often leave mementos behind at Pat Conroy’s gravesite on St. Helena Island.

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SC   recipe

Meals in 30 minutes (or less!) BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

meal does A tasty, healthy epare. a long time to pr king not have to take d some multi­tas bit of prep—an tle lit a table st e ju th ith W t dinner on ion—you can pu at ar ur ep yo pr t g Se rin ? du ve us less. Don’t belie e es th in 30 minutes or with e it for yourself timer and prov s. pe ci delicious re IU LI IA N E DRYGAI LOVA

CHICKEN MILANESE CAPRESE WITH LINGUINE (aka breaded chicken with tomatoes and cheese) SERVES 4

GWÉNAËL LE VOT

STEAK SPINACH SALAD SERVES 4-6

STEAK

1 flatiron steak, about 1½ pounds (substitutes: sirloin or ribeye) Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground 1 tablespoon olive oil SALAD DRESSING

Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground ¼ cup white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ cup olive oil SALAD

8 cups baby spinach, rinsed red onion, sliced very thin ½ 1 cup sliced mushrooms, optional 4 slices crispy bacon, crumbled (can be store‑bought bacon bits) ½ cup feta cheese (or blue cheese), crumbled

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Season steak with salt and pepper and coat with olive oil. In a cast-iron skillet—or on an outdoor grill—over medium-high heat, grill steak 4–5 minutes on each side or to desired doneness. Tent with foil and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing. Into a small bowl, add salt, pepper and vinegar, and whisk until salt is dissolved. Add mustard and slowly whisk in oil until emulsified. Set aside. Into a large salad bowl, add spinach, onion and mushrooms and toss lightly with some of the dressing. Divide salad among individual serving bowls and sprinkle with bacon and feta. Add steak slices on top of salads. Pass remaining salad dressing with the meal.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (pounded to ¼-inch thick) Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground 2 tablespoons olive oil, more if needed Linguine, cooked according to directions and kept warm 1 cup seasoned bread crumbs 1 large Roma tomato, cut into 8 slices ½ cup grated mozzarella cheese ½ cup pasta sauce, heated Chopped fresh basil, for garnish

Rinse and pat dry chicken; season with salt and pepper. In a 10- to 12-inch skillet over medium heat, add oil. While pasta is cooking, place bread crumbs in a shallow bowl. Dredge chicken pieces in bread crumbs and add to skillet. (If skillet is small, cook two at a time.) Cook 3–5 minutes on each side until brown and reaches 165 F. Add 2 tomato slices and 2 tablespoons of cheese on top of each chicken cutlet. Cover, turn off heat and allow cheese to melt, about 2 minutes. Toss pasta with sauce. To serve, place each cutlet on a bed of linguine and sprinkle with basil.

CHEF’S TIPS

Pound away Pounding boneless, skinless chicken breasts makes them even in thickness and tenderizes the meat, allowing it to cook faster. No meat mallet? No problem. Just cover the chicken with plastic wrap or wax paper and pound 2–3 times with the flat bottom of a cast-iron skillet. Perfect pasta To keep pasta from sticking, follow manufacturer’s instructions—do not overcook. After draining pasta, add it back to the pot and stir in 1–2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cover and keep warm. Do not rinse pasta or add olive oil. Both of these steps prevent sauces from absorbing into the pasta.


K A REN H ERM A N N

PORK MEDALLIONS WITH GLAZED APPLES AND GREEN BEANS SERVES 4

GREEN BEANS

GLAZED APPLES

PORK TENDERLOIN

1 pound whole green beans, trimmed ¼ cup water or vegetable stock 1 tablespoon garlic olive oil, or plain olive oil with 1 small garlic clove, minced Kosher salt Black pepper, freshly ground

4 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon cornstarch ½ teaspoon cardamom or nutmeg Pinch salt 2 large Granny Smith apples (or your favorite)

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 pork tenderloin, silver skin removed and sliced crosswise into ½-inch-thick pieces All-purpose seasoning (your favorite) 2 tablespoons chopped onion 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar ½ cup chicken stock 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

In a large skillet over medium heat, add string beans and water. Bring to a boil, cover and cook for 5 minutes while you start the apples. Uncover and continue to cook until liquid has evaporated. Toss beans well with garlic olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Remove from heat and cover until ready to serve. In another large skillet over medium heat, add butter, brown sugar, cornstarch, cardamom and salt. Stir until all ingredients are combined. Slice tops and bottoms off apples and discard, and then slice apples crosswise into ½-inch rings. Use a very small cookie/biscuit cutter to quickly remove center seed core. Add apples to skillet, cover and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook until tender, about 10 minutes. In a medium to large skillet over medium heat, add oil. Season pork medallions all over. Add to skillet and cook 5 minutes on each side, or until brown. Remove from skillet and keep warm. Pour off excess oil. To skillet, add onions and cook until wilted and lightly brown. Add vinegar and stock, and stir to dissolve the brown bits in bottom of skillet. Cook until slightly thickened. Add butter and blend well. Return medallions to skillet and coat thoroughly with the sauce. To serve, divide beans among individual plates and top with pork medallions and apple rings.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop PREPPING PORK TENDERLOIN Before cooking a pork tenderloin, you’ll need to remove the silver skin membrane. A butcher can do this for you, but it’s also an easy do-it-yourself job. Chef Belinda shows us how at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

G I N A MOORE

This recipe calls for a pork tenderloin which weighs between 1 to 1½ pounds, not to be confused with the pork loin which weighs 6 to 8 pounds. You’ll need to prep the tenderloin the night before by removing the silver skin—an easy process once you know how. For detailed instructions, see my latest how-to video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

