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On the waterfront CHANGEOUT FALL R & WINTE L E V A R T ISSUE

The insider’s guide to Beaufort

SC RECIPE

No-knead breads HUMOR ME

SEPTEMBER 2020

Getting buggy, with a side of syrup


WEAR YOUR FACE MASK.

scdhec.gov/COVID19 FIGHT THE SPREAD. CR-012796

8/20


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 74 • NUMBER 9 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 615,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

2020 | sept

Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org

17 The insider’s guide

FIELD EDITOR

to Beaufort

Josh Crotzer PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

Explore the heart of the Lowcountry with recommendations on where to go and what to do from the people who call Beaufort home.

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler COPY EDITORS

Trevor Bauknight, Jennifer Jas, Jim Poindexter

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

CONTRIBUTORS

Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Cele and Lynn Seldon, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Paul Wesslund

6 AGENDA

If you want to save money on your utility bills, a report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) can help.

PUBLISHER

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

8 DIALOGUE Voices of the new generation What do South Carolina high school students have to say about the COVID-19 pandemic? Find out in a series of podcasts sponsored by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina.

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (512) 441-5200 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Stuck at home in the COVID-19 pandemic, Chef Belinda experimented with bread recipes and baking techniques—and the results are delicious.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2020. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

16 SC STORIES Ready to ride Off-road endurance motorcycle racer Petr Angelo Vlcek explains what it’s like to speed across the tough terrain of the Dakar Rally.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

28

GARDENER

Preserving the herb harvest With autumn approaching the garden gate, it’s time to gather and store the tasty goodies of homegrown herbs.

$5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

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HUMOR ME

Belgium betrays waffles Learn about a creepy new trend in some European culinary circles that’s bugging our humor columnist.

On the waterfront FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

The insider’s guide to Beaufort

SC RECIPE

No-knead breads HUMOR ME

Getting buggy, with a side of syrup

The view from the top. It’s easy to see why visitors to Beaufort’s Hunting Island State Park love to take the lighthouse tour. Photo by Chase Toler.

SEPTEMBER 2020

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

12

12 RECIPE No-knead breads

FRO M TO P : G RE ATER B E AU FO RT- P O RT ROYA L CON V ENTION A N D V IS ITORS BU RE AU; I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA ; DEPOS ITPH OTOS


SC | agenda

The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after.

WHERE IT GOES

31% Heating and cooling systems

12%

Heating water

8%

Computers, freezers, washing machines, dishwashers and cooking appliances

6% Refrigeration 5% Lighting 4% Drying clothes 4% TV and video games

GONE FISHIN’

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

SEPTEMBER

Managing home energy use If you want to save money on your utility bills, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) can show you where to start. Nearly half of the ­electricity Americans use in their homes, 43%, goes to heating and cooling air and water, according to a report by the agency. Nearly a third of our electric use, 31%, goes to running our heating and air conditioning systems, while 12% powers our water heaters. In second place for residential electricity use is a grab bag of appliances and lighting that add up to one-fifth of the electricity we use in our homes—refrigeration (6%), lighting (5%), clothes drying (4%), and TV and video games (4%). Another 8% of residential electricity use comes from a combination of computers, freezers, washing machines, dishwashers and cooking appliances. Keith Dennis, vice president of consumer member engagement for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), sums up the report this way: If you want to cut energy use, focus on how you use your heating and cooling system and your water heater. He notes the U.S. Department of Energy recommends setting your thermostat to 78 F or higher during summer months and lowering the water heater temperature to 120 F. “Turning off an LED lightbulb may come to mind when you think about saving energy,” Dennis says. “But in the grand scheme of things, looking at EIA’s numbers, it’s adjusting your thermostat that’s going to make the biggest difference.” —PAUL WESSLUND

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ONLY ON SCLiving.coop Butter ’em up Flavored butters are the perfect way to top Chef Belinda Smith‑Sullivan’s no-knead bread recipes (see Page 12). Learn how easy it is to make a better butter by watching this how-to video at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Register to win $100 There’s nothing quite like fall in South Carolina. Sign up today for our September Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Sept. 30, 2020. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Virtual Youth Experience Podcast Challenge What do South Carolina high school students have to say about the COVID-19 pandemic? Find out as The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina present podcasts from the students who participated in our Virtual Youth Experience. Visit SCLiving.coop/news/virtual-youth-experience.


VISIT NORTH CAROLINA

Sample the best of NC just off I-95. Plan your next road trip with a stay at America’s best exit Roanoke Rapids/Weldon! - Exit173.com

Do your part while you’re in North Carolina and keep your distance, wash your hands and wear a face covering. Visit CountOnMeNC.org.


