__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

CHANGE OUT

FAL & WINTLER TRAVEL GUIDE

WORLD

CLASS

Great works of art are closer than you realize SC R E C I PE

Satisfying sandwiches SEPTEMBER 2016

SC G A R D E N E R

A bounty of butterflies


TOUCHSTONEENERGY.COM

FOCUSED ON YOUR STREET. NOT WALL STREET. Think of your not-for-profit Touchstone Energy cooperative as your very own local energy advisor. After all, we’re owned by you and the other members in our community, which means you’ll always have a say in how your co-op runs. To learn more, visit TouchstoneEnergy.com.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.


THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 70 • No. 9 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 573,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

FEATURE

SEPTEMBER 2016 • VOLUME 70, NUMBER 9

14 Masterpieces

in our backyard Explore amazing collections of world-class art without leaving South Carolina.

JASPER JOHNS (1930–), FLAGS 1, 1973, SILKSCREEN ON PAPER, ART ©JASPER JOHNS/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK, NY

Diane Veto Parham

FALL WINTE&R TRAVEL GUIDE

Flags 1, an iconic modern work from South Carolina’s own Jasper Johns, is part of the collection at the Greenville County Museum of Art.

Susan Collins

IN A $10 0 GI FT CA

Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars CONTRIBUTORS

Ron Aiken, Abby Berry, Mike Couick, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Patrick Keegan, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, S. Cory Tanner PUBLISHER

RD

W ader Reply Sign up today for our Re u could win a yo and s, ake pst ee Travel Sw to page 24 for a $100 Visa gift card. Turn ister online at reg mail‑in entry form, or er-reply. SCLiving.coop/read

4 CO-OP CONNECTION

Lou Green ADVERTISING

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 6. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor. is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network. SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

6 ON THE AGENDA

Experience South Carolina history at Colonial Times: A Day to Remember. Plus: Don’t fall victim to common energy myths that can drive up your utility bills.

28 Super sammies

Wrap your hands around four delicious restaurant-style sandwiches you can make right in your own kitchen. GARDENER

30 Bring butterflies

to your garden

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Game changers, part 2

Learn how efficient energy-storage systems will change everything we know about the power grid. ENERGY Q&A

12 Is a geothermal heat

pump right for you?

For homeowners who can afford the upfront costs, geothermal heat pumps offer high-efficiency heating and cooling.

WORLD

CLASS

Great works of art are closer than you realize SC R E C I PE

Satisfying sandwiches SC G A R D E N E R

SEPTEMBER 2016

30

RECIPE

FALL & WINTER TRAVEL GUIDE

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

SC LIFE

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY BY S. CORY TANNER

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

Cooperative news

A bounty of butterflies

The Museum & Gallery at Bob Jones University invites guests to linger and admire centuries-old masterpieces. Photo by Milton Morris.

Turn your landscape into a butterfly oasis with a selection of plants that feed the insects at all life stages. CHEF’S CHOICE

32 Farm-fresh food and

happy customers

Grits & Groceries put Saylors Crossroads on the culinary map with Southern cooking that’s always worth the drive.

6

HUMOR ME

38 Don’t let the dust mites bite Caught between the threat of insect invaders and the insanity of the mattress superstore, our humor columnist isn’t getting much sleep these days.

34 MARKETPLACE 36 SC EVENTS ON

WEB EDITOR

GLE AS

Andrew Chapman

L A R RY

PRODUCTION


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 6 page 3

Highlights

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

Colonial Times: A Day to Remember

For details, visit colonialtimes.us or call (803) 979-9776.

SEPTEMBER 22–24

Euphoria

Tasting samples and cooking demos. Food truck rodeos and outdoor dinners. Live music in intimate cafes and concerts in a baseball park. If you’re a foodie and a music fan, you’ll be euphoric at this still-growing festival, with 30-plus events over four days in downtown Greenville. Events kick off Thursday and close Sunday with a barbecue brunch and supper with festival chefs.

OCTOBER 6–8

Carolina Downhome Blues Festival

For details, visit euphoriagreenville.com or call (864) 233-5663.

SEPTEMBER 17

COURTESY OF HISTORIC COLUMBIA

Get a double helping of celebration at this year’s festival honoring African-American history and culture in downtown Columbia. The free day of outdoor fun includes artisans, dance, stand-up comedy, live music, storytellers and family games, plus tours of the historic Mann-Simons house, which will welcome visitors in a grand reopening during the festival after a year of renovations. For details, visit historiccolumbia.org/jubilee or call (803) 252-1770, ext. 23.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

MICHAEL WEINTROB

Jubilee: Festival of Heritage

Ain’t nothin’ but the blues happening at the 20th anniversary of this Camden event, a musical crawl through town with a variety of blues styles and musicians. The Fine Arts Center of Kershaw County has lined up legendary S.C. blues guitarist Drink Small, multi-instrumentalist/singer Paul Oscher and Blues Hall of Famer Joe Louis Walker (left). Don’t miss Sauce Boss, who cooks up a pot of gumbo for the audience during his show. For details, visit fineartscenter.org/events or call (803) 425-7676.

OCTOBER 14–16

South Carolina Jazz Festival

The great jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie loved Cheraw, and his hometown still loves him right back every October with a festival that celebrates his style of music. Bebop through evening jazz crawls with regional musicians, catch concerts with trumpeter Mark Rapp or vocalist Jane Monheit, and worship at a Sunday jazz mass. For details, visit scjazzfestival.com or call (843) 537-8420, ext. 12.

LARRY GLEASON

Yes, people really cooked animals over real fire and made their own toys, clothes, butter and whatever else they needed in the backwoods of South Carolina hundreds of years ago. Kids will discover a Colonial world gone by at North Augusta’s Living History Park, meet the Rat Catcher, see an 18th-century circus with a fire-breathing performer, practice with a militia and watch leeks in action at the apothecary shop.

OCTOBER 15–16


EMAIL COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND STORY SUGGESTIONS TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

O N LY O N

SCLiving.coop BONUS VIDEO CARROLL FOSTER

During Hilton Head’s classic meet, this 1920 Anderson convertible roadster, owned by S.C. collector Paul Ianuario Sr., will become just the 14th car added to the National Historic Vehicle Register.

Made in Dixie

Celebrating 100 years of S.C. automotive history POP QUIZ: Name the first company to manufacture automobiles in South Carolina. If you answered BMW or Volvo, you’re off by several decades. The correct answer is Anderson Motor Company. From 1916 to 1925, the Rock Hill manufacturer produced luxurious, colorful alternatives to Henry Ford’s mass-­produced, all-black Model T. The nameplate of every Anderson proudly proclaimed, “A little bit higher in price, but made in Dixie.” While the company built more than 5,500 cars before closing its doors, only a dozen Anderson vehicles remain worldwide. Fortunately for vintage car buffs, a collection of these made-in-S.C. automobiles will be on display Nov. 4–6 at the Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival & Concours d’Elegance. “We’re proud to pay tribute to a century of South Carolina automotive heritage this year with a spotlight on these rare GET MORE The Hilton Anderson Motor Company automobiles,” says Head Island Motoring festival president Carolyn Vanagel. Festival & Concours d’Elegance As part of the celebration, a 1920 Anderson takes place Nov. 4–6 at Port Royal convertible roadster owned by Laurens Electric Golf Club. For more informaCooperative member Paul Ianuario Sr. will be added tion, visit hhiconcours.com. Can’t to the National Historic Vehicle Register—a rare make it to the festival? The State Museum in Columbia (scmuseum. honor bestowed on just 13 other cars. org) has a 1922 Anderson touring “It’s the only unrestored Anderson, it’s the car on permanent display, and oldest drivable Anderson and it’s the only convertthe Museum of York County ible roadster, which was the high-water mark of (chmuseums.org/myco) has its the Anderson Motor Company,” Ianuario says with own 1921 Anderson showcased pride. “It was a custom-designed, patented body at the Cotton Factory Plaza in style—no other company built one like it.” downtown Rock Hill. Led by businessman John Gary Anderson, Anderson Motor Company produced cars with elegant hardwood trim and premium leather seats. Some models featured electric windshield wipers, power convertible roofs and floor-mounted headlight-dimmer switches decades before the competition, but the price of all that innovation was part of the company’s undoing, Ianuario says. “A cheap Anderson was in the neighborhood of $2,000, and you could buy a Model T Ford for $400 or less,” he says. “Anderson refused to compromise his standards of workmanship or the quality of the materials he used, and, hence, he could never become competitive.”

Paninis without the press. No special equipment needed; Chef Belinda shows you how to make a hot pressed sandwich with the tools you’ve got in your home kitchen. Watch the video online at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

BONUS

ARTICLE

Breakfast made easy. Wake up to handy devices that make morning meal prep a little more interesting.

I NTERACTIVE FEATURE Register to win a $100 gift card. Visit SCliving.coop/reader-reply to register for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 gift card. One lucky reader’s name will be drawn at random from all eligible entries received by Sept. 30.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK Join us as we celebrate all that’s great about life in South Carolina. Add your voice to the ­conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


On the Agenda

energy

EFFICIENCYtip  

Consider insulating your water-heater tank, which could reduce standby heat losses by 25 to 45 percent and save you about 4 to 9 percent in water-heating costs. You can find precut jackets or blankets available from around $20. SOURCE: ENERGY.GOV

Don’t fall for common energy myths eyesight, cracking knuckles leads to arthritis, watching too much TV harms vision. We’ve all heard old wives’ tales, but do you know the truth behind these energy myths?

EATING CARROTS IMPROVES

MYTH: The higher the thermostat setting, the faster the home will heat (or cool)

Raising the thermostat to 85 degrees in a chilly room will not heat the room more quickly. Thermostats direct a home’s HVAC system to heat or cool to a set temperature. Drastically adjusting the setting will not affect how quickly you feel warmer or cooler. The Department of Energy recommends setting

S.C.RAMBLE! BY CHARLES JOYNER, SEE ANSWER ON PAGE 35

Joseph Hayne Rainey of Georgetown was the first _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ c a e m s c l - c b r e m s c l

elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. His term ran from 1870 to 1879. Use the capital letters in the code key C A E F I M N R means at right to fill in the blanks above. s c r a m b l e

SNIFFING

OUT DRUGS

Zip lines across S.C. SC R E C I PE

MYTH: Ceiling fans keep your home cool while you’re away

Ceiling fans cool people, not rooms. Running a ceiling fan in an empty room only adds to electricity use. Turn fans off when you’re away.

If you want to peek at what’s baking without wasting energy, do it through the window in the oven door.

Reducing my energy use is too expensive

MYTH:

Reducing energy doesn’t require spending big bucks on new, more-efficient appliances or remodeling an older home. Small changes, such as turning off lights when not in use, sealing air leaks and using a programmable thermostat, can reduce energy consumption. —ABBY BERRY

GET MORE Visit SCLiving.coop’s featured video section for more myth-busting energy tips.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after.