SHRIMP AVOCADO TACOS MAKES 4–5

4–5 corn tortillas, or store-bought taco shells 1 pound jumbo shrimp (about 16), peeled and deveined 1 tablespoon Cajun or Creole seasoning 1 large garlic clove, minced 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, for frying ¼ cup sour cream, plus extra for garnish 1 tablespoon Sriracha, or hot sauce 2 cups grated red cabbage 2 small avocados, chopped Lime wedges Chopped cilantro, for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 F. Wrap tortillas—no more than five to a pack—in foil and place in oven for 15 minutes. While tortillas are warming, place shrimp, seasoning and garlic in a medium bowl and toss to combine. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook shrimp 2–3 minutes per side until charred—do not overcook. If using a smaller skillet, cook shrimp in batches to avoid crowding the pan. Remove from skillet and keep warm. In a small bowl, mix together sour cream and Sriracha. To build tacos, hold a warm tortilla in your hand, folding slightly, and place red cabbage on the bottom followed by avocado chunks and finally 3–4 shrimp. Squeeze fresh lime juice over top and drizzle with sour cream. Garnish with cilantro. Serve immediately.

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Big, bodacious crossvines

APRIL IN THE GARDEN

BY L.A. JACKSON

n The young leaves of pyracantha as well as pear and apple trees should be watched carefully now, as new growth is susceptible to fire blight. Any sign of this disease—in the form of darkened, shriveled limb tips—should be pruned out to prevent it from spreading. Dispose of any clippings. Do not compost them.

HAVE AN UGLY FENCE OR WALL IN

n By the middle to end of this month, houseplants can be brought outdoors. This is also a good time to divide or repot any that have become overcrowded. n If spring cleaning has you throwing out old carpet, put it to good use in the garden by cutting the rug (pun intended) into strips wide enough to fit between rows or beds. Turn this effective weed block over and then “beautify” it with a covering of gravel or wood chips.

Why use tap water when a rain barrel and nature will provide all the chemical-free hydration your plants need? L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH Even though 2018 was a soaker of a growing season, a rain barrel as a supplemental water supply to help irrigate the garden this summer is still not a bad idea. One heavy, 30-minute rain storm will usually run enough water through a roof gutter to fill up a 65-gallon barrel. Whether you buy one (or two) for conservation, savings on the water bill or both, it is a good investment for no-cost, chlorine-free, pH-neutral, nonfluorinated, oxygenated water that potted and inground plants will love.

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Its trumpet-shaped blooms will be irresistible to bees, butterflies and (especially) hummingbirds. flies and (especially) hummingbirds. Its dazzling display can last up to a month, with lesser blossoming continuing well into the summer. This native beauty caught the attention of plant breeders, meaning catchy cultivars have been developed. Tangerine Beauty is probably the most popular of the current selections, but Jekyll is also worth considering for its improved durability to nasty winters. Crossvines shouldn’t be that hard to spot at local nurseries this time of year,

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

L . A . JACKSO N

need of being dressed up? Trellis looking bare and bland? Like the idea of lounging under a canopy of living shade? Searching for a vertical landscape accent? If your answer is yes to any of these questions, I have a solution, but it might not be for the fainthearted gardener. The crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) is a strong climber that covers a ton of territory, effortlessly stretching more than 30 feet high with a 6- to 8-foot spread. That’s big. That’s bodacious. Native to the Southeast, crossvine is a woody ornamental that can survive winters in our state, although this evergreen might fade to semi-evergreen during prolonged cold spells. Its name comes from the cross shape that can be found on the cut end of a stem. Springtime is when this climber is ­really in its full glory because it becomes festooned—yes, I said festooned​ —with trumpet-shaped blooms, typically ­reddish-orange and yellow in color, that will be irresistible to bees, butter-

Tangerine Beauty crossvines make their presence known with a colorful spring flower display. Careful pruning will keep these bodacious beauties growing right where you want them.

and they certainly won’t be tough to find online. Crossvine blooms best in full sun, so site it accordingly. Also, keep it happy by planting in organically amended, welldrained soil. To maintain crossvine to a desirable size, every two to three years, whip out the pruners after its spring flower show sputters to a halt. It can expand by root suckers, so if you want to keep it in bounds on the ground, dig up these crossvine wannabes. Speaking of spreading, the ­similar-​ looking trumpet vine (Campsis ­radicans) is often compared to and confused with crossvine. The biggest difference is that trumpet vine, which is also a native capable of growing to 30 feet high and well beyond, can be an invasive, garden-grabbing brute that aggressively spreads by way of rampant underground runners and weedy seeds. Stick with crossvine. Sure, it can be a biggie, too, but it will be a better-­ controlled, beautiful, bodacious biggie. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


SPRINGER & SUMM TRAVEL ISSUE

Covering landmarks and historic sites in 14 states, the U.S. Civil Rights Trail is an ­ambitious ­project designed to commemorate the struggle for racial equality in America. Organized by state tourism departments, including the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, the trail leads to more than 100 churches, private homes and other landmarks—including these eight locations in the Palmetto State.

Beatrice Brown Rivers points to her name on a petition that became part of the Briggs vs. Elliott lawsuit in Clarendon County, one of five legal cases resolved when the U.S. Supreme Court ended school segregation with the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education ruling in 1954.

