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The Empire CHANGEOUT gives back The 501st Legion lends a hand to charities SC SCE NE

Following the Swamp Fox SC RECIPE

OCTOBER 2018

Blasts from the past


ent m l l o r En 2018 , Open 5 1 . Dec – 1 . v No

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2018 | oct

THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS VOLUME 72 • NUMBER 10 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 584,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033 Tel: (803) 926‑3175 Fax: (803) 796‑6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop

16 The Empire gives back Suit up with the 501st Legion—the nicest bunch of Star Wars villains you could ever hope to meet—as they lend a hand to charities.

EDITOR

Keith Phillips Tel: (803) 739‑3040 Email: Keith.Phillips@ecsc.org FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Travis Ward

4 CO-OP NEWS

Updates from your cooperative

ART DIRECTOR

6 AGENDA

Sharri Harris Wolfgang

Learn about the global competition to turn carbon dioxide from power plants into useful new products.

DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

Andrew Chapman

10 DIALOGUE Shepherding veterans

WEB EDITOR

Chase Toler L. Kim Welborn CONTRIBUTORS

April Coker Blake, Jayne Cannon, Mike Couick, Tim Hanson, Jan A. Igoe, L.A. Jackson, Patrick Keegan, Van O’Cain, Sydney Patterson, Belinda Smith-Sullivan, Brad Thiessen, Paul Wesslund, Libby Swope Wiersema PUBLISHER

12 ENERGY Q&A Tips to stay comfortable this winter Take steps now to ensure you and your family stay warm when the temperatures start to fall this winter.

14 SMART CHOICE Pet project

Lou Green ADVERTISING

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739‑5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop

Show your animal companions just how much you care with these clever pet gadgets.

NATIONAL REPRESENTATION

American MainStreet Publications Tel: (800) 626‑1181 Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor. ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send to your

21 STORIES A driving passion Laurens Electric Cooperative member Paul Ianuario shares his love of rare and vintage automobiles.

22

local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 2018. The Electric Cooperatives

is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

SCENE

21

Following the Swamp Fox Grab your paddle for an expedition on the Revolutionary Rivers National Recreation Trail.

26

of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

TRAVELS

Lost and found history See South Carolina’s colonial past in a whole new light when you visit Beaufort’s Santa Elena History Center.

30

RECIPE

Blasts from the past Chef Belinda Smith-Sullivan shares her recipes for classic, home-cooked comfort food, just like Mom used to make.

32

$5.72 members,

$8 nonmembers

GARDENER

Let’s talk about ginkgo trees

22

Ancient and otherworldly, ginkgo trees can add a brilliant splash of fall color to any landscape.

34 36 38 Member of the AMP network reaching more than 9 million homes and businesses

MARKETPLACE CALENDAR HUMOR ME

The Empire gives back

Don’t borrow the cat Humor columnist Jan A. Igoe explores the fine line that separates adoration of celebrities and outright stalking.

The 501st Legion lends a hand to charities SC SCE NE

Following the Swamp Fox SC RECIPE

Blasts from the past OCTOBER 2018

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS:

16

Equine-assisted therapy offers hope for veterans struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder.

COPY EDITOR

PHOTOS TO P A N D CENTER BY M I LTO N M O RRIS; BOT TO M BY M IC SM ITH

Albin Johnson, the Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative member who founded the 501st Legion of Star Wars costumers, gears up in his original stormtrooper armor. Photo by Milton Morris.


SC | agenda A global competition for CO2 solutions of scientists and engineers from around the world will relocate their laboratories to a patchwork of gravel lots next to a coalfired power plant in northeast Wyoming. Their mission: Nothing less than finding beneficial ways to capture and reuse carbon dioxide before it’s released into the Earth’s atmosphere. The teams are competing for the NRG Cosia Carbon XPRIZE and a share of $20 million in grants promised to scientists who develop “transformational approaches to converting carbon dioxide emissions into valuable products.” Dry Fork Station, a power plant owned by North Dakota’s Basin Electric Power Cooperative, is one of two test sites for the competition, which is financially supported by another co-op, Tri‑State Generation and Transmission Association based in Colorado, as well as the National Rural Electric Cooperatives Association (NRECA). The final prizes will be awarded in 2020. Teams will capture carbon dioxide produced by the plant and attempt to LATER THIS YEAR, FIVE TEAMS

COU RTESY O F X PRIZE

One of five finalists in an XPRIZE competition looking for ways to capture and reuse carbon dioxide is Carbon Upcycling UCLA (above), with a process that turns CO2 into building materials. Basin Electric Power Cooperative’s Dry Fork Station in North Dakota is one of two test sites for the competition.

COU RTESY O F N REC A

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Happy campers

6

COU RTESY O F DA LL A S J. S H E A LY

Greetings from beautiful Camp Kinard in Batesburg-Leesville! We are delighted to be members of the Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative and are particularly happy that we just received Carolina Connect fiber-optic internet service. We are very happy customers! Our guests are delighted with our muchimproved internet connection. Your readers may be interested to know about some of the very special camps and retreats we host. We are the home of Palmetto Health Richland hospital’s Camp Wonder Hands for kids who are deaf and hard of hearing, and Camp New Horizons, which is a

bereavement retreat for kids who have lost a sibling to cancer. We also host a camp for kids with diabetes called Camp Sweet Escape. Our Lutheran Youth provide two camps for young people with developmental disabilities, and we host many other faith-based

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

turn it into useful products, says Dan Walsh, NRECA’s senior power supply and generation director. If they are successful, the technologies developed could be applied to any carbon-based fuel including natural gas and gasoline. “We have to do something, not just for power, but for the planet to come up with a way to utilize carbon dioxide in a beneficial way,” says Walsh. “The electric power industry is no longer the largest generator of carbon. The transportation industry now owns that title.” The XPRIZE teams at the Wyoming site are taking a variety of approaches to reusing carbon dioxide. BREATHE, a team from India, is working to produce methanol, which can be used as a liquid fuel. C4X, a team from China, will be developing new ways to produce ­plastics. Carbon Capture Machine (Scotland), CarbonCure (Canada) and Carbon Upcycling UCLA (USA) will all work on turning CO2 into construction materials. For more on the Carbon XPRIZE and the teams competing, visit carbon.xprize.org. —PAUL WESSLUND

and nonprofit organizations for camps and retreats. Leadership Lexington has their annual retreat at Camp Kinard. We have also hosted events for Lexington County fire­ fighters and law enforcement officers. That means thousands of people use power—and now internet—provided by Mid-Carolina when they are at our camp. DALLAS J. SHEALY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SOUTH CAROLINA LUTHERAN RETREAT CENTERS

WRITE US Let us know what’s on your

mind by writing to letters@scliving.coop or sending U.S. mail to Letters, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033. You can also use the letters form at SCLiving.coop/contact-us.


ONLY ON SCLiving.coop

B RI A N TROUTM A N

Cane Bay High School senior Ogugua Nwaezeigwe received the R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship for her work promoting STEM education to young women. She was joined at the award ceremony by (left to right) Rita Worthy, Patrice Simmons and Eleanor Gillins of Berkeley Electric Cooperative.

Summerville teen wins $5,000 scholarship OGUGUA NWAEZEIGWE OF SUMMERVILLE is the recipient of the 2018 R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship presented by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc., the trade association for South Carolina’s independent, not-for-profit electric cooperatives. The $5,000 college scholarship is presented to a student who completes a community service project that best exemplifies the cooperative ­principle of “concern for community.” Nwaezeigwe, 17, was among 10 high school students from across the state who completed projects this summer. In mid-August, a panel of judges selected her project, “The STEMinists Program,” as the winner. Nwaezeigwe created a program to instill excitement in young women who are interested in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and math). She also created a STEM workshop for young women in the fourth through eighth grades and raised nearly $5,000 to fund it. “I believe that The STEMinists Program has created a fire burning underneath the hearthstones of curiosity that has sparked a revolution in the minds and community of our young girls,” Nwaezeigwe says. “The conversation that this program has started—I would never have imagined when I first thought of the idea. Being a woman is not a disadvantage but something to be celebrated in the STEM field.” Nwaezeigwe completed her project after participating in the annual Washington Youth Tour program, which sends rising high school seniors to the nation’s capital for a week of learning about cooperatives and government. She and seven other students represented Berkeley Electric Cooperative. Nwaezeigwe, a senior at Cane Bay High School in Summer­ ville, is the daughter of Patrick and Rosy Nwaezeigwe. The R.D. Bennett Community Service Scholarship is named for Robert D. Bennett, the first general manager and executive vice president of The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. Bennett, who led the state association from 1950 until his retirement in 1980, strongly believed that electric cooperatives should support their local communities—providing a better quality of life for their members. His spirit of community service is reflected in this scholarship ­opportunity. —VAN O’CAIN

Pigs in a blanket This classic party food is just as delicious as you remember, and oh-so-easy to make. Surprise your guests with this blast from the past by following Chef Belinda’s latest video recipe. Watch it at SCLiving.coop/food/chefbelinda.

Register to win $100 County fairs. Cooler weather. Harvest festivals. Falling leaves. Need another reason to love fall in South Carolina? How about 100 of them. Enter this month’s Reader Reply Travel Sweepstakes for a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card. We’ll draw the winner’s name from all eligible entries received by Oct. 31, so don’t delay! Register online at SCLiving.coop/reader-reply.

More pet gadgets Your pet deserves the best, so if this month’s Smart Choice column featuring pet care devices (Page 14) gets your tail wagging, discover even more options courtesy of tech journalist David Novak at SCLiving.coop/ opinion/gadget-guy.