Summer sides

JUNE 2016

It’s ­tempting to check the progress of that dish in the oven, but opening the oven door wastes energy. When you open the door, oven temperature drops by as much as 25 degrees, delaying baking and costing you money. Use the oven light instead.

SALUTING CANINE COPS

I enjoyed your article “A nose for trouble” in the June 2016 issue of South Carolina Living, highlighting the K-9 Units of the Myrtle Beach Police Department and the Horry County Police Department. The article was well written and gave some much-needed positive media exposure for the hard work done by law enforcement in the area and the K-9 officers and their partners. I’ve had several of our local residents inquire as to why the Surfside Beach Police Department’s K-9 Unit was not highlighted as well. I’m sure that time was of the essence, and I’m glad that these two departments were able to grab the positive publicity. I do wish that other departments that serve the Horry Electric Cooperative area, including ours, had been included in your article. Our agency has two K-9 teams providing services 365 days a year. Our program is unique in that our K-9 teams are not a stand-alone unit. Our teams work standard call rotation and perform their K-9 tasks, as well as continuing to answer calls for service.

—LT. KENNETH HOFMANN, SURFSIDE BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT

8

MYTH: Opening the oven door to check on a dish doesn’t really waste energy

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Furry officers think the job is a game

SC TR AV E LS

thermostats to 78 degrees during summer months and 68 degrees in the winter.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Minor

AM Major

SEPTEMBER

Minor

PM Major

17 7:22 1:07 7:37 1:22 18 8:07 1:37 2:07 7:52 19 8:52 2:22 2:37 8:22 20 10:07 3:22 3:22 9:07 21 11:22 4:07 4:07 9:37 22 — 5:22 1:22 10:37 23 — 6:52 12:22 3:22 24 — 8:22 9:52 4:22 25 2:22 9:37 10:37 4:52 26 3:37 10:22 11:07 5:22 27 4:22 11:07 11:37 5:37 28 5:22 11:37 12:07 5:52 29 — 5:52 12:22 12:07 30 — 6:37 6:37 12:37

Minor

AM Major

OCTOBER

Minor

PM Major

1 — 7:07 1:07 6:52 2 7:52 1:22 1:22 7:07 3 8:22 1:52 1:52 7:37 4 9:07 2:22 2:22 7:52 5 10:07 2:52 2:52 8:07 6 11:07 3:22 3:37 8:22 7 — 4:22 8:37 1:07 8 — 5:22 9:22 2:37 9 — 6:52 9:22 3:22 10 12:52 8:22 9:52 3:52 11 2:52 9:22 10:22 4:22 12 3:52 10:22 10:52 4:52 13 4:52 11:07 5:22 11:22 14 11:52 5:37 5:52 12:07 15 — 6:37 12:22 12:37 16 — 7:22 1:07 6:52


HURRY!—55% TAX CREDIT EXPIRES SOON

FIND YOUR BURIED TREASURE ROCK HILL, S.C.

WHAT KEEPS WAYNE SMILING? THE TREASURE IN HIS YARD How did you learn about WaterFurnace?

THE MAGIC ISN’T ALWAYS on THE FIELD. Football is here again! While you treasure your favorite team for the magic they create on the field, sometimes the real magic is hidden just out of sight. A WaterFurnace geothermal comfort system taps into the stored solar energy just below the surface of the earth to provide savings of up to 70% on heating, cooling, and hot water. Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer to learn how geothermal can be a game changer for your home and get up to $2000 in instant rebates on select packages during our Geothermal Upgrade Event.*

I was visiting relatives up North about 10 years earlier. They had a geothermal system, and I was amazed. I looked into the functionality here in the South and decided to go GEO when I did an 1,800-square-foot addition to my home.

Why did you choose a geothermal system? It was a no-brainer after all the research concluded that the constant temperature of the earth could be tapped for heating and cooling. Why not use a renewable source of energy that is right in your own backyard?

Has your power bill shown a savings? After the addition in 2011, which almost doubled the square footage of my home, my power bill is approximately half of what it was prior to the addition.

What are your favorite features? waterfurnace.com/football

Would you recommend a WaterFurnace system to your friends and family?

YOUR LOCAL WATERFURNACE DEALERS

Rock Hill/Charlotte

PANTHER HEATING & COOLING, INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (803) 792-0788 • pantherhvac.com

Myrtle Beach/Georgetown

WACCAMAW HEATING & COOLING GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 235-1158 • waccamawgeo.com

Columbia

CASSELL BROTHERS HEATING & COOLING (803) 932-6003 • cassellbros.com

Upstate

CAROLINA HEATING SERVICE INC. GeoPro Master Dealer (864) 412-2651 • carolinaheating.com

Charleston

BERKELEY HEATING & AIR GeoPro Master Dealer (843) 779-3551 • berkeleyheating.com WaterFurnace is a registered trademark of WaterFurnace International, Inc. *Rebate amounts vary on package purchased. Contact your dealer about which rebate is right for you. Promotion ends December 9th, 2016.

There is never any noise from an external unit going on and off. The fact is, you will probably never hear the unit at all. Probably the most significant and obvious feature is that, during the heating season, you can really feel the heat, and it is instantaneous.

I do highly recommend WaterFurnace to everyone. The fact is that I have had potential buyers stop by for a visit to witness the operation of my GEO. The price may be a factor; however, I would say for folks to do their homework and look at the dividends that the WaterFurnace pays for years to come.

How did you select your contractor? Easy. My experience in the past with Panther Heating and Cooling makes that simple. The job is not finished until you (the client) are completely satisfied. I liked the experience and track record that Panther has, and they are the leader in my area for geothermal systems.

Contact your local WaterFurnace dealer today to learn how you can discover treasure in your backyard.

visit waterfurnace.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


Dialogue

Game changers, part 2 IN MY PREVIOUS COLUMN, WE TALKED ABOUT

MIKE COUICK

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina

10

sweeping changes in the utility business model pushed forward by new technologies. This month, I want to focus on one area of innovation with the potential to change how we deliver electricity to your home or business— energy storage. Electricity is a unique product that is consumed the moment it is produced, and there must always be enough of it flowing through our power lines to ensure that every time a member throws a switch, the lights come on. But what if we could capture the electricity generated by power plants when demand for electricity (and thus the cost of producing it) is low, then release it when consumers need it most? Storing large amounts of energy has always been a challenge, often requiring expensive infrastructure. Consider the most common energy-storage system in use for decades, the hydroelectric dam. A variation of the typical hydroelectric dam is known as pumped hydro. During times when electricity use is low, pumps lift water into holding tanks or reservoirs. The contained water holds a large amount of stored energy. When consumers need more power, the water is released to turn generators, which convert the stored energy into electricity. Another tried-and-true form of energy storage in use across South Carolina is the high-­capacity electric-resistance water heater. More than 120,000 co-op-served homes have water heaters equipped with load-control switches. During periods of high demand for electricity, co-ops temporarily cut power to these devices so there’s more to go around. The homeowners who volunteer for load-control programs don’t know when the electricity is cut, because the insulated tanks hold enough hot water to meet a family’s needs for the control period. In effect, each water heater becomes a thermal battery, storing energy in the form of hot water. While these time-tested storage methods will continue to be a part of our energy future, the

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

search is on for additional technologies to more efficiently manage the distribution of electricity. Scientists and engineers tell us to expect multiple breakthroughs in energy-storage solutions in the coming years, including technologies that will make renewable energy sources like wind and photovoltaic solar farms far more practical than they are today. Researchers across the globe are racing to improve one such form of energy storage— rechargeable batteries. Consumers can now buy large, wall-mounted, lithium-ion battery systems (the same kind of battery found in laptops and cellphones) capable of supplying much of a family’s needs for short periods of time. Engineers are studying other electrochemical battery technologies, with dreams of building massive battery systems that could back up an entire substation or power a neighborhood during emergency outages. Other ideas in development include using superconducting magnets to store energy in magnetic fields and solar-thermal systems that trap the heat of concentrated sunlight in molten salts. These salts are highly efficient at retaining the heat until it’s needed to make steam and drive generators at power plants. It may sound like so much science fiction, but, behind each of these experimental systems, there’s very real research, not to mention sizable investments. The emerging energy-­storage market, fueled in large part by the growing success of renewable-energy production, has grown from a $200 million industry in 2012 to a projected $19 billion industry by 2017. Studying the game-changing potential of new energy-storage systems is another challenge that your electric cooperative is poised to meet. As always, our guiding principle will be finding solutions that work best for our members.


EmPowering new business

Before the first aircraft flew, and before people showed up to their new job, Santee Cooper helped power Executive HeliJet’s expansion to Myrtle Beach, creating a $1 million economic partnership for South Carolina.

Since 1988, we’ve been a driving force behind more than $11 billion in industrial investments that have produced over 67,000 new jobs. And we’re not slowing down. With our low-cost, reliable power, creative incentive packages and diverse property portfolio, Santee Cooper, working with the South Carolina Power Team and the state's electric cooperatives, continues to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

POWERING SOUTH CAROLINA

www.santeecooper.com/SL • scpowerteam.com


EnergyQ&A

BY PATRICK KEEGAN

Q

I am planning to replace my current heating system with a geo­thermal heat pump. It is comparatively pricey, but it seems like an efficient option, and I like that it includes air conditioning. Is this a good idea?

A

In most areas of the U.S., space heating and cooling account for a large percentage of homeenergy use, so upgrading to a more efficient HVAC system is a great way to reduce your monthly energy bill. A geothermal heat pump, also known as a ground-source heat pump, is among the most efficient types of heating and cooling systems you can install. Even when it is extremely hot or cold outside, the temperature a few feet below ground remains relatively constant and moderate. A geothermal heat-pump system uses this constant ground temperature to heat and cool your home. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, geothermal heat pumps use up to 44 percent less energy than traditional air-source heat pumps and up to 72 percent less energy than

GetMore Visit SCLiving.coop/energy for more on geothermal heat pumps. Installing a geothermal heat pump – Discover whether your home may be a candidate for these expensive, yet highly efficient, systems. Blowing hot and cold – Technology and tax breaks make heat pumps an attractive option for heating and cooling S.C. homes. Give your house an energy upgrade – When you renovate, consider replacing HVAC systems for maximum energy savings.