Trace the struggle for equality across the Palmetto State  TEXT AND PHOTOS BY TIM HANSON S U M M E R TO N

Historic Liberty Hill AME Church In November 1949, when 13-year-old Beatrice Brown signed a petition demanding that the Clarendon County school district stop discriminating against black children, she could not have known that she was part of a movement that would, within five years, end school segregation in the United States. Her name, neatly signed on the 10th line, was among 107 signatures of African-American parents and their children. Families signed in alphabetical order, and so the Briggs family—Harry and Eliza and their children—were the first to affix their signatures. Thus, when the lawsuit was filed it became Briggs vs. Elliott, the latter being Roderick W. Elliott, chairman of School District 22. On May 17, 1954, Briggs vs. Elliott and four similar cases were decided by the U.S. Supreme Court under the umbrella of the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling ending school segregation. Beatrice Brown Rivers, now 82, says that what African-American

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South Carolina’s Civil Rights Trail

p Robert Middleton, 90, a docent at the Penn Center’s York W. Bailey Museum for the past 18 years, attended Penn School in the late 1940s when the emphasis was on vocational skills. “They didn’t teach black history. Nothing about slavery. They were mostly trying to teach you how to work with your hands to survive.” u Johnnie Wilson, manager of the

Rev. Robert China is proud of the role Historic Liberty Hill AME Church in Summerton played in the U.S. civil rights struggle of the 1960s. He’s working to have more Clarendon County locations recognized with historic markers.

parents in the county originally wanted was school-bus transportation. “Children were walking as much as nine miles one way to go to school, regardless of the weather,” she recalls. When efforts to secure that transportation failed, community leaders met at private homes and Historic Liberty Hill AME Church in Summerton to plan an alternative strategy. As the historic marker in front of the church notes, 19 members of its congregation were plaintiffs in Briggs vs. Elliott. Today, the church and its historic marker draw history buffs and school groups from across the state and nation to Summerton, where visitors can get a glimpse at civil rights history, says the Rev. Robert China, the church’s pastor. China would like to see more visitors learn about the civil rights struggle in Clarendon County. With that goal in mind, he formed the Summerton Community Action Group to publish a brochure and place more historic markers throughout the community. “Too often we forget our history,” he says, sitting in a church pew where decades before, civil rights pioneers met to make a better world for their children. “But it is important to know where you’ve been because if you don’t, you just might end up going back there.” Historic Liberty Hill AME Church is located at 2310 Liberty Hill Road in Summerton. For information about this church and its history, visit libertyhillame.com or call (803) 478‑4812. For more Clarendon County sites related to Briggs vs. Elliott, see the “Separate is NOT equal” tour itinerary at GreenbookofSC.com/tours. 26

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Courtney P. Siceloff Welcome Center and Gift Shop, says visitors are free to explore the Penn Center campus where 1960s civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. met to plan strategies in the nonviolent struggle for racial equality.

ST. H E L E N A I S L A N D

Penn Center When the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference needed a quiet place to plan strategy during the civil rights struggles of the 1960s, it was no accident that they chose the simple cottages and serene environment of Penn Center in St. Helena. Founded by abolitionist Laura Towne in 1862 as Penn School, the center was one of the first schools in the nation to provide education for freed slaves. When Towne died in 1901, the curriculum changed from reading, writing and math to one that focused on trades like carpentry, mechanics and farming. In the late 1940s, student enrollment was in decline as black families moved away from the area and public schools became available to African-Americans. The school closed its doors in 1948 and two years later the facility was renamed Penn Center, hosting interracial conferences and offering community services like day care and a health clinic. Today, a variety of organizations hold events at Penn Center. The busiest time of year is the second week of November when the Heritage Days Celebration of Gullah culture attracts as many as 10,000 people. During the rest of the year, visitors can visit the York W. Bailey Museum and the Courtney P. Siceloff Welcome Center and Gift Shop, to learn local African-American history and stroll the grounds that


played an important part in the struggle for civil rights, says manager Johnnie Wilson. “I think the reason why Penn Center is still in existence and is still ­relevant today is that it was the first school for newly freed slaves,” Wilson says. “Without that corner­stone, other schools for African-Americans would not have been ­established. Penn Center was the trailblazer.” Penn Center is located at 16 Penn Center Circle West in St. Helena. The York W. Bailey Museum and the Courtney P. Siceloff Welcome Center and Gift Shop are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission to the museum is $7 for adults and $5 for students and children ages 6 to 16. No charge for children 5 and under. For more information, call (843) 838‑2474 or visit penncenter.com. C O LU M B I A

Modjeska Monteith Simkins House For 60 years, Modjeska Monteith Simkins—remembered as the “matriarch of civil rights activists” in South Carolina— lived in a small wood frame house near the corner of Marion Street and Elmwood Avenue in Columbia. But the dwelling, added in the mid-1990s to the National Register of Historic Places, was more than a private ­residence. It was also her office, a meeting space for civil rights workers—even a temporary place to rest for AfricanAmericans unable to obtain lodging because of their race. Throughout her long life, which spanned most of the uu

Katharine Allen, research and archives manager for Historic Columbia, holds a portrait of Modjeska Monteith Simkins, the “matriarch of civil rights activists” in South Carolina.

The Green Book of South Carolina The eight South Carolina locations on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail reflect only a small sampling of the rich number of African-American cultural sites that are scattered throughout the state. To make it easier to find these spots​—their number exceeds 350, and they are located in every county in the state— the South Carolina African‑American Heritage Commission created a web-based travel guide called The Green Book of South Carolina. Launched two years ago, the site allows visitors to plan tours based on specific interests—historic churches or historic cemeteries, for example—or to explore cultural sites around a particular city. Mobile-optimized, the site also features a statewide map and GPS-enabled driving directions, says project leader Dawn Dawson-House, director of corporate communications for South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism. The name of the website pays tribute to a publication of a similar name published from the 1930s through the 1960s, which listed African-American-friendly motels, restaurants, nightclubs and other points of interest for black families traveling the highways in those often-perilous decades. When it first appeared in 1936, pages in the Negro Motorist Green Book numbered less than 20 and entries covered metropolitan New York. By the final year of publication, the size of the book had expanded five-fold, and helped African-American travelers navigate the entire United States. The old Green Books are also inspiring new additions to the modern travel guide, Dawson-House says. “Right now, we’re going through all of the original Green Books from 1936 to 1966 and we’re looking at all of the sites in South Carolina that were advertised,” she says. “We’re trying to locate them and see if they are still standing. If they are, we’re going to put them in the database and create an original Green Book Tour.” To learn more, visit greenbookofsc.com or follow the project on Twitter @greenbookofsc and by using the hashtag #GreenBookSC.