GONE FISHIN’ The Vektor Fish & Game Forecast provides feeding and ­migration times. Major periods can bracket the peak by an hour. Minor peaks, ½ hour before and after. Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

OCTOBER 16 — 6:22 — 3:37 17 — 7:52 10:22 4:07 18 1:37 8:52 10:37 4:22 19 3:07 9:37 10:52 4:37 20 4:07 10:22 11:07 5:07 21 5:07 10:52 5:22 11:37 22 5:37 11:37 5:37 12:07 23 — 6:22 12:07 12:37 24 — 7:07 12:37 6:22 25 7:52 1:07 1:07 6:37 26 8:37 1:37 1:52 7:07 27 9:22 2:07 2:22 7:37 28 10:37 2:52 3:22 7:52 29 11:52 3:52 4:37 8:37 30 — 4:52 9:37 1:22 31 — 6:22 12:37 2:37

Minor

AM Major

Minor

PM Major

NOVEMBER 1 — 7:01 8:46 2:31 2 1:46 8:16 9:31 3:16 3 3:01 9:16 3:31 10:01 4 4:01 10:01 4:01 10:31 5 10:46 5:01 4:31 11:01 6 11:16 5:46 5:01 11:46 7 11:46 6:31 — 5:16 8 7:01 12:16 12:16 5:46 9 7:46 12:46 12:46 6:01 10 8:46 1:16 1:31 6:16 11 9:31 1:46 2:01 6:46 12 10:46 2:31 3:01 7:01 13 — 3:16 6:31 12:16 14 — 4:01 — 1:16 15 — 5:16 9:16 1:46 16 — 6:31 9:01 2:16

SCLIVING.COOP  | OCTOBER 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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SC   agenda HIGHLIGHTS OCTOBER 15–NOVEMBER 15

HILTON HEAD ISLAND CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE & MOTORING FESTIVAL OCTOBER 26–NOVEMBER 4

M ICH A E L H RIZU K

Hilton Head’s annual celebration of things that go vroom! takes flight this month with an expanded roster of classic car shows, parties, races and ­aviation-themed events, because the only things more exciting to motorheads than beautiful cars and motorcycles are beautiful airplanes. The fun starts Oct. 26–28 with the Savannah Speed Classic, three days of Grand Prix racing featuring modern and vintage sports cars, and it wraps up Nov. 2–4 at Port Royal Golf Club with the Concours d’Elegance juried car show. (843) 785‑7469; hhiconcours.com SOUTH CAROLINA JAZZ FESTIVAL

LORIS BOG-OFF FESTIVAL

OCTOBER 19–21

OCTOBER 20

Feel the soul of jazz and celebrate the life of legendary musician Dizzy Gillespie at the South Carolina Jazz Festival in downtown Cheraw. The event always coincides with Gillespie’s birthday weekend, and this year he would have been 101. More than 20 musicians from the region will serenade festival attendees for three days of concerts in addition to a bebop parade, golf tournament, sidewalk chalk competition and 5K walk/run.

M I LT

In Horry County, chicken bog is what’s for dinner, especially at family gatherings and church suppers, but each chef’s recipe is just a little different—so why not hold a competition to see who makes it best? The Loris Bog-Off Festival is your chance to sample every variation of chicken, sausage, spices and rice you can imagine while you enjoy a craft show, live music and fireworks. ON MORRIS

(843) 537‑8420; scjazzfestival.com

(843) 756‑6030; lorischamber.com/​ loris-bog-off-festival.html

VINTAGE MARKET DAYS

JACK-O-LANTERN JUBILEE

NOVEMBER 2–4

OCTOBER 26–27

Scouring thrift stores for hidden gems can get tiring and a bit dirty. Columbia’s Vintage Market Days takes the guesswork and digging out of the equation by curating the best vintage treasures from more than 100 vendors and bringing it all to the S.C. State Fairgrounds. More upscale than your average flea market, Vintage Market Days will showcase art, antiques, jewelry, fashion and furniture.

They’ll have you workin’ for the weekend at North Augusta’s Jack-O-Lantern Jubilee, with live music from Loverboy, Diamond Rio and Mark Chesnutt. This annual celebration of fall comes complete with a costume contest (after all, Halloween is just around the corner), cornhole tournament, rides for the kids and an antique car show.

(803) 873‑7467; vintagemarketdays.com/ market/columbia-metro

(803) 441‑4311; jackolanternjubilee.com ​THE SOUTH CAROLINA PECAN FESTIVAL NOVEMBER 3

You’d have to be nuts to miss the fun of the South Carolina Pecan Festival when it takes over most of downtown Florence with eight entertainment stages and more than 250 food, artisan and retail vendors. The daylong party—an homage to the nearby Young Plantations pecan company— includes a kids’ zone, amusement rides, antique tractor show and a pecan cook-off competition. (843) 665‑2047; florencedowntown.com/ downtown‑events/pecan-festival

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

GET MORE

For more happenings this month, turn to our Calendar on Page 36, and see the expanded festivals and events coverage on SCLiving.coop.


SCSF_2018_SCLiving_7.5x4.875.indd 1

9/10/18 12:28 PM

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SCLIVING.COOP  | OCTOBER 2018  |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

9


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SC   dialogue

Shepherding veterans reaction to trauma, but also a physionever easy, and in military culture, logical response, leaving the victim in the challenge is particularly difficult. fight or flight mode,” Broughan explains. The special demands placed on service “By working with horses, we have an members can sometimes lead to tragic advantage over traditional office-based consequences like depression, divorce, therapy in that we have a large space for drug and alcohol addiction, and suicide. clients to ­physically work through their As one veteran described his post-­ physiological response.” traumatic stress dis­order (PTSD) expeLEAP’s therapy is so impactful Berkeley Electric that their work with military veterans rience, “The dreams kept coming just Cooperative recently received a significant ­investment about every night. I would wake up with Your Touchstone Energy Cooperative from The Boeing Company to help a feeling of either hopelessness or sheer support and expand those services. terror. Oftentimes I would see the event “One of our goals at Boeing is to support programs that set that occurred, and the auditory and visual hallucinations veterans up for success after they leave the military,” says Jessica didn’t stop upon waking. … I spent the next four years engagJackson, Director of Boeing Global Engagement. “LEAP helps ing in risky behavior. I would get home from work and take veterans heal, which is a crucial step in transitioning to the next a handful of Percocet to try and make it through the night. phase of their lives—that’s why Boeing is a proud partner.” I still wasn’t sleeping because it was terrifying to fall asleep. I had night terrors all the time. My work performance was Another proud partner is Berkeley Electric Cooperative, ­horrible, and I didn’t care about living anymore.” which donated the working arena’s lights to illuminate and Working through his trauma proved a daunting task for this extend the time therapists can work with clients, especially veteran until he connected with Lowcountry Equine-Assisted during the winter with its early sunset. BEC not only donated Psychotherapy (LEAP), a therapy program on Wadmalaw the lights, they also helped relocate and re-install the lights Island bringing horses and therapists together to address when LEAP moved to their new Wadmalaw Island location, behavioral, emotional and psychological challenges. showing that it sometimes takes a group of shepherds to help While sometimes confused with therapeutic riding promake a single good thing happen. For the veteran with night terrors, the experience of workgrams, LEAP does not teach riding. Instead, LEAP’s activities take place with the patient on the ground, engaged with the ing with the horses and therapists at LEAP helped shepherd horses in ways that help clients better understand patterns of him from a place of chaos to one of peace. In describing his behavior and translate those insights into life-changing action. journey, this veteran says, “I tell the story of the human condi“At LEAP, we recognize that within the military culture, tion, the spirit of a man that was on the edge of the abyss and ­traditional psychotherapy can feel like ‘just a lot of talk’ how I overcame an ocean of misery. I detail my journey through among people who value action,” says Dr. Kathleen Broughan, treacherous seas … and I tell of the people who diligently founder and executive director. “Service members are handsmanned the lighthouse, never giving up on me, knowing I was on. They trust their experience and the people they serve out there somewhere, trying to find my way home.” with. LEAP strives to engage them in their own healing In addition to their work with veterans, LEAP also works process with solutions that understand who they are, respect extensively with children, adolescents, adults and families in their culture, and meet them squarely on their own terms.” the Lowcountry, addressing issues like attention deficit dis­ Each session consists of a task and objectives for the patient order, addictive behavior, autistic spectrum disorders, domestic to accomplish with a horse. The animals have a unique capacviolence, abuse and neglect, and depression. Learn more about equine-assisted psychotherapy by visiting leapinsc.org. ity to respond to non-verbal signals and working with them can help people better understand their problems, with the horses serving as powerful stand-ins for the challenges in a person’s life. A recent study showed that when equine-assisted psychotherapy clients connect with horses emotionally, their blood pressure, heart rate and cortisol levels go down and their oxytocin (the feel-good hormone) levels go up. MIKE COUICK President and CEO, “With a condition like PTSD, it’s not just an emotional The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina OVERCOMING TRAUMATIC EVENTS IS

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP


EMPOWERING VISION With our low-cost, reliable electricity and choice industrial sites, Santee Cooper is working with the South Carolina Power Team to help new businesses picture a better future – and to power South Carolina toward Brighter Tomorrows, Today.

www.scpowerteam.com • www.poweringsc.com


|

SC   energy Q&A

Tips to stay comfortable this winter BY PATRICK KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

Q

Last year, we spent our first winter in our new place, which is actually an older home. Even with the heat turned up, it always felt chilly indoors. This year, we added insulation, but we’re wondering if there are additional steps we can take to make the house more comfortable this winter.