12

electric-resistance heaters combined with standard air conditioners. A geothermal heatpump system has three A horizontal loop field can be less expensive than vertical drilling but main components: requires more space, as shown at this installation at an electric co-op. XXA collector, or loop pump and then placed at least field, which is in the ground and eight feet below the surface of cycles a liquid, like antifreeze, the water. This option can be the through dense, plastic tubing lowest cost. XXA heat pump in your home Geothermal systems typically cost XXA duct system that distributes more than other heating systems, heated or cooled air throughout largely because of the collector and your home During winter, the collector absorbs the associated digging or drilling, but their high efficiency can help reduce the heat stored in the ground, and the payback time. The cost will vary the liquid carries that heat to the based on whether new ductwork is heat pump, which concentrates it and needed and the type of collector you blows it into the ductwork, warming install, among other factors. Incentives your home. In the summer, the heat are available for those who install pump extracts heat from the home qualified geothermal heat pumps— and transfers it to the cooler ground. The collector can be set up in one most notably, a 30 percent federal tax of three ways: credit for installing an Energy Starrated system before the end of 2016. XXHorizontal system: Plastic tubing is So, if your system and installation cost placed in trenches four to six feet $20,000, you could take $6,000 off below the ground surface. This your federal tax bill. South Carolina is system works well for homes or offering a 25 percent state tax credit businesses with sufficient available on geothermal equipment and installand, as it may require up to 400 feet of trenches. lation through Dec. 31, 2018. For those with high heating and XXVertical system: If the site doesn’t cooling bills, an efficient geothermal have space for a horizontal system, system is a good option to consider. a collector can be placed vertically. People building new homes should A drill digs 100 to 400 feet below also consider, before construction, the surface and places the tubing. whether to install a geothermal heat This system can be more costly pump. The system can be included in but will have less impact on existing landscaping and can be used on the mortgage, and installing it before the home is completed means no dissmaller lots. XXPond system: For homes with ruption to your landscaping. access to a pond or lake, a pond Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina system (also called a water-source Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC heat pump) may be possible. The 29033, email energyqa@scliving.coop or fax (803) 739-3041. loop field is connected to the heat

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

FEDERATED RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION (MINNESOTA)

Is a geothermal heat pump right for you?


W H AT T O O K Y O U A L I F E T I M E TO LEARN CAN BE LOST IN MINUTES.

NEED A ROOF? WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED 100% Financing W.A.C. No Money Down Free Estimates

WITH A STROKE, TIME LOST IS BRAIN LOST.

Le arn the warning signs at StrokeAssociation.org or 1-888-4-STROKE. AffordableMetalRoofingCarolinas.com

800.505.3241

©2004 American Heart Association Made possible in part by a generous grant from The Bugher Foundation.

NOTE TO PUB: DO NOT PRINT INFO BELOW, FOR ID ONLY. NO ALTERING OF AD COUNCIL PSAs. American Stroke Association - Magazine - (4 5/8 x 4 7/8) B&W - ASNYR2-N-01065-U “Lifetime” 110 line screen

digital files at Schawk: (212) 689-8585 Ref#: 211217

$

206,990

The Worthington

2923 sq ft

New Homes Built On Your Land Visit or Contact us:

Charleston (843) 879-8661 Greenville (864) 881-1568 Augusta (706) 680-6568

www.Lockridgehomes.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

13


The dramatic Procession to Calvary, a masterpiece by Renaissance artist Giovanni Antonio Bazzi (Il Sodoma), is among the extraordinary works of art on display at the M&G at Bob Jones University.

14

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


MASTERPIECES in our backyard

THE MUSEUM & GALLERY AT BOB JONES UNIVERSITY important, something for the ages. He needs help. Hence, the small angel by his side. The two of them focus intently on each other’s faces, “Art doesn’t have to be difficult,” Erin Jones reassures me as we begin concentrating on the task at hand, and a walk-through tour of the astoundMatthew’s quill is poised to take down the imparted words of divine wisdom. ing collection of old European master­works on the Bob Jones I am so captivated by this painting, University campus. At the moment, I keep turning back to look again. The I’m not so sure about that. Simply expression on Matthew’s face, gentle standing in the lobby, with its and attentive, makes me feel I can soaring ceilings and huge tapestries almost read his mood. I like how the dwarfing the people below, hints that light bounces off Matthew’s tousled I may be in over my head. white hair and beard and the angel’s But Jones, director of the M&G at golden curls. The scene seems to Bob Jones, guides me into the first invite me in, as if I had pulled up a St. Matthew is part of Guido Reni’s Four gallery and begins to prove her point. chair to be part of this moment of Evangelists series. BJU has the world’s only known complete set of these paintings. By design, the BJU exhibits are ­biblical history. staged to help visitors find meaning This portrait of the Gospel writer, in what they see. The collection is St. Matthew, painted by the 17th-­ largely sacred art; this first small century Italian artist Guido Reni, hangs gallery, housing Italian religious paintat the Vatican in Rome. But that’s not where I’m looking at it. This version, ings from the 14th century, mimics the dim, stone interior of a church also a Reni masterpiece, is on exhibit sanctuary, where paintings like these every day at a museum in Greenville— BY DIANE VETO PARHAM would originally have been displayed. the Museum & Gallery at Bob Jones “We don’t want a stark, white experience of paintings University. And it’s not alone. The M&G collection houses on a wall,” Jones says. “If you walked into an old European hundreds more impressive artworks, including centuries-old cathedral, it might feel like this.” masterpieces that have been showcased in some of the great Centuries ago, these paintings were like illustrated museums around the world. r ­ eligious lessons for the illiterate masses, “just like we use Turns out, the city of Greenville is home to some pretty picture books to teach children,” she says. The church amazing visual treasures in the collections at the M&G and c ­ ommissioned artists to paint scenes that told stories the Greenville County Museum of Art. Curious to learn from Scripture, depicted heroic acts of saints or illustrated more, I ventured to the Upstate to explore this cache of church doctrine. So the images in the paintings needed  l l world-class art, right here in our own backyard. MATTHEW IS WRITING SOMETHING

FROM THE BOB JONES UNIVERSITY COLLECTION

Art through the ages

Explore South Carolina’s amazing wealth of world‑class art

MILTON MORRIS

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


A popular attraction for many gallery visitors, Madonna and Child with an Angel (Madonna of the Magnificat) by Sandro Botticelli is featured in the tondo room at M&G at Bob Jones University.

FRO

N E S UN I V E R S I T Y CO L L EC T E BO B JO M TH ION

to be familiar and ­easily recognizable to anyone. As a l­iterate adult who’s been to Sunday school, I’m feeling more confident as Jones talks me through Gerini’s Madonna and Child with Saints. Mary and the infant Jesus are common subject matter here, as you’d imagine. Most often, you’ll find them at the center of a painting, with Mary usually robed in colors of blue (symbolizing heaven, peace, sorrow), white (purity) and red (love or passion). From gallery to gallery, those colors repeat where Mary is depicted; the message keeps coming through. Stories start to leap out from the paintings. Saints may be depicted with some identifying feature, such as St. Francis of Assisi’s stigmata or St. Bartholomew with a knife, representing the tool by which he was skinned alive and martyred. “Things like that are gruesome to us today, but when we think about that time, beauty was hard to come by,” Jones says, putting the period art in context. “The church was the one place of hope, a place they could see somebody whose

life was inspiring to them.” A ­surprising feature of this ­collection of more than 400 paintings by old masters, plus objects of art and antiquities from around the globe, is that it could not be replicated today. It so happened that Dr. Bob Jones Jr., a lover of the arts and BJU president through the mid-1900s, began amassing works of Baroque and other old-world art at a period when those particular pieces were out of favor. His modest collection that began with 20 to 40 paintings has mushroomed to become known worldwide as one of the most important collections revealing the evolution of Western art through the ages, Jones says. As we meander through the 20-plus galleries in the BJU campus museum, traveling forward in time, we’re seeing the arc of history reflected in paintings by famed artists from across Europe. Here’s a highlight in the museum’s tondo gallery (a tondo, I learn, is simply a round ­painting):

FROM THE BOB JONES UNIVERSITY COLLECTION

Looking closer at art

X-rays of The Visit of the Queen of Sheba to Solomon by Jacopo Robusti (Il Tintoretto) revealed that the artist painted over one man and replaced him with the man in a spotted robe to the right of the throne. Traces of a headdress are still visible above the man’s head.

16

Ever wonder what the pros see when they look at a work of art? You can pick up some clues at M&G at Heritage Green, M&G’s educational satellite museum in downtown Greenville. Since 2008, BJU has offered special themed exhibits at this location. The current exhibit, “The Art of Sleuthing,” aims to give viewers a behind-thescenes—and, often, behind the paintings—look at art. It invites guests to pick up a magnifying glass and peer at the things art historians, conservators and even forgers see when they examine a painting. Here, you can discover how the experts know who really painted a particular work, what may be hidden behind layers of old paint and how to track a painting’s history of owners and travels. You’ll see how, sometimes, even the experts get fooled and how, when they get it right, it can mean a happy ending, like the return of Nazi-looted art to its true owners. “We hope it shows that there are more ways than one to enjoy art,” says Erin Jones, director of the M&G. “You just have to have a little bit of curiosity to ask questions and find answers.”

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


Nearly every gallery at BJU is home to yet another I-can’t-believe-thislives-in-Greenville attraction.

FROM THE BOB JONES UNIVERSITY COLLECTION

The Holy Family in the Carpenter Shop by Gerrit van Honthorst is one of BJU’s most popular paintings. The artist’s nickname, Gherardo delle Notti, translates as Gerard of the Night Scenes.

collection, a niche strength here is the collection of paintings by northern European followers of Italian artist Caravaggio, who played with innovations in light and shadow and who influenced a great many painters, Jones says. A M&G painting by one of his followers, The Holy Family in the Carpenter Shop by Honthorst, has been loaned to the Uffizi museum in Florence, Italy, and “is one of our guests’ all-time favorites—they flock to it,” she says. “It represents family values— you see a hard-working man, you see the tools of the time period, and you see a family together.” All in all, it’s a lot to take in. Even as a rookie art admirer, I end my tour awestruck and understanding why, as Jones tells me, for anyone interested in art history, “it’s just known that you need to get here.” GREENVILLE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

See what you see

GREENVILLE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

a masterwork by the celebrated Renaissance artist Botticelli, Madonna and Child with an Angel. This is one of BJU’s treasured mustsees; many ­visitors make a beeline for it. “We have the largest collection of tondo paintings in the United States,” Jones notes, including one, The Madonna of the Lake, that was once owned by Napoleon and Josephine Bonaparte of France. Now we arrive at my personal favorite​ —Reni’s St. Matthew. Amazing as it is on its own, it also happens to be part of the world’s only known set of Reni paintings of the four biblical gospel writers, and all four reside at BJU. It’s worth pausing here to appreciate Reni’s inclusion of each writer’s symbolic creature, embedded somewhere in each painting. Matthew’s companion, for example, is the angel helping him enumerate Jesus’ biblical lineage. Peer closely at the other three in the set, and you’ll find Mark’s symbolic lion, Luke’s ox (look carefully—it’s hard to see) and John’s eagle. The “first,” “only” and “most” highlights of BJU’s collection go on and on. Nearly every gallery is home to yet another I-can’t-believe-this-lives-in-Greenville attraction. Among them: Head of Christ, a painting loaned to the Louvre in 2011 for a special exhibition on Rembrandt. This particular piece, painted by a student in Rembrandt’s studio, reflects a pioneering choice by the great Dutch Baroque artist—he was the first to use a Jewish model in painting depictions of Christ.  Although Baroque artists are the stars of BJU’s

The modern, angular architecture of the Greenville County Museum of Art tells me right away I’m in for an entirely different art experience. Bright, high-ceilinged galleries and clean, white walls are the display spaces here for an extensive collection of American art, including pieces with specific ties to South Carolina and the South. But jobs one and two here are to lay eyes on GCMA’s pride and joy—collections of works by Jasper Johns and Andrew Wyeth. Each of these artists has been tagged with terms like “iconic” and “groundbreaking,” and Johns, who spent his growing-up years in South Carolina, is still hailed as “the world’s most critically acclaimed living artist.” Both amassed impressive bodies of work—so much so that it’s a bonanza to find these two collections under one Greenville roof. How’d that happen? “Very determined, diligent collecting over a long period of time,” supported by community donors, says Paula Angermeier, GCMA’s head of communications. If I have any doubts about whether I’ve got the chops to appreciate Johns’ contemporary paintings, a group of first graders on tour shows me the way. They are looking at a set of his “face frame” compositions, with multiple facial features scattered hither and yon across the canvas. Their guide asks, simply enough, “What do you see?” l l SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

17


JASPER JOHNS (1930–), TARGET WITH FOUR FACES, 1968, SILKSCREEN ON PAPER, ART© JASPER JOHNS/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK, NY

GCMA has the largest public collection in the world of Andrew Wyeth watercolors.