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South Carolina’s Civil Rights Trail

20th century, Simkins was deeply involved in causes directly linked to civil and social rights in South Carolina. “She really was not a one-issue person,” says John Sherrer, director of cultural resources for Historic Columbia, the organization that manages the Simkins house. Simkins was instrumental in the drafting of the Briggs vs. Elliott lawsuit. Before that, she signed on with the NAACP as secretary of the organization’s state conference. Earlier still, from 1931 to 1941, Simkins worked for the South Carolina Tuberculosis Association and traversed the state setting up health clinics to address the problem, which was particularly acute among African-Americans. After her marriage to businessman Andrew Simkins in 1929, the couple Rev. John H. Corbitt (left) and deacon Ulysses J. Thompson (right) cherish the civil rights history of Green­ ville’s Springfield Baptist Church. This bell, salvaged from the ashes of a 1972 fire, is all that remains from founded Victory Savings Bank and the original house of worship that served as a meeting place for the local NAACP chapter during the 1960s. owned Motel Simbeth, businesses that catered to African-Americans. Simkins and her husband were also enthusiastic supporters of The parks, airports and restaurants. Ulysses J. Thompson, then a Lighthouse and Informer, the most widely read black newspayoung church deacon in his late 20s, stood across the street with other church members as the flames lit up the night sky. per in the state. They prayed. They sang spirituals. And they cried. Katharine Allen, the research and archives manager “It was one of the saddest nights of my life,” says Thompson, for Historic Columbia, says that because Simkins and her now 78, and chairman of the church’s deacon ministry. husband were financially independent, she was able to devote The following day, congregants recovered the church’s her time and energy to causes. bell from the ashes, and it stands today near the Springfield “Modjeska was really interested in what it meant to be a Baptist Church—rebuilt in 1976—as a reminder of the citizen—the rights that people should have as citizens and also the responsibilities,” Allen says. “She helped usher in a church’s storied past. new era in South Carolina.” During the civil rights movement of the 1960s, there were only a few places where African-Americans could gather For more information about the Modjeska Monteith Simkins House, safely, and in Greenville the old Springfield Baptist Church call (803) 252‑7742 or visit historiccolumbia.org. The house is currently was that place. In January 1960, less than a year after baseball undergoing renovation and closed to tours. It is scheduled to reopen to great Jackie Robinson was asked to leave a white waiting room the public in September 2019. at the local airport, local leaders organized an airport protest at this church. When the NAACP and the Urban League GREENVILLE needed a meeting place to form local chapters, there was no Springfield Baptist Church question but that they would meet at Springfield Baptist. And it was at the church that plans were made for a small group Word of the fire at Springfield Baptist Church in Greenville of African-Americans to challenge a whites-only policy at the spread quickly through the African-American c­ ommunity local swimming pool and skating rink at Cleveland Park. on the evening of Jan. 25, 1972, and soon hundreds of “Church was not just a place to worship, but also a gathpeople were gathered to watch firefighters work to save the 100-year-old structure. But the fire burned fast, and from ering place for social consciousness,” says the Rev. John the start there was little hope of saving the Gothic Revival H. Corbitt, who served as church pastor for 37 years. “You house of worship. came to church for worship. You came back for the NAACP Organized in 1867 by 65 former slaves, the church served meeting.” as a venue for the town’s black citizens to meet and form Springfield Baptist Church is located at 600 E. McBee Ave. in Greenville. strategies as they struggled to desegregate schools, libraries, The church’s website is springfieldbaptist.com. uu 28

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S.C. sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail

GREENVILLE

Friendship 9 historical marker

600 E. McBee Ave., Greenville springfieldbaptist.com

135 East Main Street, Rock Hill friendship9.org

Modjeska Monteith Simkins House 2025 Marion St, Columbia (803) 252-7742 historiccolumbia.org NOTE: The house is currently undergoing renovation and closed to tours. It is scheduled to reopen to the public in September 2019.

CI V I LRIG HTSTR A I L .CO M

Springfield Baptist Church

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ROCK HILL

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G R E E N WO O D

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Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Historic Preservation Site

Historic Liberty Hill AME Church

229 N. Hospital St., Greenwood TOURS: Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (864) 229-8833 mayshousemuseum.org

2310 Liberty Hill Road, Summerton (803) 478-4812 libertyhillame.com

CI V I LRIG HTSTR A I L .CO M

S T. H E L E N A I S L A N D ORANGEBURG

Orangeburg massacre monument South Carolina State University 300 College Street, Orangeburg ADMISSION: Visitors need to get a pass from the gate guard. (800) 260-5956

Penn Center 16 Penn Center Circle West, St. Helena HOURS: Museum, welcome center and gift shop are open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. ADMISSION: Museum is $7 for adults; $5 for students and children ages 6 to 16. No charge for children 5 and under. (843) 838-2474 penncenter.com

C H A R L E S TO N

Mother Emanuel AME Church 110 Calhoun Street, Charleston emanuelamechurch.org emanuelnine.org

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South Carolina’s Civil Rights Trail

The images photographer Cecil Williams captured in the aftermath of the 1968 Orangeburg massacre appeared in newspapers and magazines around the globe, bringing attention to the heightened state of racial tension.

event. Somewhere around 10:30 p.m.—shortly after firefighters had extinguished a huge bonfire which students had built at the S.C. State campus entrance—troopers opened fire on a crowd of students. According to one theory, the shooting may have been triggered by an unexpected police warning shot. In the end, Samuel Hammond Jr. and Henry E. Smith, both 19-year-old students at the college, and Delano Middleton, 17, a local high school student, were killed. Today, a memorial on what is now South Carolina State University honors the memory of those who died. It is located not far from where the shootings occurred and where Williams took his iconic photo. “The Orangeburg massacre was the first incident of its kind on any American university campus, but received relatively little media coverage,” states a memorial signboard bearing the photographs of the men who died. “The shootings mark one of the least remembered chapters in U.S. Civil Rights history.” Visitors to the memorial will need to get a pass from the gate guard at South Carolina State University at 300 College Street in Orangeburg. For more information, call (800) 260‑5956.