A

12

p Covering cold floors with an area rug can help retain indoor heat. Also, remember to close the fireplace flue when a fire is not burning—heated air can be sucked out through the chimney. u To make sure your home is being warmed

effectively and efficiently, start each season off with a furnace inspection conducted by a professional.

places to look. You can seal them up with a variety of products like caulk and weatherstripping. A fireplace can also be a major source of air leakage. If you don’t use the fireplace, you can seal the opening or install an inflatable chimney balloon. If you’re counting on the fireplace to take the edge off winter, consider this: Unless you have a high-efficiency insert, your fireplace will suck heated air from the room out through the chimney. And in all cases, don’t forget to close the fireplace flue when there is no fire burning. Your pursuit of comfort should also include a careful look at your home’s heating system. Is it distributing heat evenly and efficiently? Forced-air systems distribute air through supply ducts and registers. Small rooms may only have one register, but large rooms could have several. You may find some supply registers are blowing copious amounts of warm air and others little at all.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

N RE L .GOV

When we talk about comfort in our homes, we usually think about where the thermostat is set. But, as you’re finding, there’s more to the picture than just the indoor temperature. An important piece of the comfort puzzle is radiant heat, which transfers heat from a warm surface to a colder one. A person sitting in a room that’s 70 degrees can still feel chilly if there’s a cold surface nearby, like a single-pane window, a hardwood floor or an exterior wall. Covering these cold surfaces can help. Try using area rugs, wall quilts or tapestries, bookcases and heavy curtains to help prevent heat loss and make your home feel more comfortable. Keep in mind, radiant heat can also work in your favor. A dark-colored tile floor that receives several hours of direct sun can retain heat during the day and radiate it into the room during the evening. Another possible cause of discomfort during the winter is air movement caused by multiple small leaks throughout your home. On average, a typical home loses about half its air every hour, and that amount can increase when outdoor temperatures are extremely cold and the wind is blowing. The best way to keep your home toasty is to minimize and seal air leaks wherever you find them. Penetrations and cracks around windows and doors, exterior cracks in brickwork and siding, plumbing and wiring penetrations from the exterior to the interior of the home, and mail slots or pet doors are good

Ideally, every room should have return air registers. If you see possible shortcomings with your forced-air system, enlist the help of a certified contractor that really knows how to improve ductwork. Ensure your furnace is running at peak efficiency by scheduling an annual inspection. Check your filter monthly and replace or clean it as necessary. If you heat your home with radiators, bleed them at the beginning of the season so they flow more efficiently. Send questions to Energy Q&A, South Carolina Living, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033, or email energyqa@scliving.coop.


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at your fingertips. From the moment you open the box, you’ll realize how different the WOW Computer is. The components are all connected; all you do is plug it into an outlet and your high-speed Internet connection. Then you’ll see the screen – it’s now 22 inches. This is a completely new touch screen system, without the cluttered look of the normal computer screen. The “buttons” on the screen are easy to see and easy to understand. All you do is touch one of them, from the Web, Email, Calendar to Games– you name it… and a new screen opens up. It’s so easy to use you won’t have to ask your children or grandchildren for help. Until now, the very people who could benefit most from E-mail and the Internet are the ones that have had the hardest time accessing it. Now, thanks to the WOW Computer, countless older Americans are discovering the wonderful world of the Internet every day. Isn’t it time

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SC   smart choice

Pet project Oh, how we love our pets. From cats and dogs to rabbits and reptiles, we spoil them as much as we can. And because they can’t do it themselves, we shop for them.  BY JAYNE CANNON

FELINE FUN

Keep your cat amused for hours with a classic hide-and-seek toy, featuring electronic mouse sounds. The OurPets Catty Whack Electronic Motion Cat Toy has a feather that moves in and out of the mouse holes, as Kitty pounces and purrs. $30. (800) 672‑4399; chewy.com.

MORE THAN A DOOR

Nifty idea, the pet door—but let’s face it, you don’t want just any creature coming through it. That’s not a worry with the SureFlap Microchip Pet Door. A collar microchip ensures that only your pet gets in, and there’s a timer so Fido only goes out when you want him to. $200. (800) 826‑2871; petdoors.com.

FIDO CALLING

When you’re having a bad day at work, seeing your dog’s smiling face may be just what you need. The PetChatz Digital Daycare lets you see your pet, talk to him, dispense treats, play games and even record your pup’s activities. $380. (855) 444‑6544; petchatz.com.

HYDRATED AND HAPPY

Pets need water for health and hydration. Make sure there’s always fresh water for your fur baby with the Pioneer Pet Stainless Steel Drinking Fountain Raindrop Design. An included charcoal filter rids tap water of impurities. It’s easy to clean too—unplug it and put it right in the dishwasher. $36. (800) 672‑4399; chewy.com.

WELLGROOMED NOT HERE, ROVER

Prices and availability are subject to change. Inclusion in this column is not an endorsement by South Carolina Living or any S.C. electric cooperative.

14

Ever noticed that your dog or cat always heads straight for the places you don’t want your pet to go? Until they learn to read “Keep Off” signs, here’s a solution. The PetSafe ScatMat Electronic Training Mat emits a safe but annoying three-second burst of static pulse when Rover or Kitty go into the forbidden area. No yelling involved. $40. (800) 672‑4399; chewy.com.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

Your pet deserves to look snappy, but groomer costs can add up. Do it yourself with an all-in-one tool, the Wahl Lithium Ion Pro Series Pet Clipper Kit. You’ll get an assortment of blades, combs, scissors and more, all in a convenient carrying case. $60. (800) 767‑9245; wahlusa.com.


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S.C. Imperial troopers suit up for good causes

in the hidden chamber where elite Imperial troopers—storm, sand and snow—cram together to prepare for battle. Sweat drips from their black spandex unitards as the troops unpack enormous rolling cases of essential battle gear: armor, blasters, helmets, backpacks, AA batteries and emergency Velcro. Soon, Lord Vader will decide if these PVC-clad troops will defend the Galactic Empire or welcome young athletes to the Special Olympics at Myrtle Beach Pelicans Ballpark. His priorities are clear: The Empire will have to fend for itself until 350 kids have had their fill of photos and ­cavorting with beloved movie villains. These bad guys belong to the 501st Legion, a fan-based costuming organization of 12,600 Star Wars devotees from around the globe that was born—no, not on planet Mustafar or Naboo—but right here in South Carolina. The legion, aka Vader’s Fist, launched in 1997 with a few devoted fans mesmerized by Star Wars. It has since become the preferred costuming organization of Lucasfilm Ltd./Disney, recognized around the world for movie-accurate costumes and raising millions of dollars for charity.

BY JAN A. IGOE

Bad guys doing good

M IC SM ITH

THESE ARE NOT THE VILLAINS YOU’RE LOOKING FOR In fact, hearts of gold rule as members of the 501st Legion entertain participants at the Special Olympics in Myrtle Beach. From left: snowtrooper Bone Beaupré, sandtrooper Greg French, Darth Vader (portrayed by Justin Branfuhr), sandtrooper Jeff Miller, and, sneaking in to join the fun, Rebel Legion’s Obi-Wan Kenobi portrayed by Chad Varn M IC S M ITH

The Carolina Garrison is comprised of more than 200 active cosplayers from North and South Carolina. “I was the first member in Myrtle Beach,” Greg French says as he slips into his ’70s disco boots, the perfect sandtrooper footwear. Each piece of custom-aged armor is numbered and donned in a specific sequence from the ankles up. “Once you get your armor on, you can’t bend over.” At 49, French is typical of legion volunteers, most of whom are active professionals with famFLEXIBILITY HELPS Jeff Miller, left, is ilies. They lead demanding lives, amused watching Greg French go through but managed to arrange a day off the contortions necessary to put on his from work to brighten the day for sandtrooper armor. children they’ve never met. Besides teaching science at Socastee High School, French serves in the Air Force Reserves and is a trained stuntman who has appeared in Spiderman and performed stunts on The Walking Dead. Any spare time is spent building robots and sourcing elusive parts, like the toilet thingamajig he located in Ethiopia that was perfect for his armor. “Hey, Vader’s here,” someone shouts as Justin Branfuhr hauls his trunks into the dressing area. His costume was approved a couple of weeks ago, so this is his official debut as villain-in-chief. Unlike troopers, pilots and Tusken Raiders (the more the merrier), there can only be one recognizable character, such as Vader, at any event. The honor goes to whomever signs up first.

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“I made my first Darth Vader costume in 2003 out of papier-mache and cardboard,” says Branfuhr, 31, who now makes movie props for a living. “It was terrible, but I’ve been building stuff ever since.” Branfuhr has since perfected costumes of Captain America, Batman, Iron Man and Master Chief from the video game Halo. If Branfuhr shows up at a costume contest in his 80-pound fiberglass Halo getup, the other competitors may as well go home. His Vader costume is no less impressive. Stormtrooper costumes can run from several hundred to several thousand dollars and take substantial time to build, even with the kits PAPIER-MACHE NO MORE available today. Vader is the most Justin Branfuhr’s Darth Vader complex and expensive costume, but costume is an impressive Jawa attire could be had for about upgrade since his first in 2003. $200. Message boards help members source parts, offer advice and sell to each other at cost. A lone good guy has somehow crashed the party. Hans ‘Chad’ Varn of Murrells Inlet, donning Obi-Wan Kenobi’s familiar hooded brown cloak, is part of the Rebel Legion, an alliance of Vader’s adversaries. Formed in 1999, it’s home to Princess Leia, Han Solo, Yoda, Luke Skywalker and the Jedi crowd. Many Star Wars cosplayers are active members of both groups, which often appear together. “If my mother was alive, she’d think I was nuts,” says Varn, a disabled Marine Corps veteran studying communications at

Katie Johnson would have been 20 in May if cancer hadn’t intervened. The daughter of the 501st Legion founder, Albin Johnson, was diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor at age 7. Her love of Star Wars was hereditary. “Katie would see R2-D2 guarding Princess Leia in her sleep,” Johnson says. “She thought it would be nice to have an R2 watching over her.” Her sister, Allie, knew pink was her favorite color. Say no more. The R2 Builders Club, a group of droid builders who work with the 501st, jumped on the project, but time was short. Unable to complete a pink droid in time, another R2 builder repainted his droid pink for Katie. She threw her arms around the robot the moment she saw it. The droid was dubbed R2-KT in Katie’s honor. “Steroids had done a number on her, but she never complained. She loved having R2-KT at her bedside,” Johnson says. “As a father, I wept with gratitude that people would do that so selflessly. You’re in a rush to make their dreams come true as fast as you can.” Katie’s memory inspired some of the legion’s preferred charities, especially Make-A-Wish. Since the R2 Builders Club completed the little astromech, the pink droid has been around the world. It appeared in The Clone Wars, became a Hasbro action figure, and delivered smiles to children’s hospitals, most recently in Singapore. Johnson has driven R2-KT, beeping away, into children’s hospital rooms remotely, watching from a distance. “The nice thing about a droid is there are no human characteristics. It sounds crazy, but the droid lets them connect with something abstract. Imagination takes over and they forget.” For more on the adventures of “the pink droid with a heart of gold,” visit r2kt.com.