WILLIAM HENRY JOHNSON (1901–70), LIFT UP THY VOICE AND SING, 1942, GREENVILLE COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART

GCMA rotates displays from its collections of works by Jasper Johns (above) and Florence native William Henry Johnson. Johnson’s paintings, also featured in the Smithsonian’s American art holdings, often include something unexpected, like the upside-down U.S. flag, below.

18

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

“They all have eyes and ears and mustaches.” “The eyelashes look like rays of the sun.” “The eyes look like someone’s peeking out a window.” That’s 6-year-olds doing exactly what GCMA hopes all its visitors will do. “People always say, ‘I wish you had more information about the paintings in your gallery,’” Angermeier says. “We want everybody to just look first, see what they see, think what they think. Do you like it or not like it? How does it make you feel?” Since this museum is constantly changing its exhibits, you’re not likely to see the same things twice on separate ­visits, giving you plenty of chances to decide what you think or feel about the 70-plus Johns works in GCMA’s holdings. Likewise, with more than 45 Wyeth works among its holdings—the largest public collection in the world of his watercolors​—you’ll always find several pieces on exhibit somewhere in the museum. Visitors are drawn to his rustic images of the people and places he knew and loved. “When people come to the museum, this is what they initially come to see,” Angermeier says, describing him as “America’s painter.” “He painted his life.” Greenville’s storied history with Wyeth began with a loaned collection in 1979 that put the museum on the art map and became a source of pride in the community. When the collection was later sold in the early ’90s to a private collector, local art lovers grieved the loss, so GCMA set out to build its own permanent collection, piece by piece. An exhibit opening in November, “Wyeth Dynasty,” will feature many of Wyeth’s works alongside those by multiple artists from his talented family, including his father, N.C., and his son, Jamie. Ticking Johns and Wyeth off my to-do list, I’m free to head to a gallery where GCMA’s wide-reaching Southern Collection takes center stage. Here, I find works not only by Southern artists—including historic creations by S.C. slave potter and poet Dave Drake—but also paintings that touch on Southern themes, including the antebellum and Civil Rights eras. “We want to tell the full story of American art history and how American history and Southern art are intertwined,” Angermeier says, noting how that mission complements BJU’s focus on old masters. “It’s a good pairing—we provide the European side, the western roots to the GCMA collection,” Jones agrees. Just a few miles apart, these museums span centuries, continents and a wide sweep in art evolution. And you need venture no farther than Greenville to see it.


ANDREW WYETH (1917-2009), BAREFOOT, 1992, WATERCOLOR ON PAPER, © ANDREW WYETH

Wyeth’s Barefoot captures his neighbor and frequent muse, Helga, in the rustic setting common to his paintings of his Pennsylvania home.

M O R E G R E AT S . C . A R T M U S E U M S

GetThere

Columbia Museum of Art

M&G at Bob Jones University is M&G at Heritage Green is located at Heritage Green, located at 1700 Wade Hampton Buncombe Street, Greenville. Blvd., Greenville. HOURS: Tuesday–Saturday, HOURS: Tuesday–Saturday, 2–5 p.m. 10 a.m.– 5 p.m. ADMISSION: Adults, $7; seniors (60 and over), $6; students, $5; children 12 and under, free. Admission when visiting both M&G locations on the same day: adults, $12; seniors, $10; students, $8. DETAILS: No photography is permitted; cameras must be checked at the gift shop. Audio tours, guided tours and private tours are available for additional fees. For details, visit bjumg.org or call (864) 770-1331. Greenville County Museum of Art is located at Heritage Green,

1515 Main St., Columbia columbiamuseum.org, (803) 799-2810 Columbia’s downtown art museum features masterworks covering 5,000 years and five continents, from Renaissance genius Sandro Botticelli to French Impressionist Claude Monet to American Realist Robert Henri.

Florence County Museum

420 College St., Greenville. HOURS: Wednesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday, 1–5 p.m. ADMISSION: Free DETAILS: No flash photography is permitted. Guided tours are free to groups of 10 or more, but must be scheduled at least three weeks in advance. For information about current exhibits or other details, visit gcma.org or call (864) 271-7570.

111 West Cheves St., Florence flocomuseum.org, (843) 676-1200 Florence opened its brand-new museum building just two years ago, but its longstanding art collection distinguishes itself with works by acclaimed AfricanAmerican painter William H. Johnson, along with a collection of 20th-century Southern art.

Gibbes Museum of Art

135 Meeting St., Charleston gibbesmuseum.org, (843) 722-2706 The Gibbes celebrated its grand reopening this year after a major renovation to the 111-year-old museum. The museum showcases American art from the Colonial era to the present, with a special emphasis on Charleston.

Spartanburg Art Museum

200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg spartanburgartmuseum.org (864) 582-7616 This century-old museum is small in size but expansive in mission. It focuses on bringing local, regional and international contemporary artists together in innovative exhibitions.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

SAVOR THE SEASONS inUpcountry South Carolina anderson

|

c h e ro k e e

|

greenville

|

oconee

|

pickens

|

s pa r ta n b u r g

E

njoy the blooming Dogwoods and Azaleas in Spring. In Summer, explore waterfalls, rivers and lakes. Take a drive along scenic byways for the fabulous Fall foliage. Spend a weekend in a cozy cabin during Winter. Whenever you choose to visit, the Upcountry will be Perfectly Seasoned for you!

Perfectly Seasoned

UpcountrySC.com | 800.849.4766 | FREE Visitors Guide

BY THE SWEAT OF OUR BROWS | SEPT 10 THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN STORY AT HISTORIC BRATTONSVILLE

PIEDMONT POTTERY FESTIVAL | SEPT 24 CELEBRATING TRADITIONAL SOUTHERN POTTERY

SPIRITS & STORIES | OCT 15 LANTERN TOURS OF BRATTONSVILLE BY TWILIGHT

CIVIL WAR REENACTMENT | OCT 22 & 23 REENACTMENTS, CAMP LIFE, LIVING HISTORY DEMONSTRATIONS

CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT TOURS | DEC 3 & 10 A SOUTHERN-STYLE CHRISTMAS IN THE CAROLINA BACKCOUNTRY

1444 Brattonsville Rd. McConnells, SC 29726 | 803.684.2327 | chmuseums.org Project assisted by City of Rock Hill & York County Accommodations Tax Program.

20

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


FYV-510b-Leisure-Travel-ad-7.625x9.875-[08.03.16].pdf

1

8/3/16

4:50 PM

They stopped because of abundant water and fertile soil. They stayed to build upon the nation’s great ideals. As you visit, make sure to explore the treasures of a community that embodies service and sacrifice at every turn. Contact us to start planning your visit at 1-888-98-HEROES or VisitFayettevilleNC.com.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

ALL AMERICAN FREEWAY


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

The Island’s Largest Selection of Vacation Homes & Condos

Be Inspired in PICKENS

A Perfect Gathering Place for Families to Create a Lifetime of Memories

COUNTY

Discover the Gems of Lake Hartwell Country, Crown of the Carolinas

Pawleys Island Realty

www.crownofthecarolinas.org 800.862.1795

843-237-2000

www.pawleysislandrealty.com 22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Come www.visitpickenscounty.com 864-898-5585


ck

R o ck A

Clo

FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

Live IT UP.

round the

2oth Annual

r all fun fo

Festival

September 30 & October 1, 2016

•Friday Events

Beach. Motown. Jazz.

7pm: Rocking Chair Parade 8pm - 11pm: High Intensity Band takes the stage for a street dance til 11pm. 9:30: Shag Contest with cash prizes for best couple. Food, arts & crafts & cork gun shooting galleries.

We bring music to your ears. All you have to do is make a choice. From Third Thursdays on summer evenings to the South Carolina Jazz Festival this October, we’ll have your toes tapping in no time.

•Saturday Events 10am - 3pm: Live entertainment on the main stage all day. Arts & crafts vendors & exhibitors, children’s amusements. 11am – 3pm: Car & truck show. Trophies given at 3pm. CASH & PRIZES!

For a free Visitor’s Guide, call 888.537.0014

Visit us on Cheraw.com

SCJazzFest.com

For more details click events tab at www.fairfieldchamber.sc

l l a F

Come and

for Aiken County

FUN-FILLED FESTIVALS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! Sassafras Festival Burnettown October 1, 2016

LOOK AT S FOR UNEW R OU ES S ! AD D R

Hook & Cook Festival Jackson October 21-22, 2016

Chitlin Strut

Salley November 26, 2106

Aiken County Visitors Center

133 Laurens St. NW, Aiken, SC 29801 803-642-7557 www.discoveraikencounty.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

WIN A $100 GIFT CARD! Welcome fall with a little extra cash in your pocket.

Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply

McCormiCk Gold rush Festival saturday, september 17, 2016 (10am - 5pm ) mCCormiCkGoldrush.net

Sign up today for our Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes and your chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. One lucky winner will be drawn at random from entries received by Sept. 30. Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply or mail in the form below. BY ENTERING, YOU MAY RECEIVE INFORMATION FROM THESE GREAT SPONSORS: jjAiken County Visitors Center jj Louise Proctor Hall, Haunted Camden jj Alpine Helen/ jj Lowcountry Tourism White County, Ga. jj McCormick Gold jj Beaufort Regional Rush Festival Chamber of Commerce jj Morris Center for jj Charleston Zipline Lowcountry Heritage Adventures jj Newberry Opera House jj Cheraw Visitors Bureau jj Pawleys Island Realty jj City of Camden and Kershaw County Tourism jj Pickens County Tourism Untitled-1 jj Culture & Heritage jj Santee Cooper Country Museums, York County jj S.C. Department of jj Discover Upcountry Agriculture — AgriTourism S.C. Tourism jj South Carolina Parks, jj Fairfield County Chamber, Recreation & Tourism S.C. — Rock Around jj S.C. State Farmers Market the Clock Festival Plant & Flower Festivals jj Fayetteville CVB, N.C. jj Summerville, S.C. DREAM jj Hammock Coast/ jj Towns County, Ga. Pawleys Island Chamber of Commerce jj Historic Bluffton Arts jj Trail Blazer Survival School & Seafood Festival jj Walhalla Chamber of jj Historic Bluffton Commerce Oktoberfest October Festival jj South Carolina Living jj Lake Hartwell Country magazine

Downtown Historic McCormick

! r Gold Pan fo nd see Feel a istory the H

sc living april_Layout 1 3/7/16 3:44 PM Page 1

1

8/5/16 10:40 AM

Santee Cooper Country... a great place to get away that’s not too far away!