ORANGEBURG

Orangeburg massacre monument On the morning after the Orangeburg massacre—a tragic confrontation in which state troopers opened fire on unarmed protesters on the campus of South Carolina State College, killing three students and wounding nearly 30 others​ —photographer Cecil Williams walked among the debris. “It looked like a battleground,” says Williams at his Orangeburg studio, holding a book of his images that documented the horrific events. “I started picking up different things from the ground, including some shotgun shells that had been used by the highway patrol.” Williams, now 80, asked a young African-American man to hold the shells in his cupped hands, raised his camera to his eye and clicked the shutter. The resulting black-andwhite image, which later appeared in newspapers around the country and in Time and Newsweek magazines, seemed to summarize what happened on the evening of Feb. 8, 1968. Throughout the week, African-American students had been protesting a “whites only” policy at the nearby All Star Bowling Alley. Just two nights before, students and police had clashed in the bowling alley’s parking lot. At least one officer was injured, and a woman was beaten by police. The confrontation heightened tensions, and Gov. Robert McNair called in National Guard troops, who joined South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) officers and state troopers at the entrances to South Carolina State College and neighboring Claflin College. Their aim was to confine students to the campuses and avoid further violence. What happened next has never been conclusively proved and there are many conflicting details and memories of the 30

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C H A R L E STO N

Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Near the end of his three-hour African-American history tour of Charleston, guide Al Miller turns his bus onto Calhoun Street and stops in front of Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, site of the horrific 2015 mass shooting by a white supremacist that left nine worshipers dead and five others wounded. Earlier in the tour, Miller had told his passengers that two of his relatives died in the church attack, and a hush falls over the group as he directs attention to a side door on the west side of the building. “That is the door that the shooter entered,” he says. A simple plaque on the exterior wall of the church commemorates the tragedy at the oldest black congregation in the city, but plans are underway for the Emanuel Nine Memorial, a $15 million public park to be built on the church grounds. Designed by Michael Arad, the architect behind the National September 11 Memorial in New York, the project will honor the victims and the church’s


I M AG E COU RTESY DBOX FO R TH E M OTH ER EM A N U E L N I N E M EM O RI A L / H A N DE L A RCH ITEC TS

ability to overcome hatred and violence with grace and forgiveness, says John Darby, co-chair of the Mother Emanuel Memorial Foundation Board. On the west side of the church, Arad’s plans call for a memorial court with a fountain inscribed with the names of those who lost their lives. Two high-backed benches on either side of the fountain will face each other. At the north end of the memorial court, a smaller space that Arad calls a “contemplation basin” is planned so that visitors can pray. On the east side of the church, plans call for a survivor’s garden—a lawn surrounded by trees and stone benches. “The survivor’s garden is a place where children can run around and people can have coffee and just enjoy being outside after church,” Darby says. The board is in the “quiet stage” of fundraising and Darby says that it is possible that funds for the memorial could be raised as soon as next year. “We are making good progress,” Darby says. “Everyone we have approached has contributed. Not one person has rejected us. It is incredible.” Mother Emanuel AME Church is located at 110 Calhoun Street in Charleston. Further information about the church can be found at emanuelamechurch.org. For details about Al Miller’s African-American history tours of Charleston, visit sitesandinsightstours.com or call (843) 552‑9995. For more information on the memorial project, visit emanuelnine.org.

This architectural drawing of the Emanuel Nine Memorial shows the fountain planned for the west side of Charleston’s Mother Emanuel AME Church. The memorial court will honor the victims of the horrific 2015 mass shooting. Plans also call for a survivor’s garden on the east side of the church. Together, the two components will celebrate the triumph of love over hate.

G R E E N WO O D

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Historic Preservation Site When he was a child, Benjamin E. Mays—who later would become president of Morehouse College, adviser to three U.S. presidents, a close associate of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and an architect of the American civil rights movement— watched a group of armed white men on horseback humiliate his father in front of their modest sharecropper house in Greenwood County. “They cursed my father, drew their guns and made him salute, made him take off his hat and bow down to them several times,” Mays wrote in his 1971 autobiography Born to Rebel. “Then they rode away.” The memory of that terrifying childhood event stayed with Mays throughout his life, and he acknowledged that it played a defining role in his efforts to secure civil rights for all people. Today, the wooden home in which Mays was born is the centerpiece of the Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Historic Preservation Site. Mays lived to be 89 years old and, when he died in 1984, left behind a legacy of accomplishments that are uu

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South Carolina’s Civil Rights Trail

The Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Historic Preservation Site in Greenwood County includes a museum (left) and the restored childhood home (above) of the man frequently referred to as the “father of the civil rights movement,” says site director Christopher B. Thomas.