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A N DRE W H AWO RTH

M IC SM ITH

M I LTON MORRIS

Katie’s droid

COMFORTABLE TRUCE Tusken Raider J.P. Morgan and X-Wing fighter pilot Brad Butler greet fans in the corridor of Pelicans Ballpark on Star Wars night.


‘If you want to get away from a sandtrooper, just run up some steps. We’re not very mobile.’ — JEFF MILLER

PH OTOS TH IS PAG E BY A N DRE W H AWO RTH

p WHO ARE THESE GUYS? On the Pelicans Star Wars night, little Denise, held by grandmother Megan Jacob of Myrtle Beach, scrutinizes stormtrooper Andrew Rochelle. Darth Vader, portrayed by Jerry Sienkiewicz, and Obi-Wan Kenobi, aka Chad Varn, fill out the pose. t WOMEN JOINING THE RANKS

Joshua Wright gets help with his sandtrooper costume from Imperial officer Jessica Wright.

Coastal Carolina University. His teenage son and daughter are used to their father making Halloween a daily event. The soft costumes, like Obi-Wan, are less expensive than the heavy armor types that require more than a sewing machine to create. But lightsabers are a different story. “I have seven,” Varn confesses. The cost averages $100 to $300, but his favorite—the one with the sequenced flashing lights and aircraft aluminum circuit board—cost him $450. His Jedi mind control tricks have yet to convince his wife that his saber collection is a great investment. Sandtrooper Jeff Miller, an Horry Electric Cooperative member, has two dozen pieces of armor and a dedicated wife to help him dress. Christine Miller attends almost every event, manning snaps and straps and escorting her husband around. The helmet, which is equipped with a microphone and two fans for cooling, cuts vision by about 50 percent. The helmet is strategically padded to keep troopers from becoming bobble­heads. Like all troopers, he can’t hear anyone who isn’t speaking directly to his chest. And if anything itches, well, tough luck. “If you want to get away from a sandtrooper, just run up some steps,” Jeff Miller says. “We’re not very mobile.” Trooper armor weighs about 20 pounds and the large, unwieldy backpacks aren’t built for comfort. “It takes 20 minutes to get the costume on and 15 to get it off. That’s with help.” Jeff Miller gets his greatest satisfaction appearing at children’s hospitals and greeting Make-A-Wish recipients. Last year at Myrtle Beach International Airport, he joined a team of Horry County police officers and fellow troopers to fulfill a young Star Wars fan’s wish. When the boy’s plane landed, the pilot took him on a tour of the cockpit while a TIE Fighter

u TRUE TO FILM “If they did it for the

movie, we do it,” says Jason Boyd, both AT-AT driver and commander of the 501st Legion’s Carolina Garrison.

pilot (Frankie Gore of Surfside Beach) snuck in behind them. “There’s no better feeling than seeing the surprise in a kid’s eyes when he realizes that a TIE Fighter pilot has boarded his aircraft and offered to give him some tips on flying in an actual cockpit,” Jeff Miller says. Another child was delighted when troopers, led by Vader himself, came to his school to grant his wish: He and his family would be going to Disney World.

Family affair It’s not uncommon for 501st members to drive several hours to support charity work or Star Wars promotions. On Star Wars night at Pelicans Ballpark, good and bad guys from both legions came from all over the Carolinas. There were Tusken Raiders from Charleston, a snowtrooper from Aiken, and another Vader from Greensboro, North Carolina. Most were in their 40s, but some had yet to be born when the first Star Wars movie premiered. Dressed as an AT-AT driver, Mt. Pleasant resident Jason Boyd is the commander of the Carolina Garrison, a position he’s held for five years. His wife, Carolyn Boyd, helps him with his balaclava, the head-to-chin cover that flattens his beard and absorbs inevitable sweat inside the helmet. “If they did it for the movie, we do it,” Jason Boyd says. A tiny part flies off the complex driver helmet, but Carolyn

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M I LTO N M O RRIS

works for the state as a selfBoyd chases it down, glue in described “computer nerd.” hand. “Just a greeblie,” Jason Johnson’s original dream was Boyd says. “That’s what we assembling 10 stormtroopers call anything we don’t really in one place. The legion, now have a name for.” represented in every state and In the 501st, men still out50 countries, has appeared in number women about five Star Wars novels, comics, carto one, but that’s changing. HEALTHY OBSESSION Albin Johnson initially became immersed in the world “More women are getting into toons and more. Members of Star Wars as a way to address depression after having a leg amputated. it,” says Carolyn Boyd, who is come from every walk of life. dressed as an Imperial officer tonight, but also has two Rebel “We have doctors and lawyers,” Johnson says. “Oh my gosh, Legion Princess Leia costumes for warmer weather. The Boyds’ we have a rocket scientist and a guy who went to Antarctica on young daughters amuse themselves nearby. They’ve witnessed a science expedition and a guy tight with the Arab Emirates.” this friendly chaos before. It took a while for the 501st Legion to distinguish itself as Charleston’s Brad Butler is Luke Skywalker tonight. His an asset to the Lucas crowd. The group had to prove it wasn’t wife, Betsy Butler, helps him dress. She is a tattoo artist out to violate copyrights, misrepresent characters, or profit licensed by Lucasfilms to replicate Star Wars characters at from charity work. “It took 2½ years to get a face-to-face with their conventions. the Lucas team,” Johnson says. When George Lucas was named grand marshal of the Rose How it all began Parade in 2007, he flew 200 stormtroopers from around the The 501st Legion is the vision-gone-wild of Albin Johnson of Columbia, and his friend Tom Crews. Johnson was only 8 ‘Star Wars created a beautiful fairytale of when he saw the original movie, and the seed was planted. perseverance and triumph over incredible Decades later, after a horrific car accident and 20 operations that couldn’t save his leg, Johnson became an amputee. odds that people around the globe Depressed and withdrawn, he found his way back with relate to.’ —501ST LEGION FOUNDER ALBIN JOHNSON Crews’ help and their mutual fascination with Star Wars. Stormtroopers armor became a great equalizer. With no face, globe in to escort him down Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena. race, age or gender, it provided ready camouflage for someone He also hired drill sergeants (from Earth’s military forces) with a disability. Name-wise, “500” sounded military and who prepared them to march 5½ miles in sync. Johnson Johnson threw in the “1st” for authenticity. “Legion” was bormarched up front, leading the group. rowed from ancient Rome. “Having only one leg, that was difficult. We tried to rig the The modest Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative member armor so it didn’t pinch. Those plastic plates don’t care that there’s skin there. We call those red welts on the back of the GET MORE knees ‘trooper tracks,’ ” he says. “We were all pretty bloody by the end of it.” HOW TO JOIN THE 501ST LEGION Do you have what it takes to be a Johnson has come a long way since the 1980s, when the stormtrooper? Applicants must be at least 18 and own a screen-accurate self-described “Dungeons & Dragons-playing, Star Warscostume, subject to approval. Select a five-digit Legion ID number, a quoting geek” couldn’t get a girl to talk to him. “I met my wife garrison and a squad near you at 501st.com/members/join_form.php. through the 501st. She was in a belly dancer outfit, a slinky Members must abide by a code of conduct and demonstrate exemplary Leia costume,” he says. “I’d do it all again just to meet her.” behavior when representing characters trademarked by Star Wars films. Despite the legion’s success, Johnson downplays his TO SCHEDULE AN APPEARANCE AT CHARITABLE EVENTS Request an contribution. appearance (at least two months in advance) at 501st.com/request.php. “Star Wars created a beautiful fairytale of perseverance and The legion does not charge for appearances, but donations to a charity triumph over incredible odds that people around the globe in the name of the organization are welcomed and encouraged. To enlist relate to,” says Johnson, who encourages his bad guys to have the legion’s help for a Star Wars promotional event, contact Lucasfilm fun, help others, make friends and stop scrutinizing costumes at fanevents@starwars.com. for something 1/64th-inch off. HOW TO JOIN THE REBEL LEGION Must be at least 18 and own a “I’m no one special, but I had faith that if I put my work “good guy” costume from the Star Wars saga. For more information, into something and didn’t put one over on people, God would visit newsite.rebellegion.com/membership-qualifications. To request an anoint it, bless it and use it for his glory,” Johnson says. “God appearance, go to newsite.rebellegion.com/event-booking-form. smiles on love being shown anywhere. It’s never wasted.” 20

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A driving passion When Paul Ianuario managed to scrape together enough money to buy his first car back in the 1960s, the North Augusta teenager was reeling with anticipation. After all, owning a car in those days was a stamp of personal independence and a widely recognized symbol of passage into manhood. He decided on a 1959 Renault Dauphine, a tiny red French sedan with a four-cylinder engine. Ianuario liked that the little car stood out from the Fords and Chevrolets and Chryslers that dominated the roadways. “I wanted something that everybody else didn’t have,” he says. “I wanted a car that was different.” Today, Ianuario is the proud owner of a collection of 24 vehicles that are, indeed, different. His collection includes a 1908 singlecylinder Cadillac, a 1910 Chalmers Detroit, a 1912 Hudson “Mile-a-Minute” Speedster and a 1929 Packard custom convertible coupe—the cars he’ll be displaying Nov. 2–4 at the Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival as the event’s 2018 Honored Collector. “You know, if I had collected just Model A Fords or just ’57 Chevys or just Mustangs, life would have been easy,” Ianuario says with a laugh. “But I never met a car I didn’t like. Each one brought back feelings and emotions about different eras. I never bought a car because it was worth money; I bought it because of its history.” Ianuario, who spent decades working in research and development for the French tire company Michelin, keeps his beloved collection of classic cars in a climate-controlled 7,000-squarefoot garage near his home, but he regularly lends vehicles to exhibits around the country so that other classic automobile enthusiasts can see and enjoy them. “I honestly believe that if you can’t share a car then you don’t have any business owning it.” —TIM HANSON | PHOTO BY MILTON MORRIS

GET MORE For more information on the Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival, visit hhiconcours.com.