T R AV E L R E A D E R R E P L Y

Register below, or at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply YES! Enter me in the drawing for a $100 gift card. Name Address   City State/ZIP  Email*  Phone

SEND COUPON TO: South Carolina Living,

TRR, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033 or travel@SCLiving.coop. Entries must be received by Sept. 30, 2016, to be eligible. *Winners will be notified by email and listed online at SCLiving.coop.

24

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Just off I-95 and I-26, Santee Cooper Country is the five county region surrounding lakes Marion and Moultrie. Visit our web site: www.santeecoopercountry.org, call (803) 854-2131 or email us at tourscc@oburg.net for your get-away information.


Table R ock St at e Par k

EXPLORE ALL OF SOUTH CAROLINA’S 47 STATE PARKS TO BECOME AN ULTIMATE OUTSIDER! Get your guide from SCParkStore.com or at any state park, and collect a stamp at each park you visit to start your journey toward becoming an Ultimate Outsider.

Share your adventure using #SCStateParks and #UltimateOutsider


FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

John Bartlam, Master Potter: America’s First Porcelain

Explore Historic Summerville

August 18, 2016 - January 31, 2017

Michael Mulligan Photography

Camden Archives & Museum www.camdenschistory.com

6 1 0 2 FALL

Where you will find a vibrant night life, live theater, plentiful shopping, over 100 dining options, more than 35 pieces of public sculpture and the Birthplace of Sweet Tea.

Something sweet for everyone.

Summerville www.summervilledream.org

South Carolina Department of Agriculture

Plant & Flower Festivals AutumnFest at the Market

September 23 - 24, 2016 Friday - Saturday 8 am - 6 pm Greenville State Farmers Market 1354 Rutherford Road, Greenville, SC

Pee Dee Plant & Flower Festival September 30 - October 2, 2016 Friday - Saturday 8 am - 6 pm Sunday 10 am - 5 pm Pee Dee State Farmers Market 2513 West Lucas Street, Florence, SC

Something for everyone at the Top! Discover North Georgia’s mountain jewel, just two hours from Atlanta, Chattanooga and Greenville.

Midlands Plant & Flower Festival

October 7 - 9, 2016 Friday - Saturday 8 am - 6 pm Sunday 10 am - 4 pm South Carolina State Farmers Market 208A Wholesale Lane, West Columbia, SC

For more information visit www.agriculture.sc.gov 26

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Brasstown Valley Resort, Hiawassee & Young Harris

MountainTopGA.com 800.984.1543


FUN ON THE FARM

Homegrown only in South Carolina

gri

r

is

Farm Fun

A

Visit SCFarmFun.org to find your next farm experience.

SC

In every season SC Agritourism offers you a new experience, from choose n’ cut Christmas trees to farm & culinary tours, trail rides, wineries, botanical gardens, farm stores, other year-round family friendly activities, and so much more!

m

The heart of South Carolina is found in our fields.

tou

9/2 9/9 9/10 9/11 9/15 9/18 9/22 9/23 9/24 9/25 9/29 9/30 10/13 10/14 10/15 10/19 10/21 10/23 10/25 10/26 10/28 11/3 11/4 11/6 11/9 11/10 11/11 11/13 11/13 11/17 11/18 11/20 12/1 12/2 12/4 12/8 12/9 12/10 12/13 12/14 12/15 12/17 12/18 12/31 1/7 1/8 1/13 1/14 1/15 1/20 1/27 1/28 1/29 2/1 2/2 2/4 2/5 2/9 2/16 2/19 2/22 2/23 2/24 2/25 3/2 3/3 3/4 3/4 3/5 3/7 3/8 3/12 3/14 3/18 3/19 3/21 3/22 3/24 3/25 3/26 3/28 3/30 4/2 4/6 4/9 4/21 4/26 4/28 4/29 5/6 5/7 5/12

Legendary 5th Dimension Gene Watson Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives John Wagner & Friends The Quebe Sisters Larry Gatlin & The Florida Boys Leon Russell The Nylons The Sicilian Tenors Capitol Steps Ambrosia Maurice Williams & The Zodiacs Adam Crabb and Special Guests Ugly Duckling / Tortoise & The Hare, Lightwire A Night of Legends, Rick Wade Shanghai Acrobats Tinsley Ellis Chubby Checker Concerto for Violin & Rock Band Twelfth Night Second City, Comedy Letters Home Brown Bear, Brown Bear & More Stories Paul Thorne Fame, The Musical KamaKaze FireFlies Terrance Simien and the Zydeco Experience Langley Winds, US Air Force NOH Guild Oyster Roast Church Basement Ladies, Away in the Basement Shenandoah Thom Bresh Christmas with Emile Pandolfi Nutcracker, Ballet Christmas with the Celts Gibson Brothers George Winston The Blind Boys of Alabama Scot Bruce: Blue Suede Christmas The Embers The Willis Clan Crystal Gayle Christmas Show A Carolina Christmas, Doug & Bunny Williams A New Year’s Evening in Newberry Atlanta Pops Orchestra Music of P, P & M and Simon & Garfunkel Artrageous Caesar Entertainment and His All Star Band Jimmy Fortune The Lettermen Balsam Range Ride the Lightning, Metallica Tribute The Tams Janet’s Planet The Stylistics Jewel of the Stars Richard Smith BeeHive: The 60s Musical The Isaacs, Gospel Dailey & Vincent Tommy Emmanuel Puccini’s Turandot, Opera The Summit: Manhattan Transfer Meets Take 6 James Gregory, Comedy Irish Music with Ciaran Nagle Yacht Rock Revue NOH Guild. A Fair to Remember Delbert McClinton Teresa Walters, Pianist Pump Boys and Dinnettes, Musical Cinderella, Ballet Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Nile, Aquila Celebration of World Dance Ailey II, Modern Dance Mallory Lewis & Lambchop Fabulous Equinox Big Band Face2Face, Elton John and Billy Joel Tribute Black Violin The Clovers Three on A String The Miracle Worker, Newberry College Hotel California: Eagles Tribute Kristi Hood and Jerry Simms Living Voices: Journey from the Dust Soloman Eichner, Pianist Sierra Hull 3 Redneck Tenors Classic Nashville, Country Revue Rick Alviti, Tribute to Elvis The Diamonds Doug and Bunny Williams John Conlee

803-276-6264

www.newberryoperahouse.com

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

27

FA L L & W I N T E R T R AV E L G U I D E

2016-2017 Season


Recipe

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

SUPER SAMMIES PHILLY CHEESESTEAK SERVES 1

Purists insist on the original Cheez Whiz in this famed Philadelphia sandwich, but substitutions can include American, provolone or your favorite cheese. 1 hoagie roll 3–4 slices provolone cheese 2–3 tablespoons olive oil ¼ onion, sliced ¼ red bell pepper, sliced 1 garlic clove, minced ¼ cup sliced mushrooms, optional 5 ounces steak (sirloin, flatiron, flank), sliced thinly Pepperoncini peppers, sliced, for garnish

MICHAEL PHILLIPS

uffed Hot or cold, st ain and pl or to the limits, st thing about simple—the be s is that there ndwiche homemade sa rictions on tweaking st re or s with the are no rule n tastes. Start ow ur yo rsions of them for n te your ow ve dulge ea cr to w lo be recipes e often in sandwiches w some popular don’t be afraid t Bu eating out. n he w ly on cheeses, in t with breads, to experimen st might ju add-ins. You seasonings or ure at gn si own develop your ! ie samm

HOT REUBEN SANDWICH SERVES 1

The traditional version of this hot sandwich stars corned beef and sauerkraut, but you might also like the variation known as the Rachel, using turkey and coleslaw instead.

Spread one side of each bread slice with dressing. Layer one slice with corned beef and cheese. Top with sauerkraut, and place second bread slice on top. Butter both sides of sandwich. Heat a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat. Place sandwich in hot skillet, and cook about 2–3 minutes on each side, until cheese starts to melt. Remove from skillet, cut in half and serve. 28

IULIIA NEDRYGAILOVA

¼ pound sliced corned 2 slices pumpernickel beef or pastrami bread 2 tablespoons Thousand 2 slices Swiss cheese Island dressing, store- ¼ cup sauerkraut, well bought or homemade drained Butter

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

Split hoagie in half horizontally, but don’t cut all the way through at the back. Open and spread cheese slices over the roll, and set aside. On a griddle or large skillet over medium-high heat, heat olive oil. Saute onion and bell pepper until caramelized, about 6–8 minutes. Add garlic and mushrooms, and cook another 2 minutes. Move vegetables to one side of the pan. In the same hot pan, cook steak, continuously flipping and chopping into smaller pieces using 2 spatulas, until meat is at desired doneness. Mix meat and vegetables together. Transfer mixture to prepared roll. Garnish with pepperoncini peppers.


KAREN HERMANN

MUFFULETTA SERVES 2–4

GINA MOORE 

The muffuletta is a sandwich made popular by Italian immigrants in New Orleans. For the most authentic version, use an assortment of Italian sandwich meats and cheeses and serve on a round, crusty Sicilian bread loaf dressed with olive salad. You can also use individual sandwich rolls. 1 round bread loaf (preferably Sicilian or Italian) 1 cup olive salad (recipe below) 3 slices each of Italian cold cuts: soppressata, mortadella, capicola and Genoa salami 3 slices provolone cheese 3 slices mozzarella or fontina cheese

HAM-AND-SWISS PANINI SERVES 1

The easiest way to make this pressed sandwich is with a panini press, which cooks both sides at once. But you can make your panini without a press by using a grill pan or skillet, applying pressure with a spatula while the sandwich cooks.