Carolinian has made a greater contribution to American society than he did.” enshrined in a museum only a few steps away from his childhood home. Displays include the cap and gown Mays wore when he received his doctoral degree from the University of Chicago and a wall listing the 56 honorary degrees he received over the years. Frequently referred to as the “father of the civil rights movement,” Mays was president of Morehouse College in Atlanta in 1944 when Martin Luther King Jr. enrolled in the school. Over the ensuing years, Mays and the young man became close friends—indeed, King called Mays his “spiritual mentor” and “intellectual father,” and when the civil rights leader was assassinated in 1968, it was Mays who delivered his eulogy. “No resident of Greenwood County has done more to change the landscape of American history than Dr. Mays,” says Christopher B. Thomas, director of the Mays site. “And I might further add that I don’t believe that any South

The Dr. Benjamin E. Mays Historic Preservation Site is located at 229 N. Hospital St. in Greenwood. Tours are available on Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and on Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Full details can be found at mayshousemuseum.org or by calling (864) 229‑8833. ROCK HILL

Friendship 9 historical marker When the small group of African-American civil rights protesters reached McCrory’s Variety Store on Main Street in Rock Hill, police were waiting for them. And when they entered the store and sat at the whites-only lunch counter to order a meal, they were quickly arrested and hustled out of a back door and across a parking lot to the city jail. Later, when the nine protesters refused to pay the $100 fine for trespassing and disorderly conduct, they were ordered to spend 30 days in prison. Because they were students at

The International African American Museum If all goes according to plan, work on Charleston’s long-planned International African American Museum (IAAM) will begin later this year and open to the public sometime in 2021. The museum, expected to cost more than $100 million, will feature state-ofthe-art exhibits on the African-American experience, and genealogy resources for African-Americans researching

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their personal family histories. The 40,000-square-foot facility is set to be built on the site of the former Gadsden’s Wharf where enslaved Africans were sold at auction by the tens of thousands. Historians believe that roughly half of all enslaved Africans brought to this country arrived at this location, and so the creation of a major museum here carries particular importance, says Elijah Heyward III,

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the museum’s chief operating officer. Few museums “benefit from being on the site where the history it honors happened,” Heyward says. “Our work here underscores the centrality of this sacred site to not only South Carolina history but American history, and honors the many enslaved Africans and their ancestors who sacrificed and contributed a great deal to the landscape of American history and culture.” For more information about the International African American Museum, visit iaamuseum.org.


GET MORE For more information on the monuments and historic sites of the United States Civil Rights Trail, visit civilrightstrail.com.

nearby Friendship Junior College, they soon became known as the Friendship 9. The arrests and their strategy of “jail, no bail” marked a turning point in the civil rights movement. Prior to their January 1961 arrests, protesters would simply pay the fine. But it became apparent to some in the movement—particularly to the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)—that paying the fine did little to promote their cause. “Jail, no bail, started right here,” says Willie McLeod, 76, one of the surviving members of the Friendship 9. He sits in a booth eating lunch with a friend only a few steps from the counter where he was arrested nearly 60 years earlier. “The trick to the whole thing was the nonviolent ­training that we received,” McLeod says, noting that CORE leaders carefully selected who would participate in the protest, eliminating people whose tempers might get the better of them or who might be psychologically unprepared to spend a month behind bars. McLeod and the others were taken to the York County Prison Camp to do their time. “They picked the hardest, dirtiest jobs for us to do,” says

Willie McLeod and eight fellow students at Friendship Junior College pioneered the “jail, no bail” strategy when they were arrested in January 1961 for trying to eat at the segregated lunch counter of McCrory’s Variety Store in Rock Hill. The Friendship 9, as they came to be called, served 30 days hard labor at the York County Prison Farm rather than pay fines. Their convictions were vacated by a state judge in 2015.

McLeod, who was 18 at the time. “We dug ditches, cut underbrush—any job they assigned.” Three years after McLeod and the others finished their sentence, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Still, it took authorities until 2015 to revisit the case of the Friendship 9. And in January of that year, a state judge vacated the convictions. Today, the fate of the old McCrory’s Variety Store location is uncertain. For a while, it was renamed McCrory’s Five & Dine and operated with its now-famous lunch counter holding photographs and short biographies of the Friendship 9. In January 2019, however, the restaurant closed for business. The site of the Friendship 9 sit-in is located at 135 East Main Street in Rock Hill. A historic marker dedicated to the protest is located in front of the closed diner. For more on the historic protest, visit friendship9.org.

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SC   calendar APR 15 – MAY 15

Upstate APRIL

19–20  Iron City Festival,

downtown, Blacksburg. (864) 839‑6006. 20  Pickens Azalea Festival, Main Street, Pickens. pickensazaleafestival@gmail.com. 20  TD Bank Reedy River Run, downtown, Greenville. tdbankreedyriverrun.com. 23–24  Flagship Detroit DC-3 Tours and Rides, Runway Park at Greenville Downtown Airport, Greenville. (864) 242‑4777. 26  Springfest, Uptown Market, Greenwood. (864) 942‑8448. 26–27  Ghost Creek Gourd Festival, Ghost Creek Gourd Farm, Laurens. (864) 682‑5251. 26–27  Project Host BBQ Cook‑Off and Festival, 320 S. Hudson St., Greenville. (864) 905‑1026. 26–28  Spring Fling, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 596‑2976. 27  American Truck Historical Society Palmetto Upstate Chapter Spring Show, Lindsey Plantation, Taylors. (864) 677‑3453. 27  Central Railroad Festival, downtown, Central. (864) 654‑1200. 27  Greater Greenville Master Gardener Plant Sale, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. scggmg@gmail.com. 27  Greer Goes Global International Festival, Greer City Park, Greer. astone@cityofgreer.org. 27  Mutt Strut, downtown, Greenville. (864) 242‑3626. 27  Spring Means Babies Festival, Split Creek Farm, Anderson. (864) 287‑3921. 27  Wheels for Meals Charity Ride, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 233‑6565. 30  Tamassee DAR School Benefit Golf Tournament, The Cliffs Valley, Travelers Rest. (864) 944‑1390 or (864) 247‑3973 for player registration. M AY

2–12  The Great Anderson County

Fair, Anderson Sports & Entertainment Center, Anderson. (864) 296‑6601. 3  Blue Ridge Fest, Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative, Pickens. (800) 240‑3400. 4  Earth Day Festival, Unitarian Universalist Church, Spartanburg. (864) 574‑1253. 4  Rainbow Ball, Summit Pointe, Spartanburg. (864) 381‑8187. 4  Strawberry Festival, Slater Hall Community Center, Slater. (864) 451‑3813.