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SC   dialogue

Voices of the new generation BRIGHT MOMENTS HAVE BEEN FEWER AND FURTHER

between during the COVID-19 crisis, so recognizing them is important. The best time I’ve had during the pandemic was the week I spent with 77 high school students in the Virtual Youth Experience, a web-based conference created by South Carolina’s electric cooperatives. In June, students selected by their local cooperatives were able to engage with state leaders

This digital discourse created opportunities these young people otherwise might not have had. It was not a passive screen experience. like U.S. Senators Tim Scott and Lindsey Graham, Gov. Henry McMaster, state epidemiologist Dr. Linda Bell, and state superintendent Molly Spearman in a series of virtual meetings. As a Boomer, I prefer traditional face-to-face interactions, but I must concede that this digital discourse created opportunities these young people otherwise might not have had. It was not a passive screen experience. They asked poignant questions of our speakers that illustrated their concerns and attitudes. They interacted with each other throughout, using the application’s chat feature to enhance the discussions for everyone. Virtual Youth Experience was a conversation, not a class. The students used the digital face time with these leaders to raise the issues their generation is confronting—the pandemic, human dignity, and race relations. Speakers like Rep. Jim Clyburn brought historical context to these discussions. They talked about mental health issues and addiction with Hootie and the Blowfish drummer Jim Sonefeld. Rev. Charles Jackson, senior pastor at Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia, talked with the students about the importance of developing community and diverse relationships. We didn’t want the experience of the week and these conversations to just slip away, so we challenged the students to collaborate with one another and create a short podcast about how the year’s events are impacting their generation. From 20 powerful submissions, a panel of journalists chose the podcast created by Grace Johnson from Hartsville (Pee Dee Electric Cooperative), Salena Robinson of West Columbia (Mid‑Carolina Electric Cooperative) and Mackenzie Starnes of Hilton Head Island (Palmetto Electric Cooperative) as the ­winner of the Virtual Youth Experience Podcast Challenge. The winners each received $5,000 toward their college education. In her comments about all of the podcasts, Cindi Ross Scoppe of The Post and Courier newspaper said she was 8

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

impressed with the students’ “very grown-up perspectives” and that she heard “resiliency” from people “adapting to a very different kind of world.” I was captivated by the podcasts and I can understand why the winning group was chosen. These three students from different parts of the state used their varied backgrounds and personalities to tell their stories. Robinson, who is African American, spoke of her encounters with “subtle racism” and said she was glad that her podcast partners also want change. Starnes, who describes herself as an introvert, said she thrived during the time of isolation. Johnson said people showed their “true colors” during the pandemic and she discovered who she could really count on. I am encouraged that these students have perspectives that will benefit them as they move through their new world. The winning podcast concluded with advice from each member of the group.

“I would like future generations to learn how little things make a big difference.” —GRACE JOHNSON

“Live life to the “Our actions are fullest. You never shaping the know what can future. Take happen in the advantage blink of an eye.” of that.” —SALENA ROBINSON

—MACKENZIE STARNES

Wise words from a new generation. We should all strive to be as hopeful as they are about the future.

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

NOW HEAR THIS Listen to the winning Virtual Youth Experience podcast at SCLiving.coop/vye.


INFORMATION YOU CAN TRUST You inspire us to find solutions, so we can provide the energy and savings you need. Being part of a Touchstone Energy cooperative means we’re always listening to make our communities a better place. What’s here today, has never been better. To learn more, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.


No-knead breads

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

While confined to home, like so many others due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I decided to go back to culinary school (in my kitchen) and “up” my bread-making skills. Since kneading dough is something that I am not particularly fond of, I decided to experiment with the no-knead technique. This method is based on slow fermentation—allowing dough to slowly rise at room temperature for 12–24 hours, unattended. Prep and mixing take less than 10 minutes and shaping dough for the oven another 10 minutes; none of these recipes require any special equipment other than a Dutch oven. The process is quick and easy, and the results are amazing! Not to mention that you can have the same quality, fresh bread whenever you want for pennies compared to what it costs in the bakery section of your supermarket. Enjoy, and be sure to read the tips section (Page 14) for additional information before you get started.

CLASSIC BOULE MAKES 1 LOAF

I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

3 cups bread flour, plus more for work surface ¼ teaspoon instant yeast 1 ¼ teaspoons kosher salt 1 ½ cups water

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, yeast and salt. Add water, and using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 12–18 hours. Dough surface will be dotted with bubbles. This is a sign that the yeast is working. Flour a clean, dry work surface and scrape dough onto surface. Sprinkle top of dough and hands with more flour. Using a bench scraper

12 SOUTH

or hands, fold dough over onto itself—top, bottom and sides—and start to shape into a round loaf. Flour parchment paper and place dough, seam side down, on parchment. Sprinkle top of dough with more flour and cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for another 2 hours. During the last 30 minutes of proofing, place Dutch oven in the oven and preheat to 450 F. Using parchment, move dough to hot Dutch oven. Bake for 30 minutes with lid on; remove lid and cook 15–20 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack. *If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave.

CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


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SC   recipe

ARTISAN OLIVE ROSEMARY BREAD MAKES 1 LOAF

3 cups artisan bread flour ¼ teaspoon instant yeast 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt ½ teaspoon dried rosemary Zest of one lemon 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 ½ cups water ½ cup chopped Kalamata olives

Flour a clean, dry work surface and scrape dough onto surface. Sprinkle top of dough and hands with more flour. Using a bench scraper or hands, fold dough over onto itself—top, bottom and

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, yeast, salt, rosemary and lemon zest. Add olive oil and water, and using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Oil hands and gently add in olives until well incorporated. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 12–18 hours. Dough surface will be dotted with bubbles. This is a sign that the yeast is working.

sides—and start to shape into a round loaf. Flour parchment paper and place dough, seam side down, on parchment. Sprinkle top of dough with more flour and cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for another 2 hours.

on; remove lid and cook 15–20 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack.

During the last 30 minutes of proofing, place Dutch oven in the oven and preheat to 450 F. With kitchen shears, slash or snip top of loaf in several places or in desired pattern. Using parchment, move dough to hot Dutch oven. Bake for 30 minutes with lid

*If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave. Turn ge the pa re for mo s bread

BRIOCHE BURGER BUNS

Buns should weigh 4½ ounces each. Use a scale, if available.

MAKES 8 HAMBURGER BUNS OR 16 ROLLS (APPROXIMATELY)

Using as much flour as necessary, roll each portion into a ball and place onto parchment-lined sheet pans or baking sheets. Slightly flatten each bun/roll with the palm of your hand. Cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for 1 hour.

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, yeast and salt. In a 2-cup measuring cup, combine water, honey, egg and butter. Add to flour. Using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will

GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

4 cups all-purpose flour or bread flour 2 teaspoons instant yeast 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 N cups water 2 tablespoons honey 1 large egg (or G cup buttermilk, if egg allergy) 4 tablespoons butter, melted Sesame seeds, white and black 1 egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon water for bread wash (or G cup cream, if egg allergy) Sesame seeds or dried herbs, optional

be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 2–3 hours, until double in size. Flour a clean, dry work surface and scrape dough onto surface.

Sprinkle top of dough and hands with more flour. Using a bench scraper or hands, fold dough over onto itself—top, bottom and sides—and divide equally into desired number of buns or rolls.

During the last 30 minutes of proofing, preheat oven to 425 F. At the end of the proofing time, brush the top of each bun/ roll with egg wash or cream and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake for 15–20 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack. *If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   recipe

CHEF’S TIPS AND TECHNIQUES

All about yeast. All of these recipes recommend instant yeast. If you do not make bread often, store yeast in the freezer. Yeast is a living organism. Freezing “pauses” it and extends the lifespan. Check label for instructions. Instant yeast can be mixed in with flour and does not require activation. Active dry yeast needs to be activated with warm water before mixing with flour. All about flour. Flour becomes compacted as it sits in the container. Stir flour with a whisk to aerate it before measuring. Flour differences are based on the amount of gluten each contains. Gluten gives bread its elasticity. The higher the gluten, the more stable the bread. These recipes will work well with either all-purpose flour (8% to 12% gluten) or bread flour (11% to 14% gluten). How to make a bread “wash.” A simple application of bread wash will help seeds and herbs adhere to the bread. Egg wash (1 egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon water) is common, but milk, cream or melted butter work equally well, especially for those with egg allergies.

EASY PIZZA DOUGH MAKES 2 LARGE (12-INCH) OR 4 SMALLER PIZZA CRUSTS

3H cups all-purpose flour 3H teaspoons pizza dough enhancer, optional G teaspoon instant yeast 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 H cups water

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, enhancer, yeast and salt. Add water, and using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 8–18 hours. Dough surface will be dotted with bubbles. This is a sign that the yeast is working. Flour a clean, dry work surface and scrape dough onto surface. Sprinkle top of dough and hands with more flour. Using a bench scraper or hands, fold dough over onto itself—top, bottom and sides—and divide into two or four parts. Shape into rounds. Flour parchment paper, then place dough, seam side down, on parchment. Sprinkle tops of dough with more flour and cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for another 2 hours. To shape dough for filling, gently stretch into desired size and shape. Stretch a little larger than needed, as dough will shrink a little. Continue with your pizza recipe. If using a pizza stone, be sure to preheat in oven at 500 F for 30 minutes. If not using pizza dough immediately, wrap individually in plastic and refrigerate up to 3 days. When ready to use, return to room temperature on counter for 2–3 hours, covered with a damp cloth. *If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave.