Split bread loaf in half horizontally, and remove some of the bread from inside top and bottom halves—just enough to make a shallow well. Spread ½ cup of the olive salad in the well on each half. On the bottom half, layer meats and cheeses, one at a time, fanning them out to completely cover the loaf. Top with other half of loaf on top. Cut into desired number of servings. OLIVE SALAD

2 slices bread (sub roll, ciabatta, sourdough or your favorite) 2 tablespoons herb mustard (recipe below) 3–4 slices ham, turkey or both 2–3 slices Swiss cheese Butter

MAKES 3 CUPS

1 cup chopped green olives 1 cup chopped black or Kalamata olives 2 tablespoons minced shallots or red onions 2 teaspoons minced garlic N cup chopped roasted red bell peppers

2 tablespoons diced celery 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning or dried oregano J teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes H cup olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

In a medium bowl, mix all ingredients. Store in refrigerator in a glass container for up to two weeks. W H AT Õ S C O O K I N G AT

SCLiving.coop

Chef Belinda takes you step by step through the art of making pressed sandwiches at home— no special equipment needed—at

SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda

Spread one side of each bread slice with mustard. Layer one side with meat and cheese, and place second slice on top. Butter both sides of sandwich. Heat panini press according to manufacturer’s instructions, or heat skillet to medium-high. Place on the press/skillet; lower press lid, or apply pressure with spatula. Cook until grill marks are golden brown, about 3–5 minutes; if using skillet, flip sandwich, and grill other side to golden brown. Cut in half to serve. HERB MUSTARD MAKES 1 CUP

1 clove garlic, minced to a 1 cup Dijon mustard paste ½ teaspoon dried tarragon 1 teaspoon finely chopped ½ teaspoon dried thyme parsley ½ teaspoon dried basil Lemon juice ½ teaspoon dried oregano Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

In a small bowl, mix all ingredients. Store in refrigerator in a glass container for up to two months. SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

29


BY S. CORY TANNER

THIS PAGE: S. CORY TANNER, EXCEPT: CATERPILLAR BY SVANHORN; PAINTED LADY BY STUART49

SCGardener

Bring butterflies to your garden A monarch butterfly (above) snacks on a zinnia but will lay eggs only on milkweed.

GARDENERS OFTEN WELCOME BUTTERFLIES

Clockwise from left: a black swallowtail caterpillar munches on parsley; a purple passion vine awaits a gulf fritillary; milkweed is the monarch’s favorite; a painted lady finds a thistle.

Larval host plants for select butterfly species BUTTERFLY

30

HOST PLANTS

Black swallowtail

Fennel, parsley, dill, Queen Anne’s lace

Buckeye

Snapdragon, plantain, verbena

Cloudless sulfur

Senna, cassia, clover

Gulf fritillary

Passion vine

Monarch

Milkweed species (orange butterfly weed, common milkweed, etc.)

Painted lady

Thistle, hollyhock, plantain

Silver-spotted skipper

Locust, American wisteria

Spicebush swallowtail

Spicebush, sassafras

Tiger swallowtail (S.C. state butterfly)

Wild cherry, tulip poplar, willow, red maple

Zebra swallowtail

Pawpaw

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

to dine from their flowers, enjoying the winged beauty and lackadaisical fluttering of these colorful insects. In fact, many gardens are specifically designed to attract butterflies. Creating a successful butterfly garden is not difficult; you just need to provide some necessary components. Butterflies visit gardens for two main reasons: to find nectar for adults and food for their larvae (caterpillars). Caterpillars feed mostly on leaves and are usually specific about which host plants they can eat. To have an abundance of butterflies in your garden, you must satisfy both needs. Butterflies are attracted to nectar plants with bright flowers in red, yellow, orange, purple and pink. Large swaths of a single color are more likely to catch a passing butterfly’s attention than a single plant or a mixture of colors. Unlike hummingbirds, most butterflies can’t hover and must land to sip nectar. They prefer plants with large petals, like sun­flowers,


Many herbs serve as host plants, but, remember, caterpillars have voracious appetites. Plant extra, to ensure you have some for yourself. the host plant for zebra swallowtails— only the leaves benefit the caterpillar. The caterpillars of our state butterfly, the Eastern tiger swallowtail, dine on the leaves of several native S.C. trees, including tulip poplar and wild cherry. However, planting additional host plants to supplement natives will ensure an abundance and diversity of butterflies. Some host plants are absolutely necessary to attract certain butterflies. To attract the crown jewel of butterflies, the monarch, you absolutely must have milkweed in your garden. Many herbs serve as host plants, too, including parsley, dill and fennel, which are attractive to black swallow­ tails. But, remember, cater­pillars eat the plants and have voracious appetites. I’ve seen black swallowtail ­caterpillars strip a parsley plant of its

Top-performing butterfly nectar plants TYPE

Butterfly milkweed* Tall verbena Coneflower* Ironweed* Aster* Phlox* Goldenrod* Joe Pye weed* Black-eyed Susan* Mountain mint* Penstemon* Yarrow*

Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial Perennial

Salvia Lantana

Black-eyed Susans attract a buckeye. The South Carolina state butterfly, the tiger swallowtail (below), sips on a Mexican sunflower.

CTPPIX

PLANT

Annual and perennial types Annual and perennial types

Pentas Sunflower* Globe amaranth Mexican sunflower Nasturtium Zinnia

Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual Annual

Deciduous azaleas* Buttonbush* Viburnum Clethra*

Shrub Shrub Shrub Shrub

*native

leaves in just three days! Plant extra, to ensure you have some herbs for yourself. Insecticides are a no-no in butterfly gardens. Butterflies and their caterpillars are very sensitive. Even organic products like Bt are highly toxic to them. Fortunately, butterfly gardens attract other beneficial insects, which will help you manage pests. Other tricks that help attract butterflies include having a puddling site. Butterflies need water, plus certain minerals and salts they don’t get from

S. CORY TANNER

zinnias and black-eyed Susans, or large clusters of short, tubular flowers, like milkweed, lantana and yarrow, where they can land and feed. Create your butterfly garden in full sun, especially morning through midafternoon. Butterflies prefer to feed in sunny locations. Avoid windy sites; they don’t fly well in strong winds. Because butterflies are active throughout the growing season, include a mixture of flowering nectar plant species from spring through fall. Mix in host plants for ­caterpillars throughout the garden. Some host plants, like milkweed, may also provide nectar through their flowers. For others, like the pawpaw tree—

flowers. They can’t land in open water, like birdbaths or fountains, so a moist patch of soil or sand fulfills this need. Create your own by placing a shallow dish in the garden with damp sand. Add one-half to three-quarters cup of table salt to one gallon of sand to enhance its attractiveness. Butterflies also like a flat, reflective surface to sit and warm their bodies in the sun. Place flat stones in sunny spots throughout the garden for this. With nectar sources, host plants, and puddling and sunning sites, your garden can become a butterfly mecca in no time. is an area horticulture agent for Clemson Extension based in Greenville County. Contact him at shannt@clemson.edu.

S. CORY TANNER

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

31


SCChefÕsChoice

BY DIANE VETO PARHAM

Farm-fresh food and happy customers the dining room, Grits & Groceries feels less like restaurant dining than it does hanging out in Aunt Heidi and Uncle Joe’s kitchen, where they’re always puttering around and c­ hatting, fixin’ up something delicious, and, lucky you, you get a plate of it. This way-out-of-the-way little ­restaurant at Saylors Crossroads in Anderson County—stop when you see the giant chicken statue—has hit on a winning combination of farm-fresh meals and kicked-back ambience. And, despite their remote location, they’ve

TOMATO PIE SERVES 8

4 ripe tomatoes, sliced ¼ cup salt 1 cup grated hoop cheese 1 cup Duke’s mayonnaise 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 1 medium onion, diced Salt and pepper to taste 8 mini piecrusts (or one large)

Slice tomatoes, and cover with ¼ cup salt. Let sit for 1 hour. Rinse well in colander, and pat dry with paper towel. Place piecrusts in pan(s), and lay tomato slices in pie shells. In a medium bowl, combine remaining ingredients. Pour over tomatoes. Bake at 350 F for 25 minutes.

32

been attracting devoted customers for 11 years. “People don’t mind a little bit of a drive if they know they’re going to get something worthwhile,” says Joe Trull, who runs Grits & Groceries with fellow chef and wife Heidi. Their recipe for success is simple: “Good-tasting food and making people happy,” he says. Those who already know and those who have heard rumors gladly make the trek from everywhere between Greenville and Greenwood when they can’t go another day without a tomato pie or Joe’s famous (no, really—they’ve been on TV) fried apple hand pies. People show up with out-of-town guests just to show off this rural treasure. “We’re just country enough that they can say, ‘Hey, look at the country people,’” Heidi jokes. The Trulls are also a little bit city, having cooked for years at New Orleans restaurants owned by chef Emeril Lagasse and at Heidi’s own restaurant, Elizabeth’s, in that city for 10 years, where they attracted crowds as regular media darlings. But when son Tom was about to be born, they wanted to replant somewhere close to their Carolina families. “When I saw this store, I wrote a check—I didn’t want to look anywhere else,” she says of the century-old country store they found nine miles outside of Belton, Honea Path and Due West. They converted it to their cozy, casual restaurant and have been “gangbuster busy ever since.”

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

MILTON MORRIS

WITH A BUSTLING KITCHEN VISIBLE FROM

Grits & Groceries 2440 Due West Highway, Belton (864) 296-3316, gritsandgroceries.com HOURS: Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Heidi describes the menu as “eclectic soul food—it’s the grandma pot food of every culture I’ve ever been in.” That translates as globally inspired combinations of “food you can scoop from a pot”—shrimp creole, beef stew, gumbo, and Southern mac and cheese, for example. The menu changes weekly, based on what fresh vegetables are coming in from local farmers and what cuts of meat are on hand from the cows and pigs they raise and butcher themselves. Joe’s in charge of desserts, which often highlight whatever fruits are in season. You have flat out wasted a trip if you don’t try their country ham balls (deepfried rounds of pimiento cheese and ham covered in crushed potato chips, sitting in a perfect pool of ­pepper-jelly sauce) or the praline bacon (brown sugar and crushed pecans smothering strips of crispy bacon). “The thing with all these young chefs is, they’re all trying to elevate Southern food,” Heidi says. “But Southern food is pretty good just the way it is.”


Palmetto  State  Marketplace

The GreaT OuTdOOrs is CallinG YOu!