44

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending. 10–12  Artisphere, downtown, Greenville. (864) 283‑6825. 11  Rally in the Valley 2019, Lake Jemiki, Walhalla. oconeeforever@gmail.com. 11  Spartanburg Philharmonic presents Beethoven’s 9th, Twichell Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. O NG O ING

Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Third Thursdays  ArtWalk, downtown cultural district, Spartanburg. (864) 582‑7616. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

Midlands APRIL

19–20  Bishopville BBQ Block

Party, downtown, Bishopville. (803) 483‑2800. 20  Bike with a Ranger, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428‑4988. 20  Earth Day Aiken, Newberry Street Festival Center, Aiken. earthdayaiken.org. 20  Heart & Sole Women’s Five Miler, Finlay Park, Columbia. (803) 731‑2100. 26  Carolina Shout! with the SC Jazz Masterworks Ensemble, Harbison Theatre, Irmo. robert@scjazz.org. 26  Historic Preservation Conference, S.C. Archives & History Center, Columbia. (803) 896‑0339. 27  4-Legged 4K, Chappell Smith & Arden, Columbia. (803) 999‑1387. 27  Barbecue Dinner Train, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. 27  Cayce Festival of the Arts, State Street, Cayce. caycefest@gmail.com. 27  Earth Day Birthday, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. 27  Kid’s Day of Lexington, Virginia Hylton Park, Lexington. (803) 356‑8554. 27  Kinetic Derby Day, Meeting Street, West Columbia. (803) 791‑1880, ext. 623. 27  Lower Richland Sweet Potato Festival, Hopkins Park, Hopkins. (803) 776‑2778.

27  Run United, Newberry Street, Aiken. (803) 649‑6245. 27  Walk MS, Riverfront Park, Columbia. (855) 372‑1331. 28  Aiken Choral Society’s 2019 Spring Concert, Aiken’s First Baptist Church, Aiken. msimpson98@yahoo.com. 29  Sweet and Savory Chefs Competition—The Golden Spatula Awards, The Hall at Senate’s End, Columbia. (803) 786‑6819. MAY

2  Dutch Fork Choral Society presents Sing Me to Heaven, Chapin United Methodist Church, Chapin. (803) 318‑0488. 3–4  Hog on the Hill BBQ Cook-Off, downtown, Chester. (803) 385‑1528. 3–4  I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for... Aiken Ice Cream, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 4  Walk Toward Brighter Days, Cherry Park, Rock Hill. d.jackson@ walktowardbrighterdays.com. 4  Art the Alley, downtown, Aiken. (803) 645‑9186. 4  Beach Bash, Friendship United Methodist Church, Rock Hill. (803) 230‑3223. 4  May Cube Steak Supper Fundraiser & Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 4–5  Under the Crown and Colonial Trades Fair, Living History Park, North Augusta. (803) 279‑7560. 5  Pickin’ & Piggin’ in the Park, Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia. (803) 731‑5208. 8  Home and Garden Symposium, Building R Atrium and Roquemore Auditorium at Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College, Orangeburg. (803) 535‑1246. 10  Coffee House in the Black Box, Aiken Community Playhouse, Aiken. (803) 648‑1438. 10–11  Aiken Bluegrass Festival, Western Carolina State Fairgrounds, Aiken. (803) 640‑9287. 11  Classical Closer, Rawlinson Road Middle School, Rock Hill. rhsymphony@rhsymphony.org. 11  Sheep Shearing Family Day, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684‑2327.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

ONGOING

Daily  “Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. Daily until April 30  Nature Imagined, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329‑2121. Daily until April 30  Laurie Adamson Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. Daily until May 31  Phil Yarborough Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557.

Lowcountry APR IL

15  The Bright Futures Golf

Tournament and Soirée, Ralston Creek Course at the Daniel Island Club, Charleston. events@D2L.org. 19–28  Horry County Fair, Myrtle Beach Speedway, Myrtle Beach. (843) 236‑0500. 20  Mess Around: A Tribute to Ray Charles, featuring Manny Houston, Charleston Music Hall, Charleston. (843) 641‑0011. 20  Soft Shell Crab Festival, downtown, Port Royal. brooke.buccola@gmail.com. 20  Spring Art Market, The Edistonian General Store, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. 20  The Hat Ladies Easter Promenade, corner of Meeting and Broad streets, Charleston. (843) 762‑6679. 22  East Cooper Community Outreach Charity Golf Tournament, Daniel Island Club, Charleston. amorrall@ECCOcharleston.org. 23–27  Myrtle Beach International Film Festival, Stone Theatres in the Market Common, Myrtle Beach. (843) 497‑0220. 25–May 4  Society of Stranders Spring Safari, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (803) 371‑4731. 26–27  Colleton County Rice Festival, downtown, Walterboro. (843) 549‑1079. 26–28  Jennie Gowan Annual Art Show, Edisto Beach Civic Center, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. 26–May 4  Artfields, various venues, Lake City. (843) 374‑0180. 26–May 5  Mamma Mia!, Florence Little Theatre, Florence. (843) 662‑3731.