Preheat, please. Always preheat the oven for 30–45 minutes prior to baking bread. Dutch ovens and pizza stones should also be preheated. Working with dough. Keep hands well-floured at all times to prevent dough from sticking. Wetting hands with water or a little oil can achieve the same results.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

PIZZ A PHOTOS BY G I N A M OO RE

Fermentation rules. While most of these recipes call for 12 hours of fermentation, it will not hurt dough to rest for a full 24 hours. Dough can be refrigerated for 3–4 days after mixing. Allow dough to come to room temperature before continuing at the proofing stage of the recipe.


Cooking with charcoal? There’s an interesting new cooking trend that calls for adding small amounts of food-grade activated charcoal to a variety of items. The health effects (pro and con) of ingesting charcoal are hotly debated, and adding it to recipes is a matter of personal choice. I decided to experiment with charcoal in the following bread recipe. In my experience, it does not add to, or take away from, the taste of the bread, and can be a festive ornamental touch. This recipe is also great without the charcoal.

CHARCOAL SANDWICH LOAF MAKES 1 LOAF

3 cups all-purpose flour H teaspoon instant yeast 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon food-grade charcoal (optional)

1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 H cups water

In a large mixing bowl, combine flour, yeast, salt and charcoal. Add honey, oil and water, and using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 12–18 hours. Dough surface will be dotted with bubbles. This is a sign that the yeast is working. Spray a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan with no-stick spray. Oil your hands and start to shape dough into a loaf. Add dough to loaf pan and press lightly to fill dough to the edges of pan. Cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for another 2 hours. G I N A MOORE

During the last 30 minutes of proofing, preheat oven to 400 F. Bake for 45 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack. *If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave.

BEER PUMPERNICKEL RYE MAKES 1 LOAF

3 cups bread flour 1 cup pumpernickel or rye flour 4 tablespoons rye bread enhancer (optional) H teaspoon instant yeast 1 H teaspoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon caraway seeds 1 tablespoon cocoa powder 1 cup water 1 cup beer

During the last 30 minutes of proofing, place Dutch oven in the oven and preheat to 450 F. Using parchment, move dough to hot Dutch oven. Bake for 30 minutes with lid on; remove lid and cook 15–20 minutes. Transfer to cooling rack.

K A REN H ERM A N N

In a large mixing bowl, combine flours, enhancer, yeast, salt, caraway seeds and cocoa powder. Add water and beer. Using the handle of a medium to large wooden spoon, stir until blended. The dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature* for 12–18 hours. Dough surface will be dotted with bubbles. This is a sign that the yeast is working.

Flour a clean, dry work surface and scrape dough onto surface. Sprinkle top of dough and hands with more flour. Using a bench scraper or hands, fold dough over onto itself—top, bottom and sides—and start to shape into a round loaf. Flour parchment paper and place dough, seam side down, on parchment. Sprinkle top of dough with more flour and cover with a clean, dry kitchen towel. Let rise (called proofing) for another 2 hours.

*If your kitchen is colder than 70 degrees, put bowl in the oven or microwave.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   stories

Ready to ride For two grueling weeks, motorcycle racer Petr Angelo Vlcek had managed to survive the punishing 5,000-mile Dakar Rally route through Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. Piloting his KTM 450 through the backcountry at speeds sometimes exceeding 100 mph, he was working hard to finish the most challenging motorcycle race in the world. Then, less than three miles from the finish line, his luck ran out. Vlcek lost control of his bike and crashed, leaving him with several torn shoulder ligaments and a fractured leg. In considerable pain, but undeterred, Vlcek righted his bike, climbed aboard and, with only one working hand on the handlebars, finished the 2018 race. Vlcek has completed a total of four Dakar Rally events, the most recent of which was in February 2020 in Saudi Arabia. In that rally, Vlcek raced in a special division where competitors ride without any outside support. They are, quite simply, on their own. “The Dakar Rally is a massive challenge,” he says. “It is something not to prove yourself, but to challenge yourself—to see if you can make it.” Vlcek moved to the United States at age 20, and today—married and with two children—owns a surfing and skate shop in Mount Pleasant. “I love surfing,” he says. “But I am definitely a better motorcycle rider than I am a surfer.” A relative latecomer to international endurance racing, Vlcek did not start riding motorcycles until his mid-30s. Now, after competing in four of the biggest events, he’s contemplating his future racing options, but would like to compete in at least one more Dakar Rally. Rumor has it the 2021 race will wind through Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt, he says. “What could be better than finishing near the pyramids on your race bike?” —TIM HANSON | PHOTO BY MIC SMITH

Petr Angelo Vlcek AGE:

44.