Paul Ianuario AGE:

72.

Duncan. Originally from North Augusta. OCCUPATION: Retired engineer; avid collector of rare automobiles. OTHER INTERESTS: “I grew up being a collector—butterflies, rocks, seashells, arrow­ heads, stamps, coins and baseball cards.” NEED FOR SPEED: Used to build and race hydroplanes. Raced 10 times in Mille Miglia, Italy’s revered 1,000-mile endurance road race, and was on the winning team five times. CO-OP CONNECTION: Ianuario is a member of Laurens Electric Cooperative. HOMETOWN:

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Following the Swamp Fox

HISTORY CLASS WAS NEVER THIS MUCH FUN Jade Perkins is all smiles on a kayak tour exploring the Swamp Fox’s territory.

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Grab your paddle for an expedition on the Revolutionary Rivers National Recreation Trail We are melting. At least, it feels that way as I stand with an outdoorsy-looking group on the banks of Lynches River. It’s a sweltering Saturday in Florence County, and the new upgrades at Odell Venters Landing in Johnsonville (repaved parking lot, dual concrete ramps and a floating courtesy dock) have just been dedicated by dignitaries in three-piece suits. Remarkably, they manage to look a bit cooler than those of us sporting shorts, sandals, sun visors and somewhat bulky life vests. But our discomfort is about to be tempered. Today, we embark on a journey through the waterways once navigated by Revolutionary War hero and local legend, Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion. Not only does this paddle trip lure us with the promise of bracing waters, gentle breezes, natural beauty and intermittent gifts of shade, but it guarantees a fascinating glimpse into the storied past of the Pee Dee and one of the craftiest militia leaders in U.S. history. It was at this landing—then called Witherspoon’s Ferry— that the brigadier general took command of his scrappy Patriot army, leading them through the waterways and wetland forests where they outsmarted the considerably

THE INS AND OUTS Holly Beaumier, director of the Florence Convention and Visitors Bureau, provides general instruction and safety precautions prior to the group’s launch.

COU RTESY O F A LE X PA LKOV ICH

BY LIBBY SWOPE WIERSEMA | PHOTOS BY MIC SMITH

LEADING THE CHARGE Watching over the Odell Venters Landing is a bronze statue of Gen. Francis Marion and his horse, Ball, by sculptor Alex Palkovich.

larger British forces. As a spectacular reminder, Marion and his trusty horse, Ball, are memorialized here by a 7-foot bronze sculpture (atop a 12-foot-tall base) created by worldrenowned artist, Alex Palkovich. You might well be moved to give it a hearty salute before you push off. This trip will begin on the Lynches River, then turn off into Mill Creek and end near Snow’s Island, Marion’s secretive headquarters. It’s a small segment of the 66 miles of blackwater tributaries known as the Revolutionary Rivers National Recreation Trail, a somewhat convoluted path that requires maps and experienced guides. Holly Beaumier of the Florence Convention and Visitors Bureau, a veteran of this trip, says we might spot snakes, alligators, beavers, otters and other creatures along the way. Depending on water levels and currents, it should take about three hours to complete our 7-mile adventure. Kayaks are loaded into the water and we are assisted into our vessels by Hughes Page of RiverRat’s Kayaks, and Terry Cook, a ranger with the South Carolina Forestry Commission and a lifelong explorer of this swampy terrain. If you were doing a stint on a survivor reality show, these are the people you’d want to be stranded with. “The water is low and there are places along the way where we may need to pull the kayaks,” Page says. “Nothing to worry about, though. We’ll be right here to help you.” The more experienced paddlers work their oars with precision, while the newbies get a feel for dipping and sweeping their blades to best advantage. With a dozen or so kayaking trips under my belt, I don’t fit either description but land somewhere in the middle. It’s been a year since my last excursion, but like a rubber band, I return to form in no time.

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KEEPING HISTORY ALIVE General Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion leads the way through a South Carolina swamp during the Revolution as depicted in this engraving by Alonzo Chappel.

River tips Plan ahead. If you plan to bring the kids, a shorter trip is recommended. Pack the essentials. Don’t forget your sunscreen, bug spray and a hat or visor to protect yourself from the elements. It’s a good idea to pack a water bottle and a snack for quick sustenance while you’re paddling.

Soon, all 11 of us are moving in a loose chevron, smoothly zippering between banks of bearded water tupelos and cypress trees. As we hoped, gliding on the water really takes the edge off the heat. The paddling is easy and the scenery is already eliciting sighs. On either side, walls of trees and foliage form forests thick enough to camouflage deer, wild boar, migratory songbirds and, quite feasibly, human beings aiming to hide from their enemies. “Francis Marion and his men were known to ride marsh tackies through here,” says Cook, referring to the smallish, South Carolina breed of horse famous for an ability to maneuver lowland swamps. “The horses the British rode would get stuck in the muck.” It’s hard to imagine this peaceful area was once a Revolutionary War combat zone. Here and there, our guides point out the massive hollows of tree trunks big enough to hide grown men and their munitions. History aside, there’s a definitive magical quality to these woods. Clusters of cypress knees look like hobbits drawn to the banks to watch our passing. On the river’s surface, a sparkly flux of water skippers creates madcap highways as they scoot about in the sunlight. When our laughter sends a flock of ibis rushing up for cover in the treetops, there are lots of “oohs” and “aahs.” “Look here—this is where some critters had breakfast this morning,” says Cook, as she passes a small tree. In the hollow of the trunk are a cluster of tiny clam shells, each an empty, gaping mouth. But this heaven on earth is interrupted by potential difficulty ahead, and its name is “Hell’s Gate.” With eyes flinty enough to ignite a log with a single glance, Cook shoots us a look and delivers gentle but firm guidance on how to traverse the hairpin curvature that will take us even deeper into the floodplain forest. “We will need to go single file up ahead,” she says. “Just

Make it a sleepover. RiverRat’s Kayaks offers longer excursions, too, some of which include overnight camping. Get involved. If river camping intrigues you, you’ll be excited to know that a local civic group, Friends of Revolutionary Rivers (FOREVR), is raising funds to build camping platforms every 10 miles along this ­fascinating trail. Learn more about this project at easterncarolinacf.org/​project/featured/ friends-of-revolutionary-rivers-forevr. Watch the video. Visit the “Featured Videos” section on the home page of SCLiving.coop to watch a video of the trail produced by Discover South Carolina and South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

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GETTING THEIR FEET WET Kayakers cool off a bit on a very hot day as they portage their craft through the shallows.


It’s hard to imagine this peaceful area was once a Revolutionary War combat zone.

IF THESE TREES COULD TALK Some of the cypresses lining the creeks of Lynches River were here 500 years before the Revolutionary War.

bathroom facilities and take a few minutes to gobble up some stay to the left, then turn as sharply as you can. If you get simple provisions and drink down icy bottles of water. Then stuck, don’t worry. I’ll get you out.” we’re afloat again, moving through a dense, gorgeous canopy She doesn’t sound alarmed, so we maintain our relaxed of trees. We are now on Mill Creek, and it is rich with an rhythm. Thankfully, the water is low today (and, again—it’s ­ethereal loveliness. hot!), so no one’s too worried about the prospect of an unex“Some of these cypress trees are around 750 years old,” pected dip or snag. As it happens, Hell’s Gate requires a few says Cook, who volunteers her time and effort to keep these minor rescues, but soon we are all through the stricture and waterways clear of fallen trees and other obstacles. “That’s one paddling merrily along. reason why I try to take care of this place—future generations Cook also instructs us on how to cross over fallen logs that are just below the water’s surface. deserve to see these natural treasures, too.” “Pick up as much speed as you can as you approach, then Indeed, it’s not hard to believe in the longevity of these hit it,” she says. “You should go right over it.” giants, their trunks belled at the bottom like the skirt of a And sure enough, those instructions work like a charm, Southern lady’s hoop dress. Everyone is enchanted by this part and more than one of us feels accomof the route, which Cook tells us was once cleared and tended by African plished at successfully meeting this GET THERE slaves from nearby plantations. challenge. Within a few minutes, we That tidbit of information gives reach a “portage,” an area so shallow Odell Venters Landing is located at 714 Kingsburg Highway, Johnsonville. For more information on us solemn pause, and its signifiwe need to disembark and pull our the Revolutionary Rivers of Florence County, see kayaks a short way over the sandy cance serves to deepen the hauntvisitflo.com/revolutionary-rivers. river bottom. Periodically, nearly all of ing beauty of this place. About an GUIDED TOURS: RiverRat’s Kayaks offers a variety of us find ourselves grounded in shallow hour later, we round a bend and excursions. Dates, times and prices vary. For online places, but with a little rocking, push spot a wooden bridge spanning booking and a complete listing of scheduled tours, of an oar and, occasionally, a pull the creek. This marks the road to visit riverratsc.com. from a passing paddler, we are on our Snow’s Island, Cook says. It also COST: Guided tours start at $30 per adult; $20 for way again. marks the end of a journey through children. Price includes kayak, paddle and life vest. At a halfway point, we head to the the remarkable, mysterious, hidden DETAILS: (843) 601‑1795 or (843) 389‑4656. shore and disembark. Here, we find places of the Pee Dee.