Ce

lebrating

44

MOBILE HOME ROOFING SOLUTIONS

2 197 - 2 016 Years

Classes available now

• LIFETIME WARRANTY • PROFESSIONALLY INSTALLED • #1 STEEL PRODUCTS • 3” INSULATION REDUCES UTILITY COST • 12” OVERHANG

trailblazersurvival.com

Since 1992 CALL TOLL FREE FOR A FREE QUOTE

864-593-1907 www.hooverbuildings.com S.C. locations - Lexington & Greer Trail Blazer Survival School Ad.indd 2

877-839-6449

MOBILEHOMEROOFINGSOLUTIONS.COM

7/7/16 12:25 PM

! e E + 00 L c 0 a l Y 0 p 0 , t T 0 , e 0 S k 3 0 r E 7 5 1,0 LIF Ma T SA

AS H ,

GE R LA

ST

E? D IN T S E TA R A Contact S SE H R S T E OU A E H Mary Watts now T T IN IN Y A S S E I H to learn about the IN B BU D E W D N N benefits of advertising S& ZI OUL ,A E A S in South Carolina Living! M G TC ER A O I D H M (803) 739-5074 ads@scliving.coop A RE E RIV

34

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP


To advertise, please go to SCLiving.coop or e-mail ads@scliving.coop

ROOF

MOBILE HOME

PROBLEMS? INSURANCE NO MORE EXPERT ROOF RUMBLE INSTALLATION CREDIT

STOP REDUCED LEAKS

INCREASED HOME VALUE

LIFETIME

ELECTRIC BILL WARRANTY

Since 1983

roofover.com

800.633.8969

20’ x 100’ x 8’-6”

COMMERCIAL

• Standard and Cut-to-length Roof & Wall Panels

• 18,000 Sq. Ft. of Quality Metal Building Inventory

INDUSTRIAL

• Red Iron Components

• Many Items on Our Floor Available for Immediate Pick-up

>>

AGRICULTURE

>> >> >>

MINI STORAGE

$7,499.00 $12,999.00 $18,799.00 $25,999.00 $7,299.00

Prices subject to change due to loads and codes.

1.800.882.5150

PREMIERBUILDINGS.COM

YES! Send 1 year (11 issues) for just $8

• Building Kits & Complete Customized Building Systems • Metal Building Accessories

• Buyers Guide Available

Stop by or call us for a quote today.

800-922-8039

www.MetalBuildingSupplyCo.com

AFRICAN-AMERICAN

®

30 x 40 x 10 ACCREDITED BUSINESS 40 x 75 x 12 50 x 100 x 12 60 x 125 x 12 Mini Storage

All your metal building design, fabrication and supply needs under one roof.

S.C.RAMBLE! ANSWER

CUSTOM STEEL BUILDINGS AT ANY SIZE

®

1500 Elrod Road, Piedmont, SC 29673

YES! Send 2 years (22 issues) for just $15

GIFT TO_________________________________________________

FROM __________________________________________________

PHONE _________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________________________

ADDRESS________________________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

CITY___________________________________________________

CITY___________________________________________________

STATE/ZIP________________________________________________

STATE/ZIP________________________________________________

AVAST, MATIE! September 19 is Talk Like a Pirate Day. Stop what you’re doing and give someone special a subscription!

NOTE: Co-op members should already receive this magazine as a membership benefit. Please make check payable to South Carolina Living and mail to P.O. Box 100270, Columbia, SC 29202-3270. (Please allow 4 – 8 weeks.) Call 1-803-926-3175 for more information. Sorry, credit card orders not accepted.

SCLIVING.COOP   | SEPTEMBER 2016   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

35


Calendar  of Events UPSTATE

SEPTEMBER

15 • Greenville Women of Distinction, Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research TD Gallery, Greenville. (864) 770-1415. 16 • Symphony of Quilts, Shaver Recreation Center, Seneca. (864) 885-2709. 16–17 • SpartOberfest, Jesus Our Risen Savior Catholic Church, Spartanburg. (864) 576-1164. 16–18 • Indie Craft Parade, Huguenot Mill, Greenville. (864) 679-9274. 17 • Antique Engine and Tractor Show, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 430-1412. 17 • South Carolina State Old Time Fiddling Championship, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. 17 • Open Arms 5K Trail Run, Conestee Park, Greenville. (864) 967-3905. 17 • Preservation Bicycle Ride, Strawberry Hill USA, Chesnee. (864) 327-0090. 17 • South Greenville Fair, Simpsonville City Park, Simpsonville. (864) 915-2746. 22–25 • Euphoria, downtown, Greenville. (864) 233-5663. 22–25 • Spartanburg Greek Festival, Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Spartanburg. (864) 585-5961. 23 • Handbags for Hope, Peace Center for the Performing Arts, Greenville. (864) 373-6306. 23–24 • SOOIE Mauldin Barbecue Cook-Off, Mauldin Cultural Center, Mauldin. (864) 289-8903. 24 • Susan G. Komen S.C. Mountains to Midlands Affiliate Race for the Cure, Heritage Park, Greenville. (864) 234-5035. 29 • Rock Out Hunger, Fluor Field, Greenville. (864) 232-3595. OCTOBER

1 • Aunt Het Quilt Show, Fountain Inn Activity Center, Fountain Inn. (864) 905-6486. 1 • Greer Station Oktoberfest, downtown, Greer. (864) 877-3131.

5 • Good News Club Golf Classic, The Cliffs at Mountain Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 292-5842. 6–8 • Albino Skunk Music Festival, 4063 Jordan Road, Greer. info@albinoskunk.com. 7–9 • Balloons Over Anderson, Civic Center of Anderson, Anderson. (864) 221-0552. 7–9 • “Green Valley: Mansions to Modern” Symphony Tour of Homes, Green Valley area, Greenville. (864) 370-0965. 8 • Fall for All Festival, Roberts Presbyterian Church, Anderson. (864) 225-9950. 10–16 • Piedmont Interstate Fair, Piedmont Interstate Fair Association, Spartanburg. (864) 582-7042. 14–16 • Fall for Greenville, downtown, Greenville. (864) 467-6667. 15 • Storytelling Festival, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. ONGOING

Thursdays through September • Fountain Inn Farmers Market, Farmers Market Pavilion, Fountain Inn. (864) 409-1392. Third Thursdays • Art Walk, downtown, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787. Second Saturdays • Heartstrings, Hagood Mill Historic Site, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

MIDLANDS SEPTEMBER

15–18 • Columbia’s Greek Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Columbia. (803) 252-6758. 16 • Food Truck Fridays, Fountain Park, Rock Hill. (803) 329-8756. 16–17 • Coming of Age Quilt Show, Events at Manchester, Rock Hill. (714) 333-5524. 17 • Animal Enrichment Day, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 17 • BBQ Dinner Train, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 712-4135. 17 • Golf Classic to Benefit Wyboo Animal Shelter, Wyboo Golf Club, Manning. (803) 696-1169. 18 • An Afternoon with Nathalie Dupree, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 981-9182.

18–25 • Raylrode Daze Festivul and Parade, Branch Junction, Branchville. (803) 274-8831. 22 • A Fine Affair, DoubleTree by Hilton, Columbia. (803) 254-0118. 22–25 • South Carolina Tobacco Festival, Village Green, Lake City. (803) 374-8611. 23 • Riverbanks ZOOfari, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 23–24 • Home and Garden Show, H.O. Weeks Center, Aiken. (803) 644-2369. 24 • Book Signing and Talks by Dr. Steve Fields, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. 24 • Edgefield Heritage Jubilee Festival, Oakley Park Museum, Edgefield. (803) 637-1800. 24 • Fall Festival and Pickin’ Party, South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 24 • Forts Pond Antique Tractor Pull, Forts Pond, Pelion. (803) 206-6942. 24 • Guided Walking Tour: Native American Lifeways, Cayce Tennis Center, Cayce. (803) 765-2200. 24 • Oktoberfest, downtown, Aiken. (803) 649-2221. 24 • Piedmont Pottery Festival, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684-2327. 24 • Take a Child Outside, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. 24 • The Thomas Family and Crossroads Bluegrass, Haynes Auditorium, Leesville. (803) 582-8479. 29 • Taste of Clarendon, Cypress Center, Manning. (803) 435-4405. 29–Oct. 1 • Evening of Short Plays Fall, Etherredge Center, Aiken. (803) 641-3305. 30 • BBQ, Bluegrass & Blue Jeans, The Farm at Ridgeway, Ridgeway. (803) 608-5510. 30–Oct. 1 • Rock Around the Clock Festival & Car Show, downtown, Winnsboro. (803) 635-4242. OCTOBER

1 • Advanced Oktoberfest Horse Trials, Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 1 • Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, Lake Carolina Community, Columbia. (623) 810-9522. 1 • October Monthly Gospel Singing, Midland Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719-1289.

Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events. 36

1 • Sassafras Festival, Sassafras Park, Burnettown. (803) 593-2676. 1 • Science Education Enrichment Day (S.E.E.D.), USCAiken, Aiken. (803) 641-3313. 1 • St. Mary’s Chocolate Festival, St. Mary Help of Christians Catholic School, Aiken. (803) 649-2071. 5 • Under the Stars Jumper Night, Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 6–9 • Carolina Downhome Blues Festival, Fine Arts Center of Kershaw County, Camden. (803) 425-7676. 8 • Fall Family Farm Day, Old McCaskill’s Farm, Rembert. (803) 432-9537. 11–13 • Weekdays on the Water: Santee Locks and Lake Tour, Santee State Park, Santee. (803) 854-2408. 12 • Under the Stars Dressage, Stable View, Aiken. (484) 356-3173. 15 • Spirits and Stories: Brattonsville by Twilight, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684-2327. 15–16 • Colonial Times: A Day to Remember, Living History Park, North Augusta. (803) 279-7560.

LOWCOUNTRY SEPTEMBER

15 • Music on Main: Midnight Allie, Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 15 • Sweet Tea Festival Weekend, Hutchinson Square, Summerville. (843) 821-7260. 15 • Sumter Green Fall Feast, Nettles Building at USC-Sumter, Sumter. (803) 436-2500. 15 • “What Lies Beneath: Archaeology of the Pre-Drayton Era,” South Carolina Society Hall, Charleston. (843) 769-2627. 15 • Yappy Hour, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 15–18 • Charleston Scottish Games and Highland Gathering, Boone Hall Plantation, Charleston. (843) 884-4371. 16 • Moonlight Mixer, Edwin S. Taylor Fishing Pier, Folly Beach. (843) 795-4386. 16 • Sounds of Summer Concert Series: Andrew Thielen Big Band, Sandhills Bank Amphitheater, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 17 • Aynor Harvest Hoe‑Down Festival, Aynor Town Park, ONGOING Daily through Oct. 31 • Andrea Aynor. (843) 358-1074. Smith Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors 17 • South Carolina Beard Center, Aiken. (803) 642-7557. Club’s Beard and Mustache Daily, Oct. 11 through Feb. 26, Competition, Rockin’ Hard Saloon, Murrells Inlet. (843) 340-6564. 2017 • “Wild Fabrications” and “Nature’s Tapestries,” 18 • Latinos Unidos Food Museum of York County, Festival, Shelter Cove Park, Rock Hill. (803) 329-2121. Hilton Head. (843) 689-6612. Mondays through Saturdays, 18 • Living Green Fest, through July 2017 • “A Compass James Island County Park, to Guide: S.C. Cabinetmakers Charleston. (843) 795-4386. Today,” McKissick Museum, 21 • Wine Down Wednesday, Columbia. (803) 777-7251. Old Towne Creek County Park, Mondays through Aug. 29 • Charleston. (843) 795-4386. Hopelands Summer Concert 22 • Music on Main: Rick Series, Hopelands Gardens, Strickland Band, Main Street, Aiken. (803) 642-7600. North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. Tuesdays in October • 23 • Dive-In Movies: “Jaws,” Hilton Hickory Hill Milk Fall Festival Head Island Recreation Center, and Dairy Tour, Hickory Hill Hilton Head Island. (843) 681-7273. Farm, Edgefield. (803) 480-3312. 23–25 • Atalaya Arts & Crafts Tuesdays • Second Shift Festival, Huntington Beach State Twosdays, S.C. State Museum, Park, Murrells Inlet. (803) 734-0767. Columbia. (803) 898-4921. 23–25 • Southern Women’s Show, Wednesdays through Charleston Area Convention Center, Sept. 28 • South Sumter North Charleston. (704) 376-6594. Farmers Market, South Sumter 24 • Irish Italian International Resource Center Pavilion, Festival, Main Street, North Sumter. (803) 436-2277. Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5584. Saturdays through Nov. 24 • 24 • Little Mozart Circus, Marion Downtown Market, downtown, Square, Charleston. (843) 763-4941. Sumter. (803) 436-2500. 24–25 • Adaptive Recreation Saturdays, weather permitting • Aiken Trolley Tours, Expo, Folly Beach, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 644-1907. 29 • Music on Main: Hip Pocket Band, Horseshoe, North Fourth Saturdays • Mountain Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. Dulcimers of Aiken, Aiken Visitors Center and Train Museum, Aiken. (803) 293-7846.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