Mount Pleasant by way of the Czech Republic. CLAIM TO FAME: Top c ­ ompetitor in grueling endurance motor­cycle races including the Dakar Rally. DAY JOB: Owner of Parrot Surf & Skate. WHY HE RIDES: “Riding motor­ cycles is the only time when I can completely forget about work and emails and phone calls. When I ride, I stay completely focused.” HOME TURF:

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020  | SCLIVING.COOP


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

B E AU FORT CVB

BY C E LE & LY N N S E LD O N  

  As longtime freelance travel journalists,

we spend much of our time visiting premier destinations far from home—​ seven ­continents and dozens of countries so far. But, as strong as our wanderlust is, we also have an equally strong affinity for the lure of home. Since 2018, home has been in Beaufort, a place we first fell in love with when the late Pat Conroy introduced us to the joys of the South Carolina Lowcountry—the smells of the pluff mud and briny breezes, the sounds of the oysters and crabs burrowing, the sights of the lush Lowcountry landscape. We have been happily ensconced in all things Beaufort ever since, and humbly offer our list of favorite places and experiences we hope you’ll enjoy on your next visit.   EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, please verify hours, prices and visitation policies for these establishments before traveling, and follow all public health recommendations. For the latest coronavirus updates, visit scdhec.gov/covid19.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2020   |   SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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“The Conroy Center has become an anchor to the Beaufort experience, in the same way Pat himself was.”

—JONATHAN HAUPT,

CONROY CENTER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PAT CONROY LITERARY CENTER A military brat, Pat Conroy came to Beaufort when he was a junior in high school. His adopted hometown later became the setting of many acclaimed books. Created shortly after Conroy’s death in 2016, the nonprofit Pat Conroy Literary Center honors and continues the author’s legacy as writer and educator for future generations, says Jonathan Haupt, the Conroy Center’s executive director. “The Center is in Beaufort because Pat told us to be here,” Haupt says. “In The Death of Santini he wrote, ‘I’ve come home to the place I was always writing about …. I’ve tried to make Beaufort, South Carolina, my own.’ The Conroy Center has become an anchor to the Beaufort experience, in the same way Pat himself was.” The interpretive center houses a treasure trove of memorabilia from Conroy’s Lowcountry life— high school yearbooks and photos of his time as a teacher on Daufuskie Island and as a cadet at The Citadel. There are handwritten manuscripts, his writing desk and photos of the film crews turning two of his bestsellers, The Great Santini and The Prince of Tides, into popular movies. At every turn, the center provides an immersion into the life of the literary legend, often told by docents who knew Conroy personally. “While many of our visitors come as a sort of a literary pilgrimage, some guests arrive in Beaufort for other reasons,” Haupt says. “And then we get to introduce these new readers to Pat Conroy.” The Pat Conroy Literary Center is located at 905 Port Republic Street and is open Thursday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., or by appointment. Admission is free; donations are gladly accepted. (843) 379‑7025; patconroyliterarycenter.org.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

SE LDO N I N K

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FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

B E AU FO RT I NTERN ATIO N A L FI LM FESTI VA L

“Films that inspire, enlighten, entertain, incite, infuriate, awaken and educate are a strong draw.” — RON TUCKER, CO-FOUNDER OF THE BEAUFORT FILM SOCIETY

BEAUFORT INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL For six days each February, our adopted hometown transforms into “Hollywood South” as the Beaufort International Film Festival (BIFF) brings in thousands of fi ­ lmmakers, cinematographers, screenwriters and other industry professionals. Known as the “Film Capital of the South” in the 1980s and 1990s, Beaufort was the set for dozens of films ­including The Big Chill, The Prince of Tides and Forrest Gump. South Carolina’s film industry waned in the early 2000s when other states and Canada began to offer big financial incentives to lure away productions. Local movie buffs Ron and Rebecca

Tucker created the Beaufort Film Society and launched the festival in 2007 hoping to win some of those productions back—and let locals and tourists alike mingle with some of the biggest names in film. “BIFF is a destination attraction,” says Ron Tucker. “For tourists, the cultural stimulation from a talented collection of artists who bring their films that inspire, enlighten, entertain, incite, infuriate, awaken and educate is a strong draw.” The 15th annual Beaufort International Film Festival is scheduled for February 16–21, 2021. Details and tickets can be purchased online at beaufortfilmfestival.com.

Who would have guessed that Beaufort was home to one of the world’s largest manufacturers of kazoos, the plastic musical instrument that utilizes a player’s voice to create a musical sound? Located in a 6,500-square-foot warehouse, Kazoobie Kazoos builds more than 1 million kazoos a year, along with other musical accessories. Daily tours are popular with tourists looking for a unique experience, and a visit includes a Kazoo Museum, two videos that highlight kazoo history and a demonstration of varied kazoos, including a wazoo, a kazoogle, a wazoogle, a kazobo and an electric kazoo (who knew?). Guests even get to make their own souvenir instrument. “Kazoos are a small way that we take a moment to just have some unadulterated fun,” says native Beaufortonian Stephen Murray, Kazoobie Kazoos president and CEO. “And, today, I think we need a little more silliness, we need a little more fun in the world.”