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Lost and found history BY LIBBY SWOPE WIERSEMA | PHOTOS BY RUTA SMITH

BEFORE ST. AUGUSTINE, PLYMOUTH ROCK

and Jamestown, there was Santa Elena. Never heard of it? You aren’t alone. Beaufort’s Santa Elena History Center aims to change all that through its main exhibit, “America’s Untold Story.” Santa Elena (not to be confused with St. Helena) was a settlement established on what we now call Parris Island in 1566 to serve as the capital of the Spanish colony, La Florida. It was the site of wars, political upheaval, religious discord and cultural battles as French and Spanish settlers jostled for position in the New World. Opened in 2016, the museum is housed in the town’s former

See South Carolina’s colonial past in a whole new light when you visit Santa Elena History Center federal district courthouse, an art deco building that began as a private residence, and then was used as a hospital during the Civil War. Its history is documented on the ground floor of the center and well worth a stop as you take in the center’s many displays. You can immerse yourself in Santa Elena history with a self-guided tour, but enlisting the assistance of one of the

‘The story of Santa Elena changes everything about the way we think of our origins.’ —MEGAN MEYER, DIRECTOR OF SANTA ELENA HISTORY CENTER

GET THERE The Santa Elena History Center is located at 1501 Bay Street in downtown Beaufort. HOURS: Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. ADMISSION: $10 for adults, $5 for students, $5 for children ages 7 to 17, and free for children younger than 7. Active-duty military, police and firefighters with IDs also admitted free. UPCOMING EVENT: The center is hosting its second annual Santa Elena Lowcountry Fair at Cotton Hall Plantation in Yemasee Nov. 2–3, featuring Marsh Tacky races and living history encampments. DETAILS: (843) 379-1550; santa-elena.org.

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knowledgeable docents volunteering at the center will provide deeper insights as you navigate two floors of ­compelling exhibits. What unfolds as you move through the visual timeline is a story that includes secrets archaeologists uncovered during excavations of the Santa Elena ruins on Parris Island. “The story of Santa Elena changes everything about the way we think of our origins,” says Megan Meyer, director

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

MULTI-USE SPACE The art deco structure housing the museum has previously served as a residence, Civil War hospital and a federal district courthouse.

of the history center. “People think of the Spanish as settling in Florida as we know it today, but the Spanish settled in South Carolina, too—a piece of history you don’t usually hear about in the classroom.” We began our tour in a viewing room, where an eight-minute film explained the complex history of European settlements in the area. Afterward, we followed our docent through the second-floor main exhibit, an area that once served as a federal courtroom, moving clockwise through the displays for a chronological perspective. With colorful maps, films, displays and illustrations, a time that seems downright ancient becomes a vivid, living ­experience. Santa Elena was founded 70 years after Christopher Columbus made his first trans-Atlantic voyage, a time when Spain, France and England ruthlessly competed to rule both land and sea. Displays detail each significant event during a time of high stakes, cutthroat imperialism and uncertainty. It’s a lot of information to take in, but the history center does a beautiful job of unpacking things bit by bit. The exhibits also include an accounting of the excavations of Santa Elena, which began in the 1800s under the assumption that the settlement was French. Trained archeologists were of a differing opinion, though, and in the 1950s declared that pottery found at the site was of Spanish origin. A new


excavation began in 1979, which led to the discovery of Santa Elena’s Spanish forts and Charlesfort—a French settlement that was abandoned just one year after it got its start in 1562. More recent excavations have also uncovered the location of Fort San Marcos, which had eluded archaeologists for about 20 years. You can read all about it in one of the final installments of the main gallery and examine a 3D model of the fort’s layout. After the main gallery tour, we headed back downstairs where we learned about the magnificent Spanish galleon ships through wooden models and film. Children can also sit at computer stations and watch historical videos geared for a more youthful audience. And who’s watching over them? Why, none other than a replica of the shrunken head of one of Beaufort’s most notorious ­residents​ —Blackbeard the pirate. “This is someone you don’t want to

SECRETS NO MORE Visitors delve into the history that has been uncovered during excavations of the Spanish settlement of Santa Elena, on what is now Parris Island.

see on one of those boats,” quips Meyer, pointing to the scraggly visage. The center also has created an “excavation site,” a sandbox where children can hunt for replica artifacts of the Santa Elena dig. A gift shop filled with mementos, educational toys and local crafts is

Spirits & Stories • Oct. 20

FA L L FA MILY F U N AND HI STORI C GHOST TALES BY TWIL IG H T

another favorite stop for visitors of all ages, and while they aren’t part of Santa Elena’s history, the old holding cells from the building’s courthouse days are still intact and open for those who wish to briefly experience the jailhouse blues and take a selfie or two.

Soldiers, the Enslaved & Civilians • Nov. 3 & 4 T H E C IV IL WA R ’S E F F E C T S O N T H E C A R O L IN A PI EDM ONT

Christmas Candlelight Tours • Dec. 1 & 8

A SOUTHERN-STYLE C H R IS T MA S IN T H E C A R O L IN A B A C K C O U N T RY

HISTORIC BRATTONSVILLE • CHMUSEUMS.ORG • 1444 BRATTONSVILLE RD. MCCONNELLS, SC 29726 • 803.684.2327 PROJECT ASSISTED BY CITY OF ROCK HILL AND YORK COUNTY ACCOMMODATIONS & HOSPITALITY TAX PROGRAMS

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SC   recipe

BEEF BURGUNDY SERVES 6–8

1 tablespoon olive oil 8 ounces thick-cut bacon slices, cut into ½-inch pieces 3 pounds chuck roast, cut into 1½-inch chunks Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 pound carrots, sliced into thick chunks, or baby carrots 2 yellow onions, chopped or sliced 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1 750 ml bottle dry red wine*

2 cups beef broth 2 tablespoons tomato paste ½ teaspoon dried thyme (or 1½ teaspoons fresh) 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened, divided 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 pound fresh mushrooms, trimmed and sliced 1 10-ounce bag frozen pearl onions Thyme, for garnish

Preheat oven to 300 F. In a large Dutch oven, heat the oil. Add the bacon and cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until bacon is crispy. Using a slotted spoon, remove to a platter. Season beef chunks with salt and pepper. Working in batches, sear in the same pan until brown on all sides, about 3–5 minutes. Remove to same platter as bacon. Repeat until all beef is seared.

K A REN H ERM A N N

BY BELINDA SMITH-SULLIVAN

Sometimes nostalgia takes over and we start to crave the dishes of our childhood. Time to dust off Mom’s old recipes and pass them on to a new generation. What you just might discover is that they are still as good—or even better—than you remember!

Into the same pan, add carrots and yellow onions and cook for 10–15 minutes until onions are lightly brown. Add garlic and cook one minute longer. Return beef and bacon back to the pan, along with any juices that may have accumulated on the platter. Add the wine and beef broth, enough to almost cover the meat. Add the tomato paste and thyme and stir well. Bring to a simmer, cover with a lid and place in preheated oven. Cook for 1 hour or until meat and vegetables are fork-tender. While meat is in oven, combine 2 tablespoons of butter with flour; roll into 3–4 small balls and set aside. When stew comes out of the oven, stir in butter-flour balls, one at a time, to thicken the stew. In a saute pan, over medium heat, heat remaining 2 tablespoons butter and saute mushrooms until brown, about 10 minutes. Stir into stew along with frozen onions. On top of the stove, over medium heat, bring stew to a boil. Lower heat and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning, adding additional salt and pepper if needed. Serve over noodles or mashed potatoes. Garnish with additional fresh thyme. *If you do not want to use wine in this dish, substitute with additional beef broth instead.