27  Mullet Haul Trail Run, Johns Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑4386. 27  Myrtle Beach Car Club Easter Car & Truck Show, The Landing at the Boathouse, Myrtle Beach. (856) 796‑0365. 27  Putting for Parkinson’s, Wescott Golf Club, North Charleston. (843) 696‑0761. 27  Race for the Paws, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795‑1110. 27  Socastee Heritage Festival, Socastee Swing Bridge, Myrtle Beach. socasteeheritage@gmail.com. 27  Taste of the Coast, House of Blues, Myrtle Beach. (843) 272‑8163. 27  Taste of James Island, First Baptist Athletic Complex, Charleston. (843) 762‑3653. 27  Tour de Plantersville, Plantersville Elementary School, Georgetown. (843) 240‑0534. 27–28  Air Show, Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, Beaufort. (843) 228‑7675. 28  Blessing of the Fleet and Seafood Festival, Mount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. MAY

1–5  North Charleston Arts Fest, multiple venues, North Charleston. (843) 740‑5854. 2–4  Sea Mountain Fiddlers Convention & Bluegrass Festival, Myrtle Beach KOA, Myrtle Beach. (843) 254‑0502. 4  Blessing of the Inlet, Belin Memorial United Methodist Church, Murrells Inlet. (843) 450‑4235. 4  CAPES for Kids Run, Briggs Elementary School, Florence. (843) 629‑0236. 4  Cars on Kiawah, Ocean Park, Kiawah Island. (240) 418‑9225. 4  Charleston Dragon Boat Race, Brittlebank Park, Charleston. (843) 714‑4131. 10–12  Charleston Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Charleston. (843) 577‑2063. 11  Mayfest on Main, Main Street, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280‑5570. ONGOING

Fourth Tuesdays  Wash Day, L.W. Paul Living History Farm, Conway. (843) 365‑3596. Wednesday  Arts and Crafts Market, Bay Creek Park, Edisto Island. (843) 869‑3867. First Saturdays  History in the Landscape, Hampton Plantation State Historic Site, Charleston. (843) 546‑9361.


|

SC   humor me

Godzilla vs. the Mistress of Mess BY JAN A. IGOE

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT

vintage horror movies—the classics made before flesh-­ eating zombies and sharkspewing tornados became routine. I’m talking about the black-and-white masterpieces that were once Japan’s primary export. By now, the original Godzilla and his foes are attacking Jell-O in assisted living, but they were terrifying in their prime. None of them had passports, so the carnage was confined to Asia. The Carolinas were pretty much Godzilla-proof. We were safe then, but a new threat has raised its adorable head. Japan’s latest destructor is intent on mutilating the vintage clutter we’ve spent eons acquiring. We can run screaming, but there is no escape from Marie Kondo and her mission to tidy up the world, starting with my friend Alice, who made me watch Kondo’s Netflix show. Marie is scary perfect. Tiny and delicate with an angelic aura and effervescent smile, she doesn’t speak much English beyond “I love mess,” so a translator shadows her around victims’ homes where she helps people heap mountains of clothes on their beds and fold socks into cubes. Since Alice has more clothes than Goodwill Industries, dumping her enormous walk-in closet on her California king didn’t seem like a great way to start, but she was determined to take her cues from the “world-renowned tidying expert.” “You pick up each item individually and ask if it sparks joy,” Alice said as she interrogated a lacy red bra, which must have sparked joy for somebody when she was 23. “You have to try her KonMari Method.” 46

‘Marie does not advise more than 30 books,’ Alice says. (Let’s hope she means per shelf.) No, I don’t. Alice will be trekking through Himalayan clothing peaks until Christmas. After that, she gets to throw out books. “Marie does not advise more than 30 books,” Alice says. (Let’s hope she means per shelf.) It would be nice to know my house is neat enough to let first responders enter in an emergency. In the case of a breakin, I can blame thieves for tossing the place. But if I ever lose consciousness, my dogs are trained to drag me outside before EMS arrives. First responders see enough carnage. I believe with all my heart that if Marie came to my house, she’d change careers. She has conquered many a mess but has yet to do battle with a

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  APRIL 2019 | SCLIVING.COOP

clothes-hoarding, bell-bottoms storing (they may come back) cartoonist who collects picture books and puts Hobby Lobby’s inventory to shame. It would be better than Godzilla vs. King Kong. Can the Tidy Tornado defeat the Mistress of Mess, her most formidable foe? I’d buy a ticket. You know, clutter remediation really isn’t new; Marie just made it magical. But the message is the same: Throw out all the stuff advertisers insisted you couldn’t live without, so you selflessly bought them to boost the GNP. Spend the next three years sorting what’s left into color-coded boxes. Go forth and mess no more. Bullying the untidy has become an acceptable pastime for the naturally neat. Just when the pressure was becoming unbearable, I stumbled on an ally. David H. Freedman believes that disorder has an upside. He even co‑authored a book on the subject: A Perfect Mess: The Hidden Benefits of Disorder. Freedman says creativity thrives in chaos, and disorderly doesn’t mean disorganized. People with messy desks can often find the file they need faster than colleagues with complex filing systems. The moderately messy might even be more efficient, he says. You hear that, Kondo maniacs? Tonight, while Alice alphabetizes her spices, we can watch Marie’s show. It’s not a horror movie after all. It’s a comedy. JAN A. IGOE is secretly hoping David H. Freedman is single. He sparks joy in her disorderly soul. Share your mess at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop. We don’t judge.


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South Carolina Living April 2019  

Explore the state's eight sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, celebrate the legacy of writer Pat Conroy and take the hassle out of travel...

South Carolina Living April 2019  

Explore the state's eight sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, celebrate the legacy of writer Pat Conroy and take the hassle out of travel...

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