M I LTO N MO RRIS

KAZOOBIE KAZOO FACTORY, MUSEUM AND GIFT SHOP

“We need a little more fun in the world.” —STEPHEN MURRAY, PRESIDENT & CEO, KAZOOBIE KAZOOS

The Kazoobie Kazoo Factory is located at 12 John Galt Rd. and is open Monday–Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guided tours are at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 p.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. The museum and gift shop are free. Tours are $9 for adults, $7 for children and free for children 3 and under. (843) 982‑6387; thekazoofactory.com.

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19


M I LTON MORRIS

“Penn Center is one of the most significant historical and cultural African American Institutions in the nation.” —MARION BURNS, CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

M I LTO N M O RRIS

PENN CENTER Historic Penn Center (formerly Penn School) was founded in 1862 on St. Helena Island to serve as one of the nation’s first schools for former slaves. Designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1974 and now part of the Reconstruction Era National Historic Park, the center offers cultural enrichment programs, day care, and food distribution for local children in the Gullah Geechee community, as well as conference and educational programs for children, youths and adults. The Welcome Center and York W. Bailey Museum are packed with displays of historic documents, oral histories, handicrafts and artifacts from the Reconstruction and Civil Rights eras. Guided and self-guided walking tours allow and assist visitors to explore the site’s 21 buildings located among 20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

glorious live oak trees and along salt marsh creeks, ­including Gantt Cottage, where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. penned his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. “Penn Center is one of the most significant historical and cultural African American Institutions in the nation,” says Marion Burns, chair of the board of trustees and interim executive director. “I see Penn Center as ‘ground zero’ of the Reconstruction Era. A destination where educators will come and learn the true history of Reconstruction as it impacted the community at large, and use the information to educate students, which will change the dynamics of the nation.” Penn Center is located at 16 Penn Center Circle West on St. Helena Island and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For the administrative offices, call (843) 838‑2432. The York W. Bailey Museum is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults, $5 for students and free for kids age 5 and under. (843) 838‑7105; penncenter.com.


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

HUNTING ISLAND STATE PARK Just 15 miles east of Beaufort’s downtown waterfront, Hunting Island State Park is 5,000 acres of postcardperfect Lowcountry landscape—miles of unspoiled beaches, meandering waterways, salt marsh grasses and coastal wildlife. “You’ve got the Lowcountry look—with the live oaks and the hanging Spanish moss and the palm trees—with a pristine beach that also has a wild, almost Jurassic Park sort of feel,” says Park Ranger J.W. Weatherford. “In the forest, you almost expect a velociraptor to run across the road instead of a deer.” Although South Carolina has many lighthouses along its coast, the Hunting Island Lighthouse is the only accessible tower. With a reservation, guests can climb 130 feet to the top and get breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean and maritime forest from Edisto to Daufuskie. Our newest discovery at Hunting Island State Park is heading out by ferry to pristine St. Phillips Island, the former private retreat and vacation home for media mogul Ted Turner. Interpretive tours and unspoiled beaches await, and home rentals in Turner’s former beach house are coming soon. For Weatherford, his favorite thing is to head to the park’s Marsh Boardwalk. “The half-mile trail is surrounded by over 3,000 acres of salt marsh,” he says. “At sunset, it almost looks like the salt marsh is on fire with the colors reflecting off the water. It’s one of the best sunsets in the county.” Hunting Island State Park is located at 2555 Sea Island Parkway on Hunting Island and is open daily dawn to dusk. Admission is $8 for adults; $5 for South Carolina seniors; $4 for children age 6–15; and free for children 5 and under. Lighthouse admission is an additional $2 per person. St. Phillips tours are $45 for adults and $25 for children under 15. (843) 838‑4868; southcarolinaparks.com/hunting-island.

“At sunset, it almost looks like the salt marsh is on fire with the colors reflecting off the water.” CH A S E TO LER

— PARK RANGER J.W. WEATHERFORD

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21


FALL & WINTER TRAVEL ISSUE

OLD BULL TAVERN Dining is taken seriously in Beaufort and the options are plentiful, but for a true “insider” culinary experience, you can’t beat Old Bull Tavern. Located on a side street in the heart of the historic district, its unassuming entrance leads to a sprawling exposed-brick interior with three separate dining rooms, a convivial bar, a community table and a cozy seating area at the front. The feel is friendly, like meeting up with old friends, from the minute you walk in the door. And that’s exactly the ambiance the owners and staff are going for. “We try really hard to provide a welcoming and home-like environment,” says Stacie van Vulpen, Old Bull Tavern’s general manager. “We want everyone who comes in to feel comfortable and part of the family.” Owned and helmed by acclaimed chef John Marshall, the food is sophisticated, yet unpretentious, ranging from duck confit, house-made ricotta gnocchi, and braised lamb shank to creative woodfired pizzas. When Chef Marshall is asked, “What kind of food do you cook?” he replies, “Food like your grandma would make. If she’s a really good cook.” To pay homage to that standard, pictures of the staff’s grandmothers hang throughout the restaurant.