What’s cooking at SCLiving.coop u BONUS RECIPE Complete your retro meal with our

Easiest‑ever Baked Alaska. Find the recipe at

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delicious as you remember, and oh-so-easy to make. Surprise your guests with this blast from the past by following Chef Belinda’s latest video recipe. Watch it at

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I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

PIGS IN A BLANKET This classic party food is still just as

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GW ÉN A Ë L LE VOT

CHICKEN TETRAZZINI SERVES 6–8 I U LI I A N EDRYGA I LOVA

CHICKEN KIEV

2 tablespoons olive oil 1 pound baby bella mushrooms, sliced 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1 12-ounce box fettucine or linguine pasta, cooked 1 pound chicken, cooked and shredded (or store-bought rotisserie chicken) ¼ cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced or chopped SAUCE

SERVES 4

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh chives, chopped 1 teaspoon dried tarragon 1 teaspoon dried thyme Pinch, cayenne pepper 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

CHICKEN

Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 cup all-purpose flour ½ cup heavy cream 1 ½ cups bread crumbs Vegetable oil, for frying

Combine butter, parsley, chives, tarragon, thyme, cayenne pepper, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a bowl (or in bowl of stand mixer). Place on a piece of parchment or wax paper and roll into a small log. Refrigerate until firm; or freeze if not using immediately. When firm, cut into 8 slices and keep refrigerated until ready to assemble. Using a paring knife, cut a small pocket into the flesh of each chicken breast, being careful not to penetrate the sides of the meat. Insert two pieces/slices of herbed butter into the pocket and, using your fingers, press cut flesh together to seal. Season with salt and pepper. Refrigerate overnight or at least 2 hours. Using three shallow dishes (like pie pans), place flour, cream and bread crumbs in one of each. Dip the chicken breasts in the flour, followed by cream and end by thoroughly coating with bread crumbs. Place on a rack over a baking sheet and refrigerate for another two hours. When ready to cook, remove chicken breasts from refrigerator and preheat oven to 350 F. In a skillet or saucepan, over medium-high heat, heat ¼-inch oil to 350 F. Place breasts into pan, sealed side down and brown; turn and brown other side. Transfer to a baking pan and bake in preheated oven for 18–20 minutes. Remove from oven and let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 cups chicken stock 1 ½ cups heavy cream 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice Kosher salt White pepper 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese, or white cheddar TOPPING

¼ cup Parmesan cheese, freshly grated ½ cup Italian breadcrumbs Parsley, chopped, for garnish

Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray a 9-by-13-inch casserole dish with cooking spray. In a large saute pan, over medium heat, heat olive oil and saute the mushrooms 6–8 minutes. Add garlic and cook an additional minute. Using a slotted spoon, remove to a bowl. In another clean, large saute pan, over medium heat, melt 4 tablespoons butter. Add flour and whisk constantly until mixture takes on the consistency of wet sand. Gradually pour in the stock while continuing to whisk; then gradually whisk in the cream and lemon juice. Lower heat slightly and continue whisking until sauce is thickened, about 3–4 minutes. (If sauce is too thick, add additional stock.) Remove pan from heat and stir in salt and pepper to taste. Add cheese and stir until it is melted. Fold in the pasta, chicken, mushrooms and tomatoes, and thoroughly combine. Pour into prepared casserole dish. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter and combine with Parmesan and breadcrumbs. Sprinkle evenly over casserole. Bake in preheated oven for 30–35 minutes or until sauce is bubbly and breadcrumbs are brown. Let cool slightly before serving. Garnish with chopped parsley.

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|

SC   gardener

Let’s talk about ginkgo trees

OCTOBER IN THE GARDEN n Whether you grow or buy pumpkins for Halloween decorations, remember that they will last longer if they still have a few inches of stem attached. Keeping the rind intact will extend the show-off life of a pumpkin. In other words, no carving.

BY L.A. JACKSON

PHOTOS BY L . A . JACKSO N

n Before herbaceous perennials are nipped to the ground by cold weather, set markers beside them or map the area so they won’t accidentally be disturbed or dug up during the busy spring planting season. n Root prune any shrubs or small trees that need to be relocated and then wait until late January or February to make the move. This extra chore done now will greatly increase the chances of successful transplants later.

TIP OF THE MONTH Many gardeners cast aspersions upon butterfly bushes (mainly older cultivars) for being seedy, even weedy—sometimes to the point of becoming invasive. If you want to prevent your butterfly bush from scattering its progenies hither and yon in your yard, now is the time to do it. Simply cut off and dispose of spent flower clusters before their seed heads begin to open, which usually happens around November. Keep in mind this is not the time for a full-blown pruning—wait until late winter to cut back overgrown branches.

32

L . A . JACKSO N

Keep the spread of butterfly bushes in check by removing spent flower clusters before seed heads open in November.

to chat about in the garden, but if you want a real conversation piece, try the ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba). For starters, it is very old—set your time machine back to 200 million years ago, and you will find ginkgo in full flaunt. Also, with apologies to Charles Darwin, it forgot about evolving and has essentially remained the same over the eons. Call ginkgo a living fossil, if you will. So, the ginkgo is ancient—now add otherworldly. During the spring and summer, the ginkgo fades into the same green-ness of many other shrubs and trees, which, from a distance, appears rather ho-hum. But closer inspection reveals weird, fan-shaped leaves that look like they would fit perfectly in an Avatar sequel. Ginkgo trees are tough, too. I’ve seen them doing quite well on mall parking lot berms and traffic islands in full sun, so in a pampered backyard, they will certainly thrive. They can stretch to over 60 feet tall with a 35-foot-plus spread, so give them room. As an alternative, consider a dwarf ginkgo. There are many mini-cultivars available, with easy-to-find examples being—literally, in descending order—Jade Butterfly, which tops out at around 12 feet tall, Spring Grove (6 feet) and the ubershort Mariken (2 to 3 feet). If you fancy more flash, variegated THERE ARE PLENTY OF PLANTS

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The White Lightning ginkgo cultivar brings variegated leaves to the garden party before turning to a handsome yellow in the fall.

ginkgo trees are also available. I have been enjoying the popular selection White Lightning with leaves scratched by pale yellow. It is another shorty, only stretching to about 8 feet high. Ginkgo trees are dioecious, meaning there are female and male trees. Many new cultivars are ginkgo guys, and this is on purpose. Female ginkgo trees produce nuts, which, after falling on the ground, begin to smell worse than nasty. So, unless you enjoy stink, skip female ginkgo selections. You won’t find ginkgo trees at every garden center, but it is worth asking the staff if they can order a particular cultivar. Online shopping is always an option, and, in this region, MrMaple (mrmaple.com) in East Flat Rock, North Carolina, offers a large ginkgo selection. Finally, an additional ginkgo plus for autumn: When colder temperatures arrive, its foliage will turn a handsome yellow. This show lingers but a few days, and then, almost in unison, all the leaves desert their branches, forming a carpet of chilled gold under the bare tree. Quite a sight—one you will be talking about all season. L.A. JACKSON is the former editor of Carolina Gardener magazine. Contact him at lajackson1@gmail.com.


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|

SC   calendar OCT 15 – NOV 15

Upstate O C TO B E R

15–31  Disciples Pumpkin Patch,

Disciples United Methodist Church, Greenville. (864) 297‑0382. 16–20  Union County Fair, Union County Fair Grounds, Union. (864) 427‑6259. 18  Oktoberfest, Oregon Avenue, Greenwood. (864) 942‑8448. 18, 25  Bluegrass & Harvest Market, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 607‑6233. 19–20  Hogs & Hens Festival, downtown, Abbeville. (864) 366‑9673. 20  Art on the Trail, Trailblazer Park, Travelers Rest. (864) 607‑6233. 20  Euro Auto Festival, The Preserve at Verdae, Greenville. (864) 501‑3892. 20  Hyco Memorial 5K and Doggie Dash, Anderson Sports & Entertainment Center, Anderson. (864) 356‑9857. 21  The Haitian Orphan Choir Concert, Disciples United Methodist Church, Greenville. (864) 297‑0382. 25  Laurens County Museum Auction and Silent Auction, Laurens County Museum, Laurens. (864) 683‑3688. 27  Fall for Liberty Bluegrass Festival, downtown, Liberty. (864) 506‑0737. NOVE M BE R

3  Fall Festival and Holiday

Market, Greenville Classical Academy, Simpsonville. (864) 329‑9884. 3  Your Next Step is the Cure Spartanburg Fun Run, USC Upstate, Spartanburg. (650) 598‑2857. 9  Art Gallery on Pendleton Square: Mike Hart, Pendleton Square, Pendleton. (864) 221‑0129. 9–11  Greenville Open Studios, various studios, Greenville. (864) 476‑3132. 10  Clusters for Kids Oyster Roast, Arran Farm, Easley. (864) 506‑0737. 10  Hartness Half Marathon & 5K, Hartness Property, Greenville. jdavis@setupevents.com. 10  Heroes & Villains: Music from Hollywood Films, Twichell Auditorium, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. 11  Veterans Day Parade, downtown, Liberty. (864) 898‑5926. O NG O I N G

Every other Wednesday  Music Sandwiched In, Spartanburg County Public Library, Spartanburg. (864) 948‑9020. Fridays  Starry Nights, Roper Mountain Science Center, Greenville. (864) 355‑8900.

36

SCLiving.coop/calendar Our mobile-friendly site lists even more festivals, shows and events. You’ll also find instructions on submitting your event. Please confirm information with the hosting event before attending.

Midlands O CTO B E R

15–21  South Carolina State Fair, S.C. State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (803) 799‑3387. 15–31  Laurie Adamson Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 18–21  The Ninth Biennial Conference of the Urban History Association: “Cities at the Crossroads,” South Carolina Alumni Center and Hilton Columbia Center, Columbia. (215) 572‑2110. 19–20, 26–28, 31  Gilbert House of Terror, Harley Taylor Road, Gilbert. (803) 892‑5396. 19–28  Western Carolina State Fair, Aiken Fairgrounds, Aiken. (803) 648‑8955. 20  Deep in the Heart Celebration, Adventure Center at Anne Springs Close Greenway, Fort Mill. (803) 328‑8871. 20  Famously Hot South Carolina Pride Festival, Main Street, Columbia. info@scpride.org. 20  Fur Ball Moonlight Gala, Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia. (803) 465‑9150. 20  Singspiration for JCMC–Haven of Rest, Weldon Auditorium, Manning. (803) 460‑5572. 20  Spirits and Stories: Brattonsville by Twilight, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 818‑6767. 20  TriSumter Triathlon, City of Sumter Aquatics Center, Sumter. (803) 774‑3998. 20–21  Pumpkin Patch Express, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. 21  Columbia Buddy Walk, Saluda Shoals Park, Columbia. (803) 252‑0914. 24  City of Stars Charity Fashion Show, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921. 24  On the Table Conversations, various locations, Columbia and Lexington. (803) 254‑5601. 25  Gesture Drawing with Marge Moody, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 26–27  Dracula, Koger Center for the Arts, Columbia. (803) 799‑7605.