30–Oct. 1 • Beaufort Shrimp Festival, Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 525-6644. OCTOBER

2 • Latin American Festival, North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 6 • Music on Main: Jim Quick & Coastline, Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 7 • Yam Jam, downtown, Darlington. (843) 398-4000, ext. 103. 7–8 • Three Rivers Yard Sale, 65-mile route in Williamsburg and Florence counties, Johnsonville. monadukes@hotmail.com. 8 • A Classical Oktoberfest, Memminger Auditorium, Charleston. (843) 763-4941. 8 • Browntown Museum Open House, Browntown Museum, Lake City. (843) 356-2586. 8 • Jefferson Blue Jay Festival, downtown, Jefferson. (843) 658-7600. 8–9 • Festa Italiana, Broadway at the Beach, Myrtle Beach. (848) 333-7059. 11 • Brewsday, Old Towne Creek County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 14 • Movies at McLean, McLean Park, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5584. 14–16 • S.C. Jazz Festival, Historic District, Cheraw. (843) 537-8420, ext. 12. 14–16, 21–23 and 28–30 • Ghost Tours of Beaufort, downtown, Beaufort. (843) 524-4678. 15 • Loris Bog-Off Festival, downtown, Loris. (843) 756-6030. 15 • Fall Arts and Crafts Fair, Centenary United Methodist Church, Conway. (781) 267-5493. 15–16 • Georgetown Wooden Boat Show, Front Street, Georgetown. (843) 520-0111. ONGOING

Daily • History Tours, Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon, Charleston. (888) 763-0448. Mondays through Saturdays, through Oct. 1 • “The History of Fishing,” S.C. Maritime Museum, Georgetown. (843) 520-0111. Thursdays through Sundays, Oct. 6–30 • Fall Tours of Homes and Gardens, downtown, Charleston. (843) 722-4630. Saturdays through Nov. 30 • Charleston Farmers Market, Marion Square, Charleston. (843) 724-7309. Saturdays • Snakes and Reptiles, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 237-4440.


SCHumorMe

BY JAN A. IGOE

Don’t let the dust mites bite HOUSTON, WE HAVE ANOTHER PROBLEM.

Millions of Americans are not getting enough sleep, according to a national health organization that sneaks tiny drones into our bedrooms to see if we’re awake. Quality sleep isn’t just a beauty thing. Humans require at least seven hours a night to remain somewhat coherent and civilized. Otherwise, we devolve into a horde of dazed, sleep-deprived zombies stumbling off to work, ready to eat the customers. (That’s assuming we don’t crash on the way.) A few centuries ago, when Homo sapiens had the approximate ­life­span of mayflies, factory workers were putting in 16-hour days. If they got to sleep at all, it was probably on rocks, so nobody complained. The idea of resting for eight hours at a clip caught on about the time the first coil spring was patented. That was 1865. By the 1930s, we were sleeping on innersprings. In the ’40s, futons hit the market. The ’60s ushered in hippies and their waterbeds—the preferred playground of every card-carrying flower child. (The Romans designed an early version, but it was more personal puddle than functional bed.) Mattresses were still pretty simple when I was growing up with frugal, Depression-era parents. They only required one thing from their no-frills mattress: immortality. It was a once-ina-lifetime purchase, just like the house. 38

No matter how it lumped or sagged, my parents intended to sleep on it until death did them part. Apparently, they’d never heard of dust mites. My folks had no idea that humans, even freshly showered humans, shed millions of skin particles that hungry dust mites—which live and breed

in our beds—gobble up like prime rib. Sooner or later, every mattress becomes an all-night buffet for eightlegged guests. If my folks had seen those mutant creatures under a microscope, they would have burned the bed and given up sleeping altogether. These mites, which are actually spiders, look like the offspring of a Palmetto bug and a lobster. They have pointy legs randomly sprouting out all over the place. Each one is armed with hooks and suckers to burrow deep into your mattress. Ten million of them

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   SEPTEMBER 2016  |  SCLIVING.COOP

may be living in your bed, where you spend 33 percent of your life. If you need a reason to sleep standing up, this is it. The mattress superstores, which are popping up on every corner like Taco Bells, want us to buy a new mattress every seven or eight years, so they keep the dust mites under contract. I ventured into one of those humongous stores recently. It’s a vast wonderland of boring, beige ­rectangles all claiming to be firmer, fluffier, softer, cooler and plushier than the next boring, beige rectangle. You need an advanced degree in sleep systems to decipher all the choices and figure out why one mattress costs $500 and another costs $50,000. (That’s right. Your car was a bargain.) It’s hard to remember we’re talking about a bed. A humble bed. It doesn’t have an engine, take dictation, float, swim or fly. It’s a stationary, fabric box that mattress makers have us believing is more complex than the Hadron Collider. After reviewing my options, I’ve decided to keep getting my eight hours of shuteye on the living-room couch, protected by snoring dogs. Since the dust mites sleep in the bedroom, it’s safer out there. JAN A. IGOE hopes you’re getting your beauty rest on a very young, immortal mattress. Try not to shed. Join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


650+ Stores Nationwide

WOW SUPER COUPON 1650 PSI PRESSURE WASHER

• 1.3 GPM

Customer Rating

LOT 69488

SAVE $70

$7999 $

SUPER COUPON

9999 $149.99 comp at

Freight.com or by calling prior our stores or Harbor LIMIT 4 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon orreceipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase be purchases after 30 dayss last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must day. Offer good while supplie 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per presented. Valid through

16 OZ. HAMMERS WITH FIBERGLASS HANDLE

R PE ON SU UP CO

CLAW

RIP

LOT 69006 60715/60714

LOT 47873 shown 69005/61262

20% OFF

ANY SINGLE ITEM

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, automotive lifts, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Badland, CoverPro, Daytona, Diablo, Earthquake, Franklin, Grant’s, Holt, Jupiter, Lynxx, Maddox, Portland, Predator, Stik-Tek, StormCat, Union, Vanguard, Viking. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17.

YOUR CHOICE

SAVE 77%

Customer Rating

3

$ 99

comp at

$17.99

12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND Customer Rating AUTOMATIC BRAKE

R PE ON SU UP O C

LOT 61256 61889/60813 shown

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices? We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 650+ Stores Nationwide. R PE ON SU UP O C

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER LOT 95578 69645/60625 shown

Customer Rating

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO 30", 5 DRAWER

LOT 65020/69052 shown 69111/62522/62573

4

$ 97 VALUE

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

WOW

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OILLESS PANCAKE AIR COMPRESSOR LOT 95275 shown 60637/61615

SAVE 49%

LOT 69397 63308/61427 95272 shown

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF GRINDING AND CUT-OFF WHEELS

• 704 lb. capacity

$399.99

R PE ON 1-1/4 GALLON SU UP HOME AND GARDEN CO

8

4000 PEAK/

WATTS SAVE 3200 RUNNING 6.5 HP (212 CC) $179 GAS GENERATORS

Customer Rating

LOT 63079/63080/69729/69676 shown LOT 63089/63090/69675/69728 CALIFORNIA ONLY • 70 dB Noise Level

5

$ 99

$

SUPER QUIET

28999 comp at

$469

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP Customer Rating CO

SAVE $61

$

LOT 69227/62116/62584 68048 shown

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed • Over 30 Million Satisfied Customers • No Hassle Return Policy

• 350 lb. capacity

comp at

STEP STOOL/ WORKING PLATFORM LOT 62515 66911 shown Customer Rating

SAVE 65%

comp at 99 $141.88

14999 $205.99

$

1999

comp at

$57.55

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 650+ Stores Nationwide • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

• HarborFreight.com • 800-423-2567

$98.62

1.5 HP ELECTRIC POLE SAW

R PE ON SU UP CO

SAVE $29

LOT 60728/690 63054/62858 shown

Freight.com or by calling our stores or Harbor or prior LIMIT 4 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon l receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannot l purchase with origina must be origina from days le. Original coupon purchases after 30 nsferab Non-tra last. s per day. er Offer good while supplie 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid through

R PE ON SU UP O C

• Weighs 74 lbs.

5999

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 68862/63190 62896 shown

$9999

comp at

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

79

PORTABLE CAR CANOPY 34

$15.99

LIMIT 9 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$

WOW SUPER10 COFT.UPx 20ONFT. ™

$

comp at

$20.26

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $106

$4999

1199

comp at

YOUR CHOICE

$14.97

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 68496/61363 68497/61360/97582 68498/61359

$

SAVE 40%

$752.99

POWDER-FREE NITRILE GLOVES PACK OF 100

SIZE MED LG X-LG

SAVE 62%

$ 99 comp at

Customer Rating

• 5 mil thickness

Customer Rating

SAVE 39%

comp at

68498 shown

LOT 61280/63124 63145/95692 shown

29999

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO Item

SPRAYER

$

SAVE $453

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

WITH ANY PURCHASE 3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT NINE LED ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

Customer Rating

16999

comp at

FREE

TOOL CART

SAVE $230

$

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$ • Extends from 6 ft. to 8 ft. 10"

6999 comp at

$99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

WOWWIRSUPELEERSSCOSECUPURIONTEMTY

SAVE 60%

Customer Rating

ALERT SYS

LOT 93068 shown 69590/61910/62447

$1199

$

1699 .99

comp at

$29

Freight.com or by calling our stores or Harbor or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon with original receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase must be purchases after 30 dayss last. Non-transferable. Original coupon per day. Offer good while supplie 1/12/17. Limit one coupon per customer presented. Valid through

At Harbor Freight Tools, the "comp at" price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the "comp at" price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Profile for South Carolina Living

South Carolina Living September 2016  

The September 2016 edition of South Carolina Living magazine.

South Carolina Living September 2016  

The September 2016 edition of South Carolina Living magazine.

Profile for vanocain
Advertisement