“We want everyone who comes in to feel comfortable and part of the family.” M I LTON MORRIS

—STACIE VAN VULPEN, GENERAL MANAGER, PICTURED WITH OWNER/ CHEF JOHN MARSHALL, LEFT, AND CO-OWNER OSCAR SALAS, RIGHT

Located at 205 West Street, Old Bull Tavern is open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday starting at 5 p.m. Reservations are highly recommended. (843) 379‑2855; oldbulltavern.com.

GET THERE

22

G RE ATER B E AU FO RT- P O RT ROYA L CO N V ENTI O N A N D V IS ITORS BU RE AU

Learn more about Beaufort and the Lowcountry region: The Beaufort Visitors Center is located at 713 Craven St. in the Historic Beaufort Arsenal. Built in 1798, it’s one of the oldest buildings open to the public in Beaufort and is also home to the Beaufort History Museum. (843) 525-8500; beaufortsc.org. South Carolina Lowcountry & Resort Islands Tourism Commission Visitors Center is found in the Frampton Plantation House at 1 Lowcountry Lane, just off Exit 33 on I-95. Open daily 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., the Visitors Center stocks tons of information on what to see, where to eat and where to stay in the region, along with Civil War earthworks in the backyard and a robust gift store for the perfect Lowcountry souvenir. (843) 717-3090; southcarolinalowcountry.com.

The Beaufort Arsenal was erected in 1798 and rebuilt in 1852. Originally home to the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery, it now houses the town’s visitor center and local history museum.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP


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|

SC   gardener

SEPTEMBER IN THE GARDEN n Ornamental grasses should be coming into their pretty prime now, with many showing off dazzling inflorescences that can be used to add extra visual gusto to indoor arrangements this fall.

Preserving the herb harvest

n Most lawn and garden centers now want to move out garden equipment to make room for holiday merchandise, so watch for sales on trimmers, tillers, mowers, weed eaters and other such outdoor handyman helpers.

BY L.A. JACKSON

L . A . JACKSO N

n Strange, cobweb-like tents beginning to show up in your trees? No, they are not from giant spiders. Instead, they are fall webworms (actually caterpillars), which love to munch the leaves from trees. An easy way to control them is to rip open the tents to expose the webworms to eager predators such as birds and wasps.

SAVE IT FOR LATER Savor the flavor of summer this winter. Herbs including basil, chives and mint can be harvested now and dried or frozen for later use. WITH AUTUMN APPROACHING THE

L . A . JACKSO N

TIP OF THE MONTH If you added lots of new plants to your garden this year, it means you probably also accumulated plenty of plastic pots over the growing season. Since they can be useful for future planting projects, to store these handy containers, soak them in a solution of one part bleach to nine parts water for at least an hour. Then, wash with a brush or sponge and wipe dry. This extra autumn chore will help assure that the containers will be free of overwintering diseases, fungi and bad bug eggs that could spoil your potting garden party next spring.

28

garden gate, it’s time to bid farewell to all the tasty goodies that have been coming out of the herb patch. Or is it? There are several ways to extend your herbal harvest through the winter, starting with what I call The Ice Cube Trick: Finely cut up some of the special herbs you have grown to add more zip to soups and stews, place them in an ice tray, fill with water and freeze. Simple. After the cubes solidify, put them in sealed bags so they won’t take on that nasty freezer taste while in cold storage. Then, when you are brewing a bubbly dish, just plop in a cube or two for extra flavoring. If you want to try your hand at drying herbs, tie up small bundles of picked herb sprigs that have been washed and patted dry, and hang them upside down in a warm spot indoors but not in direct sunlight. In about two weeks, check to see if they are crackling dry, and if so, take them down for storage. For go-go millennial types who like fast results, herbs can also be dried in the microwave oven. Place the herbs (with or without stems) between two paper towels and nuke ’em at full