26–27  Francis Marion Symposium, Central Carolina Technical College–FE DuBose Campus, Manning. (803) 478‑2645. 26–27  Jack-O-Lantern Jubilee, Georgia Avenue, North Augusta. (803) 441‑4311. 27  Color in Photography with Jake Francek, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 27  Spooky Science: Face Your Fears, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 818‑6767. 27  YMCA Pumpkin Run, Northwest Family YMCA, Irmo. (803) 748‑9622, ext. 130. 27–28  Pumpkin Patch Express, S.C. Railroad Museum, Winnsboro. (803) 635‑9893. NOVEMBER

1–4  Katydid Combined Driving

Event, Katydid Farm, Windsor. (803) 295‑6785. 1–30  Debbie Black Exhibit, Aiken County Visitors Center, Aiken. (803) 642‑7557. 2  6th Annual Fundable, 701 Whaley, Columbia. (803) 779‑5121. 2–3  Dracula, The Etherredge Center at USC-Aiken, Aiken. (803) 641‑3305. 3  Chili Cook-Off, Five Points, Columbia. (803) 748‑7373. 3  November Monthly Gospel Singing, Midlands Gospel Singing Center, Gilbert. (803) 719‑1289. 3  Pine Needle Basket Workshop, Lee State Park, Bishopville. (803) 428‑4988. 3  Starship, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 3–4  Revolutionary War Field Days, Historic Camden Revolutionary War Site, Camden. (803) 432‑9841. 3–4  “Soldiers, the Enslaved, and Civilians: the Civil War and the Brattonsville Community,” Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 818‑6767. 3–4  South Carolina Run for the Fallen, downtown, Columbia. scrunforthefallen@yahoo.com. 9  Aaron Tippin, Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436‑2616. 9–11  Craftsmen’s Christmas Classic Art & Craft Festival, Cantey Building at the S.C. State Fairgrounds, Columbia. (336) 282‑5550.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

10  Holiday Market and Craft

Show, Newberry Academy, Newberry. (803) 276‑2760. 13  Tonal Drawing with Marge Moody, Center for the Arts, Rock Hill. (803) 328‑2787. 15  Vernon Grant Ornament Debut, Museum of York County, Rock Hill. (803) 818‑6767. ONGOING

Daily  “Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898‑4921.

Lowcountry OCTOBER

15  “Help SCORE Help Veterans”

Golf Tournament and Networking Dinner, Charleston National Golf Club, Mount Pleasant. (843) 442‑5558. 15–21  Historic Bluffton Arts & Seafood Festival, downtown, Bluffton. (843) 757‑2583. 15–28  Fall Tours of Homes and Gardens, Preservation Society of Charleston and various homes, Charleston. (843) 722‑4630. 18–20  Pawleys Island Festival of Music and Art, The Reserve Golf Club of Pawleys Island, Pawleys Island. (843) 626‑8911. 19–21  South Carolina Jazz Festival, various venues, Cheraw. (843) 537‑8420, ext. 12. 19–21, 25–28  Flowertown Players’ The Crucible, James F. Dean Community Theatre, Summerville. (843) 875‑9251. 20  Edisto Fall Festival, Jungle Road (in front of Palmetto Plaza), Edisto Beach. (843) 869‑3867. 20  Fall Craft and Bake Sale, Christ Lutheran Church, Hilton Head Island. sfenkohl@aol.com. 20  Loris Bog-Off Festival, downtown, Loris. (843) 756‑6030. 20  Model-Building Contest, Cokesbury United Methodist Church, North Charleston. (843) 637‑9099. 20  Night on the Sound, Port Royal Sound Foundation Maritime Center, Okatie. (843) 645‑7774. 20  SC Yoga and Healing Arts Festival, Burry Park, Hartsville. oursacredspaceyoga@gmail.com. 20–21  Georgetown Wooden Boat Show, waterfront at Front and Broad streets, Georgetown. (843) 520‑0111.

20–21  Myrtle Beach Mini Marathon, 5K and Doggie Dash, The Market Common and multiple race courses, Myrtle Beach. info@runmyrtlebeach.com. 21  Children’s Day Festival, Park West Recreation Complex, Mount Pleasant. (843) 884‑8517. 24–28  Colour of Music Festival, various venues, Charleston. (864) 406‑6838. 25–Nov. 4  Coastal Carolina Fair, Exchange Park, Ladson. (843) 572‑3161. 27  Bid to Benefit Spina Bifida, So-Lina Auction Market, Darlington. (843) 393‑7631. 27  Historic Georgetown Bridge2Bridge Run, Front Street, Georgetown. (843) 545‑9622. 28  Charleston Coffee Cup, Memminger Auditorium, Charleston. (843) 814‑4593. 31  Halloween on the MarshWalk, Murrells Inlet Marshwalk, Murrells Inlet. (704) 609‑7535. 31  Trunk-O-Ween, Shelter Cove Towne Centre, Hilton Head Island. (843) 686‑3090. NOVEMBER

1–4  Charleston Scottish Games, various venues, Charleston. charlestonscots@gmail.com. 2–4  Hilton Head Island Concours d’Elegance & Motoring Festival, Port Royal Golf Club, Hilton Head Island. (843) 785‑7469. 3  Harvest Festival, Mullet Hall Equestrian Center at Johns Island County Park, Johns Island. (843) 795‑4386. 3  King’s Tree Trials, McCutchen Training Center, Kingstree. (843) 355‑6431. 3  Lowcountry Hoedown, Charleston Visitor Center Bus Shed, Charleston. hoedown@harborec.com. 3  South Carolina Pecan Festival, downtown, Florence. (843) 678‑5912. 8–11  Dickens Christmas Show and Festivals, Myrtle Beach Convention Center and other venues, Myrtle Beach. (843) 448‑9483. 9–10  Hilton Head Oyster Festival, Shelter Cove Community Park, Hilton Head Island. (843) 681‑7273. 9–10  YALLFest: Charleston Young Adult Book Festival, various venues, Charleston. (843) 722‑2666. 10  Fur Ball, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston. dkahley@pethelpers.org. 10  Guy Osborne Memorial Turtle Strut 5K & 8K, Pawleys Island Nature Park, Pawleys Island. (843) 237‑1698. 10  Rockabillaque, Park Circle, North Charleston. (310) 801‑2727. 10–11  Mythical & Medieval Fest, RH Acres, Socastee. (843) 360‑9052.


|

SC   humor me

Don’t borrow the cat BY JAN A. IGOE

EVERY TIME I INTERACT WITH

humans, I start to wonder how our species ended up on top of the food chain, given the preponderance of knuckleheads. Just look around. Waiting in any checkout line, there are only a couple of ways to keep busy and eavesdropping is my area of expertise. This morning, I overheard two women discussing a stranger in the other line who had a service dog politely sitting by his side. The man was flipping through an issue of People magazine. (That’s my other specialty: reading all the celebrity gossip mags on display without actually buying them.) Lady 1: “What’s that mangy mutt doing in the store?” Lady 2: “It’s a service dog, Marva. That sweet man is obviously blind.” Did I mention that the man reading the magazine was wearing a medical alert bracelet and holding car keys? (Diabetic, maybe. But not blind.) No matter, the women had already focused their frightening brain power on urgent tabloid headlines. Currently, that would be Angie and Brad waging war; Jen’s nasty divorce; Meghan’s royal battles; Fergie’s tell-all expose; Tom getting Suri back; and how some woman lost 18 pounds in two days by drinking buttered coffee. You won’t be distracted by anything as mundane as election rigging or climate change at the checkout counter. For some reason, the generic masses have always been fascinated by celebrities in crisis. When rich and famous folk have problems, it makes us feel a little better about our own. So what if you 38

If we were ever overcome by the urge to break into Taylor Swift’s mansion and borrow her cat, it’s time to seek help. lost $50 last week? Be happy you didn’t lose $15 billion like that Zuckerberg twit. Don’t get upset if your 2006 Honda needs brakes. Kim Kardashian’s Bentley does, too. And her helicopter is back in the shop. (You feel better, right?) We don’t even need real celebrities to worship. In sixth grade, I idolized Abigail Swartz. I can’t remember if she was smart, athletic or kind to gerbils, but I do remember puberty hitting her like a Mack truck while the rest of us gaped in wonder. We knew she had attained

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |  OCTOBER 2018 | SCLIVING.COOP

magical powers because all the boys went into some sort of trance and didn’t come out until senior year. (That’s how long it took the rest of us to catch up.) I followed her around like a lost puppy, hoping that her wild popularity might be contagious. Abigail would sashay around the classroom as our newly crowned goddess. The other scrawny, sixth-grade mortals existed only to carry her books or place offerings of Hostess Ding Dongs upon her sacred desk. She was my first rock star. (Of course, this was before The Beatles invaded and I decided to marry Ringo.) Luckily, celebrity worship isn’t crazy. It’s a completely natural human inclination that dates back to the stone age. Experts who study obsessions assure us that stargazing is fine as long as we don’t lose sight of what’s real and become stalkers. If we were ever overcome by the urge to break into Taylor Swift’s mansion and borrow her cat, it’s time to seek help. The important thing is knowing where to draw the line between fact and fiction, like professional humor columnists do so well. Thanks for reading. I’d stick around, but Fergie is taking me to lunch and I think her helicopter just landed. JAN A. IGOE enjoys glitz and glamour as much as the next writer but could live happily ever after if she never saw the headline, “Angie and Brad (fighting/ making up/adopting more kids/divorcing)” on another magazine cover. Real people are welcome to join the fun at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


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South Carolina Living October 2018  

Suit up with the 501st Legion--the nicest bunch of Star Wars villains you could ever hope to meet--as they lend a hand to charities.

South Carolina Living October 2018  

Suit up with the 501st Legion--the nicest bunch of Star Wars villains you could ever hope to meet--as they lend a hand to charities.

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