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

power for one minute. Turn the leaves over and microwave for another minute or until the leaves turn brittle. To prevent fresh air from robbing flavor from dried herbs, store them in airtight jars or plastic bags. Light can also take some of the tasty twang from these saved seasonings, so tuck the containers in a cool, dark place such as a cabinet or food closet. Properly stored dried herbs will easily retain their tastiness until the garden gets back into full growing mode next spring. Some herbs—chives, basil, parsley, tarragon, fennel and dill, in particular— tend to hold their flavors better if they are frozen rather than dried. Pick and wash sprigs the same way you would if you were going to dry them, and then, either with or without stems, put the herbal helpers into airtight plastic bags or freezer containers and chuck ’em in the ol’ icebox. Then, when you need special seasonings for culinary creations this winter, just thaw them out or add frozen herbs while the meals are cooking, and enjoy! L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


|

SC   humor me

Belgium betrays waffles BY JAN A. IGOE

right into the world news. Instead of the usual depressing drivel, we’ll investigate breakthroughs in bug butter. You really need to know about that. This breaking-news detour has been brought to you by social distancing, which I’ve taken to new heights. Or widths. Since March, I’ve rarely left my cave, which led to a drastic shortage of raw material. When I do observe other humans, they’re universally grumpy and primed to explode at the least little thing. Anytime, anywhere. At the grocery store yesterday, I watched two fragile, cane-carrying grannies hurl bananas at each other for no apparent reason. (OK, that was funny.) But generally speaking, it’s been slim pickings. The most exciting thing that’s happened to me this year is getting approved for garbage pickup. My tall, dark, handsome receptacle and I took lots of selfies just in case anybody presumes my social life isn’t robust. Getting garbage pickup is a huge deal around here. The HOA doesn’t appreciate garbage trucks zipping around the hood at 5 mph. That’s fine, because most residents—for whatever misguided reason—enjoy filling their spotless cars with 30-gallon sacks of stinky garbage and hauling it to their very own stinky dump, especially on 95-degree days. Every Wednesday for five years, the garbage truck rolled right past my house. All the homes up the block were grandfathered in, so they get trash pickup. But if the truck stopped to pick mine up along the way, as the HOA explained it to me, every road would have to be dug up and repaved. I tried begging, pleading and offering to slip the driver cash, but newbies never get service without a legitimate medical reason. Luckily, throwing all that trash in the dumpster didn’t agree with my back, so now everybody’s happy. Including my chiropractor. WELL FIRST, LET’S DIVE

30

The chef told Reuters that the best way to handle anything you fear is to eat it. But getting back to bug butter: If you’re guessing that must be some magic ointment that repels bugs, it’s not. I’m talking about the new waffle ingredient that repels people. According to Reuters, Belgian scientists are working on ways to replace milk fat with bug fat, which offers “high levels of protein, vitamins, fiber and minerals.” The researchers, who somehow escaped the lab and made their way into the kitchen, started by soaking fly larva in water. They blended that into a maggot mousse vile enough to make anyone gag—even people who live nowhere near Belgium, like in Montana. Waffles are not the only victims. Bug goop might find its way into cakes and cookies, too. Soon, grams of maggots per serving will be listed on the label to help us meet our recommended daily requirement.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  SEPTEMBER 2020 | SCLIVING.COOP

Meanwhile, in another kitchen somewhere in Hanoi, there’s a chef who hopes to lift somber spirits with his new offering: corona burgers. This is not a pairing of the regrettably named beer and some humdrum ­hamburger. No, Chef Hoang Tung dyes his burger buns custom ogregreen. Each bun has tiny, sculpted appendages that look just like the virus waving at you from under a microscope. Yum! The chef told Reuters that the best way to handle anything you fear is to eat it. That might just be kitchen humor, but I’d wager there’s a spider souffle and a snake stew special somewhere on the menu. The good news is, if you don’t like the food, I know a great place to dump it. There’s plenty of room next to the Belgian waffles. JAN A. IGOE is not adventurous when it comes to food. Burgers and waffles have lost their appeal and bananas might be lethal weapons. Eat with caution and stay healthy. Drop her a line at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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10 Masks per Pack

$

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

Less Than 50¢ Per Mask

SUPER COUPON

Use Online & In-Store

*71456834* LIMIT 1 - Exp. 10/26/20* 71456834

1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 10/26/20.

Compare to Mibro 426920 $64.99 ITEM 60658 97711 shown

Use Online & In-Store

*71456980* LIMIT 4 - Exp. 10/26/20* 71456980

Compare to Honda GX200UT2QX2 $329.99

Save $ 230

ITEM 60363/69730 shown ITEM 68121/69727 CALIFORNIA ONLY

Use Online & In-Store

*71457332* LIMIT 1 - Exp. 10/26/20* 71457332

Pricing, promotions, and availability may vary by location and at www.harborfreight.com and are subject to change without notice. We reserve the right to limit quantities. “Compare to” advertised price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. Although we make every effort to assure that our prices and products are advertised as accurately as possible, we are only human and in the event an error is made, we reserve the right to correct it.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living September 2020  

Explore the heart of the Lowcountry with recommendations on where to go and what to do from the people who call Beaufort home.

South Carolina Living September 2020  

Explore the heart of the Lowcountry with recommendations on where to go and what to do from the people who call Beaufort home.

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